Search results for : physics

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News Article

August 15, 2010
Scientists: Newly found fault caused Haiti quake

THE devastating earthquake that rocked Haiti in January was unleashed by a previously undetected fault line -- not the well-known one scientists initially blamed, according to an analysis of new data.

It's unclear how dangerous the new, unmapped fault might be or how it's discovery changes the overall earthquake hazard risk for Haiti, said Eric Calais, a professor of geophysics at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Ind.

He said the analysis shows that most, if not all, of the geologic movement that caused January's magnitude-7.0 earthquake occurred along the newly uncovered fault, not the well-documented Enriquillo fault.

Calais, who presented the findings this week at a scien ...

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News Article

February 12, 2014
Online application process for Lyford Cay Foundation scholarships opens

Lyford Cay Foundation, Inc. and The Canadian Lyford Cay Foundation are now accepting online applications for academic and technical training and vocational scholarships for study at approved institutions in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom and the Caribbean.All applications must be made through the foundations' website, http://www.lyfordcayfoundation.org.Applicants must be Bahamian citizens and pledge to return to The Bahamas upon completion of their studies.General academic scholarships are available at undergraduate and graduate levels for study in areas considered to be valuable to the economic needs of The Bahamas. Areas of study include agriculture and horticulture sciences and management, the arts (undergraduate level), economics, education (specialised fields, secondary and STEM subjects), engineering (specialised fields), financial services, foreign languages, hospitality and tourism management, information technology, marine and environmental sciences, mathematics, and sciences (biology, chemistry and physics).Additional eligible fields of study at the graduate level include educational leadership and school administration; international business, library and information sciences; nursing (specialized fields), physical, occupational, speech and language therapy; public health and hospital management; school and college admission counseling, and school psychology.Technical training and vocational scholarships are designed for individuals who wish to earn an associate's degree, certification, specialization or diploma in areas where there is a shortage of well-qualified Bahamians in the work force. The minimum course of study is six months. Generally, the maximum length of an eligible course is three years, but consideration will also be given to applicants pursing specific career and occupational programs that may extend beyond that period.The approved fields of study for technical scholarships have also been refined, and now include agriculture, horticulture and fisheries technology; air conditioning and refrigeration; allied health care and technology; automotive, marine and aviation mechanics and technology; computer service technology; construction and related trades (including electrical, carpentry, plumbing, painting and masonry); the culinary arts; engineering technology; heavy equipment operations; hospitality and tourism studies; machine shop and welding, and quantity surveying technology.Specialized scholarships also offer opportunities to study agriculture; architecture; the fine, visual and performing arts; arts education; business and economics; general education; engineering; jurisprudence (graduate); marine and environmental biology; marine construction, marine design, marine manufacturing systems and marine mechanics, and theology.Most foundation awards are valued at $7,500 to $12,500 per year.Scholarships are renewable annually, provided that a certain level of performance is maintained. As part of the renewal process, successful applicants are required to show proof of having contributed a minimum of 20 hours each year to volunteer projects and/or service organizations.The deadline for all scholarship applications is March 31, 2014. Independent, non-partisan screening committees comprised of prominent citizens and Lyford Cay alumni in the fields of education, government and the private sector are responsible for making the final recommendations. In addition to academic performance, the committee considers an applicant's financial need, personal qualities -- including his or her leadership skills and contribution to the community -- as well as the caliber and cost of the institution he or she wishes to attend.The foundations also offer scholarships for study at The College of The Bahamas. These are primarily need-based, and all applications and screening take place through the college. For more information please contact the COB Financial Aid Office or visit http://www.cob.edu.bs/.Lyford Cay Foundation, Inc. and The Canadian Lyford Cay Foundation were established by members of the Lyford Cay Club in 1969 and 1977 respectively. Their mission is to increase the availability of educational opportunities for Bahamians, and to support local non-profit groups through financial contributions and volunteer initiatives. To date, 1,400 Bahamians have received $19.5 million in undergraduate, graduate and technical training scholarships to study overseas; 1,200 Bahamians have benefitted from $4.2 million in scholarships to attend The College of The Bahamas, and over 200 local charities and civic organizations have received $18.4 million in financial assistance.

oFor additional information about the foundations' educational awards, and to apply, please visit http://www.lyfordcayfoundation.org/.

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News Article

December 03, 2014
LJM Maritime Academy cadets pause to give thanks

LJM Maritime Academy physics and mathematics lecturer Dr. Alvin Hepburn reminded cadets and staff at the LJM Maritime Academy to be thankful for all the opportunities they have been given at their recent day of thanksgiving.
Dr. Hepburn urged cadets to be thankful for their lives as they are, and to not worry about the things they do not have, the things they wanted and wished they had, but to instead learn to appreciate that there is great value and goodness in what they do indeed have, no matter the circumstances or conditions.
The academy presented food items to the Great Commission Ministries International that provides hot meals and clothing to the poor.
The LJM Maritime Academy opened its doors in October. The non-profit tertiary institution, offers maritime education and training in nautical science deck/navigation and marine engineering. The $30 million campus is located just north of Arawak Cay, on the soon to be named Maritime Cay, formerly occupied by the now defunct Coral World attraction.
The academy's first cohort of students includes 41 high school graduates from New Providence, Grand Bahama, Abaco, Andros and Eleuthera.

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News Article

November 07, 2014
The 'brain drain' is, if anything, a good thing

Dear Editor,
We must all thank bahamasuncensored.com for publishing the first sensible take on this unbelievably stupid "brain drain" non-issue that the local media seem to have invented in their apparent boredom with the real issues.
In a letter on that site, Kortney Rodgers points out the obvious lunacy at the heart of the argument that educated young people leaving here is somehow necessarily a bad thing.
Rodgers asks whether an aspiring astrophysicist is somehow unpatriotic for leaving Nassau to go to where astrophysicists actually have job opportunities. Or perhaps government should set up an astrophysics department in the Ministry of Works just to keep him or her here.
The Bahamas, as a small, high-income country with a relatively diverse economy - extremely diverse for its population size - continues to attract huge numbers of migrants at the bottom of its employment structure. That is the most important fundamental evidence of a basically good and successful economy.
Meanwhile at the professional level, an unusually restrictive set of policies (such as the one that blocks foreign attorneys) have created an unusually large and diverse range of professional opportunities for locals in a country of this size.
Of course educated, young, vibrant people leave here. They do so for the same reason that they leave any population centre of 300,000 souls, whether that be Tampa, Florida, Bakersfield, California or Hull, England. They head to more cosmopolitan places with lifestyle and work opportunities that are more diverse. Unlike most such places, though, in The Bahamas they usually come back.
It is the height of stupidity to expect a country the size of ours to cater to every single career choice by being a center of the most obscure and specialized industries. Yet last week some young Bahamian was complaining that he had to leave home to make his career - as a rapper!
As the world specializes and globalizes, it is normal that people globe-trot to places where certain industries cluster. Rappers will clearly have to leave Kansas to make it big, just as actors will have to leave even a vast metropolis like London to make it big.
Of four siblings, I am the only one living in The Bahamas. The other three live in three separate continents, yet not one of them left here seeking work, or because The Bahamas failed them. They left because as diverse and educated Bahamians, they liked some aspect of the lifestyle found elsewhere. That is fine and healthy. When they return, it can only enrich The Bahamas.

- Andrew Allen

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Event
2011 IBS Build-A-Bridge Challenge
2011 IBS Build-A-Bridge Challenge

Thursday 5th May 2011  8:30 AM

The IBS Build-A-Bridge Challenge is a high school competition for 10 and 11th grade students across the country. The students are organised into school teams of no more than five members and a mentor teacher. Each team receives a kit of 300 popsicle sticks and school glue from which they must construct a bridge of no more than 100 popsicle sticks. The lightest bridge holding the heaviest load will win, so the students use as few sticks as possible. This year we will introduce architecture as a judging criterion. Special Guests, Speakers and Judges: Hon. Charles Maynard, Minister, Youth, Sports & Culture; Hon. Desmond Bannister, Minister of Education; Dr. Carlton Watson Chair, School of Mathematics, Physics and Technology, The College of The Bahamas; Mr. Romauld Ferreira, Attorney, Ferreira & Company and Master of Ceremony; Mr. Andrew Stirling, Architect, Plan-It Bahamas Keynote Speaker: Mr. Robert Whittingham, Architect, Whittingham Design Consultants; Mr. Marcus Laing, Architect, The Design Group Start Time: May 5th at 8:30am End Time: May 5th at 3:00pm Where: College of the Bahamas Performing Arts Centre, Oakesfield For more information, contact Mrs. Vivian Dean Bridge Challenge Co-ordinator at 242-324-5445 E-mail: bridgechallenge@gointegrated.com


News Article

September 05, 2011
Union concerned about teacher shortage, dengue, state of schools

A shortage of teachers, the escalating dengue fever outbreak, and the state of some schools affected by Hurricane Irene, are some of the chief concerns that Bahamas Union of Teachers (BUT) President Belinda Wilson expressed as public schools open across the country today.
Yesterday Wilson said the public school system is short of about 22 teachers, particularly in the areas of mathematics and other speciality subjects.
Director of Education Lionel Sands, has admitted that the department does not have a sufficient compliment of teachers to teach the subjects of maths, physics, chemistry and several other technical areas.  Sands said the ministry relies on bringing in teachers from abroad.  He added that the ministry offers grants to persons interested in studying the more technical subjects where further assistance is needed.
Meantime, Wilson is also concerned about the dengue fever outbreak.
Thousands of Bahamians have contracted the vector-borne virus over the past two months, and at least one person has died as a result of the virus.
"I want our teachers to be safe.  Since we had the dengue fever outbreak I want to urge the minister of health to ensure that all schools have been sprayed for mosquitos to assist with student safety," Wilson said.
The union president also expressed concern about the schools that will have to open late as a result of damage sustained during Hurricane Irene.  The Ministry of Education will be relocating students at several schools on Family Islands impacted by Hurricane Irene, in order to ensure they are able to attend classes when the school year begins today.  However, students who attend Arthur's Town High School and Orange Creek Primary School on Cat island, will not begin classes until September 12, according to Director of Education Lionel Sands.
Sands told The Nassau Guardian in an interview last week, that students who attend Colonel Hill High School on Crooked Island and Snug Corner Primary School on Acklins, will be relocated due to extensive damage sustained to those facilities last week.
He added that schools on Cat Island were not that badly impacted by Irene.  He added that the hurricane interrupted summer repairs, which will be completed next week.
Meantime, Wilson reminded parents and teachers whose school routes are impacted by the massive road works across the island to plan ahead.
"I'm concerned about persons getting to and from school in a timely matter.  I'm hoping that teachers, parents and administrators map out the route so they can get to school on time.  I also want administrators to be lenient with some teachers and some students who have to travel where work is being done.  We have to be aware that it may pose challenges," Wilson said.
BUT is currently in the process on negotiating a new contract with the Ministry of Education.  Wilson said so far the process is going smooth.  She expects negotiations to conclude by the end of October.

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News Article

February 06, 2012
E-learning expert John Bain calls for computer science in school curriculum

NASSAU, Bahamas -- In a technology driven age, Computer Science has become a fundamental field of study that drives the world, yet in The Bahamas, it remains an unchartered subject in school curriculums. Now, an e-learning specialist who has just returned from leading a seminar of international experts says it's time to wake up and smell the future.
"The study of Computer Science is just as important as Mathematics and English," said John Bain, the Principal of JSB & Associates and Chairman of the e-Learning Committee of the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants. "The study of computer science is not a luxury, and should not be an elective, but an integral part of education. It is a vital, analytical discipline, and a system of logical thinking that is as relevant to the modern world as physics, chemistry or biology."
Bain, a Chartered Forensic Accountant and one of the first 40 individuals worldwide to become a Certified Specialist in Asset Recovery (CSAR,) employs the use of Computer Science skills daily in his profession. Bain assists attorneys, individuals and companies involved in civil litigation matters that involve disputes over shares, partnerships, debt or other financial issues.  
If Bain could change one thing concerning business in The Bahamas it would be to make Computer Science a mandatory subject in the curriculum.

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News Article

February 02, 2012
Where do we go from here pt. 1

The Bahamas like many other nations around the world in this 21st century is plagued with socio-economic challenges that seem to stifle the progress of our nation towards the path that leads to the desired level of peace, prosperity and security for our people.  The economy is certainly uppermost in the minds of our people as we tread through these turbulent times with many looking to the government for solutions to our economic woes.  However, there is a growing concern over the increased level of social degradation that we are experiencing as evidenced by the myriad social issues that we are confronted with daily.  Unfortunately, it appears that our young people continue to be the major casualties of this degradation.  This impact on our youth raises the fundamental question: Are we failing our youth and will we continue to lose successive generations of Bahamians to issues such as poor economic policies, inadequate education and social ills?
 
The current circumstance
At the government level, it appears that little progress has been made in improving both our economy and the educational system in our nation.  The inability of the government to diversify our economy to provide more job opportunities for its people is accelerating the increase in our poverty levels.  The recent global economic downturn has highlighted the inefficiencies of our economic model that is based primarily on the service industry with dependence on financial services and tourism.  It also stresses the regressive nature of our tax code and inefficient methods of collecting government revenue.  Most importantly, it reinforces the harsh reality of our gross dependency on the prosperity of the American and European economies.  The more we witness events unfold in The Bahamas, one can't help but wonder whether we are regressing rather than progressing.
Over the last five years alone, our national debt has risen to an astounding $4.5 billion, our debt-to-GDP ratio has increased from some 30 percent to approximately 60 percent.  Our deficit currently stands at more than eight percent and the unemployment rate has doubled during the last few years, contributing to the tremendous amount of foreclosures in our nation.  The government has justified its borrowing as the only alternative course of action to prevent a collapse in the Bahamian economy.  However, one wonders whether this was in fact the only option available and if agreed, if the borrowed funds were invested in a manner that benefitted a wide cross-section of Bahamians or just a select few.  The aforementioned statistics suggest that the funds were arguably mismanaged and invested heavily in infrastructural projects that benefitted a small percentage of contractors and companies while the country witnessed and continues to witness increased social degradation.
Being in a position where it was strapped for cash and with revenues down, the government has made minimal investment in social programs comparative to its investment in infrastructural projects and has significantly increased the tax burden on its people in addition to raising the national debt.  It is common knowledge that investment in key social programs is important for the sustenance of our nation and will help minimize the rising social issues that plague our nation.  Focusing on education, it is a given that an educated Bahamas will position itself to play a more vital role on the global stage.  The general consensus still exists that education in various forms including academic, athletic, social and culture among others, provides an individual with an opportunity to pursue a better way of life.  In The Bahamas, it appears that there are classes of Bahamian children who are being denied adequate education, particularly in the public school system.
 
The need for a better education system
The Department of Statistics' labor force report reveals that two percent of our labor force has had no schooling and six percent has stopped short of a primary education while nine percent of our total work force has not completed secondary education.  The aforesaid percentages suggest that approximately 20 percent of our working population is inadequately equipped academically to compete on a national level, let alone a global level.  There is further evidence that shows that approximately 20 percent of our work force receives a university level education while 10 percent attend some other form of tertiary education.  As a result, 53 percent of our work force attain at the most an education at the secondary level.
Combined with the aforementioned startling statistics is the fact that the national grade average based upon national examination results in 2011 sits at a discontented D average.  Even more disturbing is the fact that the D average includes the private schooling system, which if removed, will probably significantly decrease the national average.  It is reported that the recent examination results evidence that approximately 34 percent of 5,000 plus students sitting the English examination received C or above while some 24 percent who took math received a C or above.  Consequently, 65 percent of our children received an English grade of D or lower while some 75 percent of our children received a grade of D or lower.  The lack of sufficient teachers to teach key subjects such as math, physics, chemistry and other technical courses, has been blamed for these unimpressive statistics.  It is important to ascertain whether sufficient measures are being put in place to encourage more Bahamians to become educators.
In the absence of an aggressive recruitment process, are we exhausting all avenues to engage qualified teachers that will produce the desired results?  Further, what measures are being taken to reduce the overcrowding in our public system to provide for more favorable teacher-student ratios?  If we are serious about preparing the next generation for the future, greater emphasis must be placed upon adequate and quality education of our children.  We must see to it that more of the 53 percent mentioned above have the opportunity to receive tertiary level education and greater opportunities to obtain the same locally.  Of particular note is the long overdue upgrade of The College of The Bahamas to university status.
Investment in infrastructure is absolutely necessary to any society, but a lack of investment in a nation's citizens and, more importantly, the education of its youth will minimize or eradicate any lasting effect of infrastructural development due to a lack of qualified citizens in society with a propensity to increase social ills.  In this regard, it is welcomed news to hear that the Progressive Liberal Party has committed to doubling the budget allocation to education if it wins the next general election; however, such allotment must be dispensed in an effective manner that will produce favorable results in education.
Many believe that our leaders are bankrupt of ideas to address our failing education system.  The curriculum itself is widely believed to be deficient and outdated.  The lack of adequate education among our youth will inevitably lead to a further increase in social issues and will inevitably increase youth engagement in illegal activities such as the drug trade, guns and arms trafficking and anti-social behavior such as gang violence.
A lie has been sold to our children that the perceived rewards of these activities afford them a lifestyle that may otherwise be unattainable by securing an honest job and obtaining a better way of life through conventional norms.  The level of violence among our youth had increased to such an alarming rate that a school-based policing program was initiated by the Christie administration of 2002-2007.  It is worth noting that the current administration canceled the program in 2007.  However, their subsequent realization of the wisdom of the program in the midst of escalating levels of violence in our schools prompted the re-implementation of the program in 2011.  In today's Bahamas, our young people should not be faced with the challenge of having a fear of attending school due to violence among their peers; neither should teachers be afraid to carry out their functions as nation builders in fear of a potential violent backlash.
I believe that what is lacking in our society is an 'all hands on deck' approach in our society by our parents, religious leaders, politicians and civic organizations.  However, we must invest appropriately in the education of our children to acquire the requisite skill-set, diversifying our economy to provide opportunities for both educated and technical Bahamians, taking the necessary steps to reduce our national debt and deficit as well as implementing a progressive tax system in order to move our country forward.
Failure to implement the necessary policies looking at the current environment in which we live begs the questions: Is there light at the end of the tunnel?  Should we hope again?  Will the Bahamian dream be preserved for future generations?  Where do we go from here?
 
oArinthia S. Komolafe is an attorney-at-law.  Comments can be directed at arinthia.komolafe@komolafelaw.com.

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News Article

May 18, 2013
How food color can warp time when cooking

Ever tried toasting hamburger buns on a grill? It takes uncanny timing to achieve an even medium brown across the buns. Typically, they remain white for what seems like far too long. Then it's as if time accelerates, and they blow past toasted to burnt in the time it takes to flip the burgers.
The same phenomenon is at work when you toast a marshmallow over a campfire: wait and turn, wait and turn... then brown, black and -- poof! -- it's aflame. The problem is perhaps most acute when cooking shiny-skinned fish on a grill or under a broiler. Once the skin turns from silver to brown, the heat pours into the fillet, and the window of opportunity for perfect doneness slams shut with amazing speed.
Anytime you cook light-colored food with high heat, inattention is a recipe for disaster. But the physics here is pretty simple, and once you understand it you can use several methods to improve your odds of making that perfectly toasted bun, golden half-melted marshmallow, or juicy grilled fillet.
At high temperatures -- about 400 F (200 C) and up -- a substantial part of the heat that reaches the food arrives in the form of infrared light waves rather than via hot air or steam.
The higher the temperature, the bigger the part that radiant heat plays in cooking. But this form of heat interacts with color in a profound way.
The bottom of a hamburger bun looks white because it reflects most of the visible light that hits it, and the same is true for infrared heat rays. There is a reason that white cars are popular in Phoenix -- they stay cooler in the sunshine, which is full of infrared radiation.
A silvery, mirror-like fish skin is even more reflective than a white car. About 90 percent of the radiant heat striking it simply bounces away. Because only around 10 percent of the energy sinks in and warms the fish, cooking initially creeps along slowly but steadily.
That changes rapidly, however, as soon as the food gets hot enough to brown. It's like changing from a white shirt to a black shirt on a sunny summer day. As the food darkens, that 10 percent of energy absorbed rises by leaps and bounds, and the temperature at the surface of the food soars.
So browning accelerates, which increases heat absorption, which boosts the temperature; it's a vicious circle. By the time you can get a spatula under the fillet to flip it over, it may be almost black, reflecting just 10 percent of the heat and sucking in 90 percent.
There are at least three ways around this problem. The simplest is to stare, hawk-like, at the food and lower or remove the heat as soon as browning starts. That works fine for marshmallows but is not always practical in the kitchen or backyard barbecue.
In some cases, you can darken the color of the food at the start, for example by slathering it with a dark sauce or searing it in a very hot skillet before putting it on the grill. This is a way to make a fish steak cook more like a beef steak, which is fairly dark even when raw and so doesn't experience such a dramatic shift in heat absorption. This method generally shortens the cooking time.
Finally, try piling other ingredients, such as sliced onions or zucchini, between the food and the coals or the broiler element to moderate the intensity of the radiant heat. Cooking times will lengthen -- and you may end up having to toss out the sacrificial buffer ingredients if they get charred -- but that window of opportunity will stay open longer.

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News Article

September 16, 2014
New scholarship fund to help develop engineering sector

NASSAU, Bahamas -- A corporate entity is collaborating with The Bahamas Society of Engineers (BSE) to help stimulate the participation of more Bahamians in a critical sector in the Bahamian economy. BHM Co. Ltd., formerly Bahamas Hot Mix Co. Ltd., and the BSE have established a scholarship fund at The College of The Bahamas for civil engineering technology students.
The College recently received a donation that will fund a scholarship of $3,000 every two years for a full-time, undergraduate majors pursuing the Associate of Science in Civil Engineering Technology programme. There will also be an opportunity for these scholarship recipients to intern with BHM Co. Ltd.
Ebbe Saidi, Managing Director of BHM Co. Ltd., is convinced that initiating this scholarship fund was necessary in order to encourage more Bahamians to pursue a civil engineering profession.
"Civil engineering is about developing the environment. A lot of that type of industry is on the way in The Bahamas. Firms from all over the world are here and we felt that Bahamians need to enter the industry and take possession of the industry," he said during the signing of the Memorandum of Understanding to establish The Bahamas Hot Mix, Bahamas Society of Engineers Scholars Programme.
Recipients of this scholarship will be students enrolled in the ASc. programme in the School of Mathematics, Physics and Technology at The College who demonstrates financial need.

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