Education

University of The Bahamas holds Teachers Commissioning Ceremony
University of The Bahamas holds Teachers Commissioning Ceremony

May 24, 2017

University of The Bahamas (UB) commissioned more than 100 of its candidates for graduation as certified educators at the first of several inaugural ceremonies for the institution this Spring 2017 Commencement season...

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Tragic Death of Student from R. M. Bailey Sr. High School
Tragic Death of Student from R. M. Bailey Sr. High School

May 24, 2017

The Ministry of Education can confirm that a 10th grade male student from R.M. Bailey High School was fatally shot today...

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New Government to 'elevate' technical education
New Government to 'elevate' technical education

May 23, 2017

During his maiden formal presentation as Minister of Education, the Honourable Jeffrey Lloyd minced no words regarding his views on technical vocational education and training (TVET), stating that it serves as the core discipline in the efficiency of any society...

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Bahamas Technical Vocational Institute Graduation
Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute Graduation

May 22, 2017

ALIV has partnered with the Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute (BTVI) in giving the institution a $30,000.00 sponsorship in a three-year commitment...

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Creatively funding education

May 22, 2017

Charles Hamilton was the first person in his family to achieve an undergraduate education and is now seeking to earn a master's of public health after being accepted into the Europubhealth+master course -- a two-year course in public health, delivered by six European universities, leading to a double master's degree. Hamilton, who was accepted into the Erasmus Mundus Europubhealth+ program, will get to study at, at least two renowned schools of public health in Europe.
He would be the second person from The Bahamas (and the first male) to matriculate through the program. Arvis Mortimer was the first in the program. She, in turn, introduced Hamilton to the program two years ago, lighting the spark for Hamilton to seek entrance into the program, which he describes as an "amazing educational, cultural and network experience".
Hamilton says just being accepted was an amazing opportunity.
"The dual master's program will have me experience studies at the University of Sheffield School of Health and Related Research (United Kingdom) in my first year; the EHESP School of Public Health (Rennes, France), where I will participate in research modules between my first and second year, and where I will also defend a thesis at the end of my second year; and the Jagiellonian University Medical College, in Krakow, Poland, for specialization in governance of health systems in transition."
Since its inception 10 years ago, the competitive program has had just over 250 alumni from over 70 countries who have participated in the course of study.
Hamilton was placed on a reserve list for a scholarship, however, he had to accept the offer to the program as a self-funded student to secure his place. He created a GoFundMe account to assist him in addressing his tuition gap for his first year of study, which will cost approximately $8,500 and needs to be paid before June 15 in order for him to complete his registration and access the documents necessary to process his student visa to begin his studies in September.
Since his creation of the GoFundMe account on March 24, he has raised $6,671 of his $8,800 goal through donations from 90 people. He's shy of his goal by $2,129, which he needs to raise by Wednesday, May 31 to cover his remaining educational expenses and make the process easier.
"I see each donation as a person's trust in me, and I plan to be accountable to every cent sent my way through reporting online," he promised.
He is also saving and seeking grants/loans toward his remaining expenses to support his visa application, which is approximately $11,100 for living expenses over nine months.
"Being independent and hardworking, it is difficult to ask for help, but I believe an opportunity this big is worth fighting for," said Hamilton. "I believe that your investment into my professional studies will see a significant return on investment for The Bahamas."
Those interested in donating outside of GoFundMe can deposit funds to Scotiabank Account #004002512 at Wulff Road and Jerome Avenue in the name of Nikita Hamilton.
Hamilton's passion and dedication for public health goes back further than university. At St. Andrew's School, where he had received a full student scholarship nearly a decade ago, he and a friend planned a school-wide HIV/AIDS fundraiser as 16 and 17-year-olds. Prior to attending St. Andrew's School, he was the top student to graduate from H.O. Nash Junior School.
He graduated from the University of Guelph with a Bachelor of Science in biomedical sciences, with honors, 2014.
Hamilton was able to complete his studies with government scholarships, as a national scholar and an RBC Royal Bank Canadian Lyford Cay Academic Merit Scholar.
He used his course of study to focus on science and health communication, but also spent a significant time in leadership positions on campus, eventually being elected to an executive position in the student union, where he had oversight of a $1.7 million budget and 50-plus staff, board members and volunteers. He chaired and coordinated a health and dental benefits package and coordinated the internal and external student union's communication strategy. He also worked to lobby and address equity issues, including health issues, with marginalized groups.
Now seeking to pursue his master's degree, he turned to the crowdfunding site as a way to get creative to help fund his degree. If he is unable to secure the necessary funding before the May 31 deadline, Hamilton said he will return the funds to donors.
Hamilton was the youngest person hired at the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO) Bahamas and Turks and Caicos country office to immediately transition from an intern to consultant.
"I successfully managed many health communication activities and collaborated closely with international public health professionals and consultants to develop modules around public health strategies and health communication," he said.
Hamilton said his strong aptitude and skillset as a communications professional with a biomedical, science background were vital in shaping many health strategies, policies and communication messages.
"With this in mind, my acceptance into the Europubhealth+ program comes at a crucial time, as the multi-year NHI Bahamas program being put forward by the government is being rolled out. I would be in the perfect position, after the completion of my studies, to engage with health networks in the country to further strengthen health policies, communication with the public and create a stronger and more robust health system for the people of The Bahamas," he said.
Hamilton said, at the same time, the Europubhealth+ program would connect him with a global network to help him establish a multi-sectoral NGO (nongovernmental organization) following his studies, to provide ongoing support and personal development of health policy professionals in The Bahamas and the Caribbean.
"I strongly believe in being a 'servant leader' and giving back to my community. I plan to mentor individuals to consider fields in health policy, public health and health/risk communication, and act as a strong ambassador for The Bahamas while participating in my studies and practicums in Europe," he said.
Hamilton says he wants to see The Bahamas progress beyond the point where people believe the only way they can contribute to the development of health and social issues is by being a doctor.
"Strong local health policy developers, health communicators and health consultants will be necessary for the country to advance in its long-term plans," he said.
Hamilton believes the Europubhealth+ program complements his academic background, professional experience and unique skillset in public health policy and communication.

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SAC takes 10th IBS Build-A-Bridge Challenge

May 22, 2017

Jared Nurse, Sherina Abdool, Gaberille Kelson, Tyrone Perpall and Raymond Oriakhi comprised the St. Augustine's College (SAC) squad, which, for the second consecutive year, took home the win at the IBS (Integrated Building Services) Build-A-Bridge Challenge.
The SAC team, led by Nurse and Abdool, two members from last year's winning squad, re-engineered their bridge from 2016 to claim the 10th title. Their bridge this year was built with 124 sticks of the maximum 125 sticks they were able to use and held up 252 pounds for the win.
"We won through a process of re-engineering," said the squad's guide, Wesley Clarke, a senior school physics and math teacher. "We looked at where we had failed over the years and corrected that. We were able to do that because the organizers allowed us to use more sticks than previously. We started out using 100 sticks, and our lines of fault we were able to correct by using more sticks this time around."
The teacher said his team got the job done. The bridge design was completely the work of the students and he had no input, other than to oversee their progress from mid-January through to the recent competition.
"The work was purely on the students," said Clarke. "I was extremely pleased with the win. We won last year with that same design. The previous year we were using a different design and got a number of seconds, one third, one fifth and a seventh with the previous design. Since we re-engineered we won twice with the same design."
Anatol Rodgers' team was second, and St. Anne's School's team was third. The challenge, which this year was themed "Can Your Bridge Handle the Load?", not only helps students to develop interest in engineering and applied sciences, but also teaches discipline and determination to face life's challenges, according to IBS officials, of which Nick Dean is principal.
"It helps the guys who are engineering inclined to be critical thinkers," said Clarke. "They are given a scenario -- 125 sticks and told to build a bridge, and have to come up with their own design. As an engineer, it allows you to think, and think positively. Engineering is three-fold -- engineering, re-engineering and problem-solving. Those three areas are what they need to be good engineers, so it allows them to think; it allows them to be creative and allows them to go back and solve the problem when they encounter those."
He said competitions of that nature also allow for students to be more focused and to realize that, in life, they will be faced with challenges, and that is when they should get down to business and do their best.

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South Andros school wins math competition

May 22, 2017

South Andros High School was victorious at the recent sixth annual mathematics competition hosted by S.C. McPherson Junior High School.
Tristan Smith, a ninth grade student of the winning school, said he was excited that his school won the competition and happy that he got a chance to learn a lot more in the process.
"Although I'm already good in maths, this competition gave me an opportunity to learn a lot more about other aspects of sitting for my math BJC [Bahamas Junior Certificate] exam this year. I expect to pass my exam with the best grade," said Smith.
S.C. McPherson and T.A. Thompson were second and third, respectively, in the competition at which junior school students around the country were given the opportunity to compete. The competition was created to ensure that students are properly prepared for the mathematics BJC examination.
Students competed in the first round multiple choice online test; the top four students from each school were then selected to go on to the second round, a one-day competition that took place at the S.C. McPherson Junior High School auditorium.
Krizia Smith, a ninth grade student at S.C. McPherson, said the math competition has made her confident about getting an A grade on her math BJC exam.
"This competition has opened my eyes to a lot of new things and I am confident that I will be prepared for my BJC exam and even pass with an A," she said.
Kiffany Daxon, math coordinator at S.C. McPherson, said since she created the competition, she has seen a vast improvement in BJC results for students who have sat the math exam.
"Every year there are activities, programs and competitions for students studying other subjects, such as English language or the sciences, but nothing to help in math, so I thought students across the country needed a learning competition specifically for that subject. It was my vision, and I brought it to life, and now we are in our sixth year, and we have seen a tremendous improvement in results on the math BJC exams, so that says a lot about this competition," said Daxon.
Consolidated Water Co. Ltd. (CWCO) made a donation to the school to assist with the demands of the competition.
Welliya Cargill, CWCO administrative assistant, said the company supports the idea that math is a vital component in a child's education.
"We always find it honorable when there is something being done in our communities to motivate our youngsters, whether it's sports or education. We recognize how important it is for students to learn the necessary mathematical skills and to be given the best chance to shine in their national examinations, and we fully support it," said Cargill.
Daxon thanked CWCO for the donation.
"CWCO has always been our top sponsor and we appreciate it every year. The funds would be used to purchase gifts and prizes, such as trophies, certificates and electronic devices for the participants and winners," she said.

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Invest in yourself

May 22, 2017

I was watching the program "Shark Tank" on T.V. a little while back and, of course, as usual there was an array of people with new ideas which they were presenting to the "Sharks", hoping to get one of them to invest in their particular idea. So this obviously got me to thinking about investing in general.
Then it occurred to me that not enough people invest in themselves. That's right, how much do you actually invest in yourself? Now I don't mean investing in things like a house, a car, a computer or new cell phone, but I mean actually investing dollars in yourself on improving you. Yes indeed, there are far too many people who spend all sorts of money buying all sorts of luxury items, in so many cases just to show off -- to bolster their high ego by saying in their mind, look at me I've got a nice new car, iPhone, etc. This in turn is, of course, prompted by low self-esteem and assists this person in getting the attention they so desperately crave from others.
However, what I'm talking about here today is something different when I advocate that you invest in yourself. I'm talking about the greatest investment that anyone can make in themselves -- and that's an investment in knowledge. Yes my friend, how much money are you really putting into you to improve your knowledge in a particular field so that you can become more qualified and thus much more valuable to your employer?
I do hope that today's message has hit home to you and that as a result of it you will be enrolling in a course of further education that will give you additional qualifications with which to succeed in life, across the board. So pick up the phone, go online or visit an institution of higher learning where you can register today and thus start to accumulate more knowledge, which will be most beneficial to you as you seek further success in life.

o Think about it!
Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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The gentlemen of Aquinas College

May 22, 2017

Stephen Seymour, Karrington Culmer, Gregory Stubbs, Kriston Clarke and Kyle Smith were among the impressive cadre of young men from schools throughout New Providence who recently participated in the 26th annual Gentlemen's Club Ball, and contributed to the institution receiving the 2017 Gentlemen's Club "School of the Year" Award.
The Aquinas College young men were stellar examples of high school students who distinguished themselves in academics, school leadership, community service and performing arts, and took home several awards.
Stubbs won the talent competition with his piano performance. Seymour was awarded the Morehouse College Award for academic excellence, as well as the Archdeacon William Thompson Award, which is given to the gentleman who displays Christian leadership. Aquinas College took home the School of the Year award.
The School of the Year Award is based on the performance and participation of the young men as a group in the program.
Lamon Stubbs, director, Gentlemen's Club, said the Aquinas College students who participated added value to the Gentlemen's Club program.
The young men shared their aspirations for the future and spoke to what they believe is a positive outlook for young men in the country. Each spoke to how inspiring it was to network with other young men who were focused on achieving positive outcomes for their lives. They recalled a phrase Stubbs often says to them, "Lift as you climb."
Seymour graduated as class valedictorian with a cumulative average of 3.91. He is the recipient of the Principal's Award and The Sister Jean Patricia Award for Academic Excellence.
Clarke, who hopes to become a doctor, spoke to the incredible power of influence and camaraderie between Gentlemen's Club members. He graduated 11th in his class with a cumulative average of 3.45. He was also the recipient of the Principal's Award.
"Being in the Gentlemen's Club actually gave me hope as a young man in The Bahamas. It takes organizations such as Gentlemen's Club to allow young men like myself to realize that we all have to let our light shine."
Smith graduated third in his class with a cumulative average of 3.61.
Culmer wants to pursue chemical engineering; he graduated 25th in his class with a cumulative average of 3.26.
Stubbs aspires to study computers. He graduated salutatorian with a cumulative average of 3.63.
Four of the young men plan to matriculate to St. John's University, Collegeville, Minnesota. Seymour will attend Morehouse College, Atlanta, Georgia, in the fall to pursue a degree in physics and mechanical engineering.
"Upon entering the Gentlemen's Club I realized that males in The Bahamas in our generation are of a higher caliber than what many may see on the surface," said Seymour. When you look deeper at our young men, you will notice that we have been doing a lot and that we are extremely talented and driven. You may not see it now, but give it five years, 10 years. We will be making our mark!"
Shona Knowles, principal of Aquinas College, expressed pride in her students.
"It speaks volumes to the caliber of scholars enrolled at Aquinas College. Our scholars are Christ-centered and character-driven. A Catholic education is more than facts and information. At Aquinas College we ensure that the needs of all of our scholars are met on the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual levels."

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The next generation of 'gentlemen'

May 22, 2017

The Gentlemen's Club was founded by Dr. Judson and Marcheta Eneas in 1992. It is a preparatory organization for young men in their final year of high school. The club teaches its members about character building; respect; etiquette; elocution; grooming; and being socially, morally and financially responsible and culturally exposed. This is accomplished through a program that allows the students to participate in workshops, seminars and cultural activities.
Over the years, the club has trained hundreds of young men in the basics of masculinity and responsibility. As an academically based program, it gives the students opportunities to work toward earning financial assistance through marketing projects and sponsorship.
Young men who are chosen for the program are picked based on their grades, recommendations and community involvement.
Any of the young men participating in the program can rise to the top, as the winner is chosen based on his scores in the club's ongoing scoring system. Points are accumulated for marketing skills, elocution, participation and attendance. The founders said the most important thing about the program isn't winning or losing, but, rather, what the young men learn from the program and how they apply it to their daily lives and, in turn, use it to help society.

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Statement on Bank of The Bahamas by Deputy PM and Minister of Finance, Hon. K. Peter Turnquest

May 17, 2017

The Government of The Bahamas acknowledges that the Bank of The Bahamas is a systemically important financial institution and as such is fully committed to its success...

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Math Competition Helps BJC Exam Students

May 17, 2017

T. A. Thompson Junior High School, Anatol Rodgers High School, L. W. Young Junior High School, A. F. Adderley Junior High School, H. O. Nash Secondary School, S. C McPherson Junior High School, Kingsway Academy and South Andros Secondary School all participated in the competition...

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Johnathan Johnson selected Gentleman of the Year 2017

May 15, 2017

For Johnathan Johnson, his aspiration of becoming an oncologist is personal, and the $17,000 scholarship he was awarded after being named Gentleman of the Year 2017 will assist the St. Augustine's College (SAC) graduating senior as he begins his post secondary education and the start of the journey to fulfill his mission.
Johnson, 17, plans to study biochemistry at St. John's College in Minnesota before enrolling in medical school. He has had firsthand knowledge of the insidious cancer disease, as he saw his grandfather, Aubyn Hall, succumb to the disease.
"My grandfather, Aubyn Hall, was one of the greatest influences...one of my greatest friends ... one of my greatest mentors. He was literally my third parent. He was diagnosed with stage-four colon cancer in early 2013, and he died November 2013. He didn't even get to see a year after his diagnosis, and that really touched me. Seeing him in that hospital bed -- and just from what he was, a jovial and happy person, to have cancer just reduce him to basically nothing really touched me," said Johnson.
His scholarship award will go toward making his aspiration a reality. Johnson said when he applied for admission into the program, he did so not knowing about the cash prize that went to the person named Gentleman of the Year, until he'd actually won.
Graduating young men have to apply for acceptance into the program. Each potential Gentleman of the Year candidate is considered from a holistic point of view, taking into account grades, extracurricular activities, recommendation letters from their respective schools and their essays.
Johnson said, looking back at his experience in the program, he was honored to have been among 41 of some the brightest young men in the country. To be named basically the best out of that group, he said, was an added honor and what he had really wanted.
"That's what made me proud to win," he said. "It wasn't really about the money; so when they made the announcement it was like, 'Oh really? Thank you. It will be a great help as I further my education.' Seventeen thousand dollars is not a little bit of money."
Johnson's scholarship haul also included the $1,200 Mr. Price Rolle Toastmaster's Award.
Queen's College's Llando Chea was the program's first runner-up. He received a $10,000 scholarship, as well as a full tuition scholarship tenable at Morehouse College.
Aquinas College's Stephen Seymour was awarded the Archdeacon William Thompson Academic Award of $8,000 as well as a full tuition scholarship tenable at Morehouse College.
C.V. Bethel's Simeon Farquharson took home the Dr. Judson Eneas Scholarship (Omega Psi Phi) valued at $3,000.
Temple Christian School's De'Antez Knowles took home a $5,000 scholarship by virtue of his essay contest win. Taking home $1,200 scholarship awards each were Aquinas College's Gregory Stubbs, as the talent show performance winner; and SAC's Wayne Cooper, as the talent show fine arts winner.
Johnson decided to apply to the program after hearing gents from the class of 2016 speak about it. He said they always spoke so highly about it that it caught his attention, and he thought it sounded like a good thing to be in.
He said he went in open-minded, not knowing what to expect. What he came away with, he said, is that the Gentlemen's Club is basically a wealth of knowledge for young men.
"I've been taught so many things -- etiquette, grooming, how to treat a woman and how to be a respectful man in today's society. Public speaking is also a very big part of the Gentlemen's Club. Their motto is that, as a man, you should always be well spoken and able to speak on any topic on a dime."
Johnson said he watched many of his "brothers" grow in confidence from being shy and quiet in the beginning to young men who now speak confidently in public. He said while it was a great thing to see, it also helped him with his public speaking.
After his experience, he encourages all young men who qualify to apply for acceptance into the program. He said it would probably be one of the best decisions they make, but an open mind and being ready to involve themselves in activities are key.
"You literally get out what you put in," he said. "If I didn't involve myself so much in the club, I would never have been Gentleman of the Year. I would never have received a scholarship. But really there is such a wealth of knowledge in the Gentlemen's Club; it's beautiful. I would advise every young man to keep their grades up and just stay involved."
Johnson isn't just a person who talks the talk; he also walks the walk. For six years at SAC he has always made the honor roll and enjoyed the distinction of having the highest male grade point average (GPA) from seventh grade through to graduation.
"I'm very proud of that, and I worked hard to keep that," he said.
His cumulative GPA is currently 3.79. He does not know what his final term GPA will add to that, but in his first term in 12th grade he was at 3.91.
The son of John and Inger Johnson said striving for academic excellence was the foundation set for him by his parents and primary school teachers.
"They saw that I had the ability and they always pushed me. They never let me settle. I was raised not being allowed to settle, so it became like first nature to me to not settle and to work as hard as I could, because I could do it. And I just carried that throughout high school."
Johnson is in the process of sitting the two advanced placement (AP) exams SAC students are allowed to take -- English and math. He is also writing eight Bahamas General Certificate of Secondary Education (BGCSE) exams -- biology, chemistry, physics, accounting, math, English, literature and combined science.
And he's confident about how he will fare.
"I have no fear of those exams, because St. Augustine's College really does prepare us very well. They actually have us working to such a level and such a standard that BGCSEs should be a breeze," he said.
And then it's on to the next phase of his educational journey that he says is just as important as high school.
"Education means so much to me, because education is my key to the future. I want a career, I don't want a job. So for my career, I need a certain education, and it's impossible to become an oncologist without education. So really and truly, education is my way to my future, so it is everything to me actually."
When he's not hitting the books, Johnson confesses to being a soccer fanatic, which he has played since eighth grade. He was even captain of the team in his last year. He has also grown out of the Youth 17 division, where he played for Cavalier FC.
"Soccer is my life. I absolutely love soccer, and if I'm not playing it, I'm watching it," he said.
Johnson said he's also interested in sports and luxury cars.
He also said he likes positivity and positive people in his sphere.
"I like being around positive people. I like jokes. I like happiness and fun. If it's not going to make me happy, I just stray away from it. If there are people who aren't going to add to my happiness, I just stray away from them. I always encourage people. Positivity is such a big thing to me, because positivity keeps your outlook proper. You have a good perspective on life, and when you have a positive outlook, life is just better for you."
For four months every year, top graduating males become part of an elite club and are put through their paces, with the top male student emerging to earn the prestigious title of Gentleman of the Year.
The Gentlemen's Club was founded by Dr. Judson and Marcheta Eneas and sponsored by the Bahamas Beautillion Committee when it was established in 1992. It is a preparatory organization for young men in their final year of high school. The club teaches its members about character building; respect; etiquette; elocution; grooming; and being socially, morally and financially responsible and culturally exposed. This is accomplished through a program that allows the students to participate in workshops, seminars and cultural activities.
Over the years, the club has trained hundreds of young men in the basics of masculinity and responsibility. As an academically based program, it gives the students opportunities to work toward earning financial assistance through marketing projects and sponsorship.
Young men who are chosen for the program are picked based on their grades, recommendations and community involvement.
Any of the young men participating in the program can rise to the top, as the winner is chosen due to his scores in the club's ongoing scoring system. Points are accumulated for marketing skills, elocution, participation and attendance. The founder said the most important thing about the program isn't winning or losing, but, rather, what the young men learn from the program and how they apply it to their daily lives and, in turn, use it to help society.

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Garvin Tynes students encouraged to believe in themselves

May 15, 2017

Garvin Tynes Primary School students were encouraged to believe in themselves and were reassured of their academic value and purpose in the country by BTC Vice President of Project Management and Engineering Jonathan Ford.
"You matter. You have value. Just do it," said Ford at an assembly at the school to observe Autism Awareness Month. It was held under the theme "All Things Bright and Beautiful".
BTC worked with the school during the month and created a special public awareness video on autism.
BTC provided autism awareness shirts for its adopted school.
Ford said the company continues to play a meaningful role in the development of communities, having adopted five schools on New Providence and scores of schools throughout the Family Islands.
"BTC has been with us from the very beginning of our initiative and we are forever grateful," said Garvin Tynes Principal Carolyn Wright-Mitchell.

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Kingsway Academy students tour Canadian colleges

May 15, 2017

The seeds of knowledge, determination, steadfastness and dreams and hopes of a bright future have hopefully been planted in the minds of a group of Kingsway Academy students after their most recent college tour, according to school principal and tour coordinator Devona Ferguson.
Ferguson, who recently returned from a tour of five Canadian colleges with students, said each year she has seen students return from the tours with a renewed mind of college readiness and focus on preparing themselves to be college bound.
"While I myself attended university in the United States and we previously conducted two U.S. based college tours, I felt the need to explore options outside of the U.S." said Ferguson. "Many parents expressed interest in their child pursuing their tertiary level education in Canada because of the cheaper cost for tuition, the quality of life and the opportunities for paid internships while pursuing a degree."
The campus tours had the students dining in the University of Guelph's student union, as well as in a cafeteria at Brock University, where they also learned that they could pursue studies in viticulture (wine making). They engaged in dormitory walk-throughs, and at the University of Toronto, they toured the library. They also visited York University's and Ryerson University's campuses.
The different campus visits gave the students insight into the differences and similarities between each institution.
Eleventh grade student Charltonise Sands said the things she learned motivated her to return and stay focused if she is to become a successful college graduate.
"I think Canada is an amazing place to attend university. Most universities have a co-op program whereby students can obtain professional training while studying. Canada is amazing and flowing with opportunities to enrich one's life," he said.
Tenth grade student Jordan Forbes said it made him realize he could now "steer my life path directly to where it should be, and get a head-start on accomplishing the purpose that awaits me."
Fellow 10th grade student Kai Brice found the university tours informative after receiving a firsthand look at what college life is like.
"Not only did the college tour broaden my horizon, but it also enabled me to narrow down the choices of universities that I would like to attend," said Brice.
Veron Marshall, an 11th grade student, said the tour provided a vision of the path for the future.
The group also toured the CN Tower (an awe-inspiring architectural and engineering wonder of the world that is a symbol of pride for Toronto residents), Niagara Falls, a science museum, the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum and Ripley's Aquarium.
Parent Sonia Rutherford said she was grateful for the opportunity it afforded her daughter, ninth grade student Tiffany.
"My husband and I decided to send her on the tour because we believed it would bode well for her growth and development. It will also help her to decide which school is the right fit for her personality and her course of study. We were also of the view that it would help her to become more focused on what is required to be accepted in her preferred program and provide her with an introduction to what college life can be like. The trip allowed Tiffany to experience Canada and all it has to offer and what it means to be independent and responsible in terms of meeting timelines to get to various appointments, and also having the opportunity to present her resume/cover letter to the various institutions. This was indeed tremendous exposure for her. She has already heard from several of the institutions visited on this trip," said Rutherford.

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UB School of Business team 4th at inaugural Chartered Financial Analyst Caribbean Research Challenge

May 15, 2017

After more than 300 hours of research and report writing, the University of The Bahamas' (UB) School of Business team to the inaugural Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) Caribbean Research Challenge returned home with a fourth place showing.
The UB team analyzed the fundamentals and various aspects of the focus company "FitBit" for its presentation at the University of Miami's Shalala Activity Center.
Team Bahamas was comprised of Rashad Brice, Angelique Butler, Bannerman Campbell, Charles Carroll, Barranell Dorsett, Jacquella Gardiner and Ashley Murray.
University of the West Indies, Jamaica, took home the win.
The CFA Research Challenge provided an opportunity for university students from the Caribbean to compete among their peers from academic institutions around the region.
Through the research challenge, university students gained access to leading industry experts and had a unique opportunity to compete with their peers from the world's top finance programs.
Teams from the University of Technology, Jamaica; University of the West Indies Cave Hill, Barbados; University College of the Cayman Islands and International College of the Cayman Islands also participated.
The annual initiative promotes best practices in equity research among the next generation of analysts through hands-on mentoring and intensive training in company analysis and presentation skills.
CFA Society President Robert Turnquest said they were impressed by the performance of the UB students in the inaugural CFA Research Challenge for the Atlantic Islands region. He said it afforded the students the experience to professionally analyze a company and present their analyses.
"As a society, we were ecstatic to see the dedication, enthusiasm and output of the students. We will continue to work with teams from University of The Bahamas in future and continue our successful relationship with UB. We congratulate the first University of The Bahamas Research Challenge team for their hard work, herculean effort, heart and tenacious spirit displayed throughout the lengthy process.
The UB team was supported by the Dean of the UB School of Business, Remelda Moxey (associate professor); Dale McHardy (lecturer); Schell Stubbs (part-time lecturer and CFA program chair board member); and other CFA Society The Bahamas (CFASB) board members Robert Turnquest (president), Karen Pinder (university relations), Velma Miller (advocacy) and Gina MacKenzie (public relations).

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An 'anything goes' society

May 15, 2017

Our society, if it's to stand the test of time and thus survive and thrive, must have a set of very definite and specific rules and regulations that are kept in place and upheld by the courts. In other words, we live by the rule of law that is, of course, in the best interest of all citizens. If we had a situation in either a city, town or country where everyone was allowed to do whatever they wanted with no laws, no rules of conduct whatsoever in place, that city, town or country would rapidly decline, as utter chaos ruled where people would do just as they liked with no laws in place to assist in keeping order.
Now I have noticed over the last decade or so, many countries, particularly the United States (U.S.) and Canada, plus many European nations, have been relaxing some of their previous laws as they modify them to suit the whims of a certain sector of the population. Now whilst in any progressive society changes to some laws do need to be put in place at times in order to keep up with the modern way of doing things, we can very easily go overboard in one direction and relax the laws to such a point that the city, town or country becomes, as stated in today's title, an 'anything goes' society. When this happens, people will eventually suffer, believe me.
Let me give you an example of what I'm talking about. Colorado was the first U.S. state to legalize the sale of marijuana in the U.S. Now, apparently, the number of automobile accidents involving stoned young people has skyrocketed. This is simply cause and effect. You lower standards and you're immediately going to lose something.

o Think about it!
Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
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Marlin Travel donates $6000 to Gambier Primary through Sandals Foundation

May 13, 2017

Situated in the historic community of Gambier, the younger students of Gambier Primary School got a treat when Canadian travel group Marlin Travel and team members from Sandals Royal Bahamian representing the Sandals Foundation paid a visit to the campus...

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BTC Doris Johnson Continue to Award Excellence
"BTC & Doris Johnson Continue to Award Excellence"

May 11, 2017

Students for February & March Recognized...Each month, Doris Johnson Senior High School recognizes three students from each grade level...

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Bahamian medical students awarded CIBC FirstCaribbean scholarships

May 08, 2017

Bahamian medical students Yamir Smith and Emma Tuletta, who are studying psychology at the University of the West Indies, were among a cohort of 15 from around the Caribbean to benefit from this year's CIBC FirstCaribbean Scholarship.
Scholarships totaling $37,500 were awarded to outstanding undergraduate students from The Bahamas as well as Barbados, Jamaica, and Trinidad and Tobago.
Corporate donors of the University of the West Indies were praised for their continued support of the university, especially in trying financial times, as Sir Paul Altman, chairman of the campus council at Cave Hill, said that access to funding was critical for the success of students.
In his address to the 14th annual students awards ceremony at the Cave Hill campus recently, Altman said the faithful donor partners had demonstrated an understanding of the importance of investing in the region's people.
CIBC First Caribbean was singled out as the largest donor and for its commitment to the campus. Since 2003, the bank has donated 15 one-year scholarships valued at $2,500 each across a number of disciplines.
Professor Eduine Barriteau, pro-vice chancellor and principal of Cave Hill, said the lifelines the scholarships offer enable many students to achieve their goals, which, in many cases, could not have been realized otherwise.
"It is the generosity of our benefactors that makes our annual student awards ceremony possible," said Barriteau.

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