Opinion

You're really rich

July 20, 2017

Now D. Paul, with the title of today's article, you're really rich, I just know you're not addressing your remarks to me, because I live in the poorer part of town with a single mother and we have great difficulty just making ends meet each week. Yes I'm poor, real poor, so your title quite definitely does not apply to me and my family.
Now I'm sorry to correct you, but I have to in order to educate you about the truth, the real truth about you. As today's title simply puts it, you're really rich -- yes you are. You're rich in unique and special talents that the Creator imbued you with at birth. Yes indeed, you're just like any other God-created child, got a whole lot of talents, which when discovered and fully developed will take you to anywhere you want to go -- to the top of the mountain, the summit of success.
Yes indeed, I don't care where you were born or where you presently live, you are rich in natural resources, which when you develop to their fullest and work real hard will take you anywhere you want to go. Just because you were born into ghetto-like conditions does not mean that you have to stay there for the rest of your life. You just need to reprogram yourself and start to develop your God-given talents and, believe me, you'll be extremely rich.
Yes my friend, if you get nothing else into your head today, please understand that as today's short title correctly puts it, you're really rich -- yes you are, for you have within you the makings of something really special. So get to work, believe in yourself, develop and refine your God-given talents and you will be rich. I guarantee it.

o Think about it!
Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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Your assignment: the restoration of relations between God and man

July 20, 2017

As we follow the words of Jesus and subsequently the words of the apostles, it becomes clear that we have been given as a part of our diplomatic assignment, the restoration of relations between God and man. God and sinners reconciled. This is a wonderful assignment, because reconciliations are normally cause for celebration and in this case the Bible actually tells us that there is celebration in heaven every time a sinner (one who is separated from God) is reconciled. In fact, the Bible says that the angels rejoice and heaven rejoices whenever this reconciliation takes place.
We are good news ambassadors with an assignment and mission to reunite mankind to its source. This mandate is clear as evidenced by the words of the scripture in 2 Corinthians 5. "Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation; old things have passed away; behold, all things have become new. Now all things are of God, who has reconciled us to Himself through Jesus Christ, and has given us the ministry of reconciliation, that is, that God was in Christ reconciling the world to Himself, not imputing their trespasses to them, and has committed to us the word of reconciliation. Now then, we are ambassadors for Christ, as though God were pleading through us: we implore you on Christ's behalf, be reconciled to God. For He made Him who knew no sin to be sin for us, that we might become the righteousness of God in Him."
When we look further at the words of Jesus we see that He backs up the assertion that we are ambassadors because He gave us specific representation assignments. He stated Himself, and through the Apostle Paul, that we have an assignment. He said to His followers, His disciples, His ambassadors, "go into all the world and preach the gospel of the Kingdom of God." The word gospel means good news, so He designated us as purveyors of good news, but not just any good news, the good news of the Kingdom of God; the good news of reconciliation. The good news of a new birth not based upon physical dynamics. There were many good news options, but He was very specific in saying the good news of the gospel of the Kingdom of God. He expected each of us to act as diplomats communicating this specific message from His government. He clearly stated that He had His own government that superseded the existing power structure of earth. He further stated that those who accepted and submitted to His government would be reconciled to God, and those who chose not to believe would remain separated or un-reconciled.
Looking at it from a diplomatic perspective, when He said to the disciples to go into all the world, it was actually a commissioning ceremony. For the previous three years He had been training them for this powerful assignment. When it was time for Him to depart He called, appointed and anointed (gave credentials to) His followers to represent the King of kings on earth. It is hard for the finite mind to conceive that God would come among men, demonstrate what life was supposed to be like originally, show off the attributes of God in a human body and then assign His specially trained diplomats the mission of communicating this wonderful truth to the world. This is truly an awesome concept, that ordinary men would be selected, chosen to represent the King on earth with a mission of communicating the good news of the gospel of the Kingdom and acting as agents of reconciliation. This may sound crazy, but if you examine the words of Jesus this is exactly what He said and this is exactly what the apostle Paul said.
Each of us has a choice in terms of what we do with His message. I choose to believe and have accepted my role as a good news ambassador, a Kingdom ambassador, a credentialed diplomat. I have accepted my identity and my assignment. This is important because it speaks to understanding your identity. Many Christians I have encountered over the years have no idea who they really are. Jesus commissioned us ambassadors, but we act like refugees.
Now that we have established who you are as a Kingdom citizen your outlook should change, your attitude should change and your behavior should change. Your identity is not a bottom of the barrel, end of the line person who is just content to have the privilege of survival. You are an official emissary who has the full backing of your government and you have a very clear assignment.
This is why Jesus states in the book of Matthew 5:14 -- "You are the light of the world. A city that is set on a hill cannot be hidden. Nor do they light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on a lamp stand, and it gives light to all who are in the house. Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works and glorify your Father in heaven." We are legal representatives who illuminate the attributes of our Kingdom, causing men to be drawn to our King and Kingdom. Until we die we are here to represent the Most High. We represent the values, morals and principles of our government (Kingdom) even in environments that do not share the same values.

o Pastor Dave Burrows is senior pastor at Bahamas Faith Ministries International. Feel free to email comments, whether you agree or disagree, to pastordaveburrows@hotmail.com. I appreciate your input and dialogue. We become better when we discuss, examine and exchange.

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Kissing is a sacred act

July 20, 2017

This article should be enjoyable to read and yet still be serious at the same time. It is about kissing. Over the years I've written several articles on the importance of kissing in romantic relationships. On July 21 Annick and I will have been kissing as married partners for 40 years. I still love to kiss her. Those tender lips are as soft now as they were the first time I kissed her. My first kiss was in 1975 on a cool Saturday night under a sugar apple tree near Lover's Leap in Mandeville, Jamaica. We were both students in college at the time.
Although it is imperative that romantic couples kiss, I want to remind those who are not seriously connected to someone, that kissing is a serious act of love and should not be taken lightly. This sacred act is being treated too lightly, and too many are getting messed up socially and sexually through the doorway of kissing. We are too free with kissing. We have become a cheap society of kissing fanatics.
I believe romantic kissing should be treated as something very sacred, special and exclusive. In spite of how good it feels, kissing does not reach its highest potential of volcanic ecstasy unless the brain cells have kissed first. Too many young people are engaging the body first before they engage their heads. This is the kind of behavior that can lead to acquaintance rape or date rape. More than 15 years ago, I wrote my first article on kissing. It was published in a university's student newspaper in Michigan. The response was overwhelming. Since it was a Christian campus, many teenagers and young adults appreciated my candid and frank discussion on the subject. One young lady thanked me for helping her to develop a healthy relationship with her boyfriend. We both shared the view that kissing is sacred and were encouraged to remain faithful to our standard.
More and more young people want to do the right thing. They want to preserve the most intimate expressions of love for a post-wedding experience. But too many of them stand before the fires of passion hoping not to get burned. They spend long hours kissing, rubbing up and turning up the heat. They do not want to have sex and get pregnant, but they tearfully express that it happened accidentally. That's not an accident. That's a deliberate, intentional set-up, when kissing-crazed individuals are allowing themselves to be held hostage by hormonal flow.
I am sure you are wondering whether or not I am saying couples should kiss before marriage. I believe Christian couples who are courting and preparing for marriage can, and should, kiss romantically before marriage. However, they should kiss in small dosages and limit the time and the frequency. The longer the kiss and greater the frequency, the higher the temperature rises on the passion thermostat. It is important that one does not kiss on the first, second, third, fourth, or fifth date. That's dangerous to the heart. It causes the emotional arteries to become clogged, blocking the reasoning and enhancing sexual seduction. Even non-Christians can mess up their choice of a permanent romantic or marriage partner by kissing too soon and too long before marriage.
Here are steps towards romantic kissing that I suggest should take at least three months to one year to cover. I have been sharing these steps for 30 years and still feel they are relevant today -- talk, play and talk, hold hands and talk, bond minds, link shoulders, hold heads, kiss in short, small dosages.
Steps one through four are the most important time of any relationship. This is the friendship period. You need time to become friends and to play and talk together. Remember, time is your best friend. This friendship period is not time for kissing because it will stifle growth in the relationship. The next steps are the romantic phase. It is during this time when those sacred words, I love you, will be solemnly expressed. It is a time when you like being around each other and look forward to seeing each other on a regular basis. You have blended your thoughts and ideas, and have definite plans for the relationship. The last step is the kissing stage. The relationship has matured enough to share yourself in this fashion. But you need to restrain yourself, realizing your own limitations and weaknesses. Romantic kissing before marriage is risky business if prescribed in large doses. It is one sure way of opening the floodgates of passion that can lead you to the painful point of no return. Restraint and control are the key words.

o Barrington H. Brennen is a marriage and family therapist and board certified clinical psychotherapist. Send your questions or comments to barringtonbrennen@gmail.com or write to P.O. Box CB-13019, Nassau, The Bahamas, or visit www.soencouragement.org or call 242-327-1980 or 242-477-4002.

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The companion virtues of gratitude and generosity

July 20, 2017

"Blow, blow, thou winter wind, / Thou art not so unkind / As man's ingratitude."
- William Shakespeare

There is a nexus between generosity and gratitude. They are companion virtues. The most grateful people in the world are typically the most generous people. The most chronically selfish and self-absorbed typically live in a dungeon of ingratitude.
Selfishness is typically its own hell. The more selfish one is the more one gorges on the object of the selfishness, incapable of being satiated, always wanting more to fill a chasm that will continually run dry.
The selfish see the needs and wants of others but ignore them. The self-absorbed are so blind that they regularly do not even see the needs and wants of others. We are all imprisoned to some degree in these cul-de-sacs. Gratitude and generosity are antidotes to both casts of mind and heart.
Mohandas Gandhi often advised that gratitude and generosity help break the spells of self-absorption and selfishness. He said that when he became obsessed with his own problems or gave in to self-pity, he would reach out to someone else in need or to the least fortunate in a community.
Such extension beyond himself gave him a greater sense of peace. His problems tended to loom less large and less important. Gandhi had little time for self-pity, especially by those who were more fortunate than others.
Self-pity is like a wound or sore that one incessantly picks at, making healing and new life impossible. A sense of gratitude -- especially amidst the difficulties of life -- and a heart of gratitude are balms that help cure the self-pity which we all sometimes indulge in and even enjoy.
In 1884 former California governor and railroad magnate Leland Stanford and his wife, Jane Lathrop Stanford, lost their son Leland Jr. to typhoid. He was their only child.
Consumed by grief but grateful for their son's short life, they agreed a memorial for him. The memorial was a university to which they deeded a considerable fortune, including an 8,180-acre stock farm in Palo Alto, California.
The farm became the campus for a research university to be named the Leland Stanford Junior University. Today we know the institution as Stanford University, though it legally retains its original name.

Pay it forward
Stanford's endowment is now approximately $22 billion. It has produced many noted graduates and 63 Nobel laureates. Generosity or "paying it forward" most often blooms in ways we do not expect.
Here at home and around the world those struck by grief after the loss of a child, spouse or parent often memorialize their loved ones through a scholarship, donation or the creation of an organization for a designated purpose.
Many of those who create such memorials or tributes do so out of gratitude for the life of the individual they have lost. The deep sense of gratitude issues forth in a generous spirit.
Veterans who have lost limbs in war or survive harrowing experiences often have a renewed sense of gratitude for life in general, and for family and friends. Intense gratitude often inspires extraordinary generosity.
The same is true for many who have survived or are living with certain diseases, from cancer to HIV/AIDS. Many who have experienced life-altering accidents or the trauma of divorce or some other event, renew their spirits from the wellsprings of gratitude and generosity.
The hymn Amazing Grace was written by John Newton, a slave trader saved from death during a violent storm at sea. The song was a plea for mercy and written in thanksgiving. But it would still take some years and more conversion before Newton gave up slave trading.
The hymn is an expression of gratitude to God. Two of the stanzas from the iconic hymn comprise a complete prayer of gratitude:
"Amazing Grace, how sweet the sound,
That saved a wretch like me. ...
I once was lost but now am found,
Was blind, but now, I see. ...
"Through many dangers, toils and snares...
we have already come.
T'was Grace that brought us safe thus far...
and Grace will lead us home."
In gratitude for surviving a monster storm Newton's new life became one of greater generosity and rectitude.

Thankless
Too often, many of those afforded considerable privilege in life show little to no gratitude. They believe that they are entitled to what they have received in terms of financial or other privilege, though they have not worked for what they have been generously bequeathed by their parents or grandparents or benefactors.
One of the worst degrees of human ingratitude is that shown a parent by an ungrateful and selfish child. In Shakespeare's "King Lear", Lear seethes: "How sharper than a serpent's tooth it is/ To have a thankless child."
It is often alarming how commonplace it is in families to see how two children respond quite differently to parental generosity. One child may show enormous gratitude while the other becomes a poster child for ingratitude.
Generosity and gratitude are virtues of empathy. They remove our blinders, our scotosis, our navel-gazing. The companions lift our eyes and our hearts to a broader horizon and to our neighbor. The conceit of privilege and self-absorption typically blinds us to the needs of others.
The story was told in this column some time ago of a 40-something, bejeweled, well-dressed woman driving a new luxury SUV, who pulled into a clearly marked handicapped-reserved parking space at a popular grocery store in western New Providence. She perfumed the air with her sense of entitlement and self-importance.
After a few well-practiced stilettoed steps into the entrance of the store, she was intercepted by a male store employee who politely informed her that she could not park in the reserved space. Seemingly afraid to challenge her, he told her that another female customer had complained.
The driver of the SUV flew into a rage. She loudly demanded how anyone dare complain about where she parked. She threatened to tell the other woman about, euphemistically, her derriere. Given the level of outrage, it seemed that the parking spot was reserved exclusively for the SUV driver.
Several days later this same lady pulled into an adjacent handicapped-reserved parking space at the very same store. As she alighted from her vehicle an attitude-cum-tune was in the air: "I'm more important than you and this SUV tell me it's true. When I drive along the avenue I deserve more privilege than you."
Not only had this lady not learned her lesson from a few months ago, she was broadcasting an object lesson about a lack of empathy and generosity. It is highly likely that this same lady would not be a generous individual.
Understanding the equation between generosity and gratitude is like studying a perpetual physics challenge or cosmological mystery or puzzle.
One knows the contours of the equation or the mystery but one never fully understands all of its dimensions. Yet one is awed by the various phenomenon produced by the equation.
At a recent Church of God conference in The Bahamas, one of the speakers told this story: "There is a story told of a little Bahamian girl around the age of seven. Her mother saw her daughter with two juicy ripe mangos in her hand. The mother asked for one of the mangos.
"The little girl bit into one mango. Then she bit into the other mango. Disappointed and saddened that she had failed to teach her daughter about generosity and sharing, the mother asked her daughter, 'Why did you bite into both mangos?'
"The girl replied, 'I wanted to see which one was sweeter Mommy, so I could give you that mango.' The girl then proceeded to give her mother the sweeter mango."
The nexus of gratitude and generosity is all around us and, if we allow, within us all.

o frontporchguardian@gmail.com, www.bahamapundit.com.

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Natural highs

July 19, 2017

Unfortunately in today's world at the beginning of the 21st Century, there appears to be far too many people getting high on a regular basis using drugs of some type either Cocaine, Heroin, or just on alcohol, and I contend that this is not good as far too many appear to be getting hooked on drugs both legal and illegal. Yes it's a problem of monumental proportions, particularly in North America.
Now from my perspective, there's nothing wrong per se in getting high, as long as it's a, as the title of today's article simply puts it, 'Natural High'. Yes My Friend, I get high day after day, but not with the use of any drugs. I get high on life. That's right, I get high just writing these radio scripts then rehearsing them for quite a while before going to the studio to record them for distribution to the various radio stations who air the series around the world and writing these articles. Yes My Friend, you can get a wonderful 'Natural High' when you achieve something through your own efforts plus a whole lot of hard work.
For example: the student who works real hard for several years and thus finally gets their degree, will I guarantee you have a wonderful high, a feeling of great accomplishment as they receive their degree. Likewise, the person who starts a small business and works non-stop 24/7 to make it into something truly amazing and highly profitable will also experience a 'Natural High'.
Yes My Friend, please do not even entertain taking drugs of any kind to experience a phony drug induced high. Instead do something really worthwhile with your life, accomplish something extremely difficult to bring to fruition and believe me, you'll have a 'Natural High' with no side effects whatsoever. Yes indeed, 'Natural Highs' are the only ones worth having.

o Think about it!
Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to 'Time to Think' the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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The next wave of economic growth is coming

July 19, 2017

The next wave of economic growth is coming. This wave is not going to happen because some smart set of politicians in The Bahamas, or USA, or elsewhere in the world is crafting ingenious policies to bring it about. This wave will take place because, all across the world, especially in quarters in the USA, inventors and innovators, armed with a great desire to improve the world and realize their own potential, are busy developing technologies that will blow our minds. Trust me, I am seeing it. The human brain is hard at work solving problems - at least those brains that are not so lazy that their best efforts consist mainly of complaining, criticizing and combating. No, these brains are the educated, critical thinking, strategic operators of our planet, and they are getting results. Their results will produce big financial gains for our planet.
Within the next 10 to 20 years, the global economy will experience new growth based on new innovations in energy, medicine, artificial intelligence, environmental science and software application, to name a few. Automation will explode, and the human race will be able to accomplish levels of productivity unseen in the world. Travel and entertainment will change, and information technology will make collaboration a way of life. In this new order, opportunity will be democratized and globalized, but only to the extent that education is similarly popularized.
The Bahamas can be a tangential beneficiary of this new wave of economic growth, relying on travellers or portfolio investors to grace her with their presence, or we can be direct recipients of these benefits. We must engage the world in a meaningful way. We must engage it with our own intellectual thinking and innovative contributions. We must partner with its players to make things happen, believing that we are as capable as they are. We must take courage enough to invite global competition to test our metal, either making or breaking us for the better. We must lead as though we are Fortune 500 companies in formation.
As I said earlier, the politicians will not lead this wave of economic growth, but the wise ones will not be foolish enough to hamper it. The wise ones will get out of the way and let it happen to the maximum. Good policies that promote and don't stifle innovation, collaboration and partnership is what they will produce. They will break doors down to give market access to good products and services, at home and abroad. They will recognize the wisdom of strategy, the genius of thinking and the brilliance of technological advancement. They will employ these and deploy these for the benefit of national growth and development.
Am I dreaming? Hell yes! And why not? All the reality around me is not as grand as I believe it can be. Why not dream? Things can be better, much better. This new economic wave is coming. That is no dream. Those who are ready will benefit from its fortunes, and those who don't will be around for the next 30 years simply complaining about all that happened around them and left them behind.
"Get busy living or get busy dying," said Andy to Red in the movie "Shawshank Redemption". That's for sure. You can do as you think best.

o Zhivargo Laing is a Bahamian economic consultant and former Cabinet minister who represented the Marco City constituency in the House of Assembly.

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Hearing loss in women

July 18, 2017

Hearing loss in women, though not as common as hearing loss in men, appears to be on the rise and starting at a much earlier age than in previous generations. Researchers are finding that more and more women in their 20s and 30s are being identified with hearing loss. Additionally, according to studies done on women in the USA, Australia, and Europe, one third of women in their 50s have some degree of hearing loss, while women in their 60s are two-thirds more likely to have hearing loss.
Hearing loss in women, even a mild one, can be devastating, because it not only affects a women's ability to hear, understand and communicate, it also has a negative effect on her quality of life -- for example, her relationships with family and friends, her social life and her job. This often leads to frustration, depression and isolation. Additionally, new research shows links between hearing loss and other more common health conditions like cognition, dementia, falls, anxiety, and an overall reduction in mental and physical health.

Causes of hearing loss affecting women
Age: As with men, women also tend to lose some ability to hear as they age. However, unlike men, who normally tend to have a greater hearing loss in the higher frequencies, women have more hearing loss in the lower frequencies as they age.

Autoimmune inner ear disease: This type of hearing loss happens suddenly and results in a dramatic reduction of hearing in either one or both ears. It may also affect the person's balance. Immediate medical treatment is needed to help restore as much hearing as possible.

Hormone replacement therapy (HRT): New research is now showing that older women who were treated with both estrogen and progestin, show a 10 to 30 percent increase in hearing difficulties compared to women who were not treated with HRT.

Otosclerosis: Otosclerosis is inherited and usually found in persons of Caucasian or Asian ancestry. It is a calcifying of the bones of the middle and inner ear resulting in hearing loss, since sound is now not as easily transmitted through the auditory system. Women are significantly more likely to have this disease than men, with pregnancy creating even more of a risk for them.

Noise: Exposure to any kind of harmful noise can result in acquiring a permanent hearing loss. The noise can be recreational, like listening to your favorite music at extremely loud levels, or it can be work related -- working in an environment that exposes you to loud levels of noise. A noise-related hearing loss can happen because the noise is too loud, because you are too close to the noise, or because you have been exposed to the noise for an extended time.

Pain relievers: In a study done by Curhan and colleagues, researchers discovered that women who took over-the-counter pain killers ibuprofen and acetaminophen an average of five to six times a week, showed a 21 to 24 percent risk of increased hearing loss compared to women who did not. Woman who took ibuprofen on an average of two to three times per week, showed a 13 percent increased risk of hearing loss, and women who took acetaminophen two to three times a week showed an 11 percent increased risk of hearing loss, when compared to women who took these pain relievers only once a week or less.

Managing hearing loss
Early detection of hearing loss is important. When hearing loss in a woman is treated, it results in positively impacting other areas and an improved quality of life is often the result. When hearing loss is left untreated, it results in a reduced quality of life and many other common chronic diseases, and various health conditions associated with hearing loss may be aggravated. A hearing loss, even a mild one, often leads to many emotional and psychological issues such as anger, anxiety, depression, isolation, frustration, etc. Hearing loss that is identified and then managed results in an improvement in communication, quality of life and overall general health.
If you are a woman struggling with one or more of the following signs and symptoms of hearing loss, you should have your hearing checked:
o Difficulty following a conversation.
o Straining to hear what is being said.
o Needing things repeated.
o Thinking others are mumbling.
o Turning the TV volume louder.
o Having a ringing or buzzing noise in your ear.
o Family members saying you need your hearing checked.

o For further information on any hearing-related disorder, please contact Dr. Deborah Nubirth, doctor of audiology, in New Providence at Comprehensive Family Medical Clinic, Poinciana Drive at 356-2276 or 677-6627 or 351-7902 in Grand Bahama; or email dnubirth@yahoo.com.

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Ankle sprains are one of the most frequent musculoskeletal injury seen by primary care physicians

July 18, 2017

Ankle sprains are one of the most frequent musculoskeletal injury seen by primary care physicians. It is estimated that each day more than 25,000 people in the United States require medical care for ankle sprains. The ankle joint is made up of three bones -- tibia, fibula and talus, held together by many ligaments that provide stability by limiting side-to-side movement.
Ankle sprains are common sports injuries but they can also happen during everyday activities. An ankle sprain is an injury to one or more ligaments in the ankle. The most common sites of injury are in the outer, or "lateral" -- ankle ligaments. More than 80 percent of ankle sprains are a result of inversion, or inward rolling of the ankle, usually on the outer side of the ankle. The severity of an ankle sprain depends on whether the ligament is just stretched, partially torn, or completely torn, and on the number of ligaments involved in the injury. Ankle sprains are not the same as strains, which affect muscles rather than ligaments and an ankle fracture means broken bones.

Causes
Ankle sprains are usually caused by an unnatural twisting motion in the ankle most commonly when the foot is pointing downward and is forced inward, awkwardly. Persons would describe this as "rolling their ankle." This stretches the ligaments on the outer side of the ankle. Sprained ankles often occur during sporting activities and can result from a fall, a sudden twist, stepping on uneven surfaces or in a hole and even wearing the wrong shoes.

Symptoms
When the ankle is sprained, the soft tissues around the ankle are injured and inflamed. The symptoms may include pain or soreness, swelling, bruising or redness, difficulty walking and stiffness in the joint. The symptoms vary depending on the severity of the sprain.
There are four key reasons why an ankle sprain should be promptly evaluated and treated by a podiatrist.
o An untreated ankle sprain may lead to chronic ankle weakness/instability and more injury.
o Sometimes it may be difficult for you to tell the difference between a sprain and an ankle fracture.
o An ankle sprain may be accompanied by other foot injury that must be treated as well.
o Rehabilitation of a sprained ankle needs to begin right away. If rehabilitation is delayed, the injury may be less likely to heal properly.

Diagnosis
When evaluating your injury, the podiatrist will get a history of the injury and the symptoms you are experiencing. X-rays or other imaging studies such as a CT scan may be ordered to help determine the severity of the injury. A complete physical exam will be done, touching and moving the parts of the foot and ankle to determine which parts have been injured.
The initial care for a sprained ankle at home is important to help reduce pain and speed up healing. Persons will often report that immediately after a suspected ankle sprain they would soak their foot in hot water. This is NOT recommended. In fact, it increases swelling and can make the ankle worse. Remember RICE --rest, ice, compression and elevation. All of these are done to reduce and prevent swelling and can be started at home even before you see the podiatrist.
Rest: For the first 24 to 48 hours after the injury your activities need to be seriously decreased or stopped all together.
Ice: For the first 48 hours after the injury, place an ice pack or frozen vegetables wrapped in a towel on the sprained ankle for 20 minutes at a time every three to four hours.
Compression: Wrap the ankle in an ace bandage from the toes to above the ankle. The wrap should be snug but not too tight so that it's uncomfortable.
Elevate: Keep your ankle elevated as high as possible by sitting in a recliner, or putting books or pillows under the ankle.
After twisting your ankle, if you have pain, swelling and difficulty walking or standing, it is time to see the podiatrist. Treatment by the podiatrist will continue the RICE treatment. The podiatrist may also apply an ankle brace or cast boot to reduce motion in the ankle joint. Crutches are also used to prevent walking or bearing weight on the ankle. The most common medications used to treat ankle sprains are anti-inflammatory that reduce both pain and help control the inflammation.
When you have an ankle sprain, rehabilitation is crucial--and it starts the moment your treatment begins. Early therapy helps to promote healing and increase your range of motion. This may include doing prescribed exercises or even seeing a physical therapist who will help with flexibility and strengthening exercises in the ankle. A follow-up visit is usually scheduled one to two weeks after the initial treatment to monitor the healing progress.
Most ankle sprains heal without complications or difficulty, leaving the person able to walk and play their sport without pain or swelling. The healing time depends upon the severity of the ankle sprain and if there was any other injury.

If persons do not get treatment and rehabilitation after an ankle sprain, chronic ankle pain and instability results. This makes the ankle weak, it "gives way" at times and increases the risk of more injuries in the future. Very seldom surgery may be needed to repair torn ligaments around the ankle.
Ankle sprains can be prevented by wearing proper shoes for the activity you are involved in, or the sports you play. Always wear stable shoes that give your ankle support like high-top basketball shoes. Very high heels or platform shoes are not the best choice if you want to prevent an ankle sprain. For athletes, balance training may help keep the ankles strong and flexible. They may also consider having a weak ankle taped or wearing an ankle brace for extra support during the game.

o For more information email foothealth242@gmail.com or visit www.apma.org. To see a podiatrist visit Bahamas Foot Centre on Rosetta Street, telephone 325-2996, or Bahamas Surgical Associates Centre, Albury Lane, telephone 394-5820, or Lucayan Medical Centre on East Sunrise Highway, Freeport, Grand Bahama, telephone 373-7400.

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Life is reality

July 18, 2017

In the last article I mentioned a quote by Fabio which he mentioned when he was being interviewed by Jesse Watters on the program "Watters' World" on T.V. Well the title of this article is another quote by Fabio ... he said, "Life is reality." Yes it is, and not one great big holiday as some people seem to treat it. Far too many people seem to think of life, this lifetime we all have on planet earth, as one great big eternal party, but my friend, as Fabio put it, life is reality. It's for real and it's something which we should all take really seriously, as it's supposed to be a real life learning experience whereby we continuously learn invaluable lessons in living which will assist us with our lifelong experience of endeavoring to reach the ultimate goal, which is a state of perfection.
That's right, life is reality -- it's a, or it's supposed to be, a schoolhouse in which we daily learn important lessons in living which will contribute in a meaningful way to assisting us in achieving the ultimate goal, which is as stated already, to finally reach a state of perfection.
And yet, from my personal observations, it would appear that far too many people are treating this life, their allotted time on planet earth during this particular incarnation, as if it was one great big party. Now believe me, there's nothing whatsoever wrong with having a good time every now and then and thus enjoying yourself; but my friend, as Earl Nightingale put it in his famous recording "The Strangest Secret" -- all of our joy, our satisfaction will come not from our leisure, but from our work.
Yes my friend, if you thought life is just one great big, continuous party -- think again. Today is the day for you to get serious about this thing called life, as Ernest Holmes would put it. Yes indeed, as Fabio put it, life is reality. So today's the day for you to get real, stop all of the nonsense and start to seriously work toward achieving some really worthwhile goals which will eventually lead you to the promised land.

o Think about it!
Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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The tragedy of Bahamian development Faustian or Shakespearian tragicomedy

July 18, 2017

Banks and historical development
The stage provides great entertainment, except when we are a part of it and we are the ones being laughed, jeered at, or at the receiving end of rotten tomato throwing. As the country sits poised to lose its self-proclaimed status as a banking centre, given the exodus of the offshore, onshore or commercial banks, and the real shift from off-shore banking to wealth or asset management, the country needs to sit up and start to seriously reconsider its position. Lies continue to be taken as truths and pipe dreams reign. Sadly, the populous and the government both seem unwilling or unable to pull back the veil of the story they have created. We have bought into a lie about a healthy GDP for years, even while we have faced the obvious non-truth of this story. Radio talk show hosts continue to promote the country as a high GDP country when, in reality, The Bahamas has a serious problem as inequality deepens and worsens; the GDP means little except for those outliers who take the GDP up to its high point. There are a few people who own a great deal of money in the country, but that money does not usually reside in the country, for the most part. Further, many of the corrupt officials who have benefited from this lie of financial prosperity move their dollars offshore to places untouched by Bahamian law enforcement. These same few benefit at the expense of the population.
Historically, Bahamians were resilient people who, because they were not allowed to own bank accounts in commercial banks such as the Royal Bank of Canada, had an entire system of lending and financial working that depended on local people who ran asues. These asues were usually run by women and worked well to keep citizens alive. Much like burial societies and friendly societies that derived form the African heritage, these empowered the blacks. Sadly, the government saw this as a bad way of saving and chose to make it illegal. All that came from Africa was painted with a tar brush as being bad and working against national development. Desegregation allowed poor, black Bahamians to open bank accounts, but it also encouraged them to pull out of the traditional and very functional asue system. Today, while asues continue to service parts of the population, they have been undermined by the government's distrust of an unregulated banking system, but the number houses have full-government support. The latter represent a serious risk to the stability of the country, in part because some operate illegal banking systems that are not regulated as the Canadian banks are, which also causes the Canadian banks to resist remaining in the local economy. A story two years ago or so in The New York Times about Scotiabank in the Caribbean put the writing on the wall, however, many people chose to ignore it. Now, the MPs are laying the failure of this first world status so many of them boasted about at the feet of the government; it is a pipe dream as banks close branches and downsize staff. Some islands have been left without any banks or are told to go to the next branch that is on another island. How is this development? We are reaching first world status real fast.
In The Bahamas in the 21st century, in order to seek medical attention, most people must buy a plane ticket and fly to the capital where the lame-duck hospital, that has really only been partially updated, continues to function as if it were servicing a population of a small town, not a country of over 370,000 people. It was already outdated and too small and too downtrodden in the 1970s into the 1980s. Those who buy tickets to fly in must also pay to stay somewhere and seek assistance with transportation. Often, they land for scheduled surgical procedures only to be told that their surgery has been cancelled and a new date will be given to them soon. How much does this cost the user? How do the framers of National Health Insurance foresee overcoming these problems, especially in a country that is so far down the black financial hole that it can hardly see the light from the sun? We speedin' down the first world road.
Now we are telling people that they must buy a plane ticket to fly to the bank! How is this national development? It seems that the national only now focuses on New Providence. Although, please do not be surprised when yet more bank closures in the capital will negatively influence the already hours-long bank queues and refusals to give poor, hard-working black people mortgages, though they will give them loans for cars. This begins an incredible debt cycle as many people are told that their bank will become fully automated rather than a branch that one can go into to speak to a flesh and blood human. We should understand that to mean that unemployment will increase, money in the local economy will decrease, and poverty will rise. The fewer jobs around, the more poverty increases. This is not rocket science. Yet government remains moot on this, or claims that unemployment is falling. When banks pull out of towns, they leave gaping holes like wounds that will either fester and puss, or cause eventual death. The number houses cannot operate as banks unless government chooses to allows this, which then means that our international relationships will be threatened by controls placed on capital flows and transparency. Having come out of the offshore banking system, it is clear that the country has done nothing to develop to keep up with a rapidly changing global village. How is this development? This is the new economy understanding of first-worldness.
Selling land was an excellent way to make money, once. International landowners are a godsend, but an economy cannot be pegged to that done-sailed ship. It is the most unsustainable and short-term way to 'develop' a country. Further, when we sell off all immovable assets to people who can pay top dollar, the land prices are pushed up incredibly. Realtors and other agents like this because they earn large commissions (and that is a good thing), but everyone else loses out because it becomes impossible to buy land in the home country. Again, this is not to say we do not want foreign direct investment, we want investors, but this cannot be the sole source of national income.

Changing government is good, but where is the plan?
The crooks usually slink off through the wings stage left as government changes and the dust settles. As Moody's threatens to once again downgrade the country, where is the government plan to fight this? What are the action points they plan to implement? Where are the policy changes? The only policy mentioned so far has been increasing taxation, insisting that people pay their taxes, but those other people who live above, outside, to the left of, or to the right of the law continue to evade taxation. How do you plan to get them to pay their taxes? Instead, it seems that the plan is to punish the middle class who are already heavily taxed. Please shut the front door on those who say how low the tax rate is here for locals. If you pay a dollar for something in the U.S. by the time it lands in your house it costs $10, depending on how many times it is VATed and taxed and marked up, yet we do not see this heavy taxation. At the same time, the state has signed onto the WTO and has not implemented the policies, nor has it changed the tax structures and duty structures that are required by the WTO. Where to next? Small Bahamian business are dying under the weight of onerous taxes and fees, and the reality that large international corporations can operate in the local economy more effectively than small, local businesses. We are throttling through our barrier to first-worldness.

Moving onto the smart island
How can we move into this coveted place when the infrastructure is still dumb? Not sure that there is another way to write it. The state and the nation have allowed the state to do this, have refused to update, upgrade, make sustainable, improve, stabilize the energy grid, or even the public service infrastructure. Without reliable energy, not energy that pollutes and goes off three, four, five times, browns out, or stays off for days and at the same time loses $7 million, the smart island dream is just that, a dream. It is sad when the lies become so believable that we go to bed and wake up with them, and start to wear them as second skins. How can we sit so close to Florida, have an American company provide us with energy, and have the most expensive energy in this hemisphere? Is it the hemisphere? Computer and internet router blow when de dam lights dip de las time. On de islan is worser. Yet, what do we do? We complain but do nothing. This is first-worldness?

Bahamianization
We so often talk about foreign being better than Bahamian and that they must be paid more than locals, so we are now right back to the pre-Burma Road days, but no one does anything proactive about the obvious cases of discrimination. How do we claim to be about Bahamianization when Bahamians are usually earning somewhere around $8,000-$10,000 annually? International persons make more than that. Take note, this is not to challenge internationalization of the country or the economy, but rather to point out that Bahamians continue to be treated like second-class citizens in their own country, and many Bahamian women are treated like third-class citizens, and anyone who is perceived as 'Haitian' even though they have been here for one, two, three or four generations, are treated like fourth-class citizens. Discrimination? We see it when Bahamians are asked not to be on hotel property and when fences are erected to protect private beaches, easements wiped out. The joys of the first world, ain no body got time to worry bout beach.

We soon reach
We are in a national travesty or tragicomedy along the lines of Shakespeare or Marlow and Doctor Faustus or the Duchess of Malfi, where people can be daggered to death in public and souls can be sold to the devil, yet nothing is done and most actors don't know their lines because they can't read or count. Education is so poor that the smart island must be driven by the few who actually graduate. What is smart about an island that refuses to accept the reality of where it is and how low it sits in the rising water, with the most biased structure that is against most of the population? Yet, when Dr. Fuastus is tempted should he not go to Lucifer when there are no other viable options? As the Moody's reality sinks in, what will government do? The mess that has been made from a 55 percent debt-to-GDP ratio 2012-2013, to a 72 percent debt-to-GDP ratio in 2016/2017, (Moody's) says that we are in for a rough stage life. If no one is going to jail for the murderous corruption and the strangle-hold control of national development by a few Lucifers, lets stop the mud-slinging and really start to work towards improving life. What is going to be done about the departing banks, the rising costs of buying a home, the inability for most people to survive, that is not just words and sweet talk while sipping a sweet tropical drink with an umbrella in it while floating on a clear blue pool, not the sea because it too salty? This stage is so termite-eaten and un-kept, unmaintained like most government buildings and services (so the potential down-rating of postal service would be no shock to anyone, except the state), we will soon fall through. Such is life in promised first-worldness.

o Ian Bethell-Bennett is a professor at the University of The Bahamas.

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It takes courage not to be discouraged

July 17, 2017

I was watching the show "Watters' World" on TV a while back, a show that incidentally I find hilarious, and he was interviewing Fabio who has just become a U.S. citizen and who lives in California. Now during the interview, that covered a whole range of subjects including sanctuary cities, Fabio uttered the phrase that is the title of this article. Fabio said, "It takes courage not to be discouraged." Yes indeed it does. I mean ... I'm quite sure that all of us at one time or another have had some very negative things happen to us in relation to one specific area of our lives. Believe me, this can cause a person to be extremely discouraged. Now when one gets discouraged about any aspect of one's life, it is indeed very difficult, to put it mildly, to get out of that discouraged state of mind; however, it is essential that we do so, that is, not be discouraged, and as Fabio so correctly stated, it takes courage and a whole lot of it. In a nutshell, if you wish to succeed in the end, in spite of all the discouraging defeats you will experience along the way as you pursue your goals and objectives, you've got to be very strong and thus be able to deal effectively with the occasional defeats that we will experience from time to time.
Yes indeed, as I wrote about some time back, life ain't easy. No it's not! However, it's the tough times when we're inclined to get discouraged, which in the end, provided we don't quit, mold us into the true winners we are.
Yes my friend, if you really want to be successful, across the board, you've got to be a tough cookie to use a well-known, appropriate phrase. Yes indeed, as Fabio put it when he was interviewed on T.V. by Jesse Watters on the program "Watters' World", it takes courage not to be discouraged, yes it does. So stay strong -- don't give up and you'll win big time, believe me.

o Think about it!
Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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Island insights: San Salvador

July 17, 2017

Unlike neighboring islands, San Salvador's greatest assets lie beneath the surface of its waters, offering world-class sports fishing and scuba diving opportunities. However, greater competition and entrepreneurial spirit are needed to energize the local economy and help this island reach its full potential.

Sports fishing
While many Family Islands offer deep-sea fishing opportunities and excursions, San Salvador distinguishes itself through unrivaled wahoo fishing, backed up by exceptional billfish and tuna fishing. Although San Salvador's fishing industry is not as well-known or commercially developed as those of Family Islands like Bimini or Abaco, San Salvador has long attracted avid sports fishermen throughout The Bahamas and the United States (U.S.) with the promise of secluded waters and wahoo exceeding 100 lbs. As such, San Salvador is ripe with potential for young Bahamian fishermen interested in providing charter services for visitors to the island.
However, San Salvador's fishing industry depends on more than just charter fishing entrepreneurs to reach its full potential. The island currently has only a single commercial marina available to yachters outside of Club Med, despite the quality of San Salvador's deep-sea fishing, marking a key investment opportunity for those interested in constructing and managing a marina.

Cultural and historical tourism
San Salvador has long been accepted as the site where Christopher Columbus first made landfall in the Americas, yet the island has not capitalized on its unique historical significance. Today, a simple cross marks the reported spot of Columbus' arrival in the New World, with few resources available to interested visitors or local history buffs. Specialized tours and perhaps a cultural heritage village would complement San Salvador's existing tourism businesses, and provide fresh and worthwhile excursions for those visitors looking for authentic Bahamian experiences beyond the familiar appeal of an all-inclusive resort.
San Salvador is also home to several well-preserved plantations, including The Bahamas' only preserved records of daily life on a Bahamian plantation, while the Dixon Hill Lighthouse is one of the few remaining manually operated lighthouses still in operation in the world, and one of only three of its kind in The Bahamas. Yet these historical sites remain chronically undeveloped. Greater local buy-in and government commitment to refurbish San Salvador's historical sites, particularly the site of Columbus' arrival, could re-brand San Salvador as a historical treasure.

Diving
In addition to its stunning deep-sea fishing potential, San Salvador also boasts world-renowned wall diving within extremely close range of its coast, featuring rare marine wildlife, including a range of shark species highly sought by divers. Resting in its own carbonate platform, San Salvador offers divers an unrivaled wall diving experience that has led to the island being previously ranked within the top three dive spots in the world by publications such as Dive Magazine and Scuba Magazine. And though the island has long attracted divers from across the world through its current dive excursion options, there is always room for expansion, be it through new dive companies or smaller villa accommodations for visitors.

Challenges
San Salvador has a modest yet sustained population of roughly 1,200, with the bulk of the working population employed by either the government or the Club Med Columbus Isle resort. While this dynamic has instilled a degree of job security in the community, some believe that it has hindered competition and growth.
The lack of meaningful competition in most tourism and service industries is arguably one of the greatest impediments to San Salvador's growth. For decades, the Club Med Columbus Isle resort has dominated San Salvador's tourism sector, offering guests an attractive all-inclusive package. While Club Med, the island's largest private employer, has proved an invaluable driver of the local economy in the past, there exist growing concerns that the all-inclusive business model has stifled growth in other branches of the tourism industry.
Aside from Club Med, there exists only a handful of smaller hotels and lodgings, such as the Riding Rock Inn Resort and Marina, which has long served as the only viable marina for yachters. For a bit of context, the island currently only has five accommodations and a mere two restaurants listed on travel site Tripadvisor, despite the fact that the island has experienced steady visitor growth in recent years (with the notable exception of the 2015-2016 season after Hurricane Joaquin) and features an international airport -- something that many other Family Islands crave. Excursions and activities beyond those offered at Club Med are similarly limited.

Moving forward
San Salvador currently occupies a unique position amongst developing Family Islands. It has a small but dedicated visitor base that returns to San Salvador largely due to the strength of the island's diving industry and the international brand appeal of Club Med, with clear room for growth. Yet there are critically few small businesses to support the existing number of annual visitors, while the island's service sector remains underdeveloped. New small, boutique hotels could attract new and returning visitors while also creating demand for new restaurants and excursions.
Islands such as the Exumas have already enjoyed the benefits brought about by regular international airlift, and Cat Island will likely experience a surge in interest from developers and potential visitors, should the government make good on its long overdue promise to upgrade the facilities at New Bight Airport.

o Roderick A. Simms II is a director of the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce and Employers' Confederation and chairman of its Family Island division. To respond to this article, email rasii@me.com.

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Removing the strip on asphalt shingles

July 17, 2017

Especially during the hurricane season, when high winds cause damage to roofs, owners, builders and building supplies executives are drawn into an argument. It begins when someone picks up a shingle that has been blown from the roof, notices the cellophane strip on the underside and comments, "I see, the strip wasn't taken off. That's why the shingle flew off." Before you can say "roofing cement", the argument has begun.
Who started this argument in the first place? The reason for the discussion, as noted above, is that after storms, after shingles are blown from roofs during high winds, people notice the shiny strip on the shingle -- a strip they think should have been removed to allow the shingle to stick to the one below. But, in fact, the cellophane strip (or in some products a plastic or wax-coated paper strip) found on the bottom of individual asphalt roof shingles and located just over the glue strip that bonds shingles together while in the package, is factory-installed only to prevent the shingles from sticking together while they are still in the bundle, in storage or in transit.
On the other hand, there is a glue strip on top of the asphalt shingle which is intended to create a bond to the shingles nailed atop when the roof is later warmed by sunlight. That is the key to the performance of an asphalt shingle roof. The success with which asphalt shingles bond together as the glue strip is heated by exposure to the sun is a factor in keeping the shingles in place during high winds and preventing wind damage. That is why people are concerned about the removal of the strip. They think it is part of that process, but it is not. The glue strip on top of the shingle, in fact, bonds with the three tabs of the shingle above.
In The Bahamas, exposure to even a few weeks of normal sunlight will cause the glue tabs on the under-side of asphalt roof shingles to soften and adhere to the surface below, protecting the roof against high winds.

Why not still remove it just before nailing?
Certainly, if you want to remove the protective cellophane strip when the shingle is about to be nailed, taking it off might not hurt. But the fact is that it is not aligned with the actual glue tabs or glue strip of the shingle course below. Therefore, removing the cellophane strip will do nothing to speed the adhesion between shingles. It has no effect at all on the performance of the asphalt shingles. In fact, there have been instances when the removal of the strip damaged the underside of the shingles and some manufacturers recommend NOT removing it.

Then leave the strip alone
In answer to the common question then, not normally: according to roofing manufacturers, it is not required to remove the cellophane strip on the back of roof shingles before they are nailed.
In short, the people who make the shingles tell us to leave the plastic or cellophane sealant protection strip in place, explaining that when the shingles are nailed in place the strip on the successive shingle course will no longer be in contact with the adhesive sealant strip on the upper surface of the lower or previous shingle course. We take that as good advice and hope that ends the debate.

o Patrick Rahming & Associates is a full service design firm providing architectural, planning and design services throughout The Bahamas and the northern Caribbean. Visit its website at www.pradesigns.com and like its Facebook page. The firm's mission is to help its clients turn their design problems into completed projects through a process of guided decision-making, responsible environmental advice and expert project administration.

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Sit down and shut up

July 17, 2017

"There is a time to speak and a time to listen, and sometimes people need to shut up."
- David Hope, Baron Hope of Thornes

Since the general election on May 10, there have been many revelations from the newly elected administration that have caused Bahamians to wonder if some of the politicians in the last administration were living in an alternate universe.
Leading up to the election, there were frequent and audible whispers of varying claims of corruption on the part of public officials, not necessarily limited to, but including, elected officials. On Election Day, the Bahamian people declared that they had, had enough of Perry Christie and his colleagues. They almost decimated the Progressive Liberal Party (PLP) at the polls, rejecting one former Cabinet minister after another, not taking any chances that the PLP would be returned to office. To ensure that Mr. Christie would not be given another chance at governance in the unlikely event that his party won, his constituents ousted him after 40 years as their representative. The rejection of Christie's PLP was definitive, resounding and complete.
Therefore, this week, in light of the total rejection of the Christie administration, we would like to Consider this... What do the people of The Bahamas want to hear from their fallen leaders?

Understanding what was said
Almost every week since the election, one of the former MPs, and even some of the sitting parliamentarians, including those in the Senate, reinforce for the Bahamian people that they made the right choice on May 10. The arrogance, anger and general lack of appreciation by the fallen warriors of what the people were saying suggest that the PLP simply did not get it.
The people were just tired of the empty promises of their disconnected representatives, the sense of entitlement demonstrated by so many ministers and their obliviousness as to how much the average citizen was hurting. Bahamians were weary of seeing the few favored ones being given all sorts of concessions while the average citizen was ignored as they struggled to make ends meet.
It is patently clear that, two months after the PLP's historic defeat, many in that party still do not understand what the people were saying to them on May 10.

Let's start with an apology
If the PLP truly understood the message of May 10, the new party Leader, Mr. Philip Brave Davis, should humbly admit that the PLP government made many mistakes while in office; that many of the mistakes were indefensible and inexcusable; and that, on behalf of the PLP, he apologizes to the Bahamian people for those mistakes.
He should go further. He should admit that, in light of the May 10 election message, the PLP will radically reform itself by returning to and reaffirming its core values; by reassessing its vision for a 21st century Bahamas; and by reviewing and reorganizing its party structure to ensure that it becomes more inclusive, relevant and attractive to the electorate.
He should go even further. As the leader of the PLP, he should commit to radically evaluating future candidates and promise that the party will not resurrect those who shamefully tarnished the government and the party in its last dispensation.
This is what real leadership demands. This is what the Bahamian people would respect. Until it is done and Bahamians hear and understand that the party has clearly heard their message, the PLP will remain in opposition.

Many need to sit down and shut up!
In their haste to gain the public platform, too many persons are speaking on behalf of the PLP. Sitting MPs and senators, on a regular basis, jump at the opportunity to advance their personal positions on matters of national importance as soon as a reporter places a microphone or recorder in their faces. Unfortunately, this often results in utterances by persons ill-prepared to make considered statements, simply because they have not allowed their brains sufficient time to filter their comments for rationality, logical cogency or basic common sense. The result is that they often make fools of themselves and the party.
This must be contained, because the haphazard, free-for-all approach on whatever matters they are asked to speak on is damaging the party's brand. Mr. Davis should authorize designated persons to speak on behalf of the parliamentary caucus and the party, but only after approving the text of such statements. At all other times and in any other encounters with the media, PLPs should learn how to say "No comment."
The PLP's constitution empowers the national chairman to speak on behalf of the party, which brings me to my next point.

The national chairman
We observed in an earlier column that the PLP leadership should call for and immediately accept the resignation of its national chairman who, along with the leader, equally bears responsibility for the party's complete rejection at the polls.
The national chairman is responsible for the orderly operation of the constituency branches, and there is no doubt that most of the branches were not functioning as they were intended for years, prior to and in preparation for the general election.
Before the general election, the national chairman publicly announced that the PLP would win at least 28 seats. Either he was as delusional as his leader in this regard, or he was completely out of touch with what the branches should have been advising him. In either case, he should go, and he should go now.
Just as Mr. Christie resigned as the leader of the PLP, in the interest of advancing the party's chances for recovery, rehabilitation and re-engineering, Mr. Bradley Roberts should not wait for the next party convention to resign. He should do so immediately.
Every single day, the relentless statements that are issued by the national chairman inflict further damage to the party's brand, and enable Bahamians to reconfirm that their decision to vote out the PLP on May 10 was the right one.
Furthermore, what is now urgently required is a more benign, less belligerent national spokesman, whose primary responsibility would be to heal the wounds that were, and continue to be, inflicted on the party and to rebuild the organization. It is time for humility, but this cannot and will not happen if the current national chairman continues to hold that office.

Former Cabinet ministers
There are several former ministers who, through their conduct in public office, greatly contributed to the PLP's defeat and to the devaluation of the party's brand.
Some of those ministers continue to make public statements to defend their actions and decisions while in office. The fact of the matter is that the Bahamian people do not want to hear from them. The electorate was subjected long enough to their arrogant, self-serving conflict of interest dealings, abuse of office and obscene sense of entitlement. No one, except possibly for their most ardent supporters, really wants to hear from them - not now and perhaps not ever. They should simply sit down and shut up. No one is listening to them and, even if they listen, no one believes them. Their credibility has been totally devalued.
We are also speaking of those ministers whose questionable deeds might not have been discovered or disclosed yet, but whose subterfuge will, in the fullness of time, be exposed.
If the PLP is truly committed to reform and regaining the confidence of the Bahamian people, the party should ensure that absolutely none of the candidates, including ministers who lost their seats in the last election, should hold any leadership office whatsoever within the PLP for the foreseeable future. It is time to purge the party of those whose failings contributed to its defeat.
It is time for a new day in the PLP, with new faces and personalities who are not tainted by their connection to the Christie administration. If the party refuses to heed this admonition, it will remain in opposition for at least two terms, possibly longer.

Conclusion
The time has come for those who contributed the PLP's defeat to recognize that the greatest contribution that they can make to the party that they profess to love is to sit down and shut up. We have absolutely no interest in anything you have to say.
Failure to do so will result in a very long and winding road to recovery for a party that once personified the hopes, aspirations and dreams of many Bahamians. Unfortunately, in the last five years, those hopes were banished, the aspirations were disregarded and the dreams were woefully and tragically shattered and betrayed - all by persons who were intoxicated by the acquisition, application and abuse of power, often to the disadvantage and disgrace of the Commonwealth that they solemnly pledged to serve.
As the Bible tells us, "To everything there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven." And, in the words of Baron Hope of Thornes, "sometimes people need to shut up".

o Philip C. Galanis is the managing partner of HLB Galanis and Co., Chartered Accountants, Forensic & Litigation Support Services. He served 15 years in Parliament. Please send your comments to pgalanis@gmail.com.

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Solid waste management in The Bahamas has some history: Let's learn and apply the right lessons

July 14, 2017

The recent fires that plagued the Harrold Road landfill in early March of this year were a turning point for many residents on New Providence Island who suffered the shutdown of schools and public facilities, and in some cases, evacuation from their homes. Based on an assessment by a Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) team, the closest residents to the landfill site at Jubilee and Victoria Gardens were acutely affected by the fumes. Although healthier alternatives of disposal such as sanitary landfills, incineration and composting do exist, the Harrold Road landfill is currently classified as a Hazard Waste Partially Controlled Dumpsite by the PAHO. Thus, it is critical that an open and honest dialogue on solid waste management be established engaging The Bahamas' government, our private sector, and local, civil society groups to ensure the safety and cleanliness of the very air that we breathe.
Uncontrolled landfill fires are sadly not unique to The Bahamas. Finding an adequate solid waste disposal mechanism is a challenge for most countries in the Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) region. Jamaica experiences 1-2 landfill fires annually, while St. Maarten experienced a record-breaking 19 dump fires just in 2016.
It goes without saying that the appropriate disposal of waste is critical to prolonged health and well-being for all citizens. Throughout the Caribbean and Latin America, solid waste management is one of the least recognized public policy challenges, although its relevance to economic and environmental policy-making can be clearly identified. Recognizing the importance of proper waste management, the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), in partnership with the government of The Bahamas (GOBH), funded a comprehensive study of garbage collection practices and the condition of the various landfills within The Bahamas during the early 1990s.
The purpose of this IDB-GOBH study was three-fold: (1) to invest in appropriate disposal facilities for New Providence and 10 of the Family Islands; (2) to develop well-managed hazardous waste disposal facilities in The Bahamas; and (3) to provide comprehensive institutional support with a focus on health education and awareness. Based on the study's recommendations, the IDB provided a loan to support a solid waste management plan in 1999, which culminated in the construction of waste management infrastructure. Although the integral infrastructure was developed, operational management and support has remained inadequate throughout the past 18 years. As result, a number or key lessons were learnt from this experience.
Even with the best intentions, challenges in implementing efficient solid waste management practices in small island developing states (SIDS) like The Bahamas are complex. Limited institutional and human resource capacities, an ever-growing population, the mixed density of populations scattered on more than 700 islands in the Bahamian archipelago, the limited availability of suitable land, and the excessive costs required for waste management operations are just a few of many hurdles that SIDS typically face. However, if progressive measures are employed to tackle these challenges, core sectors of SIDS economies stand to be significantly impacted, especially in the realm of tourism - a sector most SIDS countries heavily depend on.
Barbados has undertaken innovative approaches to solid waste management by utilizing the expertise of the private sector. In 2009, Barbados created the Sustainable Barbados Recycling Center (SBRC), to divert waste from its sanitary landfill; and the SBRC ultimately achieved a 70% conversion of waste into recyclables. As the product of an IDB-sponsored solid waste management workshop in 2015, Barbados improved its favorable results further through a collaborative effort with the Import-Export Bank of Korea (KEXIM). The IDB-KEXIM collaboration resulted in the improvement of transport routes for garbage collection on Barbados, using international best practices. As a result of these solid waste management initiatives, Barbados now has a collection rate of 90%. Supported by a well-functioning regulatory framework, Barbadians anticipate further benefits, once the recommendations for transport optimization are fully implemented.
Belize has also had its fair share of solid waste management challenges. Troubled by a range of institutional and budgetary shortfalls, the Belizean authorities approached the IDB's private sector window in 2002 seeking solutions for its waste management problems. In coordination with the government of Belize, a public-private partnership for the construction, management, operation and maintenance of major facilities was developed. To ensure financial viability, the project design included compliance supervision funded by an environmental tax as well as the use of user fees which would gradually be phased in at a socially acceptable rate. To ensure social sustainability, a heavy focus was placed on integrating institutional strengthening and public awareness.
Although these projects are by no means perfect, they illustrate the possibilities of sustained partnerships with the private sector. To engage the private sector, trust needs to be built. For example, when the government undertakes competitive requests for proposals, this activity serves to build trust by facilitating a transparent process of recruitment. Maintaining longevity and stability in government operations is also critical. The implementation of long-term concessions may also serve to maintain momentum until a stakeholder approved tariff, levy or alternative can be implemented. Knowing that challenges occur in the real world and navigating rough waters within a co-partner system --rather than a sovereign-subordinate one -- is critical to successful solid waste management.
Returning focus to The Bahamas' case study, effective solid waste management is reliant on the immediate implementation of policies that can lay the foundation for consistent waste management. A full understanding of realistic operational costs is also critical to maintenance, especially within an archipelago that is consistently impacted by storms and hurricanes --events which have catastrophic effects on equipment, amenities and human resources. Building trust between private and public entities should be emphasized and improved, even if there have been historic deficiencies.
There is also a strong role to be played by civil society in the management of the country's waste since, after all, we personally produce it -- we're all stakeholders. Local, non-governmental and community-based organizations have already started when it comes to public awareness and educational activities related to waste management. Notable local examples include the Eco-Schools program represented by The Bahamas Reef Environment Educational Foundation (BREEF) to encourage sustainable waste management practices as well as the Abaco-based Friends of the Environment who undertake an awareness-based litter reduction and recycling program. Nationwide, the annual International Coastal Cleanup was positively recognized by many environmental and social groups who served to remove over 1,000 pounds of trash from the beaches of The Bahamas during 2016.
Achieving success in solid waste management in The Bahamas also requires partnering with local stakeholders who know the Bahamian environment and its logistical structure. They are best able to identify potential opportunities and future challenges within the system since they stand to be most impacted by any flaws therein. Knowledge sharing and expertise can be gained by working with international stakeholders who have worked and learned through successful and not-so-successful experiences in solid waste management, bringing with them best practice methods, lessons learnt, innovative ideas, and the capital needed to effectively implement these complex and costly programs.

Authored by Chitralekha Deopersad and Natalie Bethel from the Inter-American Development Bank's (IDB) country office in The Bahamas (CBH), in collaboration with the IDB's Infrastructure and Energy and its Water and Sanitation (WSA) Divisions.

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Pain must be dealt with

July 14, 2017

Pain is an inborn warning system that tells you loud and clear that something is wrong with some part of the body that needs to be dealt with by a medical professional as soon as possible. Two of my closest relatives, a daughter and grandson, where involved in an automobile accident and as a result were in considerable pain in certain areas of their bodies. This pain assisted the physician to be able to zero in on their medical problems, deal with them and thus ultimately completely heal them of their injuries.
Yes indeed, pain is a divinely built-in warning signal to let you know that something is not right with the human body, thus medical attention needs to be sought immediately. Yes indeed, as today's title simply puts it, pain must de dealt with. So I'm sure we're all agreed with the fact that physical pain denotes a malady in the physical body.
But my friend, what about emotional or psychological pain, doesn't it need to be dealt with too? Of course it does! However, sad to say, whilst most will deal quickly with physical pain, many will leave emotional, mental pain undealt with for far too long. This, believe me, is very dangerous. My friend, in all sincerity, when you are emotionally distraught you need to get some proper attention from a psychiatrist, psychologist or professional counselor who will assist in getting rid of the emotional pain you're experiencing.
Yes indeed, pain is simply a signal that all is not well, either physically, mentally or emotionally. Please don't try to deal with your pain alone, but instead visit a professional who is properly trained to be able to adequately take care of it. Yes my friend, as today's title puts it, pain must be dealt with before it's too late. So please, deal with yours today.

o Think about it!
Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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The saga and bravura of Haitian migrants

July 14, 2017

I was recently at the Toussaint Louverture airport in Port au Prince, Haiti, departing for New York City; the real action was not with JetBlue or American Airlines passengers leaving for the Big Apple, but with the LAN airline transporting Haitian migrants to Chile. It looked like a well-organized conspiracy orchestrated by several entities; the airline, the traffickers, and different governments all working in tandem for a human tragedy occurring with the open knowledge of everyone concerned. Some 300 young Haitian men and women were vying to find a seat on a plane that seats only 150.
Upon further inquiry, I was told the same scene has been repeated every day for months at the airport. A year ago, the destination was Brazil for Haitian migrants trying to reach California. President Donald Trump put a stop to this human trek by closing the borders to those migrants at Tijuana, Mexico.
Some ten years ago, in an essay on the Dominica experience, I alerted officials to the human trafficking observed in the Nature Island. Hundreds of Haitian women were trying to reach Martinique via Dominica with the complicity of all parties involved.
The Dominica government took notice and informed those Haitian people they were welcome in Dominica, not as victims of traffickers, but as true citizens. The Dominica experience has since been one of the most satisfying for the Haitian migrants, they have contributed to revitalizing the economy of Dominica and they have saved LIAT from bankruptcy due to their frequent visits to Haiti.

In the beginning
Haitian migration might have started even before Haiti became an independent nation. It has its genesis in the days when the Haitian Revolution between 1789 and 1803 could have gone either way, for the French colonists led by Rochambeau and his ferocious dogs set upon the freedom fighters, or for the Haitians led by Toussaint Louverture and later Jean Jacques Dessalines.
Several property owners fled with their slaves, first to Cuba and then to New Orleans, Louisiana, building the first Creole enclave on the American continent with the savor and the spice that characterizes the Caribbean joie de vivre.
Even before that event there was a huge fire in French Cape (later Cape Haitian) in 1793 that caused some 10,000 French settlers and free blacks to migrate to New Orleans, Charleston, Savannah, Baltimore and Philadelphia, transforming forever the texture of these cities in religion, music, cuisine and architecture.
The Haitians encountered the hostility of the segregationists, who opposed the newcomers with their emancipator and dangerous doctrines proffered "by insolents, insubordinate and ungovernable Negroes". Yet their influence was decisive in helping to win the Civil War. Louisiana, albeit today a regressive state in terms of social mobility, was woven with the influence of the Haitian migration, in religion (Catholic and voodoo) and in politics, with equal access to public accommodation before the rest of the United States.
To conclude this first migratory episode, Haitians left the United States in general, the Louisiana Purchase territory in particular (acquired by the United States through the bravura of the Haitian founding fathers), in much better shape than it was before. One should note the singular signature of some of the Haitian migrants of that era, in particular: Jean Baptiste le Sable who built the city of Chicago and Pierre Toussaint, a hairdresser, who might become the first black man elevated to sainthood in the United States following the steps of St Augustine in Christendom via Africa.

The second wave of migrants to Cuba
Around 1915 and later the second wave of migration occurred from Haiti, especially to Cuba. It was due to the expropriation by the Haitian government of land owned by the peasants for the benefit of the great American companies such as the Standard Fruit and the Dauphin Plantation. Some 10,000 workers left to man the sugar plantations also owned by the Americans in Cuba. They faced discrimination and ostracism due to their language (Creole), their religion (voodoo), and their lack of education.
But soon, as today in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, the Haitians earned a reputation "as the most efficient and most exploitable segment of the labor force". Yet, the vicious circle of opening and closing the gate for the sugar industry caused, as in the Dominican Republic today, the forced repatriation of some 40,000 Haitian migrants by the year 1936.
Before Fidel and Raul Castro, the presence of the Haitian migrants in Cuba had been a silent and suspicious one, created by the plain racism of the Cuban people who preferred to see themselves closer to European/Spanish ancestry than African. Communist Cuba did not attract too many Haitian immigrants, yet the integration of those who remained in Cuba through the years has been almost total, with Cuba offering today a class of some 200 students every year completing their medical degrees for the benefit of Haiti.

The third wave of migrants to the Dominican Republic
I have painted the story of the Haitian migration to the Dominican Republic in several previous essays, Suffice it to say, it has been complicated, since the Dominican government in 2013, strengthened by its highest court of law, decided to strip some 210,000 Haitians born in, or who have lived for decades in, the Dominican Republic of their Dominican citizenship. The jus soli in application in the land for centuries has been revoked, especially for the Haitians.
The anti-Haitian sentiment in the Dominican Republic has its origin in the darkest times. Jean Pierre Boyer, the third president of Haiti who ruled over the entire island of Hispaniola around 1820, mistreated Haiti and the Dominican Republic so badly that the scars have not healed since. In addition, while the Dominican Republic looked towards Europe, in particular Spain, Haiti is geared towards Africa and its cultural values for its way of life.
Playing the devil's advocate, I have said in several essays on the Dominican Republic that Haiti, forced to absorb one million Dominican citizens on its territory, would have been a much worse, inhospitable host. In fact, it is the inhospitable status of Haiti that causes so many of its own citizens, in particular in the rural areas, to migrate to the Dominican Republic as cane cutters, laborers and construction workers.
The earthquake of 2010 opened the eyes of the Dominican Republic to Haiti as a possible consumer market for its products. It is providing all the essential goods, from construction material to all types of foodstuffs, including the ubiquitous plantain and wood charcoal. Will the Dominican Republic accept the fact that it is in its interest to help Haiti build its own nation? Will Haiti eat its pride and accept to heal its wounds and transform its own nation into one that will become hospitable to its citizens? The answer is still in the air.

The fourth wave of migrants to the United States and the rest of the Caribbean
Around 1957, a cataclysm of almost biblical proportions happened in Haiti. Francois Duvalier, elected with the slogan of 'change for the better', plunged the country for the next three decades into a frenzy so malefic for the nation, that around two or three million Haitians may have left the country, for Africa first, and later the United States, France and Canada.
It was the era of nation building in Africa; the United Nations recruited the best of the best of the Haitian professionals to help the new regimes in Africa freshly out of colonialism to achieve statehood. Haitian teachers, lawyers, doctors were helping the Congo and other nations in West Africa to develop sane institutions and adequate infrastructure. Was it too good to be true or a flaw in the recruitment process that this transfer of skills and knowledge did not last long?
Haiti was still under a ferocious dictator and, instead of coming back home, around 1970 those migrants went to New York and to Quebec where they have contributed to their revitalization. The dictatorial regimes and the many natural cataclysms falling upon the country occasioned the rural exodus in rickety boats towards Florida around 1980. It is has been continuous and unabated, in spite of the U.S. maritime enforcement forcing some migrants to look towards The Bahamas and the other islands of the Caribbean for solace and sun while Haiti is sinking into hell under successive regimes of faux democracy. It has recently been reconstituted into the exodus by air via Brazil or Chile towards California.

Back to Chile
The Chilean government, under pressure from Chilean civil society and the legislature, has started the process of putting the brakes on the free-for-all for Haitian migrants to enter into the country. Yet the booming Chilean economy needs fresh oil to keep the engine running in perfect condition. The aging Chilean population should also search for new blood to continue the process of nation building. This scenario is well understood by President Michelle Bachelet, but not yet by the larger population.
While the Haitian government and Haitian society has not understood very well the concept of harnessing the capacity of its youthful population to create wealth, it falls on any smart nation to profit from this resource, to the advantage of the host country.

In conclusion
As Jean the Baptist, I shall continue to preach in the desert that salvation will come for Haiti and for its departing migrants when the Haitian government will accept to apply the five principles of nation building, to wit: The sentiment of appurtenance for and amongst all; the building of sane institutions and excellent infrastructure so its population will cease to be nomads at home and abroad; the affirmative action for those who have been left behind; the search for and the application of the nation's divine mission; and last but not least, the teaching to the youth the principle that the building of the nation is a continuous creation.
Hopefully my book, "For the Country, for the Nation: A Society's Vision to Render Haiti Rich, Powerful and Independent", edited by the State University of Haiti, will propel a critical mass of citizens to turn the tables and force the government to enshrine these five principles in its proposed new constitution and its national budget. The migrant saga will then become a nightmare of the past and Haiti will be busy changing the world for the better, as its emancipator mission was dictated by the divine Creator and accepted by its ancestors!

o Jean H Charles LLB, MSW, JD, is a regular contributor to the opinion section of Caribbean News Now. He can be reached at jeanhcharles@aol.com. Published with the permission of Caribbean News Now.

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Spirit of excellence and exuberance: Cleophas Adderley

July 13, 2017

Cleophas Adderley was invited to be the guest speaker at a weekly youth program which began its sessions with the pledge of allegiance and the national anthem. He became visibly frustrated as the pre-teens and adolescents sang "March on Bahamaland" in a desultory and unenthusiastic manner.
He abruptly stopped the singing, fuming that he was not going to allow his national anthem to be sung in such a tepid and lethargic manner.
He made the young people stand at attention. He tested their voices. He offered a quick lesson on the meaning and importance of the national anthem. Then he directed the group in singing the anthem with gusto and purpose.
He insisted that they lift up their heads and their voices toward the rising sun in celebration of being proud Bahamians. He believed in individual and national pride born of excellence.
The story exemplifies the spirit of excellence and exuberance of Cleophas Adderley, who disdained mediocrity and slackness, and whose joie de vivre was infectious, especially in his lifeblood: his passion for music.
He would wholeheartedly agree with a line from a presentation in this year's independence celebration on Ft. Charlotte: Being Bahamian "is not bout smoking slackness".
Adderley was a genuine nationalist, who did not allow his patriotism to blind him to the beauty and treasury of other cultures nor to the challenges and shadows in his homeland.
He enthusiastically celebrated the best of humanity from traditional African songs to reggae to Beethoven to choral music to Junkanoo and other traditional songs of The Bahamas, Haiti and other countries and cultures.
Both his father and mother taught him a love of country and the pursuit of excellence. He was the last child of Cleophas E. Adderley, who served as a member of Parliament.
He was the grandchild of R.M. Bailey, a noted tailor, who helped form the Ballot Party. Bailey was a progressive thinker. His daughter Helen, was Cleophas' mother. Helen Bailey Adderley also loved music. She was a seamstress, organist and pianist.

Tutelage
As he often stated, Cleophas famously loved being a Bahamian. In 1973, the year of independence, he was in Lower Six at The Government High School, the only Advanced Level music student, under the tutelage of Marion "Mickey" St. George.
His classmates included: Heather Thompson, Sheffield Wilson, Bernice Pinder, Basil Barnett, Wendy Smith, Leslie Pinder, Louise Barry, Gregory Rahming, Olivia Mortimer, Sabrina Ingraham, Thomas Birch, John Farmer, Icelyn Russell and Mary Smith.
Some of his classmates remember him as self-confident, very diligent in his studies, and filled with opinions on the news of the day.
Passing the auditorium one would often hear Cleophas on the piano, the strains of which would blossom into a brilliant musical career. Ten years later, in 1983, as the country celebrated its tenth anniversary of independence, Adderley launched the Bahamas National Youth Choir (BNYC), with just under 80 members.
Though he became a lawyer and worked for a number of years in the Attorney General's Office, his enduring passion was music. A lover of opera, he proclaimed that Junkanoo was operatic, combining music, the visual arts and theater into a magical display of Bahamian artistry and ingenuity.
A dear friend recalls that when the BNYC performed on stage in a city overseas, that the music hall erupted in delight and dance as the choir showcased the drums, cowbells, horns and rhythms of Junkanoo. The friend recalls the exuberance, the joy, the magic of the moment, and of how proud she was to be Bahamian.
Adderley and the BNYC displayed our Bahamian pride and imagination across the continents of the world, dazzling audiences and sharing our heritage on the world stage. Like their beloved director, the hundreds of young people who populated the BNYC demonstrated their love of being a Bahamian.
Adderley was famously a disciplinarian. He did not allow lateness, sloppiness, surliness, crudeness or incivility. He demanded neatness, punctuality, good manners and civility in language and bearing.
He knew that the world watched the manner and the bearing of the members of the BNYC whether they were performing in Latin America, Asia, Africa, the West Indies, North America or Europe. He demanded the same excellence when the choir performed at home.

Better angels
In a nation where slackness and mediocrity often reign, and where the crudest voices are often allowed free reign, Cleophas Adderley and the Bahamas National Youth Choir mirrored and called us to our better selves and angels.
Cleophas once enthused: "It's important that any civilized country have national cultural institutions that will help to reinforce their identity and also help to foster national pride, and help to show that it's a country worthy of historical and cultural note."
He insisted: "If we didn't have these things, we would really be like an undeveloped town or settlement, and we in The Bahamas are so much more than that - we are a sophisticated, developed nation and have much more to offer than just sun, sand and sea."
Adderley composed "Our Boys", the first Bahamian opera, which according to a report in this journal, "was also the first opera to have been written and performed in the English-speaking Caribbean".
A devoted Anglican, he also composed "Missa Caribe", the first Bahamas concert mass. His beloved friend, Bahamian singer and musician, the talented JoAnn Callender, rightly says that she wished that Cleophas had time to compose more of his original work.
In a tribute to Adderley, Prime Minister Hubert Minnis noted: "Though we have lost a musical genius, his spirit lives on in all who were fortunate to be touched by his life, his spirit and his music."
There is hardly a living Bahamian here at home who has not listened with enthusiasm and delight to the music of the BNYC under Adderley's meticulous direction. Most of us know one or more individuals who were members of the choir.
The Bahamian Icon Awards' Lifetime Achievement Award for his trans-generational contributions to nation building through youth development was a fitting tribute to Cleophas just before he left us.
Cleophas Adderley made all of our lives a little richer, more bearable and more beautiful. We have been touched by his excellence and his exuberance. How fortunate that we were contemporaries of such an extraordinary talent and artist. His inspiration and legacy endure.

o frontporchguardian@gmail.com, www.bahamapundit.com.

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Surround yourself with winners

July 13, 2017

The advice given in today's title is really sound advice, either to you as an individual or to you as a leader of an organization, business or country. Yes indeed, it's most important to be surrounded by people of like mind, people who are positive in outlook and who buy into your vision of the future.
We've all heard the popular phrase, 'beware of the company you keep', which is so full of wisdom. There's another version of this phrase that I heard from a friend some years ago, as she told me that her father told her the following -- 'with whom you run, you become'. There's nothing worse than to be a really positive individual who has a series of lofty goals for the future, but who is surrounded by totally negative people who are very skeptical, and who jeer at you and laugh out loud when you articulate your dreams and goals to them.
So it's important for you to choose your friends extremely carefully, making absolutely sure that they are positive people who are on the same mental wavelength as you. These positive, upbeat friends will give you positive feedback and encouragement, which will assist you in becoming and remaining successful across the board.
Likewise in business, just like Richard Branson, chairman of the very successful Virgin Group of Companies, you need to build a competent team of very experienced winners to guide the business to success after success.
Yes, there's no doubt about it whatsoever, if you wish to be successful either as an individual or as leader of a business or other organization, you need to, as today's title simply puts it, surround yourself with winners -- positive visionaries who are very optimistic about the future and who will therefore assist in keeping you positive and focused on your goals.

o Think about it!
Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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