Education

Q.C. inducts six into hall of fame number of inductees rises to 10

February 06, 2017

Six people have been inducted into the Queen's College (Q.C.) Hall of Fame by the school's board of governors for their contributions to their communities, school, profession and society as a whole.
Hartis E. Pinder, Marvin V. Bethell, Harriett E. Pratt, Oswald C. Munnings, Dr. Desiree Cox and John Robertson were the latest to be inducted at an event dubbed "Henceforth Celebratory Event" at the Crown Ballroom at the Atlantis resort.
The latest inductions brought the hall of fame members to 10. They join the first set of inductees, Reverend Charles A. Sweeting, Sir Durward Knowles, the late Captain Geoffrey Brown and the late Dr. Keva Bethel.
The Hall of Fame was initiated in 2003 to pay tribute to illustrious men and women who have made significant contributions to their communities, schools, professions and society as a whole.
At the event, 18 staff members were honored for their long service and commitment to the school, having served for 20 years or more and collectively having given 526 years of service to the institution.
The longest serving staff member currently employed at the school is Virginia Minnis, vice principal and head of foundation years. She began her career with Q.C. in 1978 and has completed 38 years of service.
Other long-service awards were meted out to 37-year staff members Sherry Allen, administrative support, and Veronica Roberts, librarian, primary years; Sylvia Beneby, vice principal, head of primary years (34 years); Debra Andrews, administrative support, and Cassandra Bowles, careers counselor (33 years); Maria Tsavoussis, deputy head, high school curriculum (32 years); Gregory Deane, head of the modern languages department, high school (31 years); Delice Lynch, human resources officer, and Angela Culmer, deputy head, primary and foundation years (29 years); Wilhelmenia Shearer, administrative support (28 years); Celia Hoare, English department teacher high school, and Kathryn Winterbottom, primary years teacher (26 years); Shawn Turnquest, vice principal, head of high school (25 years); Florence Sweeting, facilities department (23 years); Rosemary Wilson, facilities department, and Marion De Souza, school nurse (22 years); and Wayne Sawyer, facilities department (21 years).
Reverend Christopher H. Neely, president of The Bahamas Conference of the Methodist Church (BCMC); Dr. Reginald W. Eldon, director of education and training (BCMC); Andrea U. Gibson, Q.C. principal; Rev. Kenris L. Carey, president emerita (BCMC); and members of the school's board of governors said the event served as an affirmation for the honorees who were celebrated for their contributions as effective stewards of the Q.C. legacy. It was a testimony to the diversity and strength of Q.C., and showed that it takes many people to keep Q.C. on the cutting edge of progressive education.

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Team Generali, Ubuntu Challenge raise over 12K to support Afrikids project

February 06, 2017

The Bahamas' Ralpha Moxey was among nine men and women from Generali Worldwide to learn the true meaning of the word "Ubuntu", which means "I am, because we are", encompassing the idea of teamwork, collective ownership and compassion for others. Moxey and the nine other men and women have returned home from a life-changing trip to northern Ghana, where their objective was to learn more about the impact of Generali's partnership with Afrikids and Alquity.
Afrikids delivers award-winning projects that help the communities the volunteers visit during their trip.
Alquity's mission is to transform how people invest, and to achieve significant returns while creating a better, fairer world for all. It does this by investing in companies that care about the communities within which it operates, and by allocating up to 25 percent of its fee revenues back into the economy.
A percentage of the investments Generali has made into the Alquity Africa Fund has been supported transformational projects on the continent and helped people to lift themselves out of poverty.
As well as learning about the charity's work first hand, the team spent three days living alongside host families in a remote village.
In northern Ghana, 70 percent of the population lives on less than $1 per day. Team Generali and the Ubuntu Challenge raised over $12,500 toward supporting Afrikids' Opening Doors to Schools project. The initiative aims to improve basic education for children in 60 schools in the Talensi, Nabdam and Bolgatanga districts in the upper east region of northern Ghana.
The project has already touched the lives of over 25,000 children. Enrollment at schools has increased by 20 percent; completion and pass rates have also increased. From buying school uniforms to improving enrollment, retention and academic achievements, the project is said to be making a real difference.
Moxey and the team spent their first day in Bolgatanga, Ghana, the capital of the northern region, learning about Afrikids' work and how the Generali-Afrikids-Alquity partnership is making a real difference in Ghana.
The team witnessed the impact of projects like the School of Night Rabbits, which was set up to get homeless children back into the education system and out of the never-ending cycle of long-term poverty.
"The most challenging aspect for me was the language barrier," said Moxey. "My host, Alizeta, spoke absolutely no English; and though we were provided with a few common FraFra phrases, it was still quite difficult to communicate in a really meaningful way. Thankfully though, two of Alizeta's older daughters speak a bit of English, so when they were home from school we had means for translation."
The farewell gathering in Sirigu was one of the things Moxey found touching. It was there that she learned her host doesn't speak any English because she never had the opportunity to go to school; because of that reason Alizeta does all she can to ensure that her children go to school.
"It really reinforced the point that many of the things that we may take for granted as rights, are privileges for them," said Moxey.
"I was incredibly impressed by Alizeta's tenacity and work ethic. Every morning she was up before dawn getting the kids ready for school, making breakfast and preparing for the market. She and her family manage a stall selling grains, beans, seasonings etc. We would return home in the evenings to fetch water, clean up and begin preparing for dinner, which most nights Alizeta would cook well after dark, somehow balancing a flashlight between her face and shoulder with incredible talent."
Moxey's favorite memory is of her final night at the compound.
"We were all sitting around in the common area -- Alizeta, the girls, her mother, and a couple of the neighbors. One of the neighbor girls, Aliatu, said that she wanted to share some of their traditional stories with me. The stars were so majestic that night, and the thought that I was sitting there listening to stories that had passed on from generation to generation -- that were now being passed on to me, literally brought tears to my eyes. Someday I hope to share those stories with children of my own."
In Ghana, Moxey was joined by Generali ambassadors from around the world -- David Quinn, Navan, Ireland; Bernard Haughey, Navan, Ireland; Ian Hackeson, Guernsey; Jo Smeed, Guernsey; Paida Mudzi, Guernsey; Nicola Shakerley, Guernsey; Lorna Carolan, Navan, Ireland; and Rick Felbabel, Guernsey.

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Doris Johnson and BTC recognize three males in student of the month program

February 06, 2017

Ashton McDonald, Edward Munroe and Eleazor Goodman were recognized for their athletic aspirations by BTC in Doris Johnson Senior High School's student of the month program.
The 10th through 12th grade students received smart phones and cash incentives from BTC in the program that encourages students to go the extra mile, according to school principal James Clarke.
Every month, Doris Johnson Senior High School identifies one student from each grade level in the program.
BTC public relations manager Indira Collie said it takes a village to raise a child and BTC continues to play an active role in building a better future for The Bahamas.
"Incentives like these go a long way in proving to our children that hard work does have its merits," said Collie.
BTC has five adopted schools in New Providence and over 30 schools nationwide.

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BAMSI hosts Taylor University honor students

February 06, 2017

Taylor University's first year honor students were given an overview of The Bahamas' agricultural industry, as well as a historical perspective of its development and the concerns that necessitated the establishment of the Bahamas Agriculture and Marine Science Institute (BAMSI).
The 40 students from Indiana participated in an environmental science course that focused on small island sustainability during the study abroad opportunity the university offers every January.
Led by Dr. Michael Gueberts, chair of Taylor University's department of earth and environmental science, and his assistant, Armilia Francis, the students were in The Bahamas for almost two weeks researching how agriculture and food systems relate to sustainability in this island nation. The study, conducted on San Salvador and New Providence, looked at various systems that support the community -- food, water, waste and other natural systems.
At a reception for the students at St. Matthew's Parish Hall, BAMSI President Godfrey Eneas spoke to the students about the country's agriculture industry.
Eneas, who also serves as the Bahamas ambassador to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, (FAO) told the Taylor University students that, 40 years ago, The Bahamas was farming nearly 90,000 acres of land using traditional methods such as pothole farming, and slash and burn, but today the number of acres being farmed is less than 10,000. As such, Eneas emphasized BAMSI's role as an agent of expansion and advancement, which focuses on increasing the size of this nation's farmed acreage, bringing more Bahamians into the sector and implementing sustainable measures that support the evolution of the industry and incorporate a level of food security. He told the students that BAMSI would achieve the objectives through a multi-pronged approach -- its outreach initiative, the Associated Farmer's Programme (AFP), its tutorial and commercial farms as well as the marine component and the academic arm.
Eneas highlighted the pressures faced by small island states throughout the Caribbean which struggle with astronomical food import bills. This situation, he said, arose not only in response to the region's need to satisfy the demands of a financially strapped populace and millions of migrants who cross borders as tourists every year, but also because of geopolitical influences and trade pressure.
The results of this new agricultural era were the Caribbean being identified as a food deficit region, with food imports out-pricing local production; an increase in poverty and hunger; and an overall decline in health.
Taylor University has strong ties to The Bahamas and a significant alumni presence in The Bahamas. Current Bahamian student Karissa Moss facilitated the meeting. She was excited to share with her fellow students the role BAMSI is playing in developing the country's agriculture industry through sustainable initiatives. Dr. Raveenia Roberts-Hanna, executive director of BAMSI's academic arm, said the visit by Taylor University's students was in line with BAMSI's mandate to partner with international centers of higher learning, sharing information, research, technologies and exposing students to BAMSI's core mission.

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Always be respectful

February 06, 2017

Let me commence here today by asking you a very simple straightforward question, Do you like others to respect you? Well what's your honest answer to that question? I'm quite sure it's in the affirmative for just about all of my valued readers, wherever in the world you may be. Well then, if you want others to respect you, firstly you need to fully understand the fact that respect cannot be demanded by anyone -- I don't care what your position or standing in the world may be. It must be earned. Yes it mus.
I have to laugh when I hear many people stating that we must respect this person or that person, perhaps the general manager of the company we work for, or the leader of the particular country we live in. But my friend, as Dr. Denis Waitley puts it quite clearly and succinctly in his book "The Winner's Edge" -- "No one can demand respect. It must be earned." Yes indeed it must. I mean it's really just plain old common sense, that if you always be respectful as today's title instructs you, it stands to reason that you too will be respected by one and all.
I guess it gets back to another article that I wrote a while back titled "Give What You Want". Yes indeed, we get back to the universal law which governs the universe and our individual life, what we put out each and every day, we will, we must receive in return, so always be respectful.
Of course so much of what I propose in these articles is just plain old common sense. You can't expect to be respected by those whom you daily disrespect. Yes indeed, if only every single soul living on planet earth today was always being respectful to one and all, each and every day, I'm sure we'd have a much better and indeed more peaceful world.

o Think about it!
Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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BTC Lends a Helping Hand to Educultur

February 02, 2017

BTC restored hope to the founders and operators of Educulture Bahamas Limited by replacing electronics to the facility. Just days prior to the Boxing Day Junkanoo Parade, the facility was broken into and vandalized. BTC provided three desktop computers and a smart television to Educulture...

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PM Calls for Understanding Between Private and Public Educational Institutions

February 01, 2017

It was during a luncheon for the Founders of the West Grand Bahama Youth Development Association when Prime Minister Perry Christie got the full picture of the work being carried out, not just by the Association, but by the Total Education Centre in Grand Bahama...

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Strengthening of Alliances Expected from 9th Inter-American Meeting of Ministers of Education

February 01, 2017

Building and strengthening of alliances are among the expected outcomes of the 9th Inter-American Meeting of Ministers of Education scheduled to take place February 9-10 at Atlantis, Paradise Island...

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Fitzgerald: We've done all we can to end school violence
Fitzgerald: We've done all we can to end school violence

February 01, 2017

EDUCATION Minister Jerome Fitzgerald yesterday said the onus for recent violent incidents on school campuses must fall on the wider society, further lamenting that officials have done everything they can to stop school violence...

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7th grade student had gun on campus
7th grade student had gun on campus

February 01, 2017

A SEVENTH grade male student of AF Adderley Junior High School brought a gun on the school's campus Monday and was arrested by police, officials confirmed yesterday...

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Naomi Blatch Pre-School visits Police Headquarters -Fire Services Divsion

January 30, 2017

Sixty pre-school students of Naomi Blatch Pre-School along with their principal, Joyann Wells, and teachers visited Police Headquarters, Fire Services Division, January 27, 2017 to learn about fire safety and understand the functioning of the fire station...

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Going the extra mile

January 30, 2017

While many teachers are deserving of praise for the extras they do to ensure their students' success, Vonchelle Cooper, a third grade teacher at Nassau Christian Academy (NCA) is one of them. She not only offers her students verbal incentives, but also gives tangible incentives. Despite the fact that she teaches a class with 28 students, she wants each student to leave her knowing that she always believed in them when they look back at their formative year with her. For the academic year that they are with her, she wants to instill in them that she could be teaching the country's next prime minister, that she could have the person who might have the cure for cancer or the person who might be the commodore of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force.
These are thoughts the 26-year veteran verbally instills in her students each school year, which she hopes will take root and germinate in the future. However, in the immediate term, and in a way the seven and eight-year-olds understand and appreciate, she provides incentives to encourage her students to strive to do better and be the best they can be now.
"Knowledge and what you have in your head is something that no one can take from you. And when you are qualified, you can demand the value placed as an employee anywhere," says Cooper.
At the beginning of the academic year when she's meeting her students for the first time, Cooper informs them of what she expects from them. As they are all new to each other, she also lets them know that they are all starting out on the same playing field, and that they are all in the running for the incentive awards; they just have to do what needs to be done to earn the awards.
At the end of each school term, for the past nine years, Cooper has given incentive awards to the top male and female students with the highest grade point average. She also gives an award for good behavior, focusing on student Christian character development. The student who receives that incentive award is one who is caring, the person who she sees in class encouraging a peer, or who will step up to say they have an extra sandwich or drink if a classmate does not have lunch. She also gives an award to the most improved student.
"They may have come into third grade struggling, but after I've read their confidentials to see what their weak points or strong points are, I normally give the students six weeks, because by then I can basically tell who is going to have difficulty working and keeping up with the standard for third grade. So I watch them and encourage them," she said.

Term one top students
At the end of her first term this year, Deja Taylor and Breuanna Thompson finished with the same grade point average (GPA) for the girls, and Patrick Mackey was the top male student. Richard Glinton was the runner-up. She noted that Glinton had started out slowly at the beginning of the year, but gained noticeable ground; she said in his term one final examination, his average was noticeably improved.
"You could see that time and effort was put into him -- studying, reviewing and knowing the information."
Cooper treated the students to lunch on a Saturday afternoon at Outback Steakhouse.
The students were even allowed to choose a dress theme for their outing and the colors they would wear. They chose for everyone to wear white tops with blue jeans, a dress code that Cooper also had to adhere to.
The outing presented her with another opportunity to educate her students on etiquette -- how to hold their utensils, placing their napkins on their laps and making sure that elbows weren't on the table.
After their first incentive award she said the students went back to school excited about working hard and eager to claim the second term incentive awards.
The top boy, top girl and the most improved student will receive gift certificates to the store of their choice at the Mall at Marathon. Cooper normally gives the top student a $50 gift certificate; the second highest average student will get a $40 gift certificate; and the most improved student will get a $25 gift certificate.
"They've made it even more competitive... because Richard told Philip, 'Boy you ain't gon' beat me this second term. I getting that gift certificate.' So it's competitive. When they do any test or quiz, they're like, 'What you got?' or 'I'm studying.' You see that they're making that effort to really review the material."
She has definitely had some surprises over the years, with someone who wasn't on her radar upending everything between the first and later semesters.
"I've seen my GLAT (Grade Level Assessment Test) grades improve to where I had 15 students who may have had all As and one B or all As and two Bs in the national. The year before I took a student out of nowhere -- this child, their average may have been a C-minus, and they were able to pull up to high Bs, low As; and in GLAT the student performed even better than I expected."
While the top students receive handsome rewards during the academic year, in an effort to ensure that none of her children ever feel that their efforts weren't good enough, Cooper has a family event for the class in May at the bowling alley.

Program inception
Cooper started the incentive program while teaching at Temple Christian Schools. She implemented it there for two years before she transferred to NCA, where she continued it.
"What I noticed was that the children seemed not to be motivated. I brainstormed about what I could do to get these kids to take more interest in their schoolwork and to show them that good work pays off."
When she first started the program, the teacher gave out reading books, puzzles and gift certificates; she graduated to taking the children to Mr. Pretzels when it was open; she moved on to lunch and dinners as well as the gift certificates.
She continues incentives throughout the school year for students who are struggling.
"If I'm out shopping, and if I know a child is struggling with math, I'd get them a math workbook. If I know they're struggling with phonics... I get them a book to encourage them with reading."
The veteran teacher said over her many years in education she has noticed that Bahamians do not like to read.
"We like to ask questions. We like to be told. What I did to encourage reading amongst my students is I would give them a book, but to ensure they were reading, they had to give me a summary, whether it was oral, whether they wanted to write it out..."
Cooper said she has had many students who come into her third grade class struggling to read. She said parents need to know the difference between their children being able to read and 'calling' words.
"Reading is understanding and the comprehension. So I keep saying to my parents, 'Oh your children are great callers of words. They can call words, but they're not readers'. And they would look at me strange and say. 'What are you talking about?' But when I say a child is a reader, I know I can give them a piece of material, they can read it, and they can interpret it and answer comprehension questions using logic," she said.
Regarding financing her incentive program, the teacher said, "God is good, and when you are a tither, God says he will hold back the hands of the devourer concerning you, and so I plan for it. She enters asues or set aside funds she earns from her private tutoring to finance her incentive program.

A family-centric classroom
The teacher also runs a family-centric class. Every year she encourages her students to think of themselves as one big family.
"From the beginning of the year when I meet them that first day in August... that first day of school, I tell them that grade three Cooper is a family, and family takes care of one another and my children are able to quote that and say that. And that means no one gets left behind, no one is left out."
The golden rule in Cooper's classroom is for students to treat their peers the way they want to be treated.
"If you don't want someone to do something to you, before you react and do it to that person, always ask yourself, 'Would I want this to happen to me?' So I very rarely have the rifts," said the teacher. "I could have the one or two with strong personalities, and I may have to pull them aside, or sometimes I may have to openly scold them in the front of the class so that children are not intimidated and feel that they can't come to me and say they're being bullied or something is going on and they feel fearful. They know I will not tolerate it, number one, and because I continue to say we are a family, we have less rifts and troubles in the class."
Cooper who has taught grade levels from K5 through third grade during her two-plus decades in the classroom said she still has former students who come to her with teacher appreciation gifts.
"Not everyone will show their appreciation or even come back to say thank you, but what I get out of it, when I see my students doing well, and saying 'Mrs. Cooper I'm now matriculating into university or college and going to pursue this... pursue that', and you see them and they're doing well -- they're not wasting their time, that is my satisfaction."
While she strives to do her part to ensure that her children excel academically, Cooper said parents are just as important in the process and she would like to see more of them involved.
"Too many times we have where, once people are paying the school fees, they feel as if the brunt of this is on teachers and on the school to train, to educate."
She said when the parents, homelife and the teachers work together, it works. She said parents have to prioritize their children's best interest.
"Too many times it's the gadgets, the clothes, the latest fad, and education is put on the backburner," said Cooper who is also NCA's grade three level leader.
In doing what she does she also said she has a team of hardworking teachers who love their job and see it as a ministry behind her, in the persons of Stancia Lockhart, Daywan Wilson and Terry Miller. Cooper said the trio help to make her look good.

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Disgusting behavior brings disgusting results

January 30, 2017

I remember well a participant in a seminar I was facilitating many years ago requesting a meeting with me after the seminar. He said that he had some problems in his life that he'd like to discuss with me. So after the afternoon session finished and everyone had left we sat down and I asked him what his problem was. He started by telling me that it appeared that his whole life was in a mess. He said, that he didn't appear to be able to get along with anyone at work, and that when he went home in the evening to his wife and children, everything was also most unpleasant with constant arguments erupting between him, his wife and the children.
I told him that I felt he and perhaps his spouse needed to get some in-depth counseling. However, I did endeavor to put him in touch with the concept that we all have to in the long run accept full responsibility for what is happening in our lives. He looked at me in a rather puzzled manner and said, "You mean it's all my fault?" I replied, well maybe it is and maybe it isn't, but I also emphasized what I spoke about in the seminar and that was about the law of cause and effect, that what we put out daily in the form of thoughts, words and actions will, it must eventually return to us or as the title of this particular article simply and succinctly puts it, disgusting behavior brings disgusting results. Yes it does.
When I finally got back home after a three week trip to The Pacific and Far East, I received a heartwarming letter from this person who had sought my assistance, stating that he and his wife had commenced counseling and that things were running a lot smoother, both at work and at home as he became aware of some of his annoying behavior traits, which he had changed.

o Think about it!
Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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Bamsi Hosts Students From Taylor University

January 26, 2017

THE Bahamas Agriculture & Marine Science Institute (BAMSI) recently hosted 40 students from Taylor University in Indiana, USA, to a special reception at St Matthew’s Parish Hall. BAMSI President Godfrey Eneas, who also serves as the Bahamas ambassador to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation...

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National Development Plan presented at BTVI

January 24, 2017

The Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute’s staff, faculty and students were recently presented with a thorough breakdown of the government's National Development Plan (NDP)...

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Customs Department in GB Assists Barlett Hill Primary

January 24, 2017

Members of the Customs Department assisted Bartlett Hill Primary School with their relocation efforts on Tuesday, January 24, 2017, after being displaced following Hurricane Matthew in early October...

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BREEF-Bahamas Environmental Steward Scholard BESS
BREEF-Bahamas Environmental Steward Scholard (BESS)

January 23, 2017

Bahamas Environmental Steward Scholar (BESS) Andrieka Burrows participated in a three-day kayak and eight day sailing trip around southern Eleuthera...

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School brawl renews call for government tracking system

January 23, 2017

A brawl at the Government High School on Thursday resulted in one student detained in hospital in critical and two more were treated and later discharged. Parents were understandably outraged as they showed up to the school to check on and collect their children...

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The next level

January 23, 2017

Windsor High School at Albany, an elite boarding high school and athletic academy, which will open its doors in fall 2017 under the leadership of Director Lisa McCartney, was officially launched last week at Aviva Beach at Albany with plans to offer a rare academic and athletic upper school experience.
Set within the gated community of Albany, Windsor High School will cater to students ages 14 to 19, who are ready to challenge themselves to be the best they can be, according to McCartney.
The institution is a registered Cambridge school, offering IGCSE (International General Certificate of Secondary Education), AS and A-Level programs and qualifications. Students will have the opportunity to earn the necessary credits toward U.S. universities, and will be prepared for entrance exams, such as the PSAT (Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test), SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test) and ACT (American College Test).
Windsor will offer day and boarding school programs, along with flexi-boarding, which will be open to day students who may need to stay on campus for short-term stays in instances when their parents may be traveling.
The school will follow the United Kingdom high school system; years 10 through 13 will be equivalent to American grades nine through 12.
Windsor will afford a select group of students pursuing athletic excellence in certain sports the opportunity to do so while being at school with a group of peers, without sacrificing the typical social school experience. The Albany Golf Academy and Albany Tennis Academy will offer athletic and training academies by coaches Mitchell Spearman, a top golf instructor, and former world number one tennis player Lleyton Hewitt, respectively.
At Windsor, the aim will be to develop the full potential within each student. With a focus on education, sports and personal enrichment, the school environment, McCartney says, will foster an environment where time-honored educational practices and rigorous athletic training meet an impassioned value system, with the aim to shape and develop the next generation of leaders.
"I'm excited about the opportunities that we've now created for our young people. I'm excited about the opportunities for growth, the opportunities for exposure that aren't readily available to children on the island," said the director.
Windsor's vision is to see graduates who are confident, engaged, reflective, innovative and responsible global citizens.
Academic subjects offered include English (language and literature), languages, sciences, mathematics, art and design, business studies, economics, environmental management, global studies, computer studies, history, music, photography, physical education, physical science and psychology.
"The new campus will attract young aspiring golfers and tennis players to start with. We're marketing it now globally to junior tennis players and junior golfers, leveraging the beautiful weather in The Bahamas, and the amazing facilities that Albany boasts," said McCartney.
An added incentive will be the school's scholarship program for both student athletes and those students who excel academically.
Windsor will be able to accommodate 50 boarders on day one. The school's flexi-board program will allow the institution's day students to stay for a week at the boarding house, space contingent, in the event that their parents may be traveling.
"The idea is, if I'm going away for a week, I can leave my kid and I know that she's fed, her homework is done, she gets to school safely and she has a good time living at Albany for a week," said McCartney.
Windsor's fees are $30,000 per year for boarding students. Day student fees range from $17,000 to $22,500.
Flexi-boarding runs about $150 to $170 per night.
With a few verbal commitments expressed in the boarding program, the director says they are in the process of sending out registration material and the procedures for student enrollment.
"We're talking to a husband and wife team that currently work with me, who are teachers. The husband's been a boarder; they're both master's degreed teachers, and they have a family. They are excellent with children and have a great reputation among the school community. They are our most likely candidates to run the boarding school," she said.
"A lot of families choose to send their kids away to boarding school from The Bahamas, and it's not because of a lack of an amazing education, it's exposure on another level... it's all the other things that come along -- the social."
As such, Windsor will also provide an avenue for Family Islanders who want their children to pursue high school education in the capital.
"What we've done is we've created an opportunity to create a new social dynamic amongst the high school community in The Bahamas, so I'm most excited for children that will now have exposure to all that they have exposure to."
The boarding school component is just one component of the new Windsor High School. They have developed five disciplines around which the school is built -- sports, creative arts, business studies, marine sciences and music production.
In the creative arts division, Windsor is investing in a program that enables a child who wants to be a fashion designer to continue his or her dreams. One of McCartney's ninth grade students is already taking college level courses at Parson's School of Design, New York. Those types of connections, she said, are what they are hoping to foster and the type of exposure they like to give to their children.
Following the Cambridge business studies model, McCartney said the school has created a lecture series involving some of the world's top business people who are residents, landowners and visitors to Albany, to speak to their business studies students.
"The idea is to expose our high school students to people who are world leaders in business at high school when they are creative, and yearning to learn. I'm really excited about the business studies aspect of it and our lecture series."
Windsor's marine sciences program, she said, will also provide amazing exposure for their students.
"Albany has given us use of their boats. They have boats docked in the marina all day long, during school hours that are not being used, and they said to us to use them. The idea is for kids to walk out of our backdoor to the marina, jump on a boat and go and have field studies in the beautiful oceans of The Bahamas. What better laboratory is there for a marine sciences program?"
The school's music production is another area that she's excited about, and they are again partnering with Albany for the program. Aspiring music learners will have access to Albany's recording studio, Sanctuary.
"There is so much more to the school than the boarding and the sports -- the boarding and the sports is just two more amazing components," said McCartney.
A school that helps children to strive to reach their full potential is what the director said she is striving for the Windsor High School at Albany.
"I would love to be the school that inspires amazing things from its students, and I think we're well on the way with creating the Albany campus. And I yearn to inspire these children to reach their full potential."
The Windsor School at Albany will sit on a 25-acre campus. Building one will house the main administration building as well as 12 classrooms. An additional four classrooms will be in the second building, which will be the creative arts block. The school's third building will contain the cafeteria, and the fourth building is the dorm, which will have 25 double occupancy rooms and a two-bedroom apartment for the dorm parents.
The school will also boast a 25-meter swimming pool, a gym facility on campus exclusively for the students, a full-sized soccer pitch, track and six tennis courts.
As of last week, McCartney said they are well on their way to being completed for the new school year. The roofs of the creative arts and cafeteria structures have been completed. Those buildings were awaiting windows. The roof on the main 12-classroom block was three-quarters of the way complete; the dorm was at belt course, and McCartney anticipated the roof would be completed in the next few weeks. The frame of the gym was up and should be completed within the next three weeks.
"We are very much on schedule for opening with the next academic year," said McCartney. "I'm really excited to have been a part of, and have a hand in something that did not exist, and that really excites me. And I'm thrilled that our students have an opportunity to thrive in an environment that's unparalleled."

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