Entertainment

The crazy returns

May 19, 2017

I've been to a number of plays in my lifetime and have been bored stupid -- sometimes to the point where I literally needed toothpicks to prop my eyelids open to make it through the night. Then last year came Gea Pierre's "Crazy Love". I went in skeptical and left having experienced almost every emotion imaginable.
I laughed.
I cried.
I celebrated.
I actually developed hate for some characters, as did many other patrons who couldn't help but shout their opinions to the characters onstage. Yup, you kind of forgot that they were just playing a part.
"Crazy Love" took you through all the intricacies that come with falling in love and the kind of things that develop or transpire. It was a little eccentric, a little off-balance, and for all generations. You got to see the beginning stages of love from the early 20s on up. It dealt with love, divorce, infidelity, miscommunication -- everything that could go wrong in love.
Did I say I laughed my head off?
And now one-year later, Pierre returns with "Crazy Love 2" -- and no ifs, ands or buts about it -- I'm there.
After nine sold-out shows in Grand Bahama, Pierre's "Crazy Love 2" is coming to New Providence next weekend, and from the feedback of the Grand Bahamians, they say that it's just as good -- if not better than part one.
"We definitely did not disappoint. The audience loved it as much as part one," said Pierre.
According to the playwright, even persons who didn't see part one are able to pick up on the storyline because it's written so that it's a separate play, but a continuation of the stories of the characters, and also opens new stories, which means that Pierre will be bringing part three to the stage.
"People who did not see part one that saw part two were able to pick up on the storyline."
The "Crazy Love 2" story picks up eight months after "Crazy Love" ended and reveals characters that have grown in interesting ways.
"We had the breakup of two main characters -- Barber and Keisha, so their relationship takes an interesting turn, and you see what happens there -- whether they end up together or not. We have Diva, who broke up with the guy who was treating her very poorly, and we may see her go back to him. We have other characters who had a wife last time, who still had a wife, who may not be with his wife this time. And we have three new character additions -- two females and a male -- who came to spice up these characters' lives in an unexpected way."
The cast is comprised of Donovan Munroe (Stephan), Remardo Russell (Barber), Evan Williams (Dboy), Matthew Wildgoose (Keith), Mark Gardiner (Craig), Andre Cartwright (Lil Reg), Kyla Andrews (Keisha), Alexis Pelecanos (Diva), Philcher Grant (Cassandra), Shorrell Dames (Vanessa), Ontario Richardson (Shawn), Antonique Rolle (Bri) and Mark Gardiner (Craig).
While part one tugged on every emotion and audience members could see pieces of themselves in almost every character, Pierre said to expect to run the gamut of emotions once again in "Crazy Love 2".
During the play's Grand Bahama run, Pierre said they had a lady in the audience who cried because she was so angry at what was going on onstage; because things had happened in her life. That lady, she said, took in the play three times.
"So I think this one is more gripping because it has more depth to it, so I'm extremely proud of the work I did, not only as a writer, but what these guys did as characters to get you involved in the emotion. We still bring a whole lot of laughter and that sort of thing, but there are still relevant, trendy, fun situations that happen. It's going to be interesting for the audience to see how the characters have grown up some."
Pierre believes "Crazy Love 2" is as good as part one.
She didn't write "Crazy Love" with the thought that there would be a part two and three, but wrote "Crazy Love 2" with the mindset that there would be a part three. She said people will see part three coming in the end of part two.
"It was just so many persons asked us about a part two, and when I thought about it, it was actually the only play that I've ever done that the characters could go on and I felt that I could continue to tell their story, so we got back into it."
Pierre wrote "Crazy Love 2" during Hurricane Matthew, and the resulting drama that she said is reflected in the show's plot that picks up right after the storm, is also a subliminal message about rebuilding and moving on, which Bahamians are very much known for.
It took Pierre approximately two weeks in the writing process, but a few weeks of going through the characters, punch lines and roles in her head.
"When I'm writing I always look for if it can make me feel something as a writer, then I know that I can somehow convey that same emotion to the audience."
As she prepares for a successful staging of "Crazy Love 2" in New Providence at the University of The Bahamas Performing Arts Centre, Friday, May 26 and Saturday, May 27 at 8 p.m. nightly, and Sunday, May 28 at 5 p.m., she said she is excited.
Pierre wrote her first production at age 15, and has 22 years of writing experience.
"I've written many plays over the years. I've been blessed in that they've all been very successful and very well-received. This one is a very different production for me in that it's more geared towards young people and relevant issues, and the success of it has been extremely overwhelming," she said.
"Crazy Love 3" is already in the can and will be brought to the stage in February, according to Pierre.
Pierre's "Crazy Love" won an Icon Award last year; "Crazy Love 2" has been nominated for an award.
Tickets for "Crazy Love 2" can be purchased at Airbrush Junkies, Mall at Marathon; and can be purchased for $35 VIP (wine included) and $25 general, $30 at the door. Free delivery on 10 or more tickets ordered via Whatsapp 5591542.

GEA PIERRE'S STAGE PLAY 'CRAZY LOVE 2'
When: Friday, May 26 at 8 p.m.
Saturday, May 27 at 8 p.m.
Sunday, May 28 at 5 p.m.
Where: University of The Bahamas Performing Arts Centre
Tickets: $35 VIP (wine included), $25 general admission, $30 at the door
Box office: Airbrush Junkies, Mall at Marathon

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Give a man a brush and watch him paint

May 19, 2017

A palette of acrylic, an airbrush, and his brushes are all Wedlear Eugene needs to make him happy. And he's turned what for him was once just a passion into a business, as owner of Eugene's Portrait Gallery.
Eugene, 19, couldn't be happier that his passion is now his job, and that he's now a sought-after artist with people clamoring to commission him for a portrait painting.
With the demand for his impressive portraits growing daily, he couldn't be happier that his passion is now his job. With the support of his family thrown behind him, Eugene turned his passion into his job and is happily producing his in-demand special commissioned pieces. And when he isn't working on a commissioned piece, you will find him in his workshop relaxing and painting whoever and whatever he feels like painting on any given day.
"Painting makes me feel calm," said the shy artist. "And when I do something it makes me feel happy that I can do a painting for someone in a different format."
The wowed reaction and satisfaction he gets from customers when he presents a finished piece makes him proud.
"The first thing they look at is the background -- then the painting of the face. When they look at it together, it wows them."
He has quite a number of commissioned works under his belt, but has also painted people he wants to paint for his own pleasure. The most famous person, in his estimation, that he has painted and presented with a portrait has been Tom Izzo, who coached Bahamian Lourawls "Tum Tum" Nairn Jr. at Michigan State University.
The teenager has also painted and presented fellow artists Jamaal Rolle and Stefan Davis with portraits he's painted of their likeness.
In his stable he has portraits of people such as former Bahamian NBA players Mychal Thompson and Rick Fox; football player Tom Brady; and baseball player Kris Bryant.
Rihanna, Beyonce, Wiz Khalifa, DC Young Fly, and on the local front, Sebas Sebastian are on his painting bucket list.
With Eugene in demand for his portraits, he's happy to have his family support him in his endeavor.
"One time ago, to be honest, when I wanted to pursue it, they [family] used to tell me to go look for a job, and I used to do that, but I wouldn't get any calls back, so I just planned on doing something for myself and this makes me happy. It's a job and I'm happy doing what I love."
Eugene's passion for art goes back to his childhood. As a six-year-old, he remembers drawing houses but developing other styles as he matriculated through junior school and high school, when he decided to take the craft more seriously as his talent became more evident with the encouragement and tutelage from a number of teachers.
Eugene works mainly with acrylics and sometimes oil paint in the production of his portraits.
The self-taught artist also makes use of technology in the process. He says he can work from a photo, but uses an app to get the drawing the way he wants it, before he adds the background and allows it to dry. He then draws the image on it and begins to paint.
Today it's hard to believe that a few years ago he said he couldn't even draw hands. "Hands are hard to draw," he said in a humble tone.
Eugene said a 24-inch by 36-inch portrait takes him approximately three days to finish, and he's chomping at the bit to work on a 40-inch by 60-inch portrait.
His twin brother is also artistically inclined, but unlike Eugene, he gave up on art and currently works two jobs; however, he lends his encouragement to Eugene.
Eugene says he doesn't understand why his twin gave up, because he can do multiple styles, including realism, colored pencils and shading.
The abstract artist says he believes God gave him his talent, because he doesn't know which family member he could have gotten it from.
To commission Eugene to produce a portrait, contact him at 809-0214 or Wedlear Eugene on Facebook, or on Instagram at art.unity_.
People wanting to commission a piece should give him notice, because due to his work schedule Eugene is very much in demand.

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Miss Haiti and former Miss World Bahamas make appearances at BTC sponsored Haitian Flag Day

May 19, 2017

Miss Haiti and Miss Universe first runner up Raquel Pelissier and former Miss World Bahamas Chantal O'Brien were among the members of the Haitian community in New Providence at the recent BTC sponsored Haitian Flag Day festivities.
It was a celebration Pelissier said was important, as many Haitians live outside their home country and they should be proud to know where they are from.
"I feel it's great that BTC gives Haitian Flag Day so much support," said Pelissier.
"It shows that there is a lot of support, especially for the Haitian community," said O'Brien. "We know that Haitians contribute a lot to the economy here in The Bahamas, so I feel like BTC's decision to take this up was a really good idea, and I think that the Haitian community can appreciate being able to call home and keep in touch."
Haitian Ambassador Jean Victor Geneus said BTC sponsorship was an important gesture as it showed how close BTC is to the Haitian community.
BTC CEO Leon Williams told patrons that they support the Haitian community in all their endeavors, not just on Flag Day, and that they would be their partner for life.
BTC will also sponsor the Haitian Flag Day celebration in Abaco this weekend.

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Peace and quiet

May 19, 2017

There's no doubt about it, we live in a rather chaotic world where everywhere one goes there appears to be noise and utter chaos. But my friend, it is my contention that if one really wishes to be successful, across the board, and of course have some much needed peace of mind, we need to spend set periods of peace and quiet each and every day. Yes we most definitely do, that's for sure. As I'm endeavoring to write this particular article early in the morning with the windows open to let in some fresh air, I'm literally being bombarded by loud music as automobiles drive by taking children to school and adults to work. Quite frankly, it's difficult to think clearly and creatively under such circumstances, where so many people appear to have no consideration for anyone as they pollute the atmosphere with loud noise, day after day.
But my friend, there's no doubt about it whatsoever, if you wish to be successful at all that you do, you most definitely need to spend set periods of time alone in peace and quiet, so that you can think clearly with no distractions in order to plan and strategize your way forward on the never-ending, constantly changing road to success.
Of course, as anyone who is a regular reader of these articles is aware of, the spiritual side of a person's life is extremely important. In fact, it should be the foundation upon which we all build our lives, to get in touch daily with the God of our being, our source. We most definitely need to spend time in peace and quiet as we contact the God within from which all success emanates.

o Think about it!
Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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Cancer society ball to celebrate life, faith and hope

May 19, 2017

It's going to be a celebration of faith, hope, love, peace, happiness, survival and joy, highlighting the multiple dimensions of life and the reasons it is important to continue seeking a cure, as The Cancer Society of The Bahamas hosts its 16th annual ball.
The annual black tie fundraiser that will benefit hundreds in the Bahamian community will take place Saturday, May 20 at the Melia Nassau Beach Resort. It is being held this year with the support of RBC, whose sponsorship will assist the cancer society in obtaining the equipment and resources they need for cancer patients within the community. Proceeds from the ball will also help the society with its Cancer Caring Centre Expansion Project, adding a hospice facility and day care, with an additional 16 rooms for patients.
"We are pleased to continue our sponsorship of the cancer society's annual ball," said
Brian Knowles, RBC head, corporate banking said, "We respect and appreciate the entire team for their tireless commitment and the great work they do everyday to help people directly and indirectly affected by cancer. We support this event because it increases the awareness of cancer -- both treatments and prevention -- and by doing so supports the future of our communities."
Globally, RBC sponsors multiple events and campaigns in the fight against cancer.
Each year, RBC hosts the Race for the Kids, an annual fundraiser held at various locations around the world. The Caribbean race, currently based in Trinidad, raises thousands of dollars to support and treat children with cancer.

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HBO Films' The Wizard of Lies, Starring Robert De Niro and Michelle Pfeiffer, Debuts May 20 Exclusively on HBO
HBO Films' The Wizard of Lies, Starring Robert De Niro and Michelle Pfeiffer, Debuts May 20 Exclusively on HBO

May 12, 2017

Starring Robert De Niro and Michelle Pfeiffer, the film is directed by Barry Levinson with a screenplay by Sam Levinson.

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It's like candy 'Shugar'

May 12, 2017

Cameo's 1986 hit "Candy" says, "It's like candy" -- but if you ask the country's newest Music Master it's all about "Shugar".
By day Valarie "Shugar" Richards is a nurse in the burn unit, where she specializes in treating burns and wound care at the Princess Margaret Hospital. At night, she sheds the scrubs for her entertainer's costumes and soothes people's hearts with song in her role as lead singer with the Soulful Groovers Band. And now "Shugar" has another title to her resume -- the coveted one of Music Master.
"Shugar" took home the third Music Masters title for her song "Carryin' On Bad" during the recent Junkanoo carnival weekend. "Carryin' On Bad" is a song about getting on stage for carnival, and carrying on bad in a good way.
She won a $20,000 total prize purse.
The win was a surprise, but a happy one for "Shugar".
"You want to win. You go in to win, but you know, sometimes things happen. You've never seen the judges and you don't know what they're going to do and what they really like. The only thing you can say is you're going to go out there and do you, and call it a day, and hope and pray that you come out on top," she said.
She is all too familiar with this scenario. "Shugar" entered the inaugural Music Masters competition with her song "Bahamas Carnival" (Jump and Wave) which did not even make it into the top 20. Disheartened with the result, she skipped the second competition. After a little prodding, she decided to enter this year's competition. She emerged victorious.
"Someone from Bahamas carnival called wondering if I was entering this year. The deadline had passed, and I wasn't really checking. I said I would lay out. When they called to find out if I was doing anything, I said since they called I would send something."
She went on to write what would become this year's winning song in one day.
"When I'm writing a song I just put my mindset into the actual happening of carnival and then I just see what people do, and then I write. I sing and then I put the words. I do the chorus first and then I hum it through and then I sit, because you don't always use what you start with. You can change the wording if something doesn't match. But as long as you have the melody of the song ... you have the body of the song, you can always go back and change the lyrics. Once you have the verse, and the chorus, and your bridge, then you could always go back and change up the words."
"Shugar" took her song to Colyn McDonald. She sang the melody for him and he went to work producing what would become a Music Masters win. McDonald had also produced "Shugar's" first Music Masters entry.
Also, coming into the money after this year's Music Masters competition were Clay "Q'Pid" Adderley with "Fusion Of Vibes" -- $12,500; Aurelia "Bantangy" Russell with "Dis Ga Be Long" -- $7,500; and Patrice Murrell with "Come To Wave" -- $4,000.
The remaining finalists received $1,000 each -- Philip "Lil Joe" Cartwright with "Sweet Carnival"; Venetia "Ebony" Gibson with "Road Survivor"; Ilsha McPhee with "Here Again"; Carlton "Muzikal" Smith with "My Carnival"; Aurela "Bantangy" Russell with "Island Party"; and Patrice Murrell with "Your Ting".
Sammi Star won the inaugural Music Masters competition; Fanshawn Taylor-Evans was the winner in year two.
This year's win also restored "Shugar's" faith. While she hadn't been certain she would enter the competition again, she said, not making it through did not stop her from singing. Since she was declared the winner people have expressed to her how happy they are that she won.
"They said nothing before its time, and they were so glad it had now happened. They were expecting it the first time I went in, but it didn't happen, so they were happy for me," she said.
She expects great things to happen for her coming off the win. She also said she will continue doing what she does.
"I do me and I have fun," she said.
Actually, this nurse and entertainer happily tells people she has split personalities.
And if she knows nothing else, she says she knows she loves music and to perform for people.
The country's newest Music Master grew up in Great Harbour Cay, Berry Islands. In an all too familiar story that musical greats tell, she grew up singing in church and in school. Her teachers would always pick her to "raise a hymn" during morning assemblies. Very early in life she came to realize that she had a voice that people wanted to hear.
She's a natural talent vocally and has never had any voice coaching.
In 1988 she joined the Soulful Groovers Band, which originated out of Grand Bahama in 1964, and today still has one of the original founding members in Vincent Wright who plays the trumpet.
She was a fan that followed the band in her young days, and got her first introduction to the band when her uncle brought them down to the Berry Islands to play in his club at the Graveyard Inn.
Today "Shugar" and the Soulful Groovers Band can be found playing on Tuesday evenings at Compass Point. And they perform almost every genre of music, from jazz to calypso to ballads, so much so that "Shugar" says she can't put herself into just one genre.
"I'm so used to doing so many that it's very easy."
Someone who "loves" music, she can't fathom how people can hear music and not move. She recalled the days when she had to have music in her ear while she studied.
"Shugar" believes her talent comes from her uncles, two of whom sang. She said she used to sit and watch her uncle, Valence Dean, after whom she's named, and who owned the Graveyard Inn, perform.
"I used to sit there and listen, and I loved that. And he loved that I sang," she said.
The Soulful Groovers lead singer has two daughters and a son. Her baby Vanessa, she said, loves to sing, but she doesn't think she's interested in performing or is just shy like "Shugar" was in her younger years.
"Growing up I was very shy. I don't know when I broke out, but now I broke out," she said.
The Music Master has penned a number of previous hits to her credit, including the ever popular "Do Right In" which she co-wrote with her guitar player Edison Rolle.
"I came up with some lyrics, but Edison Rolle who sang the actual song swapped words, tweaked it and made it excellent."
Also on her writing resume are songs like "New Key", "Crab Fest", "Don't Wanna Ga Home", and "242".
She also has a number of songs already written, and, with the Soulful Groovers Band, has an album "Music Salad" out which was written by the members of the band.
The country's newest Music Master is married to law enforcement officer Winston "Vincent" Richards, whom she met and married while he was stationed in the Berry Islands. They relocated to the capital after he was transferred.
Her advice to up and coming artists is to not have an ego. She said an ego is the surest way to career suicide and not getting far.
"Be humble and you will move along; just be themselves," she said.

2017 MUSIC MASTERS AND BAHAMAS JUNKANOO CARNIVAL RESULTS
Valarie "Shugar" Richards -- "Carryin On Bad" -- $20,000 (total prize purse)
Clay "Q'Pid" Adderley -- "Fusion Of Vibes" -- $12,500
Aurelia "Bantangy" Russell -- "Dis Ga Be Long" -- $7,500
Patrice Murrell -- "Come To Wave" -- $4,000
Finalists receiving $1,000 each
Philip "Lil Joe" Cartwright -- "Sweet Carnival"
Venetia "Ebony" Gibson -- "Road Survivor
Ilsha McPhee -- "Here Again"
Carlton "Muzikal" Smith -- "My Carnival
Aurela "Bantangy" Russell -- "Island Party"
Patrice Murrell -- "Your Ting"

ROAD FEVER BEST COSTUME
Bahamas Masqueraders -- Winners for all five sections - $15,000
Road Fever Song competition - Dyson Knight - $5,000

ROAD FEVER BEST OVERALL GROUP
Bahamas Masqueraders -- $7,500
Xtasy -- $5,000
Fetish -- $2,500
Euphoria Madness
Enigma

BEST APPLICATION OF INDIGENOUS MATERIAL
Barabbas Carnival Tribe -- $7,500
Enigma -- $5,000

JUNKAMANIA
High Energy Show Group -- Treco Johnson -- $15,000
Lisa Jayne and The Junkawarriors -- Lisa Russell -- $10,000

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Atlantis comes to life

May 12, 2017

The soul and richness of Atlantis' location and its people are being brought to the forefront as the resort kicked off a commitment to storytelling and preserving the oral and visual history of the country by creating a platform for Bahamian makers to share their works with the world through "Come to Life" -- a visual journey that provides an intimate peek into the spirit of The Bahamas through 15 Bahamian artists, musicians and designers.
The initial creative component is a 60-second, anthemic, cinematic expression film featuring a voiceover by Jeffrey Poitier, a native Bahamian actor, film director and nephew of the legendary icon Sidney Poitier.
The shared mission storytelling platform and cultural movement launched earlier in the week with a first look on ABC network's morning show Good Morning America (GMA). The longer form film will be released later this month.
"The world has changed since Atlantis first opened. Businesses must now partner with their communities to achieve shared sustainable success," said Howard C. Karawan, president and managing director at Atlantis. "We needed to bring the soul and richness of our location and our people to the forefront. It already existed at Atlantis -- in our connection to the ocean, the marine life, and most importantly, embedded in each of our 7,500 associates. The stories were here waiting to be told. We always knew Atlantis was in The Bahamas, but what we forgot is that The Bahamas is in Atlantis. By encouraging our team to share their stories and let their personalities shine, we have seen inspirational moments between the Bahamian spirit and our guests. In doing so we are imbuing our people, and Bahamians in general, with a sense of pride and empowerment."
In "Come To Life" Atlantis is turning its own marketing into a storytelling opportunity to celebrate Bahamian artists and groups -- from photographers to musicians and artists. The movement focuses on co-creation with the artists to provide them with a platform for global recognition and success. They include T!CA HOL!DAY, a 23-year old soulful R&B singer/songwriter who originates from Andros; Bahamian visual artists and painters Piaget Moss, Pam Burnside, Allan Wallace and Steffon Grant, who explore ideas of personal identity and human emotion; Antonius Roberts, one of The Bahamas' most prominent artists and sculptors; photographer and artist Dede Brown; photographer Farreno Ferguson; creator Cherell Williamson; models Latesia Smith, Sacha Kalis and Jessica Thompson; Atlantis employees Ordain Moss (human resources) and Ryan Dean (Dolphin Cay behaviorist); and the music of the Roots Junkanoo Group and Bahamian Voices.
"The cultural and ecological gems within The Bahamas and at Atlantis have long been hidden from the world," said Lauren Snyder, chief marketing officer at Atlantis. "On this project we explored the concept of authenticity. It was most important to simply let the story unfold, evolve and live. This film and the accompanying images are a platform to nurture a Bahamian renaissance. The sounds ...

the smiles ... the voices ... the land and the sea -- all speak to life and the magnificence of the experience here. Atlantis has long been the home of many magical voices, stories and memories. Through this shared mission creative studio, comprised of so many talented visionaries, we have simply turned the camera around."

A love letter to The Bahamas
At the helm of the film production, director Per-Hampus Stalhandske, music producer Sam Spiegel, and creative stylist director Ron Hansford tapped local intriguing personalities to feature their inspiring stories. The film immerses audiences in the fascinating Bahamian culture, filled with vivid and inviting cinematography that taps into local creativity and a soulful spirit.
"When I first heard about this project, I had no idea either about Atlantis or The Bahamas," said Stalhandske. "I knew it was white sand and blue water, but that was about it. I was really excited when I started digging into it and learning more about Atlantis, and learning more about the country and then coming here. It kind of changed everything when you get to meet all these people, see all the places and really dive into the culture. It was very eye opening. It really changed my perspective."
The music in the film, produced by Sam Spiegel, showcases the Roots Junkanoo Group and Bahamian Voices, a group comprised of male and female vocalists who are alumni of The Bahamas National Youth Choir.
"This music quickly became a whole track that I'm getting ready to release for the summer," said Spiegel. "It is really a tribute to The Bahamas and a tribute to Junkanoo music. I explore a culture through its music. When I discovered this unique genre of music [Junkanoo], I quickly found out it is very rich in tradition and culture. Right when we first started writing, I wanted to honor and celebrate the people and culture of The Bahamas and was inspired by T!CA as a Bahamian woman. I wanted to draw on her love for her country and Junkanoo as it is really about coming together. The song is a love letter to The Bahamas."
"I worked at Atlantis a few years ago and to actually come back and be the voice of this movement is amazing - to see how you can go from being someone in the background to being in front of something so magical is something I never imagined," said T!CA HOL!DAY.
Protecting and restoring the surrounding ecology is a critical goal of the "Come to Life" mission. The Disney Conservation Fund (DCF), a program of ABC's parent company Disney, has been supporting conservation programs in more than 115 countries over the past two decades, including efforts to reverse the decline of wildlife such as sea turtles, sharks and coral reefs. Atlantis' non-profit organization, Atlantis Blue Project Foundation (ABPF), also works to support environmental organizations helping to ensure a future for marine life in The Bahamas. Both programs share a commitment to protecting and restoring coral reefs around The Bahamas, advancing conservation efforts for marine animals and their habitats, and engaging communities to take action to protect the ocean.
"We're looking forward to taking our ABC viewers on an immersive journey, sharing these stories across Good Morning America (GMA) and our ABC owned TV stations, inspiring others to experience these amazing natural wonders like never before," said Jeremiah Tachna, senior vice-president, ABC Full Circle.
Alongside ABC, iHeartMedia and Horizon Media have also committed to give the film and its messages the spotlight. iHeartMedia will exclusively power music and sound that will be heard onsite throughout Atlantis and will also launch a dedicated channel "Atlantis Radio," available nationally on iHeartRadio. The channel will feature artists from and around The Bahamas as well as the sounds captured from the ocean, the marine life and the marine biologists who make up the on island team. The curated music experience at the property will capture the mood, time of day and energy of the experience at Atlantis.
"We will co-create the musical moments that help to make vacation memories -- from the best digital beats, to the most mind-blowing live performances," said Gayle Troberman, chief marketing officer of iHeartMedia. "Atlantis vacationers will be able to enjoy these one-of-a-kind music experiences that bring together the power of radio with the magic of the Bahamian culture to move you from one amazing moment to the next."

"Come To Life" Makers
Pam Burnside: Artist and art advocate. Owner of Doongalik Studios Art Gallery, and co-founder of Creative Nassau, formed in 2008 with a group of passionate Bahamians who wished to showcase their unique Bahamian culture to the world, whilst actively developing a creative tourism model to ensure that by the year 2020 more persons will travel to The Bahamas to experience its art, culture and heritage rather than just its sun, sand and sea.
Aaron Burrows: The Roots Junkanoo Group. Junkanoo drummer at Montagu Beach.
Jarell Coakley: Model, actor, rap artist. Mr. Bahamas 2015 and CEO of Rellovant Entertainment. Man in forest.
Tomii Culmer: Model, Miss Universe Bahamas 2014. Model dancing on beach.
Ryan Dean: Artist and Atlantis employee since 2009 at Dolphin Cay where he is a behaviorist.
T!CA HOL!DAY: Musician. Artist on track and dancer in straw outfit.
Sacha Kalis: Underwater Dig model.
Ordain Moss: Singer/songwriter and Atlantis employee for more than five years. Model on leaves at Queen's Staircase.
Piaget Moss: Contemporary artist. Artist in Royal Lobby.
Jeffrey Poitier: Voiceover. Bahamian filmmaker and creator of "Voices" which documents the earliest untold stories of the Bahamian and African-American people who were the original settlers and builders of Coconut Grove in Florida.
Antonius Roberts: Artist. Bonfire guest and shared mission advisor. Artist and sculptor and Open Space designer.
Sam Spiegel: Music producer.
Per-Hampus Stalhandske: Director.
Roots Junkanoo Group: Bonfire
Jessica Thompson: Model. Queen's Staircase model.
Cannon Turnquest: Bahamian child. Boy at Aquaventure.
Allan Wallace: Artist.
Cherell Williamson: Creator. Miss Universe Bahamas 2016.
Talent used but not pictured in the 60:
Bahamian Voices: A group of 20-25 year old vocalists who are alumni of The Bahamas National Youth Choir.
Dede Brown: Artist and photographer.
Farreno Ferguson: Photographer.
Steffon Grant: Artist.
Latesia Smith: Entrepreneur. Eyes with freckles and glitter.

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On tap this weekend at the Art Walk at Marina Village

May 12, 2017

All manner of arts and crafts, as well as a farmer's market, what better way to spend a Saturday afternoon.
The Art Walk at Marina Village satisfies every vice -- with visual artists to ceramicists, and farmer's market purveyors with everything from jams and jellies to native teas and drink, food and chocolate, locally grown herbs and greens, cooling popsicles and vegan treats.
Strolling along the walk at the twice per month Art Walk is an absolutely fantastic way to spend a Saturday afternoon with the family.
And with a constant rotation of artists and artisans, live entertainment, cooling and delicious libations and nibbles to be had, you will never be disappointed or run out of new choices in which to indulge.
Since its debut, the art walk has expanded exponentially. It is where you can indulge your taste for art, crafts, an appreciation for music by Bahamian artisans, and locally grown and made products.
The Art Walk at Marina Village is held every second and fourth Saturday between 12 noon and 7 p.m.

This week at the Art Walk at Marina Village
Artists
University of The Bahamas (Keisha Oliver)
Leando Johnson
Nadine Lynch
Dion Lewis
Marco Mullings
Kurtz Ritchie
Ryan Turnquest
Preston Hanna
Vivien Archer
John Paul
Robin Hardy

CRAFT VENDORS
Andrew Burrows -- My Bahamas Sponge
Astrid Pinder -- Fine Ocean Jewelry
Ava Forbes -- Jewelry
Lorette Evans -- Sasha's Foxy Paws pet clothing
Nancy Swaby -- Nancy's Fancies wire jewelry
Hands Up -- Fabric items
Ras Hailu -- Coconut shell products
Tiff Gallery -- Batik products
Trevor Tucker -- Art and ceramics

FARMER'S MARKET VENDORS
Denise Worrell, Naturally Bahamian -- native teas and drinks
Jameel Lightbourn, Cheesecake Heaven -- baked goods
Kentisha Ward, Pop Stop -- native fruit popsicles
Natasha Adderley, Bahamas Island Farms -- local produce
Rionda Godet, Ridge Farms -- jams, jellies and pepper sauces
Sara Constantine, Constantine's -- jams jellies and sauces
Johnathan Forbes, Tasty Teas -- local bush teas

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Lift-off: Guardians of the Galaxy Vol 2. engenders lots of hope for future editions

May 12, 2017

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (Rated B)
Cast: Chris Pratt, Zoe Saldana, Dave Bautista, Bradley Cooper, Vin Diesel
Genre: Action Adventure/ Sci-fi
Dwight's Rating: 3.5 Stars

The surprises keep coming!
From the moment the original "Guardians of the Galaxy" touched down in theaters nearly three years ago, it was a surprise just how massive a box-office juggernaut it turned out to be. Even more surprising was that it was actually enormously entertaining, well-written, acted and directed.
But most surprising of all is that this new sequel "Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2", is as good as that great original.
There have been concerns about whether this was going to be possible at all. In my August 2014 review, I wrote: "This movie sets up a sequel (scheduled to be released in 2017), and possibly the next, long-running movie franchise. While that's an exciting proposition, it comes with a bit of trepidation too. As we've seen before with "Iron Man", often the bar is set so high with the original, it makes it exceptionally difficult for any subsequent movie in the franchise, or even in the genre, to fill the galaxy-sized shoes."
Indeed, while most similar films do struggle with their follow-ups, with only a few bucking that pattern, "Vol. 2" excels, and in some very key respects, it's even better than the first film.
The main characters from the original are all back: Peter Quill (Chris Pratt) and his fellow Guardians are hired by a powerful alien race, the Sovereign, to protect their precious batteries from invaders. When it's discovered that Rocket has stolen the items they were sent to guard, the Sovereign dispatch their armada to search for vengeance. As the Guardians try to escape, the mystery of Peter's parentage is revealed.
Director and screenwriter James Gunn returns, too, delving even deeper into the exploration of those characters, and giving more insight into their many quirks.
As with the original, the depth of the characters, and the performances from the actors are what set the whole franchise apart from others in this comic-book action genre. Pratt -- now a bona fide star -- is back in the movie franchise that made him a household name, proving why he is such an accessible everyman hero.
Once again, the scene-stealers remain the character Rocket Raccoon, voiced by Bradley Cooper, and especially pro-wrestler Dave Bautista as Drax, who's blessed with some of the movie's best lines and scenes; his interactions with actress Pom Klementieff as Mantis are priceless.
Then there's Groot -- the verbally-challenged, tree-like humanoid. If you watched the original, you know that certain events have resulted in the formerly adult Groot now being a tiny baby tree -- the cutest, most adorable thing you'll likely see on the big screen this year. Any moment Groot appears is sure to bring a smile to your face. Vin Diesel deserves some sort of award for the many different tones and inflections he uses for his one solitary line in now TWO entire movies: "I AM GROOT".
It's also even funnier than before. Unlike almost every other movie that seems so desperately to be primarily targeting Millennials, the humor here is accessible to even Baby Boomers, but especially oft-neglected Generation Xers, with references to 80s pop culture and TV shows "Cheers" and "Night Rider". The largely 70s-era soft-rock soundtrack is also top notch.
One issue though: the expected final big fight scene is more than a tad drawn out and repetitive, contributing to the whole film feeling as if it were at least 15-minutes longer than it should have been.
Nevertheless, even though you may be more than ready to get out of the theater as the credits start to roll, you really should stick around, as the movie has multiple "endings". Those credits on their own are quite entertaining, with lots of site gags. Plus, every few minutes, they are interrupted for vignettes with hints as to what we can expect in the next film (in what looks to be a long-running franchise).
There's something for nearly everyone in "Vol 2.": romance, action, spectacular effects, family drama (sibling rivalries, father-son conflict, abandonment issues) and humor -- a truly fantastic couple of hours.
This engenders lots of hope for future editions. And while we can wish for the best, we know how this usually goes. At some point, the director/writer gets bored or disillusioned and leaves (or is fired), or one of the main actors decides to leave, and then it all goes downhill from there.
But let's be positive! Just as "Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2" and "Logan" are surprisingly two of the best films so far this year, clearly anything is possible.

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Tabanca setting in

May 12, 2017

Here we are again, back to tabanca (melancholy). Bahamas Junkanoo Carnival was so sweet that we are literally suffering from withdrawal.
I have not had the heart to listen to one bar of soca music, lest it bring me back to the unadulterated fun that was had last week Saturday.
I began my Bahamas carnival journey on Thursday -- the first concert day. I was eager to see what the vibe would be like on the first night, what with the almost-postponement still fresh in our minds.
Well, our Bahamian entertainers and foreign artists did not disappoint. And while the crowd was a bit meager, the vibe was still nice for the first night of carnival.
I continued my carnival sojourn the next morning as I flew out to Miami to join Stephan Rolle on his Bahamas Carnival Cruise. I wanted to know what this cruise was all about and how the idea of it melded with carnival -- it is, of course, a one-of-a-kind thing for any carnival world-wide.
Stephan and I picked up some essentials from all around Ft. Lauderdale before heading down to the Port of Miami in a car chock-full of carnival costumes.
When we arrived we began our distribution of costumes immediately, with excited Bahamas carnival goers prancing up to us excitedly, signing in and grabbing bags of costumes from Bahamas Masqueraders, Xstacy, Enigma, Extreme and Euphoria Madness.
Before we knew it the Carnival Victory's horns were signalling us to board the ship, and we packed away the costumes not distributed and carted them off to our stateroom. The stateroom then became Bahamas Carnival Cruise headquarters, with people in and out securing and sizing costumes, and singing soca tunes in excitement for Road Fever the next day.
The Bahamas Carnival Cruise crew took over the nightclub Friday night, enticing the DJ to play soca music and preparing ourselves mentally for the road the next day.
As we pulled into the Port of Nassau, Stephan's passengers began to emerge in their greens, oranges, reds and whites, and the feeling of carnival washed over us. When we hit the streets of Nassau, buses whisked us off to the start of the Bahamas Junkanoo Carnival parade.
As we split off into our respective groups, I was in charge of showing Miami (by way of Guyana) social media personality, Vicky Vybez (Victoria Gunraj), and the owner of the website UK Soca Scene, Quinten Reid, the ropes at Bahamas carnival. Vicky donned an amazing costume from Bahamas Masqueraders and was the center of attention through much of the parade route, while Quinten immortalized the streets of Nassau with his photography (seen at www.uksocascene.com).
At the end of the route there were nothing but positive comments from the Bahamas Carnival Cruise goers about Bahamas Junkanoo Carnival. Many had never been to Nassau before. Almost all had never seen the streets of Nassau the way they saw them last Saturday.
Thanks to the carnival bands and the Bahamas National Festival Commission, the parade route was safe and enjoyable.
We do not yet know what next year will bring, but we know that we're ready to beat the road again.

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Technology addiction

May 12, 2017

I guess that the simple definition of an addiction is something one just has to have and simply cannot do without, as you feel completely lost when you don't have it. I have observed a whole lot of people lately who are hooked on a whole lot of modern technological gadgets.
Firstly, I know people who are hooked on loud music playing in their automobile. That's right, I heard one particular person say the following, "If I don't have music in my car constantly playing, I'll fall asleep." I mean this is an addiction. This person is addicted to loud music and apparently is unable to drive without it. To me this is serious. It really is.
I heard another person say when I was visiting him one day when a break down with the Cable TV occurred, that if the TV didn't come back on real soon, he'd go crazy. This, to me, is really frightening to think, that someone is unable to sit in a room and just talk to another, or be still and meditate, or plan future events in one's mind. No, I simply must have TV playing all day and all night as I'm literally hooked on it. I'm a TV addict.
Believe me, from a psychological perspective, this is obviously not good, as the TV is controlling the person and not the other way around, as it should be. In short, when one is addicted to something, that individual has surrendered to what they're addicted to.
Of course the largest group of technology addicts are the smart phone junkies, those who are never ever without their smart phones, on the Internet or calling someone on WhatsApp. Why, you can't even speak to these people, as they're totally engaged with their phone. They can't put it down. They're definitely addicted and do, in my opinion, need professional assistance to help them to finally get rid of their addiction.

o Think about it!
Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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Carnival show was 'bigger and better'
Carnival show was 'bigger and better'

May 08, 2017

Bahamas Junkanoo Carnival concluded its third year with a "bigger and better show," with event organisers claiming the festival continues to be "an economic stimulus for the cultural sector and source of empowerment" for small businesses...

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KB Launches Album-13 Songs in his Music with a Message Collectin, Collector's Albums for STB 3rd Anniversary
KB Launches Album-13 Songs in his Music with a Message Collectin, Collector's Albums for STB 3rd Anniversary

May 05, 2017

Best-selling rake n scrape artist Kirkland KB Bodie today made entertainment history, releasing an album that marries his conscience collage with a call for action, 13 songs packed with purpose and driven by heartache and hope...

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Courtney Celeste Spears: Let's dance

May 05, 2017

Renee Robinson, a former principle dancer with the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, who just happens to be an idol of Courtney Celeste Spears, a professional dancer with strong Bahamian roots (she's the granddaughter of Sister Sister Breast Cancer Support Group president Andrea Sweeting), will lend her incredible talent to helping Spears stage her first ArtSea convention, which will be dedicated to helping aspiring young dancers cultivate their talent, and recognize the potential in pursuing a professional dance career.
Through ArtSea, Spears strives to be the bridge that connects artists of The Bahamas and the Caribbean to the vast dance world -- whether it's dancing in college to obtain a degree or dancing professionally. The ArtSea founder said the convention will be an outlet for young, talented artists to learn and grow within their craft.
The program's objective is to provide students with the tools to build their self-confidence, and give them applicable knowledge in pursuing a professional dance career.
Joining Robinson will be fellow dancers Gabriel Hyman (modern), who, with Spears, is in his second season with Ailey II; Larissa Gerszke (ballet), who is with Complexions Contemporary Ballet; Courtney Ross, who is with Ron K. Brown's EVIDENCE: A Dance Company; and Shannen O'Neill (jazz), who is currently on her first voyage as a dancer on the Regent Seven Seas Explorer where she performs Broadway shows.
Four genres of dance will be addressed at ArtSea -- ballet, jazz, contemporary and hip hop.
Spears said young dancers should come ready to dance for the duration of the ArtSea convention and to be inspired.
"I'm getting so excited as ArtSea nears," said Spears. "ArtSea is something that I've always wanted to do. It's always been a passion of mine, and now it's coming to fruition. It's an honor for me to share my passion with The Bahamas and continue in bringing the dance community together. I want the youth of The Bahamas to have a weekend they will never forget, and learn how far dance can take them. The exposure they will get from this workshop is unlike anything they can imagine. Dancing has taken me all over the world, and I believe that ArtSea can truly change lives."
ArtSea will be held June 24-25 at the British Colonial Hilton for dancers aged eight to 23.
Spears' ability to bring the legendary Robinson to Bahamian shores means that local dancers will get the opportunity to work with a former principle dancer who has a stellar resume and has worked with many renowned choreographers -- Alvin Ailey, Lar Lubovitch, Donald McKayle, Judith Jamison, Ulysses Dove, Jerome Robbins, Bill T. Jones, Garth Fagan, Katherine Dunham, Hans Van Manen and Carmen de Lavallade.
"We are pleased to welcome the legendary Ms. Renee Robinson, former company member with The Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, to The Bahamas. She is a global icon in the dance industry, and we are ecstatic to have her share her knowledge with us."
Robinson's resume also includes dance training in classical ballet at the Jones-Haywood School of Ballet, the School of American Ballet, the Dance Theatre of Harlem and The Ailey School.
Her televised performances include the Kenney Center Awards; United States President Bill Clinton's first inauguration; the Bill Cosby Special on Alvin Ailey, and on the PBS special "A Hymn for Alvin Ailey".
In 2003 Robinson also performed at the White House State Dinner in honor of the President of Kenya, Mwai Kibaki.
During their 2006 season, the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater celebrated Robinson's 25th year with the company; her tenure was the longest of any female dancer in the company's history.
Bahamian dancers will get to work with Robinson, who upon her retirement was the last company member to have worked with The Ailey Company's founder, Alvin Ailey. She was also the only dancer to have performed with all three of the company's artistic directors (inclusive of Artistic Director Emeritus Judith Jamison and Jamison's successor, Robert Battle).
Robinson is currently on faculty at Yale University.
Participants in the ArtSea workshop will learn dance classroom etiquette, technical dance skills, teamwork, communication skills, body awareness, injury-prevention and how to process dance college applications.
College consultant Tracy Miller as well as physical therapist Sheyi Ojofeitime will also conduct ArtSea workshops.
Miller, who is the operations and marketing manager at Parsons Dance Foundation and responsible for all daily and project management, digital and print marketing, donor relations, and event planning, will host a dancing in college seminar.
"I got a full scholarship for college through dance," said Spears. "And a lot of them and their parents didn't even know that is an option."
Ojofeitime, the senior physical therapist at the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, who is responsible for providing onside and tour physical therapy services to dancers and staff, will conduct a body and wellness workshop. Dancers are asked to bring their yoga mats with them.
During the workshop, Spears said young dancers will learn how to maintain the health of their body to prevent injuries and encourage longevity in their careers.
"As dancers, we use our bodies so strenuously, and a lot of the dancing industry is knowing how to take care of your body, and being able to take care of your body on your own," she said.
Spears said the quality faculty that she has been able to put together to come to New Providence for ArtSea is an honor.
"We are excited to be welcoming Gabriel Hyman, Larissa Gerszke, Courtney Ross and Shannen O'Neill, all young professionals currently succeeding in the dance industry," she said.
A final performance showcase will allow the artists to display what they learned during the ArtSea convention.
Spears said ArtSea is her way of reaching young people. She describes dance as the "beautiful vessel" she has been provided to be able to give back.
"I feel that this is what God has called me to do. We have to always remember that the young generation is the future of The Bahamas and the world, and I feel that my vessel through which to give back and share is through dance. And Nassau is home for me. I feel so alive when I'm there. My family is there. My culture ... my roots are there, so I've always felt extra passionate about trying to bring back all that I've learned and all that I know from being in the States to the place that I call home."
Spears, a Baltimore, Maryland native, is the daughter of the former D'Andrea Sweeting-Cary.
When ArtSea takes place, Spears's two-year run with Ailey II, one of the most popular modern dance companies, will have come to an end and she will commence the next chapter in her dance career -- auditioning for other companies.
Spears said a number of students have already registered to secure their ArtSea spot. She encourages anyone interested to register early to take advantage of the savings. Early registration for ArtSea is through Sunday, June 4 at $100 per person and includes all the activities for the weekend. Late registration closes on Friday, June 9 at the increased rate of $150. To register online visit www.artseadance.org; email artseadance@gmail.com.

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The art of all things Bahamian

May 05, 2017

Patrons at the most recent ArtWalk at Marina Village were in for an extra treat -- they got to take in Sara-Cristy Constantine plaiting straw when she wasn't explaining the taste profiles and various uses of her native jams, jellies and sauces to visitors and locals alike.
Plaiting is rooted in Bahamian culture, and has been practiced for generations. The plait is crucial to the making of traditional straw creations such as bags and hats that were sold in the country's Straw Market, and for which it became famous.
Straw plaiting was a common sight in days gone by. People sat on their porches and braided the straw that was sold to make the straw handicraft that The Bahamas became famous for. Even though straw plaiting is still done by those who know the art form, it isn't such a common site to walk by a porch and see a person sitting in a chair calmly plaiting their straw. So Constantine's straw-plaiting ability was indeed a treat at the most recent art walk.
And as in previous art walks -- the art, crafts, music and eats and drinks were also highlights of the day.
The ArtWalk at Marina Village takes place every other Saturday between 12 noon and 7 p.m.

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Tomorrow we will be free

May 05, 2017

Tomorrow we will be free. Tomorrow we will take to the road and we won't "business" about what anyone thinks. We will sing and dance, throw our heads back, fling our hands in the air and forget about life for a while.
That is the essence of carnival. That is the message of soca. And the fusion of the culture of our neighbor -- our family -- fused with the culture of The Bahamas makes that experience even sweeter.
At a press conference to announce the start of Bahamas Junkanoo Carnival, Soca icon Machel Montano, who takes to the big stage with Bunji Garlin tonight, expressed his elation in seeing the culture of The Bahamas fused with that of the rest of the Caribbean.
"We have held an important level of respect for bringing culture and sharing culture," said Machel.
"Coming out here for us is not only to come out here and show them how to jump up, but for us to learn.
"We have a journey where somehow soca and carnival can understand Junkanoo and The Bahamas. I think this is the early opportunities for us right now and we feel very proud for us to be here together."
Yesterday the Bahamas Junkanoo Carnival festivities began with Shurwayne Winchester headlining on the big stage. Tonight Bunji and Machel will present their big 2017 collaboration "Buss Head"; and tomorrow Beres Hammond will close out the weekend's festivities.
But the fun does not stop with the three-concert nights. Before things really get going, the Glow Cooler cruise will be rocking out-of-towners into the evening and end just in time for the Bunji Machel mash-up. And on Sunday Icebox Entertainment returns with its "Suits" boat cruise.
And of course on Saturday all of The Bahamas Carnival Road Fever bands will be on the road in full force, with everyone in carnival costumes chipping down the road.
This year, the Ministry of Tourism provided a helpful guide to make it through the long journey that is the road:

HOW TO SURVIVE
Stay hydrated!
The rum and beers will be flowing, but remember to also drink lots of water and Gatorade in between, otherwise, you could end up passed out on the side of the street and then where would you end up? Quite possibly the subject of memes about what NOT to do at carnival.

Use sunblock!
The road march starts in the morning and TRUST ME the sun is gonna be HOT! I went to Trinidad carnival in February, and I still have tan lines more than two months later! 30 SPF sunblock will not work. You need 75 SPF and you need to reapply throughout the day. If you want to, you can trade in your headpiece for a cap until you reach the stage (the judging points).

Wear comfortable shoes!
My first road march I wore leather boots that fit me perfectly. WRONG MOVE! One hour into the road march, I had to abandon my partner (also my feting partner), climb up on the back of a truck and rest my burning feet. My shoes felt like they were too tight. I recommend the soft booties or tennis. Dance shoes also work. If you are going to get the leather boots, get them one size up. Don't say I didn't warn you.

EAT!
This seems like a given, but you would be surprised how many people forget to eat before going out on the road march. Some bands provide breakfast, but you should always eat beforehand just in case their food sucks. Remember my warning about passing out on the side of the street drunk? Yeah, eating helps prevent that. So, don't forget to eat, and I don't mean bread and toast. Eat a hearty breakfast and finish it off with water or Gatorade.

Get the essentials!
If you're carrying your phone, make sure it's in a waterproof case. Now before you start worrying about costs, a simple "baggy" or zip-lock bag provides sufficient protection. Have sun shades with you. As I said, the sun will be brutal. Vitamin C and pain pills are also recommended.
Wear extra deodorant! Even if you think you're wearing enough, slather on some more. If you're doing carnival right -- and if you follow my guidelines -- then you will sweat A LOT. The whole point of this exercise is to lose your inhibitions, let loose, wuk up yourself!

Make sure your costume fits!
This is so important and for obvious reasons -- but particularly for women. There is nothing worse than an ill-fitting costume (except passing out on the side of the street). The costumes don't leave you with much room for error. So, pick up your costume at your earliest opportunity, try it on, dance around your house and make the necessary
adjustments if needed. You don't want any private parts peeking out on the road and you do not want self-consciousness to weigh you down. Also, women should wear flesh colored tights. It's not absolutely necessary, but I think it completes the look. I would never go on the road without it and my legs are pretty. If you still need some, go to KB's Carnival Stockings on Facebook and order.
Build your endurance!
Now, this one can be tricky, especially for the people who decide to play mas at the last minute. But don't worry, I was out of shape last year and managed to have an awesome time. I must admit though, I took several "walking breaks", which means, instead of chipping along, I walked on the side of the road and had to step over a few drunken revelers in the process. :D

PROTECT YOUR BELONGINGS!
People steal. Don't make yourself an easy target. Put your money in another zip lock bag and tuck it in your boots or sneakers.
Last but not least, enjoy the moment! Don't look around and watch others have fun, join in! Whine to the ground if you feel like it; jump up if you want to; carry on as bad as you feel like. Don't hate on others whose dance moves aren't up to your standards. Carnival is all about acceptance -- all shapes, sizes, dances moves, and drunks are welcome. However, it's equally important that you respect others. If they don't want to dance with you, move on to someone else.

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Tebby releases new singl

May 04, 2017

Singer-songwriter Tebby has released a new single -- "All Wrong" a ballad music video in anticipation of her "Love & Heartbreak" debut album.
Love is a complex journey, and "All Wrong" is a Pop/R&B ballad that explores the emotions that people feel when faced with the uncertainty of love.
"All Wrong", a pulsating song infused with Pop and R&B written by Tebby, takes a journey through the highs and lows of love. It reflects on the pain experienced when relationships fall apart -- questioning its existence and whether it was ever right to begin with. And that at some point, after the emotional rush simmers, and if people are strong enough, they see each other for who they truly are -- not the expectations they put on one another -- and in that moment, they decide if the life they're living is the one they truly want.
It says the journey is a messy, but beautiful one.
The music video showcases the rise and fall of a relationship by taking viewers on a journey of a once shared myriad of happy moments that then begin to grow distant. Its climax is a fight scene leading to a couple gathering their thoughts and deciding whether the relationship is worth fighting for or if they are better off letting go. It was shot in Nassau by Jiggy Productions and directed by Davrielle Burrows.
The song was engineered by Hashaun Adderley and recorded at Duncan Town Studios in New Providence.
"We worked hard on this music video and I am very excited to share these lyrics written from the heart which reflect life experience that everyone can relate with," said Tebby, who has been at full speed pursuing her passion for music this past year.
Since her last release Tebby has kept on making waves with her music and performance skills. She was the Master of Ceremonies for the FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup Bahamas' Official Draw that aired live around the world. She performed in Miami, New York, and hosted a Tempo Cross Caribbean Count Down TV show. She is a semi-finalist for Bahamas Junkanoo Carnival and won best New Artist of the Year award at The Elevation Awards.
"All Wrong" is available on iTunes, Amazon, Google Play, Spotify and Tidal.

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Be kind to animals

May 04, 2017

I've written before of course of the vital need for all humans, all of God's creation, to be kind and loving toward one another. But you know, sometimes the way in which people treat the animals of the world is absolutely scandalous. Some people accuse animals of being dumb when in fact they are far superior to humans in so many ways. One of the ways in which they completely outshine humans, in my opinion, is the way in which they give us unconditional love. That's right -- having left the dog all day alone by itself, just look at the wonderful, warm reception they give us upon our return home in the evening. Yes indeed, animals are, in my estimation, more loving, forgiving and kind than humans as they greet us enthusiastically on returning in the evening.
Now occasionally we all come across cases of cruelty to animals that bring tears to the eyes of many. I honestly believe that young people who are cruel to animals in their youth will be cruel to humans when they grow up. So it's incumbent on all parents, guardians and teachers to instill in the children in their care a deep love and affection for all animals, and make them aware of the fact that they're part of the universal family too by being kind and loving to them at all times. Believe me, if you treat your animals with great care, love and kindness, they will always be there for you. Yes they will.
Now apart from being kind to our own animals, I believe that we all need to become involved with organizations which cater to taking care of those animals who have not been treated well, by volunteering to assist with the work which those organizations who take care of animals who have been abandoned do, and assist in getting them new homes.

o Think about it!
Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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