Nassau Guardian Stories

You're really rich

July 20, 2017

Now D. Paul, with the title of today's article, you're really rich, I just know you're not addressing your remarks to me, because I live in the poorer part of town with a single mother and we have great difficulty just making ends meet each week. Yes I'm poor, real poor, so your title quite definitely does not apply to me and my family.
Now I'm sorry to correct you, but I have to in order to educate you about the truth, the real truth about you. As today's title simply puts it, you're really rich -- yes you are. You're rich in unique and special talents that the Creator imbued you with at birth. Yes indeed, you're just like any other God-created child, got a whole lot of talents, which when discovered and fully developed will take you to anywhere you want to go -- to the top of the mountain, the summit of success.
Yes indeed, I don't care where you were born or where you presently live, you are rich in natural resources, which when you develop to their fullest and work real hard will take you anywhere you want to go. Just because you were born into ghetto-like conditions does not mean that you have to stay there for the rest of your life. You just need to reprogram yourself and start to develop your God-given talents and, believe me, you'll be extremely rich.
Yes my friend, if you get nothing else into your head today, please understand that as today's short title correctly puts it, you're really rich -- yes you are, for you have within you the makings of something really special. So get to work, believe in yourself, develop and refine your God-given talents and you will be rich. I guarantee it.

o Think about it!
Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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Your assignment: the restoration of relations between God and man

July 20, 2017

As we follow the words of Jesus and subsequently the words of the apostles, it becomes clear that we have been given as a part of our diplomatic assignment, the restoration of relations between God and man. God and sinners reconciled. This is a wonderful assignment, because reconciliations are normally cause for celebration and in this case the Bible actually tells us that there is celebration in heaven every time a sinner (one who is separated from God) is reconciled. In fact, the Bible says that the angels rejoice and heaven rejoices whenever this reconciliation takes place.
We are good news ambassadors with an assignment and mission to reunite mankind to its source. This mandate is clear as evidenced by the words of the scripture in 2 Corinthians 5. "Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation; old things have passed away; behold, all things have become new. Now all things are of God, who has reconciled us to Himself through Jesus Christ, and has given us the ministry of reconciliation, that is, that God was in Christ reconciling the world to Himself, not imputing their trespasses to them, and has committed to us the word of reconciliation. Now then, we are ambassadors for Christ, as though God were pleading through us: we implore you on Christ's behalf, be reconciled to God. For He made Him who knew no sin to be sin for us, that we might become the righteousness of God in Him."
When we look further at the words of Jesus we see that He backs up the assertion that we are ambassadors because He gave us specific representation assignments. He stated Himself, and through the Apostle Paul, that we have an assignment. He said to His followers, His disciples, His ambassadors, "go into all the world and preach the gospel of the Kingdom of God." The word gospel means good news, so He designated us as purveyors of good news, but not just any good news, the good news of the Kingdom of God; the good news of reconciliation. The good news of a new birth not based upon physical dynamics. There were many good news options, but He was very specific in saying the good news of the gospel of the Kingdom of God. He expected each of us to act as diplomats communicating this specific message from His government. He clearly stated that He had His own government that superseded the existing power structure of earth. He further stated that those who accepted and submitted to His government would be reconciled to God, and those who chose not to believe would remain separated or un-reconciled.
Looking at it from a diplomatic perspective, when He said to the disciples to go into all the world, it was actually a commissioning ceremony. For the previous three years He had been training them for this powerful assignment. When it was time for Him to depart He called, appointed and anointed (gave credentials to) His followers to represent the King of kings on earth. It is hard for the finite mind to conceive that God would come among men, demonstrate what life was supposed to be like originally, show off the attributes of God in a human body and then assign His specially trained diplomats the mission of communicating this wonderful truth to the world. This is truly an awesome concept, that ordinary men would be selected, chosen to represent the King on earth with a mission of communicating the good news of the gospel of the Kingdom and acting as agents of reconciliation. This may sound crazy, but if you examine the words of Jesus this is exactly what He said and this is exactly what the apostle Paul said.
Each of us has a choice in terms of what we do with His message. I choose to believe and have accepted my role as a good news ambassador, a Kingdom ambassador, a credentialed diplomat. I have accepted my identity and my assignment. This is important because it speaks to understanding your identity. Many Christians I have encountered over the years have no idea who they really are. Jesus commissioned us ambassadors, but we act like refugees.
Now that we have established who you are as a Kingdom citizen your outlook should change, your attitude should change and your behavior should change. Your identity is not a bottom of the barrel, end of the line person who is just content to have the privilege of survival. You are an official emissary who has the full backing of your government and you have a very clear assignment.
This is why Jesus states in the book of Matthew 5:14 -- "You are the light of the world. A city that is set on a hill cannot be hidden. Nor do they light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on a lamp stand, and it gives light to all who are in the house. Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works and glorify your Father in heaven." We are legal representatives who illuminate the attributes of our Kingdom, causing men to be drawn to our King and Kingdom. Until we die we are here to represent the Most High. We represent the values, morals and principles of our government (Kingdom) even in environments that do not share the same values.

o Pastor Dave Burrows is senior pastor at Bahamas Faith Ministries International. Feel free to email comments, whether you agree or disagree, to pastordaveburrows@hotmail.com. I appreciate your input and dialogue. We become better when we discuss, examine and exchange.

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Kissing is a sacred act

July 20, 2017

This article should be enjoyable to read and yet still be serious at the same time. It is about kissing. Over the years I've written several articles on the importance of kissing in romantic relationships. On July 21 Annick and I will have been kissing as married partners for 40 years. I still love to kiss her. Those tender lips are as soft now as they were the first time I kissed her. My first kiss was in 1975 on a cool Saturday night under a sugar apple tree near Lover's Leap in Mandeville, Jamaica. We were both students in college at the time.
Although it is imperative that romantic couples kiss, I want to remind those who are not seriously connected to someone, that kissing is a serious act of love and should not be taken lightly. This sacred act is being treated too lightly, and too many are getting messed up socially and sexually through the doorway of kissing. We are too free with kissing. We have become a cheap society of kissing fanatics.
I believe romantic kissing should be treated as something very sacred, special and exclusive. In spite of how good it feels, kissing does not reach its highest potential of volcanic ecstasy unless the brain cells have kissed first. Too many young people are engaging the body first before they engage their heads. This is the kind of behavior that can lead to acquaintance rape or date rape. More than 15 years ago, I wrote my first article on kissing. It was published in a university's student newspaper in Michigan. The response was overwhelming. Since it was a Christian campus, many teenagers and young adults appreciated my candid and frank discussion on the subject. One young lady thanked me for helping her to develop a healthy relationship with her boyfriend. We both shared the view that kissing is sacred and were encouraged to remain faithful to our standard.
More and more young people want to do the right thing. They want to preserve the most intimate expressions of love for a post-wedding experience. But too many of them stand before the fires of passion hoping not to get burned. They spend long hours kissing, rubbing up and turning up the heat. They do not want to have sex and get pregnant, but they tearfully express that it happened accidentally. That's not an accident. That's a deliberate, intentional set-up, when kissing-crazed individuals are allowing themselves to be held hostage by hormonal flow.
I am sure you are wondering whether or not I am saying couples should kiss before marriage. I believe Christian couples who are courting and preparing for marriage can, and should, kiss romantically before marriage. However, they should kiss in small dosages and limit the time and the frequency. The longer the kiss and greater the frequency, the higher the temperature rises on the passion thermostat. It is important that one does not kiss on the first, second, third, fourth, or fifth date. That's dangerous to the heart. It causes the emotional arteries to become clogged, blocking the reasoning and enhancing sexual seduction. Even non-Christians can mess up their choice of a permanent romantic or marriage partner by kissing too soon and too long before marriage.
Here are steps towards romantic kissing that I suggest should take at least three months to one year to cover. I have been sharing these steps for 30 years and still feel they are relevant today -- talk, play and talk, hold hands and talk, bond minds, link shoulders, hold heads, kiss in short, small dosages.
Steps one through four are the most important time of any relationship. This is the friendship period. You need time to become friends and to play and talk together. Remember, time is your best friend. This friendship period is not time for kissing because it will stifle growth in the relationship. The next steps are the romantic phase. It is during this time when those sacred words, I love you, will be solemnly expressed. It is a time when you like being around each other and look forward to seeing each other on a regular basis. You have blended your thoughts and ideas, and have definite plans for the relationship. The last step is the kissing stage. The relationship has matured enough to share yourself in this fashion. But you need to restrain yourself, realizing your own limitations and weaknesses. Romantic kissing before marriage is risky business if prescribed in large doses. It is one sure way of opening the floodgates of passion that can lead you to the painful point of no return. Restraint and control are the key words.

o Barrington H. Brennen is a marriage and family therapist and board certified clinical psychotherapist. Send your questions or comments to barringtonbrennen@gmail.com or write to P.O. Box CB-13019, Nassau, The Bahamas, or visit www.soencouragement.org or call 242-327-1980 or 242-477-4002.

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Sixth place finish for Higgs in swimming

July 20, 2017

The swimming portion of the 2017 Commonwealth Youth Games (CYG) began yesterday at the Betty Kelly-Kenning National Aquatics Centre, and just one Bahamian made a final.
A total of 20 athletes will represent the country in various swimming events over the course of the weekend -- eight of them competed on opening day -- and only Lilly Higgs qualified to compete in a final.
Higgs finished sixth overall in the girls 200 meters (m) breaststroke in 2:36.43. Eleanor Black, from England, won the gold in 2:31, Rae Rasmussen, from Australia, took the silver in 2:31.49, and Hanim Abrahams, from South Africa, was third in 2:32.32.
Higgs finished fourth in her morning heat in 2:37.37. Bahamian Katherine Slatter also competed in that heat and finished fifth in 3:00.59.
Brianna Nesbitt was able to win her 200m free heat in 2:20, but the time wasn't fast enough to qualify her for the final. Zoe McCarroll also competed in the girls 200m freestyle. She finished eighth in heat four in 2:18.56.
Izaak Bastian finished third in heat three of the boys 50m butterfly in 26.11 seconds. Devante Carey also competed in the boys 50 butterfly. He finished sixth in heat four in 26.24 seconds. Victoria Russell was the sole female representative in the girls 50m butterfly. She finished third in her heat in 28.93 seconds and was an alternate for the final.
Bastian was an alternate for the final in the boys 200m breaststroke. He finished fourth in his heat in 2.22.91. William Russell also competed in that heat and finished sixth in 2:28.32.
"We had a lot of the kids swim best times, so I think that was good. We told them coming into the competition that this was a higher level than the competition at CARIFTA," said Team Bahamas Head Coach Andy Knowles. "You can't really hold back at all in the morning, because there is no guarantee that you will make it to the evening swim. I think it was just an adjustment period. I think that this is the next level that the kids need to aim for. We have dominated CARIFTA for the last few years now, so we have to get them used to racing kids who are really fast.
"Today wasn't our strongest day, but I think we will be stronger on day two, especially in the 50 breast. Our goal will be to get as much swimmers as possible to advance to the second swim. We had one today and had like four or five come really close, so if we can get a couple in that we will be really good."
The swimming action continues today at the Betty Kelly-Kenning National Aquatics Centre, beginning at 10 a.m.
In tennis yesterday, Bahamian Donte Armbrister won his opening match in boys singles, 6-3 and 6-1, over Graham Mani Jr., of the Solomon Islands; and William Holowesko finished seventh in the boys timed trial in cycling in 12:26. Matthew Oliveira, of Bermuda, won the gold, finishing in 12:06, Dylan Hughes of Scotland was second, finishing in 12:18, and Sebastian Berwick of Australia won the bronze, finishing in 12:21.

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The Bahamas loses again in beach volleyball, but girls make quarters

July 20, 2017

The Bahamas' girls and both boys beach volleyball teams lost yesterday, but the country was able to salvage something as the girls survived a draw, allowing them to play in today's quarter-finals. Hence, they are still alive for a medal at these 6th Commonwealth Youth Games (CYG) here in Nassau, The Bahamas. Meanwhile, the best both boys teams could finish is ninth.
In the girls match, the Bahamian duo of Mechelle Moss and LaTavia Braynen battled hard, but fell to top seed Australia in straight sets, losing 21-8 and 21-15. They played much better on Wednesday than they did in their opening match against England in which they scored just 12 points.
"We're getting better. I feel great about our performance because we're making progress and you can see it," said Moss about their play so far at the CYG Bahamas 2017. The beach volleyball segment is ongoing over at the Malcolm Park Beach Soccer Facility at the foot of the Sir Sidney Poitier Bridge. This competition represents The Bahamas' first-ever experience in girls beach volleyball at this level, and the country's first-ever experience against major world powers in girls beach volleyball. Moss and partner Braynen are not fazed at all.
"I'm okay that we weren't successful with a victory because we really put our all into it. We tried our best. As we go along we get a lot better, and that's a good sign," said Moss.
Moss also excels in softball. The 17-year-old two-sport star said that she is just trying to suck up the entire experience of the Commonwealth Youth Games -- her first international exposure representing The Bahamas -- before she goes off to college in the fall. She'll be attending St. Augustine's College (SAC) in Raleigh, North Carolina.
"I'm still trying to soak up the whole experience of the Commonwealth Youth Games," said Moss. "I'm looking forward to everything that's attached to the games. It's been a great ride so far and hopefully it continues. We're into the quarter-finals, so we're just going to come out and give it our all."
The girls survived a draw among the cellar-dwelling teams and will play Scotland in their quarter-final match today. That match will be played at 10:30 a.m. this morning over at the Malcolm Park Beach Soccer Facility. The winner of that match will play the winner of the match between New Zealand and England in the semi-finals.
"We played much better today. Our execution was top of the line, and with a little more work, we'll be right there," said Braynen. "We believe that we could compete against anyone right now. We feel good with where we're at. We just have to serve more consistently, be more aggressive with blocking and attack a lil more."
The boys 'B' team of Aaron Springer and James Cleare lost both of their matches yesterday. They fell to Australia in their first match, 21-9 and 21-6, and lost to St. Lucia in their second match, 21-10 and 21-19. They will play Trinidad & Tobago in their next match, today at 12:10 p.m. The Bahamas' 'A' team of Nathan Wert and Kyle Wilson also lost yesterday. They fell to South Africa, 21-18 and 21-9, in just under 45 minutes. Wert and Wilson will play Jamaica in their next match at 11:20 a.m. today.
"The match was good at the beginning, but after being out in the hot sun, I think that we just got tired and wore down a bit," said Wert. "We really needed to win that game, and I'm upset that we didn't, but I'm happy with the effort. I'm looking forward to playing Jamaica. It should be a good match. We haven't played them before so it should be interesting. The plan remains the same -- to go out there and give it our best, and see how good we could do against them."
Wert and Wilson were right in that first set against South Africa yesterday, until faltering late. They were competitive again at the start of the second set, but lost 11 of the final 12 points to drop the match in straight sets.
"They used a lot of strategy against us and it worked out in their favor," said Wilson. "It was hard to attack them because of how they were serving, but we gave it our best and just came up short. The second set we were kind of fatigued, and also I think we got down on ourselves a bit for dropping a tough first set that we feel we should have won. We just need to stay calm and settle down a bit. Once we do that, we'll be alright. I know that we could do a lot better, and we will."
Both of The Bahamas' boys teams failed to make the quarter-finals. The best they could finish in this competition is ninth.
The CYG Bahamas 2017 continues today with seven of the nine sports on the docket. Also, the athletics portion of the game gets underway today. Over 1,000 athletes from 64 countries are competing in the CYG Bahamas 2017.

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Team Bahamas loses badly in rugby sevens drops three games

July 20, 2017

It was a tough experience for The Bahamas' junior boys national rugby sevens team yesterday, as that segment of the sixth edition of the Commonwealth Youth Games (CYG) got underway at the original Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium. The boys finished the day with a winless 0-3, suffering losses to Fiji, Samoa and England.
In the first game of the competition, Fiji knocked off The Bahamas quite easily, shutting them out 59-0. Fiji jumped out to an early lead in their game against The Bahamas and never looked back. They took a 33-0 advantage at the end of the first quarter. Fiji added to their lead quickly in the second quarter, scoring twice within the first five minutes of play.
The Bahamas' inexperience showed throughout. They struggled to advance the ball against Fiji's defense and appeared to be overwhelmed by the pace of the international game. Fiji went on to score 26 points in the second quarter to seal the deal against Team Bahamas.
Later in the day, The Bahamas suffered a lopsided 59-5 loss at the hands of Samoa.
The Samoan team held a commanding 31-0 lead at the end of the first quarter and outscored The Bahamas 28-5 in the second to claim their second victory of the day. Samoa took down England 19-7 in their opener.
In their final game of the day, Team Bahamas suffered a 72-0 shutout loss to England.
"After today, we just have to remain positive," said Kyle Charlton, Team Bahamas' assistant coach. "We're going up against some of the top-ranked clubs in the world and some of our players have been playing for just six months. My most experienced player has only been competing for two years now, so we just have to remain positive moving forward. We have to embrace the exposure that we are getting in these games and use it as motivation going forward. These losses will serve as motivation because no one likes to lose, especially at home. Although the competition will be tough throughout the remainder of the tournament, we just have to remain focused on the experience we're getting and improve."
Team Bahamas will be back in action again today. They'll take on Bermuda in their first game, which is set for 9:44 a.m., and then Sri Lanka at 12:30 p.m.
All rugby sevens games will be played at the original Thomas A. Robinson Stadium.

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Beach soccer losses for The Bahamas

July 20, 2017

A pair of goals in a 10-second span in the final third spelt doom for The Bahamas boys beach soccer team last night, as they fell to St. Lucia in their opening game of the 6th Commonwealth Youth Games (CYG) at the Malcolm Park Beach Soccer Facility.
The Bahamas had all the momentum early, dictated the pace for much of the game, but completely unraveled in the final stanza, surrendering three goals to St. Lucia - two from Hakeem Harrow, and the other from Sebastien Ribot. A goal kick from Team Bahamas' goalie Michael Butler ricocheted off Harrow and found itself in the back of the net. Just 10 seconds later, Harrow beat The Bahamas' defender and diverted a shot past Butler. It was all the cushion St. Lucia needed. The held off The Bahamas, 5-2.
"It was a hard fought game for us. We just fell short at the end," said Team Bahamas forward Phieron Wilson. "We made some simple mistakes, but we just have to come out here in the next game and fight harder. It was a battle today. Unfortunately we came up a bit short. We're going to go home, rest up for a bit, and come out stronger tomorrow. I believe in my team and I'm very confident that we will do well in the next game."
Wilson scored both goals for The Bahamas. He gave the country a 1-0 lead in the first stanza with a shot from about 20 feet out. His teammate swung at the ball and missed, and that was enough to distract the goalie from St. Lucia as the ball bounced past him for the first goal of the game. Later in the first, St. Lucia got on the scoreboard. They scored with four seconds remaining in the opening period to even the score at one.
Wilson again put The Bahamas in the second period. He found himself all alone with the St. Lucia goalie, and pushed a shot past him to give The Bahamas a 2-1 lead with 7:25 remaining in the period. Again that lead was short lived, as Ribot scored moments later for St. Lucia to even the score at two. He also scored the go ahead goal in the final period, and St. Lucia never looked back.
Team Bahamas will move on to play Antigua & Barbuda in its next game, tonight at 8 p.m. at the stadium. A win is crucial if the team plans on winning a medal in boys beach soccer action.
The Bahamas girls team also played yesterday, and were completely overwhelmed, losing to Jamaica, 15-2.
"We're a lil disappointed in ourselves, but we know that tomorrow is a new day, and what happened today will only make us stronger for tomorrow," said Team Bahamas striker Hannah Darville. "We're looking forward to the other games. Most of us are new to playing beach soccer, and it was our first international experience. We're looking forward to playing better, and hopefully advancing to the gold medal match."
The girls will play their next game against the Turks and Caicos Islands, at 6:45 p.m. this evening. Like the boys, a win is crucial if they plan on winning a medal.
This is the first time that The Bahamas is playing in beach soccer, in boys and girls action, at this level.
The CYG Bahamas 2017 continues today with seven of the nine sports on the docket. Over 1,000 athletes from 64 countries are competing in the CYG Bahamas 2017.

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Healthy Greene wants to win a medal for The Bahamas

July 20, 2017

The Bahamas will send an eight-member team to the Pan American U20 Athletics Championships, scheduled for July 21-23 in Trujillo, Peru.
The eight members of the team are: Females -- Brianne Bethel (100/200 meters), Daejha Moss (long jump/high jump), Serena Brown (discus/shot put), Laquell Harris (discus/shot put); and males -- Holland Martin (200 meters/long jump), Jyles Etienne (high jump), Kyle Alcine (high jump/long jump), and Tamar Greene (long jump/triple jump).
Bethel and Martin are from Grand Bahama, and the others hail from New Providence.
The Manager of the team is Laura Pratt-Charlton, the Head Coach is Patrick Adderley, the Assistant Coach/Chaperone is Ann Thompson, and the Medical Doctor is Dr. Charles Clarke.
Today, The Nassau Guardian sports section features jumper Tamar Greene. Here's his story:

'My Story'
My name is Tamar Greene. I'm a triple jumper and I compete in the under-20 boys division. I first surpassed the qualifying standard for the 2017 Pan American U20 Athletics Championships at the 2017 Bahamas National High School Championships, and by doing so also set a new high school meet record in the triple jump. At that moment I was really happy, because I would get the privilege to represent my country for the sixth time.
Reflecting on the 2017 CARIFTA Games, and coming off a gold medal at CARIFTA in the under-18 boys division in 2015, it boosted my confidence level. It got me in the mindset that I needed to be in. During the month of February I had an injury, I stained my left hamstring, and that put me out of action for the remainder of February leading into March. My confidence level went even higher because I was able to come back healthy a week before high school nationals, and the CARIFTA Games was right around the corner. During the time of my injury it was tough, because I had to work extra hard to get back in shape, and most importantly, I had to get in the right mindset for the remainder of the season.
Going into Pan Am U20, my goal is to compete to the best of my ability and to stay injury-free during the competition and, most importantly, bring home a medal. I would also like to send my best wishes to all of my teammates and to the other teams that will be representing The Bahamas this summer.

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CDC to celebrate 35

July 20, 2017

From a room in the home of then pastor Reverend Clementina Stubbs to the E.P. Roberts Primary School auditorium, and then the realization of a dream of being able to worship in a 1,000-seat edifice, the membership at Calvary Deliverance Church (CDC) has much to be thankful for as they prepare to celebrate their 35th anniversary.
The church, located at Malcolm Allotment, East Street South, which is now under the leadership of Bishop-elect James Newry and his wife, Elder Queenie Newry, will celebrate the milestone in the life of the church during its annual convention, July 23-27.
The convention's theme "Our Season of Recovery" was chosen as a way to reassure people of God's faithful promise to always stand by His children.
"It's an indication that nothing will be lost concerning your children, health, career, peace, marriages, finances, and family, for this is the year of recovery," said Newry, the church's third pastor. He was installed in January 2013.
"Despite the present situation and challenges being faced, in God's Word He reassures you to pursue that which seems to rage against you, for you shall without fail recover all. You ought not to be afraid, for the Lord thy God is with you. However, you must remain resilient in your pursuit to recover your families, communities, health and country. Without fail God's Word said you will recover it all."
Newry reminds his church members to always look at where God was able to bring them from, and to be thankful to Him for His favor in their lives.
Speaking during the conference will be Newry, Elder Byron Brown, Apostle Rodney Roberts, Bishop Moses Johnson, Dr. Sharon Rolle and Pastor Samuel Cornish.
Edison Sumner and Voices of Praise, Church of God of Prophecy Brass Band, Bishop Denczil Rolle & Friends, Shaback, Five Porches Choir, Church of God Mass Choir and Brass Band, Transformation Ministry Praise Team and Calvary Deliverance Church Fine Arts, Praise Team, Sanctuary and Youth Choir will perform during the celebration.
CDC was established on July 17, 1982 in the home of Rev. Stubbs before they moved to the E.P. Roberts Primary School auditorium on Lincoln Boulevard. At that time, the membership consisted of 20 adults.
In three years, and a church congregation that had grown exponentially, the land on which the edifice stands today was purchased, and on February 3, 1985 the church held a groundbreaking ceremony. That historic service was officiated by Rev. Stubbs, Bishop V.G. Clarke, the late Bishop W.M. Johnson, national overseer of the Church of God, the late Elder Bursil Brown, and the late Deacon Livingston Austin.
The building's foundation was erected October 25, 1985.
In December 1986, a thanksgiving service was held in the basement of the church that once housed the children's chapel and continued in that area, while the main edifice, which was then called the upper room, was under construction.
Early in 1990, the church's cornerstone was laid, completing another milestone in its history.
Bishop Clarke was appointed as pastor on June 26, 1993 and under his leadership the church experienced further growth. An extension was added to the church in November 1988 to host the administrative office and pre-school, CDC Academy, which began in August 1999.
A refurbished edifice was re-dedicated in September 2004 with expanded seating for 1,000; it also included a bookstore, conference rooms, a library and a lower chapel for children's service.
During the five days of celebration, tributes will be bestowed on a number of the church's members for the sacrifices they made in helping to get the ministry to where it is.
During the anniversary celebrations, worship services will be held at 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. on Sunday, July 23 and 7 p.m. nightly, Monday, July 24 through Thursday, July 27.

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NHI should not be a one-size-fits-all model, says Sands

July 20, 2017

The model for National Health Insurance (NHI) should not be a one-size-fits-all model, Minister of Health Dr. Duane Sands said yesterday, adding that the debate on what NHI should become has "missed the mark".
Sands compared healthcare to the varying classes on an airplane, suggesting that those with the means to afford the creature comforts of the most expensive kinds of health services (first class) should be on a separate tier than those who may have to choose business class or coach.
"This is the model of healthcare we need to deliver - if you can afford creature comforts, if you can afford amenities, there is no reason you should not get it," he said.
Sands explained the principle of universal health coverage like this: "Ensuring that all people have access to needed promotive, preventative, curative and rehabilitative health services of sufficient quality to be effective, while also ensuring that people do not suffer financial hardship and pain for these services, is the
definition of universal health coverage."
He insisted that a healthy population is essential for sustainable development and said data shows an extra year of life expectancy can lead to growth in gross domestic product (GDP).
Sands said given The Bahamas' unique health profile, in which chronic non-communicable disease is a big factor in the morbidity of Bahamians, a "Bahamian solution" to NHI has to be found that will be the most effective system to service the needs of locals. He said Bahamians have for too long used research and data from other countries to make decisions about our own.
"We have not adequately invested in healthcare research and development to answer uniquely Bahamian questions," Sands said. "We have relied on extrapolating data from the first world."
Besides this, the physical plant of the public health care system has not been updated and upgraded in a lot of instances, and Sands said the country has done away with its "retrogressive approach to rating high risk, or older persons, or people with pre-existing conditions".
"We have not dealt effectively with inefficiency, waste and abuse in our public healthcare system," he said.
"We have ignored calls to manage and account for the hospital and public health accounts of most individuals.
"We have not equipped or supplied our facilities with the support services and materials needed in a modern healthcare environment. Our record keeping is outmoded, our information management systems are obsolete, and we have refused to tap legal means of funding to build local capacity.
"We have refused to deal with those people who have at best not provided value to our healthcare system and, at worst, are guilty of extorting limited funds from the national coffers by inadequate productivity or unreasonable charges."
Sands said the private sector will have to partner with the government to produce the new iteration of NHI.

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Aliv wants smart medicine push

July 20, 2017

The country's newest mobile service provider is eying the health services sector by toying with the idea of "smart medicine". Healthcare, Chief Aliv Officer Damian Blackburn joked, is in Aliv's DNA.
Blackburn, speaking at the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce and Employer's Confederation's "power breakfast" yesterday, said Aliv wants to have healthcare professionals practicing smart medicine, using their smartphones and Aliv's twin LTE networks.
He added that the idea of smart medicine was reawakened in his mind after Prime Minister Dr. Hubert Minnis spoke of his goal of expanding telemedicine in the country.
"I did listen intently last week at the global symposium... central to his theme was what his government was looking to do around communication, which was telemedicine," Blackburn said.
"Absolutely we at Aliv stand ready to help the government with its agenda in telemedicine, but we do hope to change the agenda a little, we'd like to move it on to smart medicine... so, medicine from the smartphone.
"Nothing would make me more delighted than to see The Bahamas in five years time using the smartphone to its fullest capabilities from a medical angle. There are a lot of apps being developed right now for smartphone use that really are about preventative medicine, rather than reactive medicine."
Blackburn said his mother, as well as the mother of Aliv's chief financial officer, were both nurses. It was therefore easy for them both to decide that Aliv should help to advance a digital platform that would help nurses and doctors do their jobs.
"Nothing would delight me more than to see this generation of nurses not running around like I used to see my mother doing... reacting like I used to see my mother doing, reacting to medical problems," said Blackburn.
"I hope to see the medical professionals in the future, starting here in The Bahamas, using the full capabilities of smartphones with their patients to monitor and prevent things before they happen."
Blackburn ensured the room at the power breakfast that his company has already built two "next generation LTE" networks that are already primed for telemedicine and smart medicine.
Minister of Health Dr. Duane Sands said The Bahamas has to move forward with technology advances.
"We have got to use the technology available in the world today in order to deliver all of these things to all of these people from Inagua to Abaco," he said.

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D'Aguilar: Not much we can do about cost to enter the country

July 20, 2017

There may be nothing The Bahamas can do about the expensive nature of flights into the country in the near- to medium-term, Minister of Tourism Dionisio D'Aguilar told Guardian Business yesterday. Meanwhile, this country's competitors, whose flight prices are only $8 less in some cases, are seeing their tourism products boom.
A quick check of flight comparison website Kayak.com showed a flight from New York to Kingston, Jamaica at $531, while a flight from New York to Nassau during the same time period was selling for $523 (prices quoted were different airlines). However, the distance disparity between this country and Jamaica is 520 miles. It is quicker and shorter to get to Nassau than to Kingston.
Last year Jamaica saw its tourism numbers grow almost six percent over the previous year. Air arrivals to New Providence last year grew less than one percent over the previous year, according to tourism statistics.
Statistics have shown that The Bahamas' tourism product has not grown in 20 years and has been "stagnant because the value for money has eroded", according to a tourism expert.
And costs continue to go up as the Nassau Airport Development Company seeks to increase its fees by the end of the year.
D'Aguilar explained that: "If you're flying, we have built into our ticket prices all of the charges associated with entering the United States from The Bahamas."
These kinds of charges, he said, will be difficult to write off if The Bahamas is interested in decreasing the costs to passengers entering and leaving the country.
"I don't want to be flippant to the fact... we are very mindful of the charges involved," he said. "Yes, it is a substantial number."
Though D'Aguilar considers this country's fees "substantial", he said as a Caribbean destination "we are very competitive".
A tourism expert told Guardian Business recently that this country has "eroded its most significant advantage" -- its proximity to the United States -- by being one of the most expensive destinations in the region to get to.
The expert, who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the nature of his job, told this paper that The Bahamas has the largest potential for tourism development in the region, but lamented that the archipelago has damaged its brand with high taxes and fees.
"The U.S. is the biggest economy in the world, which technically allows us to charge a lot more money for our products compared to people elsewhere, because people look at these vacations in terms of what the total cost is, not just simply what the room rate is or the all-inclusive rate," he said.
"Because of our location we should have absolutely the lowest cost to get from the United States to The Bahamas."

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Centreville residents express concerns during town hall meeting

July 20, 2017

Centreville constituents expressed concerns about the state of the economy and a possible credit rating downgrade during a recent town hall meeting hosted by Member of Parliament for Centreville Reece Chipman.
The more than 200 people who attended the town hall meeting were very much interested in understanding how they can better control their finances.
Chipman said that for his constituents, who for the most part represent a class of people struggling to make ends meet, the state of the economy means they will have to struggle to find jobs and put food on he table.
"They understand that they need to save once they get an opportunity to work," Chipman said. "A lot of them actually asked for more discussion as we move forward on finances, money, business and opportunity."
Chipman said he wanted to conduct an economic discussion that talked about issues from their perspective.
"We wanted it to be an economic discussion from their eyes, because to them the economy means 'am I able to afford my next meal', in some cases the economy means 'am I going to be able to find a job next week', the economy means 'do I have enough education to even go out there and get a job', so we were just trying to tie in all the ventricles at this point," he said.
The town hall meeting also addressed issues such as drainage, street lights, contractual workers, environment, mosquitoes and water pumps. Special projects such as "True Colors", dental, eye and music programs and the MP special award program for students, were also discussed.
"Many constituents were concerned about garbage collection, small business assistance, regularization of employment and national status, job opportunities and GED or continuing education," a press release on the event said.
"There was also a discussion on the Urban Renewal home repairs and summer programs. Constituents were informed of the many facilities in the area that should be committed to community development."
Former member of Parliament for the constituency and former Prime Minister Perry Christie was widely criticized for not doing enough for his constituents during his terms in office.

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'Service excellence trumps everything else', Bahamahost graduates told

July 20, 2017

FREEPORT, Grand Bahama - Bahamahost held a graduation ceremony for 415 persons from Bahamas Immigration, Treasure Bay Casino, public service drivers, Bishop Michael Eldon High School, Sunland Baptist Academy, Grand Bahama Academy, Pineforest Academy, Jack Hayward High School and St. Georges High School at Calvary Temple on July 18.
The guest speaker for the event was Parliamentary Secretary in the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation Travis Robinson. Also in attendance were Parliamentary Secretary for Information and Communication in the Office of the Prime Minister, Pakesia Parker-Edgecombe; Rev. Frederick McAlpine, member of Parliament for the Pineridge constituency; Director of Tourism for Grand Bahama Betty Bethel, and other tourism officials.
Robinson said a country that was number one in tourism should not be "reclaiming our culture of service excellence" as the theme of the graduation stated, but instead should be moving forward. He said with the large number of graduates, he was hopeful as more people are understanding the importance of the product.
"We need to master what we have, and that's customer service."
He continued, "When we think about the countries in the Caribbean, Jamaica and all of the likes, they have sun, sand and sea just like we do, and we celebrate that. Yes, we have some of the most beautiful beaches in the world. And we talk about that everywhere we go. What is it that separates us from all of the other countries around the world that call themselves tourist destinations? Ladies and gentlemen, graduates, it is our hospitality. The way we greet and interact with our visitors on a daily basis."
The parliamentary secretary explained that the ministry will take an aggressive approach to educate the population that tourism is serious business, as seventy cents from every dollar that we spend comes from it.
Director of Tourism for Grand Bahama Betty Bethel spoke to the graduates about the importance of what she described as the foundational principles of any culture: honesty, integrity and pride.
"As you all know, our destination is in a state of emergency and you would also know that our government is working feverishly to turn it around. The role you will play when our destination has been fully restored again, as a vibrant center for tourism, will be to activate everything that you have learned recently in Bahamahost training, combined with the fundamental skills and attributes that speak to honesty, integrity and pride - the values that industry leaders look for first in all persons vying to be in our tourism sector.
Bethel encouraged the graduates to be honest with themselves when deciding a career in the tourism industry. "It is a selfless act when a desire to provide service excellence trumps everything else. If this is not you, then you do not belong in the service industry. And this is where honesty comes in. Please be honest with yourselves when choosing or continuing a career in the tourism industry."
She congratulated the graduates on their accomplishment and added that it comes at a time when all equipped, skilled and dedicated people in the tourism industry are needed in Grand Bahama.

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Hyperbole from a former MP

July 20, 2017

Police said they were investigating a report of theft of electronic items on the night of the May 10 general election at the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation (BAIC). The corporation's then chairman, Dion Smith, the former Nassau Village MP for the Progressive Liberal Party (PLP), was arrested, held overnight and released the next day. Eight BAIC employees were also questioned and released.
Last week Assistant Commissioner Paul Rolle, who heads the Anti-Corruption Unit, said Smith was cleared in relation to the investigation.
"The stuff removed was apparently his (Smith's). Persons thought different. We found out it is not so; so in relation to this there was no evidence of any wrongdoing," he said in an interview with this newspaper.
There was a concern that something illegal happened. Police investigated, took people into custody and released them. Police determined no wrongdoing occurred. Police publicly said the matter is concluded.
In this case it appears as if our system worked and that it was reasonable toward those questioned.
Smith thinks otherwise. He said yesterday he is "afraid" of what the Minnis administration will do next.
"I am afraid in my own country," he said in an interview with The Nassau Guardian.
"I am wondering if I should go to the U.S. and seek some asylum."
Smith added that the ordeal greatly impacted his family.
"I am afraid of what they are going to do next," he said.
"I have never seen any other country treat people the way in which they (the FNM) are treating people.
"I have a family, and if this is what politics is all about, I am not interested.
"I love my family more than anything else."
In democratic countries around the world, citizens, be they politicians or not, are questioned by police in relation to complaints and investigations. It happens dozens of times each day in The Bahamas. Smith is an attorney. He knows this.
It would have been an abuse if police detained him just to harass him. It would have been an abuse if they charged him and there was no evidence to support the claim. These things didn't happen. Smith exaggerated with the asylum remark in his interview.
The PLP has accused the governing Free National Movement (FNM) of engaging in a witch hunt against its members. Kenred Dorsett, the former environment and housing minister, was charged with bribery, extortion and abuse of public office. Former St. Thomas More MP Frank Smith was arrested yesterday in connection with an extortion and fraud by false pretenses investigation.
We have laws in The Bahamas. We have independent courts. The commissioner of police, who holds a constitutionally protected office, leads the police force. He is the one who directs what happens based on the law. If the police think there is evidence of wrongdoing, they have the power to charge with most offenses. There are just a few matters that require the consent of the attorney general.
If charges are uttered, magistrates or juries decide innocence or guilt after a trial. Magistrates and judges determine sentences in cases of conviction.
Politicians are citizens just like everyone else. If there are questions about their conduct in public office police should investigate. It should not be perceived as a big deal if a sitting or former MP has to answer questions. Regular Bahamians do it all the time.
Smith need not seek asylum. As far as we know, no one is trying to do anything to him for political reasons.

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Fred Mitchell's campaign for PLP leadership has begun in earnest

July 20, 2017

Dear Editor,

The Progressive Liberal Party (PLP) will be holding a convention this year in order to elect a substantive leader, deputy leader and chairman. The MP for Cat Island, Rum Cay and San Salvador, Philip "Brave" Davis, is the interim leader. Bradley Roberts is chairman. The latter has stated that he will not seek reelection for the chairmanship post. It is a given that Davis desires to be the substantive PLP leader. That is a post he has coveted, even during the tenure of former PLP Leader Perry Christie. Christie's position as leader of that party was nothing short of impregnable, as the thumping of Alfred Sears in the PLP leadership contest this past January at convention aptly demonstrated. Well over 1,250 stalwart councilors voted in favor of Christie, while Sears got just under 170 votes. I believe Davis has refused to pile on criticism for his former leader in order to pander to the 1,200 plus stalwart councilors who are still loyal to Christie. In order to achieve his goal of becoming leader, he mustn't anger this important voting bloc. If Davis becomes the substantive leader of the PLP, he would be one election win away from achieving his ultimate goal -- becoming prime minister.
With The Bahamas still steeped in an anti-Christie mood, Davis runs the risk of further angering the Bahamian people who overwhelmingly rejected Christie on May 10 when he panders to the rabid PLP base. It is a very sensitive balancing act he is currently engaged in. I hope the Davis faction of the PLP recognizes that their path to victory at convention will not be a cakewalk. That is because Davis might be facing a formidable challenger in Senator Fred Mitchell. The actions of Mitchell over the past two months are glaring indications that he intends to run for the PLP top post. Mitchell also wants to be prime minister. Davis giving him a Senate seat has afforded Mitchell an influential platform he otherwise would not have. Mitchell has traveled to Exuma, Long Island, Grand Bahama, Bermuda and Florida over the past several weeks. He has spoken to many PLP operatives during his stops to the aforementioned Family Islands. He has also been very active on his Facebook pages Bahamasuncensored and Fred Mitchell-Minute By Minute. The latter is his way of keeping in contact with average PLPs. Mitchell uses his Facebook forums to launch incessant attacks against the Free National Movement, some of which are downright petty.
Mitchell has also been visible in the media. This is his shrewd way of remaining relevant. He is evidently consolidating his base within the PLP. He is more articulate than Davis. He can speak extemporaneously. He has also pandered to the rabid PLP base by refusing to publicly criticize Christie. Like Davis, Mitchell is determined not to anger the 1,200 plus stalwart councilors who supported Christie in January. Frankly, the only two advantages Davis has over Mitchell are funding and position. As the interim PLP leader, this must be seen as a head start for Davis. But with many PLPs already expressing deep dissatisfaction in Davis' performance thus far, Mitchell becoming PLP leader isn't out of the realm of possibility. Mitchell perhaps senses this deep discontent within the party. That may explain his subtle leadership campaign. Mitchell knows that Davis is in a very vulnerable dilemma. He knows Davis is no way near as invincible as Christie. He knows that Davis can be beaten. While he hasn't officially or otherwise announced his bid for the PLP leadership post at convention, I am of the view that his campaign for the post has nonetheless begun in earnest. With the PLP being at rock bottom, this might be the only opportunity that Mitchell will ever have to become leader.

- Kevin Evans

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Legalizing marijuana can reduce crime

July 20, 2017

Dear Editor,

Parents, guardians, siblings, cousins, aunties, uncles and friends mourn today because of the non-stop shooting deaths in New Providence. The cycle is all too familiar.
Young Bahamian men are having their breath removed from their bodies because of violence and are becoming statistic after statistic; young men with unfulfilled dreams will soon be forgotten by the general public.
When will this carnage end? When did it begin? Does anyone have the answer?
The pain of losing a loved one in this manner leaves a stinging sensation on one's psyche, because in most cases it is totally unexpected. Additionally, the reasoning behind a lot of these deaths may seem silly to the general public, but the streets operate under a different code.
One of the major reasons, in my view, why crime, particularly murder, is so high in The Bahamas is because of the marijuana drug trade in the country. A lot of crime can be linked to some drug deal gone bad, some gun that was stolen, someone "running tape", and various other reasons. The complicit nature of Bahamian society and the lack of political will of successive governments has not helped the situation at all.
In 2011 The Bahamas saw 127 murders, which included name brand figures known to police, one of them nicknamed 'the Emperor'. If you check the records, a lot of these men had some connection to the drug trade. A lot of these victims were involved in serious crime before their untimely demise.
I have never used marijuana in my life, but I have read about and seen first hand some of its positive and negative attributes. From my vantage point, its use does not seem to be anywhere as dangerous as that of alcohol, a legal substance in The Bahamas.
The police have done a yeoman's job in terms of making historic drug arrests, and they probably arrest hundreds of people annually. But at what cost? Have we ever considered the folly in arresting someone for a natural drug that is used to heal people and ease their pain?
The illegality of marijuana is one of the best examples of a sovereign nation such as The Bahamas continuing to follow a 1980's worldview. Remember the War on Drugs lead by Nancy Reagan? If we did some research we would see what a hoax this was.
When will we conduct a study to determine the effects the illegal marijuana drug trade has on crime and murder in The Bahamas? When will we seriously look at the benefits of legalizing this trade?
I know it sounds crazy to some, but if you legalize marijuana in The Bahamas you would probably eliminate a criminal subculture within months. The dangers of drug traffickers travelling overseas to import this herb would be a thing of the past. There would be no need for these criminals to arm themselves with high-powered rifles to protect their contraband, their street ratings and credibility. Users would be able to walk into a government-regulated store and purchase the desired amount of weed legally. Of course, some rules would have to be set regarding quantities that can be purchased.
Drug dealers are very territorial and they command a certain respect on the streets. When certain lines are crossed, and they often are, the only answer thought of is violence.
The number of murdered people in The Bahamas so far in 2017 is now in the mid 70s. At this rate, we will record over 130 murders for this year. We are losing too many of our young men to violence, which stems either directly or indirectly from the marijuana drug trade.
Road blocks, saturation patrols and good investigative techniques will catch a few criminals, but it will not stem the violence because it does not address the root causes of the problem.
Despite the best efforts of law enforcement, people from all walks of life are getting high in The Bahamas every day, and in some cases all day. And it appears that supply is never an issue.
I think legalizing marijuana in The Bahamas will help to save many of our young Bahamian men from murder, because it will normalize a lot of the leading criminal elements in the country who arm themselves and their soldiers to protect their contraband and their reputations.

- Dehavilland Moss

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The companion virtues of gratitude and generosity

July 20, 2017

"Blow, blow, thou winter wind, / Thou art not so unkind / As man's ingratitude."
- William Shakespeare

There is a nexus between generosity and gratitude. They are companion virtues. The most grateful people in the world are typically the most generous people. The most chronically selfish and self-absorbed typically live in a dungeon of ingratitude.
Selfishness is typically its own hell. The more selfish one is the more one gorges on the object of the selfishness, incapable of being satiated, always wanting more to fill a chasm that will continually run dry.
The selfish see the needs and wants of others but ignore them. The self-absorbed are so blind that they regularly do not even see the needs and wants of others. We are all imprisoned to some degree in these cul-de-sacs. Gratitude and generosity are antidotes to both casts of mind and heart.
Mohandas Gandhi often advised that gratitude and generosity help break the spells of self-absorption and selfishness. He said that when he became obsessed with his own problems or gave in to self-pity, he would reach out to someone else in need or to the least fortunate in a community.
Such extension beyond himself gave him a greater sense of peace. His problems tended to loom less large and less important. Gandhi had little time for self-pity, especially by those who were more fortunate than others.
Self-pity is like a wound or sore that one incessantly picks at, making healing and new life impossible. A sense of gratitude -- especially amidst the difficulties of life -- and a heart of gratitude are balms that help cure the self-pity which we all sometimes indulge in and even enjoy.
In 1884 former California governor and railroad magnate Leland Stanford and his wife, Jane Lathrop Stanford, lost their son Leland Jr. to typhoid. He was their only child.
Consumed by grief but grateful for their son's short life, they agreed a memorial for him. The memorial was a university to which they deeded a considerable fortune, including an 8,180-acre stock farm in Palo Alto, California.
The farm became the campus for a research university to be named the Leland Stanford Junior University. Today we know the institution as Stanford University, though it legally retains its original name.

Pay it forward
Stanford's endowment is now approximately $22 billion. It has produced many noted graduates and 63 Nobel laureates. Generosity or "paying it forward" most often blooms in ways we do not expect.
Here at home and around the world those struck by grief after the loss of a child, spouse or parent often memorialize their loved ones through a scholarship, donation or the creation of an organization for a designated purpose.
Many of those who create such memorials or tributes do so out of gratitude for the life of the individual they have lost. The deep sense of gratitude issues forth in a generous spirit.
Veterans who have lost limbs in war or survive harrowing experiences often have a renewed sense of gratitude for life in general, and for family and friends. Intense gratitude often inspires extraordinary generosity.
The same is true for many who have survived or are living with certain diseases, from cancer to HIV/AIDS. Many who have experienced life-altering accidents or the trauma of divorce or some other event, renew their spirits from the wellsprings of gratitude and generosity.
The hymn Amazing Grace was written by John Newton, a slave trader saved from death during a violent storm at sea. The song was a plea for mercy and written in thanksgiving. But it would still take some years and more conversion before Newton gave up slave trading.
The hymn is an expression of gratitude to God. Two of the stanzas from the iconic hymn comprise a complete prayer of gratitude:
"Amazing Grace, how sweet the sound,
That saved a wretch like me. ...
I once was lost but now am found,
Was blind, but now, I see. ...
"Through many dangers, toils and snares...
we have already come.
T'was Grace that brought us safe thus far...
and Grace will lead us home."
In gratitude for surviving a monster storm Newton's new life became one of greater generosity and rectitude.

Thankless
Too often, many of those afforded considerable privilege in life show little to no gratitude. They believe that they are entitled to what they have received in terms of financial or other privilege, though they have not worked for what they have been generously bequeathed by their parents or grandparents or benefactors.
One of the worst degrees of human ingratitude is that shown a parent by an ungrateful and selfish child. In Shakespeare's "King Lear", Lear seethes: "How sharper than a serpent's tooth it is/ To have a thankless child."
It is often alarming how commonplace it is in families to see how two children respond quite differently to parental generosity. One child may show enormous gratitude while the other becomes a poster child for ingratitude.
Generosity and gratitude are virtues of empathy. They remove our blinders, our scotosis, our navel-gazing. The companions lift our eyes and our hearts to a broader horizon and to our neighbor. The conceit of privilege and self-absorption typically blinds us to the needs of others.
The story was told in this column some time ago of a 40-something, bejeweled, well-dressed woman driving a new luxury SUV, who pulled into a clearly marked handicapped-reserved parking space at a popular grocery store in western New Providence. She perfumed the air with her sense of entitlement and self-importance.
After a few well-practiced stilettoed steps into the entrance of the store, she was intercepted by a male store employee who politely informed her that she could not park in the reserved space. Seemingly afraid to challenge her, he told her that another female customer had complained.
The driver of the SUV flew into a rage. She loudly demanded how anyone dare complain about where she parked. She threatened to tell the other woman about, euphemistically, her derriere. Given the level of outrage, it seemed that the parking spot was reserved exclusively for the SUV driver.
Several days later this same lady pulled into an adjacent handicapped-reserved parking space at the very same store. As she alighted from her vehicle an attitude-cum-tune was in the air: "I'm more important than you and this SUV tell me it's true. When I drive along the avenue I deserve more privilege than you."
Not only had this lady not learned her lesson from a few months ago, she was broadcasting an object lesson about a lack of empathy and generosity. It is highly likely that this same lady would not be a generous individual.
Understanding the equation between generosity and gratitude is like studying a perpetual physics challenge or cosmological mystery or puzzle.
One knows the contours of the equation or the mystery but one never fully understands all of its dimensions. Yet one is awed by the various phenomenon produced by the equation.
At a recent Church of God conference in The Bahamas, one of the speakers told this story: "There is a story told of a little Bahamian girl around the age of seven. Her mother saw her daughter with two juicy ripe mangos in her hand. The mother asked for one of the mangos.
"The little girl bit into one mango. Then she bit into the other mango. Disappointed and saddened that she had failed to teach her daughter about generosity and sharing, the mother asked her daughter, 'Why did you bite into both mangos?'
"The girl replied, 'I wanted to see which one was sweeter Mommy, so I could give you that mango.' The girl then proceeded to give her mother the sweeter mango."
The nexus of gratitude and generosity is all around us and, if we allow, within us all.

o frontporchguardian@gmail.com, www.bahamapundit.com.

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Frank Smith arrested

July 20, 2017

Former Progressive Liberal Party (PLP) Senator and Chairman of the Public Hospitals Authority (PHA) Frank Smith was arrested and questioned by police for nearly six hours in relation to allegations of extortion and fraud by false pretenses yesterday, according to his attorney Damian Gomez.
Gomez, the former minister of state for legal affairs, said Smith, who denies the allegations, would be held in police custody overnight at a police station.
The Nassau Guardian spoke with Gomez shortly after police had concluded questioning Smith at the Central Detective Unit (CDU).
Gomez said he and Smith arranged to meet with officers at CDU on Tuesday but came in at about 10 a.m. yesterday.
He said present during the questioning was an officer from the newly-established Anti-Corruption Unit.
When asked if Smith will be charged in court, Gomez said, "I assume they do because they are holding him overnight.
"If they see the evidence they may well change their minds. I will give them that information tomorrow morning."
Gomez said he and the police have agreed to meet at 10 a.m. today where "we will present them with the documentary evidence that we have which we say exonerates him".
"He should be released. I don't think this should go any further," Gomez said.
When asked if the allegations were in relation to Smith's time as chairman of the PHA, Gomez said, "In a sense, yes. This is really someone getting up and deciding to injure."
Gomez said he intends to commence "civil suits against" Smith's accusers.
Gomez said Smith was calm while in custody.
Philip McKenzie also represents Smith.
Smith, a former vice chairman of the Progressive Liberal Party (PLP), is a certified public accountant and served as the member of Parliament for the St. Thomas More constituency from 2007 to 2012.
He lost his nomination bid to run for the PLP in the Free Town constituency in the 2017 general election. The party nominated Wayne Munroe, QC, who lost to the Free National Movement's Dionisio D'Aguilar.

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