Search results for : moss

Showing 811 to 840 of 1000 results


News Article
Harriot Cargill Coakley, 82
Harriot Cargill Coakley, 82

Funeral service for Mrs. Harriot Cargill Coakley, 82 yrs., a resident of Small Hope, Andros, who died on 3rd December, 2011, will be held at Central Church of God, Small Hope, Andros, on Saturday at 10:30 a.m.

read more »


News Article
Harrison John Kelly, 83
Harrison John Kelly, 83

Funeral Service for Brother Harrison John Kelly age 83 affectionately called "Pa" of Lower Bogue Eleuthera, who died December 29th at his residence, will be held on Saturday 10:00 a.m. at Charles Wesley Methodist Church Lower Bogue Eleuthera.

read more »


News Article
Has the DNA thrown in the towel

Dear Editor,

The Democratic National Alliance (DNA) celebrated its one year anniversary on May 12, 2012. This is a noteworthy accomplishment given the respectable support that it received during the last general election. The DNA hosted several town hall meetings, street meetings and even several "mass rallies". They were also able to nominate a full slate of candidates in a general election; an historic feat in Bahamian politics.
I am of the view that because the DNA had many triumphs in just one year that in five more years the sky would be the limit for this party. Success only comes though with continued hard work. Since the general election of May 7, 2012 the DNA's camp has been noticeably quiet. There was the concession speech by Mr. Branville McCartney, the party's current leader and a press statement by current chairman, Mr. Mark Humes.
Nearly one month has passed and the public at large has yet to hear of the plans going forward of the DNA. This in my view will not deepen the DNA's base and is threading on irresponsibility. In fact this nonchalant approach may well cause its base to erode. Has the DNA stopped trying to deepen the democracy in The Bahamas? Has the DNA followed the predictable path of former third parties who lost at the polls and threw in the towel?
Many Bahamians have expressed their desire to vote for the DNA the next time around and many of them say that if the DNA continues its pre-election agenda, that it will at the least be the official opposition in 2017. Many Bahamians are hoping for the demise of the Free National Movement (FNM) and are plotting that in 2017, the FNM will not be elected to office.
I can say emphatically that the FNM is a well-established institution and in 2017 they will again be a major contender for the Government of the Bahamas. The same cannot be currently said for the DNA but if they were to regroup, they will again adversely affect the FNM's performance in 2017.
This is a critical period for the DNA because it must quickly decide if it will continue on with its message of change for The Bahamas or if it will give up its mandate and sink into oblivion. History I can tell you is not on the DNA's side.
The DNA fully expected to win several seats in the last general election and even though the consensus amongst the majority of Bahamians is that the DNA performed well, insiders know that the loss for the DNA was a crushing blow. But if the DNA is really serious about change, the fight will continue. If feelings of disappointment still exist, I want to say that these are normal occurrences. But life must go on. Confucius once said, "Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall".
The DNA failed to win the government of The Bahamas. The question is, will the loss cause them to rise or has the defeat sealed the DNA's fate? I say to the DNA party leader and its executive members that one month has now passed and it is high time that they get back to the drawing board and make public their course of action. Thirteen thousand Bahamians voted for change and this commitment deserves at least a public announcement of the party's direction.
There have been at least 50 stories that the DNA could have addressed since the May 7 general election. The FNM has already regrouped and they are trying to mount an effective opposition to the current government. They have elected a new leader, deputy leader, chairman and all its party officers. They have set their goal of retaining the government of The Bahamas in 2017. The same cannot be said for the DNA.
One month of silence for a political party, whether it is 40-years-old or one-year-old in my view is an attempt either knowingly or unknowingly at political suicide. I would admonish the DNA to take a page out of the Bahamas Democratic Movement's (BDM) book after the 2007 general election. They were relentless in their opposition to what they perceived as bad policies by the then governing FNM party and the opposition PLP.
The DNA will not be a contender in the next general elections if their silence continues. Whether they have thrown in the towel or not is any one's guess. But they have a responsibility to come to the people and state their future plans.

- Dehavilland Moss

read more »


News Article
Hazel Synthia munroe-Ramsey, 74

Funeral service for Hazel Synthia munroe-Ramsey, 74 yrs., a resident of Malcolm Road, who died on 31st December, 2011, will be held at St. Joseph's Catholic Church, Boyd Road, on Saturday at 2:00 p.m. Officiating will be Msgr. Alfred Culmer. Interment follows in Southern Cemetery, Cowpen & Spikenard Roads.
Left to cherish her memories are her 1 son: Salathiel Dean; grandchildren: Salathiel Dean Jr., Natavia, Antonio, Delano, Teko & Keno Dean, Lehona & Kevin; great grandchildren: Alvin, Jewel Dean & Christia Thompson; 2 brothers: Cedrick & Bernard Ramsey; adopted sister: Vernie Russell of Freeport, Grand Bahama; 1 daughter-in-law: Victoria Dean; granddaughter-in-law: Stacy Dean; 1 brother-in-law: Dereck Jackson Sr.; sister-in-law: Rosemary Adderley; numerous nieces & nephews: Barry and Sharon McPhee, Ricardo Newbold Sr., Barry and Shawnell Dorsette, Lavardo and Angel Jackson, Jennifer, Shakera, Jermaine and Tameko Jackson, Monique Barton, Rochelle Moss, Denise Pratt, Joycelyn, Joan, Samantha, Edwin Jr., Paul, Carlos, Gino, Ingrid Ramsey, Jacqueline Neely, Shanique and Shirley Adderley, Daniel Durrant, Albertha, Eugene Jr. & Sr., Julian and Javon Brice, Jimmy and Rosemond St. Suerin, Sean Kennedy Sr., Chadwick Kemp, Janet Taylor and Lavardo McQueen, Jamal and Tamara Gibson, Shanreese Gibson, Latoya McPhee, Rashanda and Hugh Johnson, Candice and Mandel Miller, Shantia and Kevin Cooper, Kandal Leadon and Kenneth Evans; grand nieces & nephews: Curtis Walkes, Sean Kennedy, Barrise, Barrinek and Barry McPhee Jr., Terranique Lightbourne, Ramona, Renicka and Ricardo Newbold Jr., Kendeece and Kenreese Leadon, Kevin, Kemron, Shantino and Keano Cooper, Princess and Jordan Gibson, Latwon Fernander Kenneth Evans Jr., Shanyiah Miller, Madison Johnson, Taneko Taylor, Barrise, Barranell, Barry Dorsette Jr., Justin Hanna, Kiara Ferguson, Kendal Munroe Jr., Aziah Jackson, Tess, Michael, Dante, Edwin, Shaquille, Rashad, Edricka, Orecia, Aalyiah, Sasha, Asharon, Shantera and Laterio; 1 aunt: Evelyn Wallace; numerous cousins: Fanny, Syl, Wendy, Sandra, Gloria Lundy, Carnet and Lloyd Rollens, Gloria Wallace, Dorothy Strachan, Patsy Newry, Ann, Reymond, Paul Armbrister, Charlotte Rolle & Troy Laverity; other relatives & friends: the Wallace family, the Munroe family, Malvies Rahming, Sandra Rahming, Gwendolyn Cartwright, Antonia, Maxene Ramsey, Petty Pratt, Theresa and Alphy Bethel, Ministry of Health Welding Department, the West Street, King Street and Wellington Street families & the entire Bain Town community, the Female Medical I of Princess Margaret Hospital, and others too numerous to mention.
Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday from 9-12:00 noon & at the church from 1:00 p.m. until service time.

read more »


News Article
He's so sweet

By SHAVAUGHN MOSS
Lifestyles Editor
shavaughn@nasguard.com
She's been known as the Queen of Junkanoo and Rake'n'Scrape, but the artist formerly known as"Sweet Emily" is now a queen for the Lord, and the title that best fits her is Evangelist Emily. It is that woman who had an encounter with the Lord seven years ago and converted to serve him who is now releasing her first gospel CD to the Bahamian public in a surprise musical twist--reggae.
Williams recently released"My Testimony"a CD which has 10 reggae tracks all performed to reggae beats. It was an album which she said the Lord directed and mandated that she do. Seven years since her conversion, there are fans who ha ...

read more »


News Article
Herbert Walkes, 97

Memorial Service for Herbert Walkes, 97, Resident of Eneas Jumper Corner, will be held on Saturday September 10th, 2011, at 11 am, at Evangelistic Pentecostal Church Bahamas Inc., Nassau, Bahamas, officiating will be Bishop Deon Mott, assisted by Pastor Jermaine Jones & other ministers of the Gospel, organist Deondre Mott, Cremation will follow.

He is survived by his wife of 10 years, Thelma Walkes, sons, Minister Herbert Walkes Jr., Pastor Rosco & Alexander & Floyd Walkes, daughters, Mary Rolle, Iris Dean, Sandra Walkes, Buelah Fowler, Marie Evans, Joan Walkes, Emmie Walkes, Jennifer Roberts, Mildred Jean-Pierre, Mavis Walkes, Carolyn Bain, Rosalie Moss, Florance Cooper, Ruthmae Mott, J ...

read more »


News Article
Hibiscus plants can be propagated by cuttings

Q. I have a beautiful yellow hibiscus plant that I want to multiply to make a hedge. Can I?propagate this plant by taking cuttings, and how long would it take?
— C.I., Fox Hill

A. Hibiscus is easily propagated from cuttings. An eight to 12-inch stem section with about two to three leaves left on the stem section makes a good cutting. Dip your cutting in Rootone Powder and bury it two to three inches in a seed-starting medium. Keep the cuttings moist and they should root in less than two months. However, depending on the variety, you may find that air-layering (mossing) the branches will produce faster and sturdier plants.

Q. I am a young Baha ...

read more »


News Article
Higgs leads the way for Team Bahamas

Two gold medals and several final appearances was how Bahamian swimmer Margaret Albury Higgs closed day three of competition in the annual CARIFTA Swimming Championships, here at the Betty Kelly Kenning National Aquatics Complex.

read more »


News Article
High marks, nothing but praise for Team Bahamas

By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

NEW DELHI, India -- Team Bahamas left New Delhi on Thursday night and, led by the boxing double bronze medal duo of Carl Hield and Valentino Knowles, those who are coming home should arrive at the Lynden Pindling International Airport around 4:30pm today.

The team, which travelled through New York before they separated (with the majority of the athletes going to their various destinations in the United States), will be made up of the majority of officials, the cycling and boxing team (minus Floyd Seymour) and quartermiler Jamal Moss making the trek home.

The team finished the games in 19th position out of a field of 71 count ...

read more »


News Article
Hilton McQueen, 89

FUNERAL SERVICES for the late HILTON McQUEEN of Lowe Sound, Andros will be held on Saturday at Mt. Calvary Baptist Church, Lowe Sound. Officiating will be Pastor Iffill Russell, assisted by other ministers of the Gospel. Interment will follow in the Lowe Sound Public Cemetery.
Left to cherish fond memories are his children: Wencel and Elvera McQueen; Adopted Children: Algerine and Franklyn Russell; 1 Brother: Felix Russell; 2 Sisters: Rose and Francine Russell; Brother-in-law: Rev. Maxwell Roberts; Sister-in-law: Vickie Russell; Grand-children: Tivia Russell, Johnathan Russell, Ricardo, Suzanna Rolle and Geno Rolle; 12 Great-Grandchildren; Numerous Nieces and Nephews including: Dave, Cartlon and Richard Miller, Abbie Russell, Greg, Crystal and Keith Roberts, Curtis, Toya, Shavon, Dareo, and Ora Neeley, Metas Seymour, Deandra and Tameka Moss, Latesha Storr, Cecil, Rhonda, Stacey, Erza, Bradley, Neka and Shannon Russell, Rose and Ethlyn McQueen; Other relatives and friends including: Zelamae Russell, the Russell Hill family, Stanford Johnson and family, James Miller and family, Neville Dean and family, Terrance McQueen and family, Bronco Billy and family, Otis McQueen, Asilee Evans & family, Mitchell Johnson and family, Rhoda Miller and family, Zelda Campbell and family, Erroll and Duke Moss and family, Urena Evans and family, Mt. Calvary Baptist Church family and the entire community of Lowe Sound, Andros.
The family will receive friends at the church in Lowe Sound on Friday from 2 p.m. until service time.
 

read more »


News Article
Homicide files to be sent to coroner

Two cases involving stabbing deaths the media initially reported were murders, are being transferred to the Coroner's Court for further investigations, officer-in-charge of the Central Detective Unit (CDU) Paul Rolle revealed yesterday.

Rolle said police are preparing files for transfer. The cases, which have been classified as "death investigations", include the investigations into the deaths of Elkin Moss, 36, of Jackfish Drive, and Denero Rolle, 30, of St. Vincent Road...

read more »


Movie
Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs Evil (3D)
  • Genre : Animation
  • Rating : A - All ages admitted

Red Riding Hood is training in the group of Sister Hoods, when she and the Wolf are called to examine the sudden mysterious disappearance of Hansel and Gretel....


News Article
House committee to probe NIB, other matters

The Public Accounts Committee (PAC) of the House of Assembly plans to probe the accounts of the National Insurance Board (NIB), Committee Chairman Hubert Chipman has confirmed.
On Sunday, auditors from Grant Thornton handed over two forensic reports on NIB to Minister of Labour and National Insurance Shane Gibson.
Chipman said the committee intends to view what the auditors have turned in.
The St. Anne's MP said, "Once we get the report we will turn it upside down and let the chips fall where they may."
He made the comment before it was revealed that there are actually two reports.
This committee intends to meet within the next two weeks, Chipman said.
The forensic examination took about four months with numerous delays.
Though he did not wish to speculate about the causes of the delays, Chipman said it is not abnormal for the process to take as long as it has considering the scope of the audit was widened.
"As a former auditor there are a lot of things that can cause a delay," Chipman told The Nassau Guardian. "...I understand they widened the scope as time went on, and I understand they didn't have all the information as some of it was in the Office of the Prime Minister."
Grant Thornton was contracted by the government to audit NIB's accounts after a 22-page letter written by then Chairman Gregory Moss, with serious accusation against NIB Director Algernon Cargill, was leaked last November.
Cargill was later suspended pending the outcome of the audit. He filed suit against NIB and Moss.
Chipman said the committee also intends to conduct a wide scale probe on other matters, including but not limited to, the additional $150 million borrowed by the government for this fiscal year.
The government claimed the money was needed to fulfill commitments not fully represented in the 2012/2013 budget.
He said the opposition wants to find out what transpired, adding that the government's mid-year budget statement lacked the
necessary detail to account for the variance.
"I have copies of the mid-year budget for the last few years and what [they] did was show ministry by ministry, department by department what was projected to spend at the end of the year [and] whether there would be any variances," Chipman said.
"There was nothing hidden about it. We were just given a spreadsheet, which is very difficult to analyze what was the cause of the overrun of the $150 million.
"I'm not sure what it exactly was because we don't have all the numbers. It will be quite interesting to see what has transpired.
"I have also been asked questions by St. Anne's constituents as to what it cost the Bahamian people exactly for these government delegation trips and ministers' trips abroad, and what office it has been charged to.
"We don't know. Another question we would want to know is the differential between the cost of this government's 21 Cabinet ministers in comparison to the Cabinet ministers of the Free National Movement government."
The committee will also probe the total cost of school repairs, Urban Renewal, the number of public servants hired since the 2012 general election and the cost of the UK-based gaming consultants, who were engaged by the government ahead of the gambling referendum, held on January 28.
"The public has asked a lot of questions and raised concerns about what is going on here and there with many things, and the committee will find out."
He added the committee will attempt to meet every quarter to ensure the government is transparent and accountable as it relates to public spending.
The PAC is responsible for auditing government accounts and ensuring that money designated for public spending is being properly managed. It has three opposition members and two government members.
In addition to Chipman, other PAC members are Gibson (MP for Golden Gates); Ryan Pinder (MP for Elizabeth); Peter Turnquest (MP for East Grand Bahama) and Richard Lightbourn (MP for Montagu).

read more »


News Article
House to get NIB Reports at Next Sitting

Minister of Labour and National Insurance Shane Gibson said yesterday he intends to release the forensic reports into the accounts of the National Insurance Board (NIB) when Parliament meets again in May. Gibson has had the reports now for three weeks.

read more »


News Article
Hubert Wong, 84

Funeral Service for Hubert Wong, 84, of Paradise Island Drive, Paradise Island, will be held on Saturday October 15th, 2:00 p.m. at St. Anselm’s Catholic Church, Bernard Road, Fox Hill. Monsignor Preston Moss, Fr. Nduka Uzor and Deacon Rev’d. Raymond Forbes will officiate. Interment will follow in Woodlawn Memorial Gardens, Soldier Road.

He is survived by: his loving and devoted wife of 63 years, Lilla Wong; six sons: Andrew, Peter, Paul, Derek, Gary and Rodney; one daughter: Linda Lightbourne; seventeen grandchildren: Andrew Jr. (DeVaughn), Omar, Peter Jr. (P.J.), Paul Jr., Derek Jr. (D.J), David, Gary Jr. (Kevin) and Nahshon Lightbourne; Melissa, Leah, Brooke, Broquell and Chri ...

read more »


News Article
Hubert Wong, 84

Funeral Service for the Late Hubert Wong, 84 years of #5 Paradise Island Drive, Paradise Island, will be held on Saturday October 15th, 2:00 p.m. at St. Anselm's Catholic Church, Bernard Road, Fox Hill. Monsignor Preston Moss, Fr. Nduka Uzor and Deacon Rev'd. Raymond Forbes will officiate. Interment will follow in Woodlawn Memorial Gardens, Soldier Road.
 
He is survived by: his loving and devoted wife of 63 years, Lilla Wong; six sons: Andrew, Peter, Paul, Derek, Gary and Rodney; one daughter: Linda Lightbourne; seventeen grandchildren: Andrew Jr. (DeVaughn), Omar, Peter Jr. (P.J.), Paul Jr., Derek Jr. (D.J), David, Gary Jr. (Kevin) and Nahshon Lightbourne; Melissa, Leah, Brooke, Broquell and Christina Wong, Ramona and Sophia Lightbourne, Felicia Moss (Lisa) and Mia Fawkes. Thirteen great-grands: Nahshontia, Nahshon, Chezidek and Khiyah Lightbourne, Dexter, Danej, Davante, Deshawn Moss, Isaiah, Isabella, Amorie and Rainon Wong and Maliyah Fawkes; one brother: Charles Adderley; three sisters: Vernita Meadows, Beryl Elliott and Annamae Burrows; five daughters-in-law: Millicent, Wendy, Christine, Nadia and Brenda Wong; one son-in-law: Remorn Lightbourne; four sisters-in-law: Ethlyn Thompson, Irene Griffin, Andrea Adderley and Beatrice Wong; one brother-in-law: Theophilus Meadows; two grand daughters-in-law: Angela Lightbourne and Melissa Wong; two grand sons-in-law: Dexter Moss and Maurice Fawkes; three aunts: Alberta Miller, Cardell Russell and Geneva Miller; one uncle: Samuel Miller; numerous nieces and nephews including: Cleopatra Obeng, Elvis, Frederick and Rosenell Edgecombe, Laverne Armbrister, Teresa Williams and Kirk Griffin, Anthony, John, Phil and Lisa Meadows, Nyoka, Andrea, Jannell, Christopher and Dave Elliott, Ron and Shawn Adderley, Belinda and Kevin Wallace; other relatives and friends including: Robert Humes of Brooklyn, New York, Gloria Woods of Brooklyn, New York, Patsy Hamilton of Grand Bahama, Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Griffin and family of Eleuthera, the staff of Wongs Printing, Board of the Boys Industrial School, Prison Fellowship Committee, the Chinese Community, Bahamas Body Building, Full Gospel Ministries, Kiwanis Club of Nassau, staff of Sunshine Paradise Suites, the Kemp Road Community, members of Church of God, the Catholic Community, Dr. Jagadeesh, Bishop Walter and Minalee Hanchell (Great Commission), David Major, Bishop Kirk and Sherol Smith, Donald Curry, John Ellis, Bishop Chester Role, Martha Sands, Silkert Thompson, Thelma Lim, Lakeno Strachan, Nurse Chanelle Diggiss, Ann Griffin, Greg Williams, Pastor Jay Simms and Christian Life Church Family, Minnie Simms, Arthur Eldon, Richard and Ruth Demeritte, William, Barry and Ronnie Wong, Eddison Deleveaux, Dr. Norman Gay, Danny Sumner, Arthur Peet, Dr. Olga Clarke, Mr. Frederick Arnette (Billy Graham Min.), Velma Curling, Jean Davis, Brian Wong, Diane Brown, Mary Sands and Family, James and Marge Williams and family, Una Clarke, Bishop Ros Davis, Leslie and Beverly Culmer, Arimintha Newbold, Pastor Rick and Gay Dean and Family of Faith, Claire Marie Johnson, Nicola Paul, Sharon and Rodney Pinder, Garth Culmer, Cynthia Boothe, Denise McPhee, Carnetta Lightbourne, Denise Strachan, Francis Henfield, Monsignor Preston Moss and St. Anselm's Catholic Church family, Dorcas Prayer Group (Iris Dean, Mary Sands, Velda Campbell. Evelyn Winder, Kayla Smith), Ekklesia Ministries. Greater Love Ministries, Bishop Philemon Wilson and Faith Temple Ministries family. Freedom International Ministries and many others too numerous to mention.
 
Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44 Nassau Street on Thursday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon and at the church from 1:00 p.m. until service time.
 
 

read more »


News Article
Hurricanes on course to win CCAA title with deadly 1-2 punch

By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

The Holland College Hurricanes are on a course to win the Canadian Collegiate Athletic Association men's basketball title this weekend and coach George Morrison has a deadly 1-2 punch in sophomore Donathon 'Donnie' Moss and transfer Leo Morris to thank for it.

"Donnie is an excellent basketball player and an excellent athlete," Morris stated. "He has had an unusual impact on our programme. Although Leo just joined us over the Christmas holiday, he has been just as impressive."

Moss, the 20-year-old graduate of Jordan Prince Williams Falcons, averaged 19.47 points and 8.2 rebounds per game. His be ...

read more »


News Article
I-Group rep. denies pull-out threat

Island Administrator Charles Moss said yesterday an I-Group representative confirmed the company would pull out of Mayaguana if there was any attempt to renegotiate its heads of agreement, but the I-Group's Mayaguana representative Tim Haffner sought to clarify what he said was a "passing comment".
"While at the airport, Mr. Haffner came to me and he was talking about the government revisiting the heads of agreement, with regard to the airport," Moss said.
"I said, Mr. Haffner I will speak with you at a later date, as soon as I hear from the Minister of Transport and Aviation Glenys Hanna-Martin.
"Mr. Haffner then informed me that, well, if the government revisits the heads of agreement, his employer is going to pull out of all interests and pull the plug on Mayaguana."
Moss claimed two police officers who accompanied him heard the conversation.
Haffner, who was contacted for comment, said he expressed to Moss he feared the company may pull out, but he hoped that did not happen.
"Now people take things out of context, and so, no, that has never been discussed," Haffner said after Moss' comments were read to him.
"The comment, I said, I hope they don't, so that was strictly a passing comment at the airport.
"That's not an issue that has ever been discussed. It was a passing comment that I hope it never comes down to that."
The mother, sister and brother-in-law of former Cabinet minister Sidney Collie were killed last Thursday morning when a plane crashed into their truck on the airport's runway.
They were using the truck's high beams to guide the nine-seater LeAir plane onto the runway, officials said. The plane was scheduled to pick up Collie's ill uncle and take him to Nassau.
The lights were not functioning because of the I-Group's ongoing work, MICAL MP V. Alfred Gray said following the incident.
Under the I-Group agreement, the developers are responsible for the refurbishment of the airport and runway.
The deal originally made by the Christie administration in 2006, was changed by the Ingraham administration last year.
On Sunday, Hanna-Martin said she was getting advice on how her ministry can finish repairs at the airport in Mayaguana without interfering with the heads of agreement.
Asked what would happen if the government revisited the deal, Haffner said, "I have no idea. That is out of my hands. That is between [I-Group President Stephen Roy] and the government. I would have no input."
Haffner said yesterday the company is prepared to sit down and review its progress on the project, but the ministers, who visited the island after the crash, made some comments at the time, before they had "time to do their homework".
He said the company got approvals from the government on January 30 and began work in February.
The company has continued carrying out residual work on the airport after stopping for a few days after the runway accident, according to Haffner.
"We are not doing any permanent work like paving at the moment," Haffner said. "We are just doing work on the safety zone and shoulders, and that type of thing, works that need to be done.
"We just had [an] inspector down on Saturday and we are just waiting for a report from him to proceed. We are moving ahead as scheduled."
He added that following a brief conversation recently with Roy, company officials are awaiting a meeting with the government.

read more »


News Article
IMF Urges Slash To Public Corporations

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has directed the government to reduce expenses at public corporations by at least $10 million annually.
The disclosure, likely to have a major impact on all Bahamians, was contained within a recent speech by Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC) Chairman Leslie Miller to employees.

read more »


News Article
IRVIN TAYLOR, 74

Funeral Service for IRVIN TAYLOR aged 74 years of Angel Court, Golden Gates #2 who died on Sunday, September 25th, 2011 will be held on Sunday, October 9th at 2:30pm at Bahamas Harvest Church, Prince Charles Drive. Officiating will be Pastor Mario Moxey assisted by Other Ministers of the Gospel. Interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.
 
Dad will forever be loved and cherished in the hearts of those who knew him well which includes his Mother-in-law: Ethel Florence McKenzie-Fernander; (3) Children; Jeffrey, Dion & Shevaun Stubbs-Bain; (8) Adopted children: Bernard, Carolyn, Bethsheba, Dedree & Keith Munroe, Anthea Gardiner, Jermaine Davis & Marvin Thompson; Daughter-in-laws: Sidney, Danielle & Tanya Stubbs & Sheila Munroe; Son-in-laws: Michael Bain, Kevin Gardiner; (20) Grandchildren: Diargo, Dania, Imani, D'Jenae, K'Shon, Jedargo, Kaisha, Jordan, Gavaun, Gavan, Kelvano, Cleon, Kiana, Kevan, Lamont, Dagmar, Carson, Bernard Jr., Sasha & Bershell; (2) Brothers: Fonswith & Clonius; (5) Brothers-in-law; Bernard Evans, George Jr., Hubert Rolle & Jenkin Nottage; (5) Sisters-in law: Elva and Vernita Stubbs, Gloria Rolle, Mrs. George Fernander, Pastor Harriett Fernander & Dolly  Fernander; (2) Uncles; (5) Aunts; Numerous Nieces & Nephews including: Ava McKinney, Valeria, Tanya, Nancy, Ian, Craig, Brandon Stubbs, Edwin, Arthur, Horatio, Melony, Dedriee, Erika, Shynika, Pamela Grant, Clyde, Pamela, Princess, Phais, Joanne, Janice, Constantino, Casius, Ellen, Marge, Marilyn  Prescilla & David Farrington, Brenda, Gwendolyn Moss, Ruth, Catherine, Elva, Anita, Cardinal, Michael, Conrad, Valdez, Valden, Valenti, Judy, Sharon, Sabrina & Barbara, Tyrone, Christine, Shawn, Margie,  Marvin, Perry, Pedro, Lynette, Bernadette, Kevin, Trevor, Sheldon & Jason; The Golden Gates Neighborhood families: Mr. & Mrs. Moxey; Mr & Mrs. Riley; The Johnsons, The Demeritte Family; Mr & Mrs. Glinton; Mr. & Mrs. Stuart; Paula & Dru Newbold, The Rutherfords Family, Martha Rolle & Family, Lamaicee, Donelle Conliffe and Family, Rev. Dr. George Kelly & Family; A host of other Relatives and Friends including; James (Blokie) Stubbs, Larrimore, Ulycese Culmer, Altamese Carey & Family, Rosemary Cambridge & Family, Reuben Stuart & Family, Roslyn Newbold & Family, Tuiton, Chris & William Stubbs & Family, Margret Stuart & Family, Winifred Bannister & Family, Merle Sands & Family, Ellen & Family, Ms. Bowleg, Kirk Neely & Family, Gavin Dean, Richard & Bessie Dean and Family, Mrs. McKenzie and Family, Antrim, Ernest, Arazetta, Idena, Annie McKenzie, Bradley, Dudley & Emperor, Antoinette Bonaby, Marilyn Munroe and Family, Shirley Newbold & Family, Mable Smith, Robert Farquharson and Family, Owen Hamilton & Family, Marilyn Munroe & Family, Bertlene & Family, the Management & Staff of Trace Security, Residents of the Cable Beach Manor, the Management & Staff  of Purity Bakery, The family of IHG, the staff of Atlantis, Kerzner International and SuperClub Breezers Hotel, Bahamas Harvest Church Family, Kiwanis Club of New Providence and the Metropolitan Baptist Church Family.
 
Viewing will be held at Clarke's Funeral Home #10 Tonique Williams-Darling Highway on Friday, October 8th from 12noon to 5:00pm and on Saturday from 11:00am to 3:00pm and on Sunday at 1:30pm at the church until service time.

read more »


News Article
Ian Anthony Bethell, 76

Funeral Service for Ian Anthony Bethell, age76 years, of 10 Claire Avenue, will be held on Saturday October 22nd, 2011 at 10:00 a.m. at St. Matthew's Anglican Church
Shirley and Church Streets. Officiating will be Rev. Fr. Crosley Walkine assisted by Deacon Lynden Douglas. Interment will follow in the Eastern Cemetery, Dowdeswell Street.

Many relatives and friends are left to cherish happy memories. These include: his wife: Fruzan Langdon -Bethell; daughter: Natasha Bethell-Sands; son: Dr. Tony Bethell-Bennett; two grandchildren: Thomas Albert III and Natalia Grace Sands; brother: Charles Bethell; three sisters: Ruth Adderley Rolle, Mae Munroe and Betty Bethell Butler; son-in-law: Thomas Albert Sands II; one aunt: Ulrica Bethel; one brother-in-law: Chris Langdon; one sister-in-law: Christina Proudlove; twelve nephews and nieces: Rhonda Grant, Chuck, Craig and Gail Bethell, Trevor and Ian Bethell, Deseree Day, Cleo and Terry Adderley, Vernrod Wilkinson, Clare and Jo Proudlove; numerous cousins including: Joan Pyfrom, Althea Huyler, Robert Isaacs, Justice Jeanne Thompson, Heather and Tommy Thompson, Dawn Lady Marshall, Sherry Minnis, Oswald, Gerry, Peter, Sonia and Justice Stephen Isaacs, Theresa Moss, Roslyn Neely, Sylvia (Billie) Philips, Keith and Karen Bethell, Sandra Podlewski, Denise Bastian, Arlene Simmonds, Winton Isaacs, Dr. Gail Saunders, Terry North, Leonard Archer, Janet, Frank, Denise and Jeff Williams, Jenny Dotson, Charlie Isaacs, Janeen, Edward, Justice Jon Isaacs and Dr. Maurice Isaacs, Bobbi Adderley, Vivian Braithwaite, Irrington, Pamela and Leslie Isaacs, Hon. Janet Bostwick, Hon. Charles Carter, Dr. Philip and Donny Huyler, Julia Pierre, Margaret, Boysee and Sidney Isaacs, Juliette Buggs, Todd Isaacs, Gerald Isaacs III, Linda Carr, Anne Stubbs, Brenda Roberts, Gerrard and Neil Albury, Tyrone and Craig Pyfrom, Denis and Neil Fountain, Kim Bastian, Deidre Turnquest, Kenny, Tony and Derek Fountain, Brenda Knowles, Ann Scott Beese, Jack and Mark Isaacs, Lisa, Patrick, Nicholas and Jennifer Archer, Philip Marshall, Dr. Elsa Wilson, Chantal Thompson, Nicole Ferguson, Roshanne, Eyma and Ward Minnis; many other relatives and friends including: Yvonne Isaacs, Jean Isaacs, Lois Bethell, Vivian Archer, Natalie Bethell, Nickie Bennett, Elorn Rolle, Bernadette, Kristi and Jarryd North, Michael Neely and family, Gary Moss and family, Eddie Minnis, Chester, Nicholas, Timothy and Kyle Wilson, Sandra, Sharelle, Marissa and Michelle Pyfrom, Joanne, Jodi, Janelle, Catherine and Christina Pyfrom, Claudia Sands and family, Captain Paul and Kim Aranha, Marvin, Zelia and Erin Bethell, Janet and Brian Dwyer and family, Peter and Ginger Burke, Donna and Ron Reid, Cynthia, Nicholas and Tanya Stanko, Clarisse Granger, Philippa, Tristana and Magnus Shaw, Bernard and Jean Miller, Shirley Adderley, Wilfred Sullivan, Roosevelt Godet, Cecil and Jane Hilton, the Carrera-Justiz Family, Larry and Kathy Feingold, Caroline Dobbie, Stephanie Rose, the Arellano Family, Friends from the Bahamas Bar Association and the Gym Tennis Club, the Burrows Family, the Claire Avenue Family and many others. Special thanks to: Dr. Christine Chin, Dr. Michael N'tari Darville, Nettie Newman, Jelliphant and Walter.
 
In lieu of flowers, donations to the Gum Tennis Club in Memory of Ian Bethell would be appreciated and can be made at any branch of the First Caribbean Bank.
 
Friends may pay their last respects at Butlers' Funeral Homes & Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets on Friday October 21st, 2011, from 10:00 a.m until 4:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday October 22nd, 2011 from 9:00 a.m. until service time.
 

read more »


News Article
Ian Samuel Williams, 44

Funeral service for Ian Samuel Williams, 44 of Fritz Lane & formerly of Rock Sound, Eleuthera, who passed away on 27th April, 2011, will be held at Church of God Greater Chippingham, Eden & Rosebud Street, on Saturday at 11:00 a.m. Officiating will be Bishop C. Dennis Lafreniere, assisted by Elder John Darville. Interment follows in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.
He is survived by his daughter: Shareka Williams; granddaughter: Jahzara Moss; adopted daughter: Shanique Armbrister; adopted son: Erinn; Parents: Samuel & Joanna Williams; Brothers: Shawn, Shane and Daria Williams; Sisters: Cherise Johnson, Sheena Turnquest & Leasa Hawkins; Uncles: Dalton Rolle (Ft. Pierce ...

read more »


News Article
Iconic, Rare Cars Including Last One of a Kind Sign on for Bahamas Speed Week
Iconic, Rare Cars Including Last One of a Kind Sign on for Bahamas Speed Week

When dozens of classic and exotic race cars roll out for Bahamas Speed Week 2012, all media eyes are expected to zero in on one specimen so rare it is believed to be the last remaining one of its kind in the world in original condition.

read more »


News Article
Idella McDonald, 70

Funeral service for Idella McDonald, 70 yrs., a resident of Blue Hill Estates & formerly of Chester's, Acklins, who died on 23rd March, 2012, wiill be held at Calvary Deliverence Church, East Street South, on Saturday at 11:00 a.m. Officiating will be Bishop V. G. Clarke. Interment follows in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, J.F. Kennedy Drive.
Left to cherish her memories are her children: Reno Ricardo McDonald Sr., Gary Uberto McDonald Sr., Sloan Troy McDonald Sr., Kemir Ian McDonald, Nichola McDonald-Russell, Shandella McDonald-Major; grandchildren: Reno Jr., Dario, Kendeno, Gary Jr., Stephon, Deandre, Simone (Harmony), Brittaney, Almani, Elianny, Gabriel, Sloan Jr., Shekinah, Anastacia, Nashon, Joseph Jr., Jordan & Shantonya; sisters: Edna Albury, Louise Bowleg & Beatrice McIntosh; brothers: Roland, Cassius Eden & Evan Moss; step sons: Keith & Brian McDonald; daughter-in-law: Yoneris (Sonia) McDonald; step daughter-in-law: Wendy McDonald; son-in-law: Pastor Cy E. Russell; nieces: Maxine Moss, Rosemary Gaitor, Arlene Brennen, Victoria Moss, Evangelist Pachley Forbes, Annamae Moss-Bain, Min. Alerine Miller, Oleta Mackey, Charmaine Mackey, Keisha Wimbley, Tyiesha Antoine, Ingrid Smith, Domica Adams, Dereset Smith & Dominique Smith; nephews: Roy, Alexander & Vincent Deleveaux, Shelton & Stanford Moss, Rev. Lorenzo Moss, Rev. Frank Moss, Ellis Moss, Jr., Charles, Moses & Lloyd Mackey, Dwayne Smith, Hilton Major, Cheves, Cohen & Kumar Darville, Demeko Bain, Collinwood Darville, Junior, Paul, Craig & Jerome Albury; sisters-in-law: Rev. Marietta Moss, Delores Moss, Beatrice Long & Ida Rigby; nieces-in-law: Fleta Smith, Simone Darville, Merele Deleveaux, Rosa & Antoinette Moss & Nettie Albury; nephews-in-law: Reginald Forbes, Cedric Moss, Min. Leon Miller, Robert Wimbley and Raymond Antoine; 50 great grand nieces & nephews; other relatives & friends including: Newton McDonald, David & Ethlee Gibson, Joshua & Nora Newbold, William & Pearl Adderley, Janet Russell, Adler & Willamae Minus, Wellington & Albertha Hall, Chenica, Sherel, Leisa, Apostle Neelie Mae Ferguson, Peaches, Antoinette, Christel Gibson, Maggie Banton, Veronica Rigby & family, George Moss & family, Averald Carey & family, Rev. Roslyn Astwood & Brown & Bernadette Moss & family, Rev. Dr. C.B. Moss & family & the Mt. Olive Baptist Church family, Vandelyn King, Shauna, Sherry, Ms. Woodside, Naomi, Sharon, Fergie, Linda, Shortie, Ms. Cynthia, the Frasers, Mrs. Wright, Monique Williamson, Quincy, Mary Clarke & family, Nicole Watson & family, Kendra Ferguson & family, Portia, Sherylan, Makara, Neutalya, Sherese, Nicholas, Miriam Jones, the Chesters Acklins family, Moss, Darling, Cooper, Brown, McDonald, Collie, Johnson & Ferguson families, Philip & Denice Major, the Downtown Straw Vendors, the Pelican Bay Resort family, Bahamas Electricity Corporation - Abaco Family, General Post Office family, FirstCaribbean Int'l Bank family, Bishop V. G. & Elder B. M. Clarke & CDC family, the entire Golden Gates Church of Christ family along with Nicholls Town, Cambridge Lane & 8th Street the Grove families, Blue Hill Estates Community & other relatives & friends too many to mention.
Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market Street, from 3-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

read more »


News Article
Ignorance and blind allegiances must cease

Dear Editor,
Someone once said that "ignorance can be excused, but not the will to remain ignorant".  It amazes me how Bahamians, who are some of the most exposed people in the world by way of travel, remain stubborn and hardheaded towards their own future.  We refuse to inform ourselves on the issues affecting us as a country and even when we do, we still make decisions that defy logic.
I was born a Moss and will remain a Moss until the day that God calls me.  My mother, father, brothers and my children I cannot change.  I am stuck with them for life.  I once rooted for the Boston Celtics in the 1980s and in the 1990s I rooted for the Chicago Bulls.  I now root for the Miami Heat.   Some things in life we can change.
Growing up my family was predominantly PLP and as such this had a huge effect on my political views.  I basically was programmed to listen to the good that the PLP offered.  Any negative comments were squashed and labeled as nonsense.  When I became a young adult my parents seemed to switch their support to the FNM.  Of course this had an effect on me still and, of course, I fell in line.  Negative comments about the FNM were disbanded and only good commentary was ever listened to or discussed.
Now I have become an adult and realize that it is my responsibility as a Bahamian to listen to the issues as they occur in the country and then decide if I agree with them or not.  I can't continue to say that I am satisfied with the PLP when they did not oppose the destruction of homes near the Charles Saunders Highway.  I can't continue to say that I am satisfied with the FNM if they are making Bahamians feel like second-class citizens.  I think as a Bahamian first and then think about party second.  It sickens me when Bahamians say that they have been a PLP or FNM all their life and blah, blah, blah.  Wake up Bahamians.  The time is too serious in this country now to just say that "I am a PLP" or "I am an FNM".
Kudos goes to the FNM for literally opening up the air waves.  There are now many radio stations who report the news daily; there are two additional television stations besides ZNS and there are at least five daily radio talk shows.  There are also several television programs that speak directly to all things Bahamian.  These mediums provide an invaluable resource of knowledge for Bahamians who want to watch, listen and learn more about their country and the decisions being made by our elected leaders.
We should be electing governments that can set and follow sound fiscal policies and who can strengthen the judiciary regardless of who will be affected.  Why are you supporting a particular party?  Have you informed yourself of the party's policies and agenda?  Do you know the background of your candidate?  Are the decisions being made now going to affect your children positively or negatively in the future?  These are some of the questions that we as voters should be asking ourselves.  We need to raise the bar for our elected officials.  Excellent moral behavior, honesty and integrity should be traits that you should be looking for and demanding as a voter about your candidate.
Of course every decision made by any governing party will not satisfy all of the Bahamian electorate.  The Bahamian electorate in my view needs to realize, though, that ignorance can no longer be excused.  Saying that "I ain't voting cause nothing ga change" or "the government don't give me nuttin'" are some of the dumbest comments that a voter can ever state.  You might not vote, but when the government raises the taxes aren't you affected?  When the government closes a road aren't you affected?  And by the way, the government is not supposed to give anyone handouts.  They are supposed to make policy that will enable Bahamians to thrive.
In the next general election, Bahamians will vote for the FNM, PLP, NDP, PDP and the DNA.  The only sound advice that I can give every registered voter is to be informed on what the issues are and decide on which candidate and/or party they best believe can aid in solving those issues.
The most idiotic comment ever said to me was when I campaigned in the run up to the 1997 general election.  A registered voter told our team that she did not need to hear from us.  She said that if we sent a cat as a candidate that she would vote for the cat.  This is extreme blind allegiance and this is a major contributing factor to why The Bahamas is in its current state.  We need to make each other accountable for all actions taken.  I pray that this kind of blind allegiance has ceased to exist in 2011.   Don't say in 2013 that the government is doing this and doing that and get vex when you did not do your due diligence in 2012.
And for those of us who are die-hards, consider this: If someone has put a knife in our back or our children's backs and they are twisting it, causing severe injuries to our bodies, it cannot be that they mean us any good.  It is as simple as that.  Would we just say: "Tha's my cousin?  Tha's my friend?  We go way back".  We need to reconsider our alliance with that person for the safety and wellbeing of not only us, but our children as well.  We have to make sensible choices in order to have a chance at sensible solutions.
Most politicians know that where ignorance is blessed, it is folly to be wise.  In other words, once you are uninformed and ignorant they have no pressure to inform you on what is actually going on.  Inform yourselves voters and please remember that ignorance and stubborn allegiances can no longer be excused, as these traits will only cause the further downfall of our beloved Bahamas.
 
Yours, etc.,
Dehavilland Moss

read more »


News Article
Imagine a leader leading

Imagine if a Caribbean Community (CARICOM) head of government were to say boldly the following truths, however inconvenient they may be to other heads of governments:
o CARICOM's mode of marking time, at a historical moment of overwhelmingly awesome challenges for our region, which compellingly demands a more profound integration, is mistaken.
o The times demand that we move resolutely beyond minimalism (in the integration process) which inexorably leads to regression; "pausing" is but a euphemism for standing still which, in a dynamic world, is sliding backward.  That is the evidence before us in CARICOM since its leaders, including me, decided at a special conclave in Guyana in 2011 to put the "single economy" process on "pause".
Imagine if the head of government were to continue to analyze objectively the performance of CARICOM's four main pillars in the following way:
o Functional co-operation: Success is assured mainly when the policies, programs or projects are driven by the funding and will of an external agency.
o Foreign policy co-ordination is patchy at best; its unevenness exacerbated by the passion, innocence or a lack of conviction of many of us.
o Security collaboration is mostly in tatters.
o Economic integration: the CARICOM trading regime is in place juridically, but is undermined daily.  On wider economic issues of critical importance to the 'single market' such as the freedom of movement of persons and attendant contingent rights, the twists and contradictions are yet to be satisfactorily resolved.
Imagine if the head of government were to be courageous enough to identify as a central failure of CARICOM that its focus has not been on integrating the people themselves, and that the people-centered matter of the freedom of movement of people, including hassle-free travel, remains substantially elusive.
Imagine if the head of government forthrightly and outspokenly took by the horns the bull of air transportation within CARICOM and states that is caused by unfair competitive subsidies granted to Caribbean Airlines Ltd. by the government of Trinidad and Tobago.  And, then go on to point out that these problems of limitations would fester further, and in time are likely to become septic and debilitating.
Imagine if the head of government were direct enough to admit that the very existence of CARICOM is threatened by three poles of crisscrossing integration that are now pulling member countries in different directions.  Those poles are: The Economic Partnership Agreement with the European Union (EU) which imposes certain requirements of CARICOM member states with the EU that are greater than the member-states have of themselves; the increasing commitments by some member-states of CARICOM that are being given to the Venezuelan-led, ALBA group; and new arrangements that may result from trading regimes with Canada and the United States.
Imagine if, after admitting that a weak CARICOM has placed its own integration process on "pause" is not delivering for its people, the head of government were to state plainly that one thing is for sure: CARICOM cannot continue ducking these burning questions or addressing them in a piecemeal, ad-hoc or disconnected manner.
Imagine if having said all this, a CARICOM head of government were to pinpoint where the root of CARICOM's problems lie - in its governance - and, in this connection, were to assert fearlessly that CARICOM's administrative structure is less than effective and sub-optimal in performance.  Imagine if the head of government were to proclaim what the leaders have denied: that the informed public has grown weary and cynical of CARICOM's efforts to deal with the crucial issue of governance by timidly tinkering with it rather than radically reforming it.
Imagine if he had the pluck to tell the leaders of CARICOM that all of the challenges he identified are capable of solution or improvement and that the real, unbecoming deficit is the insufficiency of political will.
As difficult as it may be to imagine that a head of government of CARICOM would be bold enough, committed enough and fearless enough to say all these things, a head of government has done it.  In doing so, he has carved-out a distinctive and eternal place in the history of the Caribbean.  The Prime Minister of St. Vincent and the Grenadines Ralph Gonsalves, in a letter to CARICOM Secretary-General Irwin La Rocque, dated February 9, 2012, stated everything that has been imagined here and more. His letter was copied to all heads of government of CARICOM.  The clarion call that he sounded could not be clearer, nor could the three words with which he ended be more pellucid: "Time for Action".
Others have said what Gonsalves has lucidly and candidly set out in his letter.  Among such persons are Sir Shridath Ramphal, Alister McIntyre, Professor Norman Girvan, Dr. Vaughan Lewis, Moss Solomon, Rickey Singh, and, at the risk of being immodest, me.  The important difference between the rest of us and Ralph Gonsalves is that he is a sitting head of government, who is willing to admit that CARICOM is in serious crisis and that it must be made better "because it is a great cause for our people's enduring benefit".
Now that Gonsalves has shown such nerve, we wait to see what other heads of government will do.  If they wish to act on a blueprint, they need look no further now than at the paper commissioned in 2011 by Grenada's Prime Minister Tillman Thomas when he served as chairman of CARICOM.  The paper should have been the center-piece of the conclave in Guyana last year when inexplicably and mistakenly (as Gonsalves said) they decided instead to put the single market on "pause" and, by doing so, worsened the effects of the crisis.
Prevarication, obfuscation, delay and dithering are not options.  Urgent work is now necessary and the Tillman Thomas paper should be pursued swiftly and diligently.
o Sir Ronald Sanders is a business executive and former Caribbean diplomat who publishes widely on small states in the global community. Printed with the permission of caribbeannewsnow.com.

read more »


News Article
In Nomine Patri

"The influence of the Catholic Church is woven into the very tapestry of our national life, often in ways we do not readily see."
- Sir Arthur Foulkes
As I sat in St. Francis Xavier's Cathedral during my father's funeral two weeks ago, surrounded by family and friends, I was compelled to reflect on the extraordinary and progressive contributions that the Catholic Church has made in The Bahamas over the years. Therefore this week, we would like to Consider This... what are some of the contributions that the Catholic Church has made to our national development over the last century?
The historical record contains some of the characteristically un-Christian atrocities that have been attributed to some in the Catholic Church over the centuries, such as the Crusades and the Inquisition of long ago, at times even committed "in nomine patri" - that is, "in the name of the Father." More recently, notwithstanding the revelations about the deviant behavior of some of the Church's clerics, undoubtedly the positive contributions of the universal church throughout the ages have far outweighed such intermittent atrocities.
By any objective measure, the Bahamian Catholic Church has personified progressivism, which has been borne out in its pastoral mission and spans more than 500 years. As the late Archbishop Lawrence Burke, S.J. explained, this mission "...began when a small group of practical Catholics led by Christopher Columbus knelt to give thanks to God on a Bahamian beach." However, the modern Bahamian Catholic Church has been exemplified through the charitable contributions of the men and women of the Benedictine Order, as well as the Sisters of Charity. The first comprehensive history of the Catholic Church in The Bahamas was chronicled in Fr. Colman Barry's 1973 seminal work "Upon These Rocks".
More recently, the church's historical record was updated by Patricia Glinton-Meicholas in her book "From the Void to the Wonderful: A History of the Roman Catholic Church in The Bahamas."
Foundational years
In her book, Glinton-Meicholas, who is extensively quoted in this installation, traced the development of the early church from its 19th century connection to Jamaica, the Diocese of Charleston and the Archdiocese of New York, noting that "the latter development marked the beginning of stability and true growth in the Bahamian church."
As early as 1889, the Sisters of Charity, "the first permanent missionaries, established St. Francis Xavier, the first parish school, as a free school for poor children." A year later, they established St. Francis Xavier Academy, which later became Xavier's College, "a select school for girls." For more than a century, the Sisters of Charity pioneered early education and established parish schools which evidenced their commitment to the long-term educational development of the Bahamian community.
In 1891, Fr. Chrysostom Schreiner, then the vice president of Saint John's University in Minnesota, was appointed the first permanent Catholic priest in The Bahamas. When he arrived in The Bahamas, there were only 70 members in the congregation of St. Francis Xavier. Fr. Chrysostom was resourceful, industrious and enterprising and his tenure in The Bahamas spanned from 1891 to 1925. He was credited with many advances including the first out island missions and the purchase of "The Priory" which became the first rectory of St. Francis Church. He established the Annual Catholic Bazaar, and built Bungalow Dunmore to house visiting clergy.
Twentieth century harvest
Catholic pioneers in the early years of the 20th century "took on the roles of architects, builders, doctors, dentists, technical advisers and teachers." That period witnessed the meteoric growth in Bahamian religious vocations - by both men and women, and the explosive escalation in the erection of churches and schools throughout the country, one of whom stands out is Fr. Jerome.
The first Bahamian to be ordained to the Catholic priesthood was Monsignor Carl Albury who started his studies at Saint John's University but was ultimately ordained in Canada in 1932. He was the first in a long line of Bahamians priests, many of whom were ordained in the 1950s and 1960s.
Those Bahamian priests included such notables as Fathers Charles Coakley (the "first native Bahamian priest of the Diocese of Nassau"), Boswell Davis, Leander Thompson, Bonaventure Dean, Cletus Edgecombe, Prosper Burrows and Monsignor Preston Moss, all of whom were trained at Saint John's Abbey in Minnesota. The connection to Saint John's was a natural one.
It was recognized that "if the Bahamianization of the local church was to proceed in an orderly and timely fashion, the church would need to make higher education accessible to more Bahamians." Fr. Frederick Frey arrived in The Bahamas in 1935 and was central to the construction of St. Augustine's Monastery and College, the latter established on January 1, 1945. Initially
an all-boys school, it was an incubator for young Bahamian men wishing to pursue religious or other studies at Saint John's University in Minnesota.
In the meantime, many priests from Saint John's Abbey taught at St. Augustine's College and others performed parish duties throughout the country. Their contributions to personal, spiritual, educational, athletic and familial growth and development in the Bahamian society are incalculable.
In like manner, the 20th century witnessed the enormous growth of women, most notably the nuns of St. Martin's Monastery on Nassau Street. They, too, provided teachers and administrators in the parochial school system as well as vocations to young women in search of a spiritually-cloistered, life-time commitment to the church. Their contributions, too, are equally immeasurable.
The Bahamas has been well-served not only by the Sisters of Charity, the Benedictines, and the Sisters of St. Martin's, but also from diocesan priests and nuns from the United States and Canada, including the Passionists, Jesuits, Carmelites, Servites, the Scarboros, the Grey Sisters and other religious communities.
Social outreach
The church's message was not limited to its spiritual directive. It was as equally committed to its social outreach to heal the sick as it was to its disciple-making mandate.
There were several outstanding medical doctors directly connected to the church, notably Dr. Marie Bachem at St. Francis and Dr. Julie Wersching at the Agnes Hardecker Clinic adjacent to Our Lady's in the inner city. The Church sponsored many other social outreach programs, too numerous to mention and too impactful to quantitatively measure.
The 21st century and beyond
The 20th century Bahamian Catholic Church has laid a firm foundation for its continued growth into the 21st century and beyond. There have been and continue to be outstanding priests, nuns, deacons and lay persons who represent the "second harvest" who will continue the work of their forebears. Although the challenges of the modern church are very different from those of their antecedents, the commitment of today's church leaders is as resolute. The Bahamian Catholic Church is led by a son of the soil who clearly understands the role that the church must play in a modern Bahamas, demonstrated recently by Archbishop Patrick Pinder's commitment to zero tolerance for abuse by those whom he leads.
Conclusion
There can be no argument that the Catholic Church has positively impacted national development, not through its direct interference in the body politic or by dictating the development of public policy, but through its commitment to the development of persons who are guided by the moral and spiritual teachings and conduct of its pastoral leaders.
As His Excellency, Sir Arthur Foulkes observed at the Catholic Men's Symposium two years ago, "Catholicism's gift of an empowering education to poor and racially marginalized Bahamians was transformative and, I dare say, revolutionary."
The Catholic Church in The Bahamas enjoys a tremendously rich legacy of social outreach to the poor and the downtrodden and a deeply abiding commitment to educational development. Its beacon of hope for those who are spiritually adrift will continue to shine steadfastly through the darkness.
All of these good works, in nomine patri.
Philip C. Galanis is the managing partner of HLB Galanis & Co., Chartered Accountants, Forensic & Litigation Support Services. He served 15 years in Parliament. Please send your comments to pgalanis@gmail.com.

read more »


News Article
In Search Of Healing

A week after two ministers were arrested at Ebenezer Baptist Church following an alleged altercation, members worshiped in peace yesterday.

read more »


News Article
In search of new life

Black people were not made to eat a heavily acidic diet as their body does not respond well to having excessive acids added to its chemistry. Not adhering to a more alkaline diet is the key to many diseases people suffer from, according to herbalist Dr. Sebi (who was born Alfredo Bowman). He says many illnesses that people suffer from, like cancer, diabetes, high blood pressure and cholesterol can be eliminated if people ate foods that aren't heavily processed, or made in laboratories. He says people should aim to eat foods that are closer to what their ancestors in Africa did long before man knew about science and depended on it to feed them. If they did, he said they could find their health can dramatically improve. The message of a more alkaline-based diet was the message Sebi shared with Bahamians on his recent fourth visit to The Bahamas.
Although his dietary approach is relatively new to The Bahamas, throngs of people are already buying into Sebi's concept of the alkaline diet.
Annemarie Hepburn was introduced to Dr. Sebi's products seven months ago, and reports having seen remarkable results.
"My nephew would always tell me I should stop feeding my 92-year-old mother the natural foods I thought were good for her -- but once I tried the food and products from Dr. Sebi I was impressed. I had a skin problem but since doing a cleanse and using the Sea Moss I not only have clearer skin but also I'm losing weight naturally. My mother is even so impressed that she doesn't even like eating other foods she used to love like crabs and cassava," said Hepburn.
Sebi, 79, a health and food researcher originally from Honduras, has been sharing his knowledge for over 40 years and said he was led by God to do the research on taking care of the body and finding the truth about better nutrition. Despite disbelief of his concepts he is encouraged to spread the word about having more balanced and acid-free diets from his own life experience and seeing results everyday from people living on his prescribed alkaline diet.
"The mistake many people make about their health is that medicine and science are the answer to everything. But if you start from a good foundation in the first place there is no need or room for medicine to have to heal you. In fact most illnesses are caused by inflammation, and inflammation is caused by irritants or things your body does not need and constantly fights against," he said. "And the greatest of these problems is the presence of acids constantly being ingested in our bodies -- be it from fruit, starches, processed foods and preservatives to drinks and other things people eat without thinking about from day-to-day."

The problem
Sebi, who established a healing village in LaCieba, Honduras and the Dr. Sebi's Research Institute in Los Angeles, which focuses on gathering natural foods and researching what makes some foods healthier than others and what benefits they have for the body, said the problem all starts with the mucus membranes in the body that protects the body from acids and irritants. He said that due to being bombarded with these things, the mucus begins to grow in excess and there is chronic inflammation. Whether the inflammation becomes a cold or causes a chain reaction that results in other illnesses like diabetes, high blood pressure or even cancer is all determined by how the body reacts to trying to regain its proper balance.
"The best way to describe how badly we are hurting ourselves is to look at a car. When you have a car you know already that you are to put gasoline in it or diesel for it to run properly and for as long as it should. The same goes for the body. We are to put in the right kind of fuel so we run well and don't have hiccups or breakdowns along the way," he said.
The herbalist said the natural foods man should eat have long been lost over time, but that there are still many natural foods that are alkaline-based that people can be eating like sea moss, wild rices, agave sugars and fish.
"While this is what many of us should be eating today you have to know what's good for your body. For instance, although most birds fly all of them aren't made to eat the same things," said Sebi. "An eagle knows he must eat meat. He asks no one if it's healthy or if he needs more vegetables and starch. Other birds know they must eat fruit and seeds. They will never eat meat. So the same for humans. We are all wired a certain way to eat certain things so we can benefit the most from the foods we consume rather than be harmed."
According to the herbalist, disease and illness only exist in acidic environments, which is why Sebi encourages people to know how their body functions and to intake more alkaline products.
"This is not just to say to eat more natural foods, but to know where your natural foods are coming from. Many of the acids we are exposed to are from food we assume are harmless like cane sugar and starches. Cane sugar is not good because not only is it processed, but many of the strains of cane used today are made in laboratories and therefore are acidic in nature."

Return to eating natural foods
Sebi believes returning to eating natural foods untouched by science will promote more healthy cell growth, eliminate unhealthy ones and diminish disease and premature cellular deterioration in the body. He and his natural cell food research teams have been able to gather and readily provide the foods he talks about
for health conscious consumers.
Douglas Storr who was already health conscious said he was enticed into giving Sebi's products a try because he's always looking to do even better things for his body.
An avid fan of exercise, Storr would suffer with muscle pains and other aches normally, but he said once he found more natural products through Dr. Sebi's products he was able to fulfill his need to eat more healthily and reduce his aches.
"I was really impressed with the products like sea moss because it has done so much good for me. I had experienced a really bad tumble a few weeks ago and I really couldn't walk on it (foot). It was bruised, it hurt and I knew I had to go to a doctor, but before I did that I tried the sea moss which is supposed to help cell rejuvenation and healing first. I was amazed that as bad as my sprain was I was feeling better within three days," he said. "I never experienced something like that. I also used the sea moss to treat my dandruff and that too went away within a few uses. I really have more energy now than I have had before because of being more careful with my diet I feel."
Dr. Sebi who was born in the Spanish Honduras, never attended school -- not even kindergarten, according to his official biography. Instead, he took cues on being obedient to the procession of life from his grandmother. His early days of play and observation by the river and in the forest, coupled with guidance from his grandmother, afforded Sebi the foundation to be obedient to what he terms is the "truth" in his later life.
He went to the United States as a self-educated man who was diagnosed with asthma, diabetes, impotency and obesity. After unsuccessful treatments with conventional doctors, Sebi was led to an herbalist in Mexico where he found healing success from all of his ailments. He began creating natural vegetation cell food compounds geared for inter-cellular cleansing and the revitalization of all the cells that make up the human body.
Inspired by the personal healing experience and knowledge he gained, he began sharing the compounds with others, which gave birth to the USHA Research Institute and the Usha Healing Village.
Dr. Sebi's products can be found locally at New Life Natural Cell Foods on East Street south.

read more »


News Article
In support of police carrying guns in schools

Dear Editor,

There have been almost 850 murders recorded in The Bahamas over the last 10 years. There have been thousands or armed robberies and thousands of assault cases committed where victims received life threatening bodily harm.
Businessmen have been shot and killed, policemen have been shot and killed, teachers have been shot and killed and even members of the church have died on our streets. Students have been shot and killed.
I spoke with several of my teenage cousins and my godchild last year and they told me that fights in their schools are an almost daily occurrence. They literally fear for their safety.
Our children are growing up in a violent period in our country and don't think for one minute that they are oblivious to the high rate of violence in the country. Just like the adult population, they have become hardened and are now accepting violence as normal behavior. In desperate times, we have to take desperate measures.
Some students in our country are completely out of order. They will rob and steal from other students, threaten and maim them. Most students know that teachers and security guards are unarmed and are not trained to handle violent disputes.
I believe that the police carrying guns in some schools will offer better protection to our students, teachers, general workers and the security guards. Even the students who misbehave might find out that the police presence can be the difference between life and death. Let us not forget the harassment that teachers faced from parents over the years. I contend that armed police officers at schools will deter improper action by some parents and guardians, students and teachers.
As a father of two children still in school, I certainly would like them to receive adequate physical protection. Wouldn't you want your children to be safe in school? This is not the 1980s when disputes among students were normally settled with a fist fight. The next day all was okay and the best man won; not in today's world though. Our students today are more violent and this is a direct spill over from what they see in their homes and in their communities. Some of them will gang and beat up another student. Some of them even possess the intent to kill.
Security guards are ill equipped and under-trained to deal with violence in most of our schools. This fact has been known for years now and it is unfair to continue asking security guards and teachers to take on this role when they are clearly not trained to handle these types of situations.
The police on the other hand are equipped to handle pressure situations and they will do a much better job than security guards. Their presence alone is a display of authority and sadly we all know that some of our children will only behave when police are present.
The parental crisis in our country has forced action on this issue and we cannot wait for parents to improve their dismal parenting skills. This is not a long-term fix but it is the right action given what the country is now faced with. I applaud the minister of education and the government for having the courage to implement this policy decision.

- Dehavilland Moss

read more »