Education

Prime Minister Christie at the opening of The First Educational Conference

February 23, 2017

It is an honour and privilege to have been invited to speak to this illustrious body, the Bahamas Union of Teachers which is celebrating its 70th year as a Trade Union in The Bahamas. Our history records the impact of the Bahamas Union of Teachers in in the achievement of many milestones...

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LCIS Hosts Inaugural Invitational Swim Meet
LCIS Hosts Inaugural Invitational Swim Meet

February 23, 2017

Lyford Cay International School (LCIS) hosted its inaugural Invitational Swim Meet at the Betty Kelly-Kenning Aquatic Centre on Saturday 18 January 2017. 287 young athletes participated in more than 50 races that included all four competitive strokes - freestyle, backstroke, breastroke and butterfly...

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New Library and Technology Lab Opened at Sandilands Primary School

February 22, 2017

Education, Science and Technology Minister the Hon. Jerome Fitzgerald touted the success of the public-private partnership with Mission: Educate Bahamas/Aetos Holdings Limited that has resulted in the opening of a new state-of-the-art computer lab and library for Sandilands Primary School...

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Cosmetology Students Volunteer at Senior Citizen's Home

February 22, 2017

Pat’s Senior Citizens Home was a flurry of excitement recently, as residents got a beauty treat from Cosmetology students of the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI)...

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UB Progressing with Major Initiatives

February 22, 2017

Accreditation, capital works, and new academic programmes are among the major initiatives occurring at the University of The Bahamas...

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February 20, 2017

Deadline for entries to the third edition of the BAAA’s High School Relays Test Event 2017, scheduled for Saturday, 18 March and Sunday, 19th March 2017 at the Thomas A. Robinson National Stadium, is fast approaching...

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Lakia Rolle: Failure is not an option

February 19, 2017

Failure is only the direct result of not applying hard work and choosing to maximize your potential, according to Queen's College senior Lakia Rolle.
The 17-year-old was recently awarded the Paul L. Adderley Award for the best Bahamas General Certificate of Secondary Education (BGCSE) overall performance in The Commonwealth of The Bahamas in 2016; and the Carol Hanna Award for best overall performance for independent schools.
Rolle sat 12 senior national examinations as an 11th grade student. She earned 11 A grades and one C grade.
For her efforts, she also received a check, a laptop and a plaque.
"You should never give up," said Rolle. "Failure is not an option, and it only happens when you give up. You only fail when you don't try, so never give up. You have to realize that the sky is not the limit -- there are footprints on the moon," she said.
Rolle was announced as the top student of the national examinations at the 24th annual national awards presentation, held on Monday, February 13 at the William Johnson Auditorium, Church of God Convention Centre, Joe Farrington Road.
"I am so elated and overjoyed to know that all of my hard work has paid off," she said. "There has been a standard set at Queen's College where you can't help but to want to not only achieve what those that came before you have achieved, but supersede those accomplishments. I remember being as young as eighth grade, and I remember aspiring to wanting to be the top in the country. I wanted to defy the odds, so my sights were always set on being the top student," she said.
The QC student boasts a 3.75 cumulative grade point average (GPA).
With her national examinations squared away, she's focused on doing her best in the five AP courses she's enrolled in for her final year; they are psychology, human geography, English literature and composition, Spanish language and culture and calculus.
Rolle sat the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) last year and scored a 1,560. She wants to better that score this year.
"I want to better it, because I realize how competitive it is as it relates to scholarships and even being accepted into schools, and I really want to further my education."
The teen has her sights set on studying biology and international business.
"Growing up I never imagined myself doing anything else besides being a doctor. I like to serve people and feel that serving people through that means will give me the utmost joy. And as it relates to international business, I also love being a delegate for change, and using who I am to help my country, and I feel that being able to pursue that degree would afford me the opportunity to better my country," she said.
She has cast her net far and wide, applying to 10 colleges. She refused to fall victim to the problem of only applying to one or two schools and not getting into any.
"I decided early on that I wanted to keep my options open and made sure that all of the schools I applied to had a great science program, and a great business program, so that even if I decided to switch my major I would be able to transition into what would be comfortable for me," she said.
Rolle is also applying for scholarships wherever she can to ensure that she has the means to afford higher education. She credits her parents, Lionel and Marvia Rolle, for instilling excellence in education in her. When she thinks about all they've done for her, she said, she always gets emotional.
"I realize the sacrifices they've had to make to get me to where I am today. They have also instilled morals -- both Christian and civic in me that I know I will take throughout my life," said Rolle.
The academic achiever also manages to balance a heavy extracurricular activity schedule that has her involved in Junior Achievement; female empowerment club The Queen in Me; and the school's basketball and soccer teams. She is also president of the Christian Youth Movement at her church.
"I'm definitely heavily involved and busy, but for me it's all about balance, maximizing my potential and realizing that I'm only in high school for a little while, and I have to make an impact on not only myself, but the people around me."
Candis Petty, a graduate of C.R. Walker Senior School, who now attends the University of The Bahamas was the recipient of the Majorie Davis Award for best overall performance in the 2016 BGCSE examinations for government schools. She earned eight A grades, two B grades and two C grades.
Carmetta Barry, who last year was a student at H.O. Nash Junior School, was named the candidate with the overall best Bahamas Junior Certificate (BJC) results for government schools. She also received the best BJC results in The Bahamas for 2016. She received eight A grades and two B grades.
Bahamas Academy's Jodi Garcia was named the 2016 independent school candidate with the best BJC overall results. She earned eight A grades.
Luke Knowles, of Long Island's N.G.M. Major School, was the government school male candidate with overall best BJC results for 2016. He earned seven A grades and two B grades.
While individual honors were meted out at the award ceremony, a number of schools were recognized for excellent results in the BJC and BGCSE by their overall student body, including St. Augustine's College, Queen's College, H.O. Nash, Forest Heights Academy, C.H. Reeves and D.W. Davis.
As students were rewarded for excellence in national examinations, Minister of Education, Science and Technology Jerome Fitzgerald urged educators and students to remain focused to ensure that, at the end of the day, they give themselves the best opportunity to succeed.

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Tapping into future careers

February 19, 2017

Shanando Moss has always wanted to work with his hands, and appears to be on his way to fulfilling that dream as a student of the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute's (BTVI) dual enrollment program studying in the trade career path.
"I want to be an electrical engineer, so I am learning more about what I want to do in life," said Moss. "Currently, we are learning about electricity. I am using this as an opportunity, and I intend to come back in September for a year before hopefully going off to school."
Moss, 16, is one of 42 12th grade Anatol Rodgers High School students whose parents have agreed for them to be enrolled in the 15-week program.
"The class atmosphere is easy to learn in. The teacher, Mr. [David] Barry, makes a difference," he said.
The 25 females in the program are studying introduction to cosmetology, which includes topics such as hair analysis, beauty culture science and communicable diseases.
The young men in the trade career path classes are introduced to the fundamentals of several construction trades, including electrical installation, plumbing, masonry, carpentry, heating ventilation and air conditioning, welding, and painting and decorating.
During the almost four-month course, students spend Fridays, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at BTVI.
The program is designed to give high school students a jumpstart on post secondary education.
"The nature of the dual enrollment program eases them into college life, allowing them to immerse themselves and adjust to the work. It gives them a degree of independence," said Leroy Sumner BTVI's associate vice president of academic affairs.
"Even their parents are excited. And they won't have to make application for enrollment again. If we get them early enough, more and more of them may want to come to BTVI to complete their education. Since starting, other schools have started calling -- even in Andros and other Family Islands. It's a wonderful program designed to develop a pathway to assist students in learning a trade and earning a living," said Sumner.
Barr, the trade career path instructor, said the course helps students identify the trade they are most interested in pursuing for their lives.
He spoke highly of the students.
"This is a good group. They are very quiet. They are mannerly. They get right into their work and clean up afterwards. When I arrived, they were in here working," said Barry.
Antonique Sullivan, 16, says she finds cosmetology interesting, but says she is still trying to determine her passion.
"There is the possibility of me returning to BTVI to study cosmetology. This is a great opportunity. Not much people get to experience this while in school. It's interesting. I feel more responsible," said Sullivan.
Miriam Peet, 17, is absent from classes in math, Bahama Host, French, English and religious studies on Fridays, but ensures she catches up on any missed work.
"The majority of our teachers understands and gives us the work. For Bahama Host, we have extra classes. For others, we get what we will miss that Thursday or on that Monday when we return. I'm able to keep up, balancing the workload," she said.
Being able to keep up, she said, makes her feel accomplished.
Cosmetology instructor, Monique A. Marshall, said she was pleased with the students' performance.
"The girls are understanding the work. They conduct themselves very well and are interactive," said Marshall.

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Belief is everything

February 19, 2017

This article was written not long after the substantial win of the United States (U.S.) presidential election by businessman Donald Trump. Now as the whole world knows, when Donald Trump first announced his decision to run in the 2016 U.S. presidential election as a Republican, he had a whole lot of detractors, including within the Republican Party. Actually he has apparently no experience whatsoever in government and was just one out of a very large field of senators and government officials, including governors of states, etc.
Most people, including the media, didn't think he had a chance in hell as that well-known saying puts it. Of course he was mocked by people in his own party and by members of the Democratic Party. However after the primaries he emerged as the winner and then became the Republican candidate for the presidency.
Of course he still had his detractors and those who did everything to weaken his bid to become president, including an extremely biased, hostile media. So how come with so many being against him and doing their utmost to beat him, did he actually win? Well obviously he ran a great campaign, which was very effective. But my friend, the number one thing that Donald Trump had going for him, was his total belief that he would win in the end and he managed to do just that.
Yes indeed, as the title of today's article simply and succinctly puts it, belief is everything when it comes to being successful. That's right, whatever your goals in life are, you must believe implicitly in your ability to achieve them in a given time frame. As they say, to he that believes, all things are possible. Yes they are, and Donald Trump, like him or not, is living proof of this.

o Think about it!
Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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Students meet violence with HOPE

February 16, 2017

IN response to the recent flurry of violence in the country, the art students at Mt Carmel Preparatory Academy felt compelled to paint a piece entitled "Hope"...

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Good Practices in Education Celebrated

February 15, 2017

Top finishers in the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology’s (MOEST) National Education Good Practice Awards were recently honored for their achievements...

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Willard Patton Pre-School Called Upon the Governor General

February 15, 2017

Students of Willard Patton Pre-School's 4th year programme and students of the special education group called upon Her Excellency Dame Marguerite Pindling, Governor-General...

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Competition is Key to Improvement, GB Minister Tells School Basketball Players

February 14, 2017

Minister for Grand Bahama, the Hon. Dr. Michael Darville reminded a gym filled with primary school basketball players that competition is the key to improvement, academically and athletically...

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BTVI Student Secures Cooperative League Scholarship

February 14, 2017

A Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI) student has landed himself a $2,500 scholarship from The Bahamas Cooperative League...

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High School Students Tap into Future Careers at BTVI
High School Students Tap into Future Careers at BTVI

February 14, 2017

Shanando Moss always wanted to work with his hands. He is now well on his way to fulfilling that dream as a student of The Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute’s (BTVI) dual enrollment program where he is taking Trade Career Path classes...

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Jordan Hutcheson makes history

February 13, 2017

As an impressionable little girl Jordan Hutcheson remembers digging holes in her backyard valiantly trying to make her way to China while her grandmother, Marion Hutcheson, fried fish in the kitchen. She had dreams. Her family encouraged her dreams. They never told her that China or anyplace else for that matter was too far away or that she could never go. Today, Jordan Hutcheson, 21, is the first Bahamian to enroll at the Azerbaijan Diplomatic Academy University (ADA), where she is pursuing a bachelor's degree in international relations in a place many Bahamians have never heard of -- Baku, the capital of Azerbaijan.
Hutcheson is expected to graduate in 2018.
The city Hutcheson has called home for the past three years is described as one of the world's most beautiful cities, and is located at the intersection of Europe and Asia.
Hutcheson says she didn't find the university - ADA found her. The university offered her a full fellowship that covers her tuition, books, accommodations and even a stipend. The only thing she pays for is airfare to and from the country.
In fact, Hutcheson said she hadn't even known about Azerbaijan before applying to ADA. Once she started doing her research she liked what she came across and applied to the university. She finalized her application 28 hours before it was due.
At the time of her acceptance at ADA, Hutcheson was a student at the then College of The Bahamas (now University of The Bahamas) studying law. She does not want to become a lawyer, but law or public administration studies were the closest courses to her choice of international relations. Since she figured there would be law courses in the mix in her future, she settled on law upon entering UB.
Due to a "sheltered" upbringing, the Kingsway Academy graduate said her family did not think she was ready to go straight off to university after high school. Hence, she enrolled at COB, and left after a year.
She received her ADA acceptance and scholarship information via email, minutes before she was to sit a French final exam. Hutcheson left the exam, unable to focus.
"I just picked up my stuff and told everybody bye and then I left," she said.
She said her family was so excited for her that they went out to dinner to celebrate. Later that night, her aunts, Melanie and Stephanie Hutcheson, started looking for airplane tickets to Azerbaijan. Her Aunt Mel traveled with the then 19-year-old to the country located on the western Caspian seaside, and stayed with her a little over a week to ensure Hutcheson would be safe.
"I had a round-trip ticket, so just in case she (Aunt Mel) didn't like everything about it, I would leave with her. It wasn't final just because we went," said the scholarship recipient.
Her Aunt Mel loved the city, and Hutcheson stayed.
"I will admit I was a bit scared at first, because you can prepare yourself for an experience like that only so much by reading and watching videos. Until you get there and actually see it and you're faced with stereotypes and facing people with stereotypes, that's the only time you can get an actual feel for it," she said.
Hutcheson says pursuing studies in Azerbaijan was an adventure for her.
"It's world-class education there. It's a transformation society. They just gained independence in 1991. I live in Baku, and a lot of change is happening there and I'm happy to be a part of it," she said.
ADA was established as a training institute in 2006, to meet the needs of the expanding diplomatic service of the country. It has grown into a full-fledged university with several schools offering undergraduate and graduate degree programs. The university opened its doors to students in January 2007 and moved to its permanent "green" and "smart" campus in downtown Baku in September 2012.
The university has four schools -- the School of Public and International Affairs, School of Business, School of Humanities and Sciences and School of Engineering and Information Technologies.
ADA University's tuition is approximately $5,000 per year.
English is the language of instruction at the institution, comprised of representatives from 43 countries, in a 2,300-strong student body.
Hutcheson does not have to deal with a language barrier, but she says there are times when people do speak in Azerbaijani or Russian. She's been there long enough that she's come to know words and phrases, but she said it was tough when she first got there and had to go to the market.

Academics
On the academic front, Hutcheson is excelling. In fact she says the good habits she adopted while at COB have held her in good stead at ADA.
"I think I was always a good student, but I was a bit naughty," she recalled of her junior and senior school years. "I went to Bahamas Academy [BA] for junior school, and I wasn't the best student, and kind of got in some trouble... I was a bit naughty and got in trouble a lot. I wasn't failing, but I had a bad attitude, and you can't really get far with a bad attitude. I left [BA] and went to Kingsway Academy, where I did a lot better."
At Kingsway which she attended for 10th through 12th grades, she had an about-face in attitude and was even named a prefect.
"By the time I went to COB I did extremely well," said Hutcheson. "I didn't go into university looking for friends. My aunt is a professor, so I got my lunch and ate in her classroom or her office, and I read and did my work, went to classes and went home. So by the time I got to ADA, it was kind of like the same thing."
It's a good thing she buckled down too, because she says ADA is tough.
"We read all day. It's work all day, every day, and that's what I like about it because I learn so much," she said.
At home during the school's winter break, she said she found herself frustrated with not having enough to read or do after the daily rigors of study at ADA.
Upon graduating ADA, and for as long as her family will continue to support her, Hutcheson said she has plans to continue her pursuit of education until there's nothing left for her to get.
"Right after I graduate, I want to start my master's degree in public policy. I haven't decided yet on the destination, but know I want to stay in the Eastern hemisphere, unless an opportunity presents itself at Georgetown University [in Washington, D.C.]. If it doesn't, I'm thinking about going to Doha (the capital city of Qatar), or even looking at schools in Kuwait. I have no intentions of coming home right now or stopping," said Hutcheson.
When she departed New Providence at the end of her winter break, Hutcheson traveled to Tokyo for six months as part of an exchange program to study at Yamanashi University, before she was due to return to Azerbaijan to prepare to graduate.
"I'm on an international adventure that I love, and I can't wait to get to Tokyo and experience what's there for me," she said.
While on the other side of the world, Hutcheson took advantage of opportunities to explore. She traveled to other regions in Azerbaijan, Russia, Qatar, London and Germany.

Life lessons
As she obtains her degree in higher education, Hutcheson is also becoming educated on herself.
"Sometimes I look at myself and I see someone that's so different... even in the way that I speak and the way that I dress, and even the things that I eat. I remember doing food and nutrition [classes] and reading about caviar and stuff and thinking it's so gross and so nasty, but I eat caviar for breakfast just about every morning with my bagels, so I'm trying new things and being open to experiencing new things."
The self-professed nationalist said she now ascribes to people being less insular and says people should look to cast their nets far and wide when it comes to pursuit of higher education.
"Everybody wants to study in the United States or Canada... some people don't even want to go further than Florida, but we have the whole world to see. There are so many opportunities to travel... to do work-study. The biggest lesson is that you can always learn, that there is never ever too much knowledge you can have, and to go and travel. And don't worry about the money; don't worry about your family situation; just go. Because once the time is gone it's gone. Bahamians are some of the brightest, smartest people in the world, and it does not make sense that we're all here, that we're all on one side of the world or in one place; go and travel... apply, just step out on faith. We say that we're a Christian nation and believe in God -- then God will cover you wherever you go. Go and apply, get the opportunities, but don't stay here if you don't have to. Just try. Be fearless."
In the years she's been in Azerbaijan, Hutcheson said she's never once suffered with homesickness or had a hankering to return. She said she has no place for that emotion in her life.
"I was extremely sheltered, but my family dreamed for me. From since I was a little girl, I knew that this [The Bahamas] would not be the only place that I lived. I used to dig in the backyard and try to dig to China while my grammy would be frying fish. And they never said, 'Oh no it's too far!' or 'Oh no you can't go'. And when I finally went, I was lucky enough to have my auntie accompany me on my journey. My grandma is 83 now, and with age comes more sickness, and so I would dwell on things like that and feel sad... But in terms of moping around and saying 'I want to come home, this is so far', I don't do that because I know in a second, based on one action sometimes all that can be taken away, so I don't dwell on that. I get really sad sometimes when I think about my grandma, but besides that, no."

Making headlines in Azerbaijan
Hutcheson recently made headlines in Azerbaijan when she accidentally became the 12th million visitor of ASAN's (Azerbaijan Service and Assessment Network) service center.
She had visited the government agency to apply for a temporary document, as her residency permit was not ready, and she had hoped to travel to Slovakia to visit a friend. Within three hours of making use of ASAN, she received a call asking her to return. She did, the next day, thinking there was a problem. When she arrived at the office, there was a barrage of television cameras in her face and reporters asking her how she felt
"It was all so quick. I kind of learned what I had won after the cameras had left. It took me about an hour and a half, because I had so many pictures to take."
Hutcheson became somewhat of a local celebrity after that. She said people stop her on the streets to ask for her autograph. She's done radio shows, and even during her break she received emails from companies wanting her to be their brand ambassador and the face of their companies.
"From that day it's like I'm a superstar. I cannot go places without people recognizing me, children coming up to me and smiling, wanting autographs. Even now that I'm at home I get emails from people wanting to know when I'm going to be back in Baku, because they have a project for me to work on. I've gone to interviews and they wanted me to sign job contracts right then, all because I used the government services. If it's not a photo shoot and something quick I don't take it. I'm there to finish school," she said.
While Hutcheson is inked in ADA University's history as the first Bahamian to study there, the second Bahamian has already made her way through the university's doors. Stefanisha Strachan, who rooms with Hutcheson, is in the public affairs program and expects to graduate in 2019; the Bahamians share university housing with students from France and Lithuania.
Hutcheson said having a fellow Bahamian join her was nice.
"When I was there alone I was friends with the Kenyans. I don't speak Swahili and just know a few words. But when a fellow Bahamian finally came, it was nice to hear my own accent and to say things someone understands without having to explain. To get excited when we hear the word 'conch fritter'... things like that. It was nice to have that," she said.

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Scotiabank sponsors Eva Hilton's Junior Achievers Elementary Programme

February 13, 2017

Eva Hilton Primary School students have been given the opportunity to explore five sequential themes, each with six hands-on activities and a capstone experience that works to change students' lives by helping them understand personal finances and economics through the Junior Achievement Elementary Club Programme.
The program shows elementary students the relevance of financial literacy for themselves, families, communities, cities, regions and nation, preparing them for lifelong financial achievement.
The elementary program is built on different role concepts appropriate for the elementary grades, primarily those of individual, worker and consumer. It outlines key concepts -- the role money plays in society; sharing, saving and spending; becoming a smart consumer; and earning income by starting a business.
The Junior Achievers (JA) Elementary club includes the following programs at the respective grade levels -- Kindergarten: Ourselves; Grade one: Our families; Grade two: Our community; Grade three: Our city; Grade four: Our region; Grade five: Our nation; and Grade six: JA more than money.
Scotiabank helped facilitate Eva Hilton's students in the program, covering the charge for the school's participation in the Junior Achievement Elementary Programme, which gives students (in grades kindergarten through six) the opportunity to showcase the exceptional work they've done over several months.
"The growth in students' confidence and personal presentation is almost as impressive as the products they research, design and market," said Chanda Roberts, club coordinator. "Its sequential approach helps the students understand their economic world and prepares them for academic learning and lifelong achievement through the use of a variety of hands-on activities."
Leah Davis, senior manager of marketing and public relations at Scotiabank, said JA fills a unique need, fostering crucial financial literacy skills while teaching about entrepreneurship.
"Scotiabank being the leader in charitable donations and philanthropic activities, by supporting opportunities to make young people better off, we value JA's contribution to our community's students, including those at Eva Hilton Primary School. Well-prepared students are the success indicators of the future. The JA Company program, with its focus on mentorship and skill development, has terrific impact. Scotiabank congratulates the student participants and the companies that mentor them. They're all winners," said Davis.
Last year, Scotiabank globally announced a $2,000,000 investment in JA's Road to Success project in over 16 countries including The Bahamas.
"Young people are our future leaders, and Scotiabank's goal is to ensure that they have the necessary skills and resources they need to support their success. JA and Scotiabank believe in entrepreneurial education as a way to inspire and prepare youth to become role models for their communities."

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Catholic Schools Week celebrated

February 13, 2017

Catholic school students were reminded by Archbishop of Nassau Patrick Pinder that they should feel privileged to be enrolled in the finest Catholic school system in the region, as the Bahamas Catholic Board of Education (CBE) celebrated Catholic Schools Week (CSW).
"We do not seek to be elitist, but we do strive for excellence," said Pinder during the Sunday Mass to celebrate the week. "May you all continue to be formed in grace, goodness and wisdom so that you credit both our schools and our country."
As the CBE looks to the future and does what needs to be done to ensure the sustainability of its schools, Pinder said the academic performance of its students, their graduation rates and the value for money of the seven schools are admirable.
"The gospel is at the heart of both the mission and the vision of our Catholic schools," he said.
CSW was celebrated from January 29 to February 4, and is always near the feast of Patron Saint of Schools St. Thomas Aquinas.
The week is an annual celebration during which Catholic schools engage in activities that focus on the value Catholic education provides to young people.
"Catholic Schools Week is a time for us to not only celebrate, but emphasize our involvement in the building of our country," said Claudette Rolle, director of the Catholic Board of Education.
"Catholic schools in The Bahamas have a faith-filled past and a hopeful future. During this time we emphasize the faith, knowledge and service characteristics of our schools."
The inaugural CSW was celebrated in The Bahamas in 2009. The week has been celebrated for the past 43 years in the United States. The National Catholic Educational Association (NCEA), the largest private professional education association in the world, set "Catholic schools: Communities of faith, knowledge and service" as its theme for this year's CSW. In acknowledgement of the interconnected global world and commitment to serving local communities, CBE's theme for Catholic education for the next three years is "Many parts, one body -- Working toward the common good by building communities of faith, knowledge and service".
Catholic schools comprise the second largest educational system in The Bahamas, behind the public education system. The CBE family of schools includes Aquinas College, New Providence; Mary, Star of the Sea Catholic Academy, Grand Bahama; St. Francis de Sales School, Marsh Harbour, Abaco; St. Cecilia's School, New Providence; Sts. Francis & Joseph School, New Providence; St. Thomas More School, New Providence; Xavier's Lower School, New Providence; and Every Child Counts, Abaco.

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Are your dreams big enough

February 13, 2017

Now here's a really provocative, but never-the-less very important question for all of us to ponder here for a while today, are your dreams big enough? Mohammad Ali the former heavyweight champion of the world once said, "If your dreams don't scare you they're not big enough." Now that really made me think deeply about my goals in life, and hopefully it will also assist you in remembering the goals and objectives you've established for all areas of your life.
Of course what it all gets back to is the fact that due to so much mental conditioning in our past, so many of us actually underestimate our ability to do great things in life, thus in reality we're holding ourselves back from achieving greatness like Muhammad Ali did. It's so true, that so many people worldwide underestimate their ability and thus are temporarily unable to envision themselves sitting on top of the world so to speak.
So hopefully today many who read this particular article will indeed start to deeply reflect on the title, are your dreams big enough? And as a direct result of pondering this most important question they'll start to redefine their true purpose in life thus setting some new and expanded goals which will eventually take them to a whole new level of achievement and success in life.
Yes my friend, hopefully today's the day when you start to finally move further up the proverbial ladder of success, which as I've informed you on innumerable occasions in the past in these articles over the years has no top rung. In other words, the sky really is the limit for you, as that well-known saying puts it, as you set new and exciting goals that take you to greater heights.

o Think about it!
Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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Regional Education Ministers Urged to Provide Resources for Educating, Changing, Even Saving Lives of Students

February 09, 2017

The Hon. Jerome Fitzgerald, Bahamas Minister of Education, Science and Technology, called on education ministers attending the opening ceremony of the 9th Inter-American Meeting of Ministers of Education (9IAMME) to ensure that their nations’ schools are as good as they can be...

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