Search results for : vet

Showing 781 to 810 of 1000 results


News Article

April 13, 2012
GBPA shines at race weekend classic

FREEPORT, The Bahamas - Over 20 individuals representing The Grand Bahama Port Authority Limited (GBPA) recently participated in the Alpheus 'Hawk' Finlayson 5K/10K Race Weekend Classic. The GBPA was also a proud sponsor of the road race.
Leading the GBPA team was company director, Henry St. George, who expressed pleasure at being able to participate.
"Sports tourism is just one of many niche markets that Grand Bahama caters to and GBPA whole heartedly supports an event such as this that brings a huge boost to the local economy."
After race results were tallied, Team GBPA's talented athletes shone in various categories. Henry St. George placed first in the males 10K, under-30 group, followed by Max Remmo, who placed second. Dominic St. George came in third in the under-40 division. The top three finishers in the females 10K, under-30, were all members of Team GBPA - Cosetta Hall, Florence Bruce and Celina St. George, and co-team member Gwenique Musgrove captured first in the under-40 division.
In the males 5K race, Stephano Bevans and Andrew Brown placed third in the under-30 category and first in the under-40 division respectively. In the females 5K race, Jenny Remmo was second in the under-30 group and Christabel Bruce was first in the under-50 division. A total of seven GBPA participants were among the top 30 finalists in the overall 10K run, with Dominic St. George placing third, Henry St. George finishing 13th, Cosetta Hall coming in 14th, Max Remmo finishing 15th, Florence Bruce finishing 23rd, Celina St. George coming in 26th, and Gwenique Musgrove finishing 30th.
"It was a great event and a great day for GBPA," said St. George as he bestowed congratulations on all of the GBPA team members who gave their wholehearted support. GBPA registrants included Henry St. George, Deann Seymour, Charisse Brown, Gwenique Musgrove, Dominique Rolle, Evette Rolle, Kimberly Miller, Cosetta Hall, Max Williams, Andrew Brown, Shanta Stuart, Steffano Bevans, Joe Hamilton, Juliette Miller, Cornella Miller, D'Andra Stubbs, Nicola Elliott, Dominic St. George, Celina St. George, Max Remmo, Jenny Remmo, Christabel Bruce, Florence Bruce and Edward Lawson-Johnson.

read more »


News Article

April 13, 2012
Riding for hope

With more than 600 cyclists, 46 teams and 37 families registered, before the first pedal has even turned, it's already a record-breaking year for the seventh annual Ride for Hope 100 mile bike-a-thon which will be held on Saturday, April 14 in Governor's Harbour, Eleuthera.
But when kickstands are raised tomorrow at 8:30 a.m., the riders, from the littlest riders to the more veteran cyclists, comprising this record-breaking field do so knowing that they are pedaling to support breast cancer initiatives. And, there is nothing quite like cycling along the hilly shores of Eleuthera with the wind at your back and the ocean in sight according to cancer survivor Ken Chaplin who has ridden in the bike-a-thon since its debut seven years ago.
"Being a cancer survivor made this event a way to support the Cancer Society, but as the years went on I began to see it as a way to improve my fitness and health," said Ken Chaplin. "I am glad that I do this annually and challenge myself to meet new goals from year to year. It's really encouraging for so many other people to be involved, be it as a means to support family members with the disease or just for a charitable cause. It's also really great to see how family oriented the event continues to be. From hotshot riders to kiddies on their tricycles, it is really a lot of fun. And there are other activities to keep us all excited over the day of riding."
Adults have the option of riding anywhere from 10 to 100 miles. Kiddie cyclists will participate in the short seven mile ride from Bayfront Park to Cupid's Cay and back where they will then be able to engage in events like a bouncing castle, rock wall, tiger slide and enjoy things like free ice cream. Adult riders who are young at heart won't be left out because they will be able to enjoy treats on the park at the completion of their ride and native food and drinks will be available throughout the day.
The park will be outfitted in cultural decorations and local artisans will display their work. So whether one is riding or not, the day of fun and festivities surrounding the Ride for Hope event will be worth the trip to Eleuthera.
To ensure the safety of the hundreds of cyclists in the ride there will be seven health stations along the route which stretches from Governor's Harbor to the North Eleuthera airport. Each station will have health professionals, and food and drink to sustain cyclists for the duration of their ride.
While many people may not be up for the actually cycling part of the event, organizers say there will be lots to do for people that just want to attend the event for a weekend on Eleuthera.
Ride for Hope, which was founded by Stephen Holowesko and Susan Larson, has attracted hundreds of riders annually since its inception and their participation and donations have contributed to the $1.7 million that has been earned to date. Last year, $400,000 was raised at the event. They hope to top that mark this year.
"Cancer is a disease that affects all families and people. It is hard to find a single person not affected by it - be it a loved one, friend or associate. What makes supporting events like this even more critical is that sadly in The Bahamas we have a high percentage of women with breast cancer," said Holowesko. "So it is important to maintain programs that help the local population with cancer and those who don't know about it aware of it. We are hoping to raise as much as we did last year, but with the economy and election season, there is no saying what will happen. Even so the support we have gotten and continue get is a great thing for cancer awareness, treatment and prevention. This will really be a healthy, fun and educational weekend," he said.
Due to consistent corporate support that covers the cost of the bike ride, Holowesko said every dollar that is earned goes directly to cancer related initiatives.
"Throughout the years we have established programs like Family Island Mammogram Examinations, which pays for women from the Family Islands to come up to New Providence to get mammograms. This program has treated over 600 women in the three years it has been in use," said Holowesko.
Other programs Ride for Hope supports are a Cancer Society initiative which sends a nurse to Family Islands to do ongoing education on cancer awareness and treatment options as well as a cancer care support program for persons in need of financial help to pay for cancer treatments.
Holowesko anticipates Ride for Hope will continue to grow and more will be able to be done to directly help more people affected by cancer.

Event Schedule
Friday, April 13
6 p.m. -- Ride for Hope Fish Fry in Governor's Harbour

Saturday, April 14
7 a.m. -- Continental breakfast at staging area
7:45 a.m. -- Group photo
8:30 a.m. -- 100-milers start

read more »


News Article

February 28, 2012
Team Bahamas gets set for IAAF World Indoors

By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

Chris 'Fireman' Brown is expected to defend his 400 metres title and Chandra Sturrup is back for another 60m medal as they head the Bahamas' nine-member team for the 13th IAAF World Indoor Championships in Athletics.

The veteran duo will be joined by World Outdoor high jump gold and bronze medallists Donald Thomas and Trevor Barry, long jump sensation Bianca Stuart and quarter-milers Demetrius Pinder, Michael Mathieu, LaSean Pickstock and Jameison Strachan.

Brown, Sturrup, Thomas, Barry, Stuart and Demetrius all earned the rights to travel to the championships - slated to be held in Istanbul, Turkey, March 9-11 - ...

read more »


News Article

June 23, 2011
Paving the Way in Real Estate Marketing - 'Street of Wonders'

Nassau, Bahamas - Every once in a while an exceptional idea comes knocking on your door. For 17-year real estate veteran Carmen Massoni, the notion came in the form of 'Street of Wonders' - a collage of art, architecture, cuisine and
fashion with Turnberry Townhomes at Charlotteville as a fitting
backdrop.

This Saturday and Sunday, June 25-26, visitors to the gated community in western New Providence will have a chance to tour art and food exhibits throughout model townhomes in the neighbourhood. Entry fees and proceeds will benefit The Seahorse Institute and The Bahamas Humane Society.

"We felt the need to give back to our community and offer local artists and designers a unique venue to showcase their incredible talent," said Massoni. "Street of Wonders makes the selection of townhomes at Turnberry more engaging for our customers. Instead of driving around to visit several homes within the same area...

read more »


News Article
Tragedy Strikes Police Force
July 19, 2008
Tragedy Strikes Police Force

A 13-year veteran of the Royal Bahama Police Force lost his life during a routine firearms training exercise in waters off Goodman’s Bay Wednesday, Acting Assistant Commissioner of Police Hulan Hanna confirmed to the Bahama Journal on Wednesday.

read more »


News Article

April 17, 2012
Female sprint relay focus is important

The excellent body of work done by the 'Original Golden Girls' (Pauline Davis-Thompson, Eldece Clarke-Lewis, Chandra Sturrup, Savetheda Fynes and Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie) amounted to a standard for the ages, for all time.
When addressing the achievements of those wonderful daughters of The Bahamas, the general tendency of others is to concentrate on what they did when on the world stage. There is another element to them that is often ignored. I've always contended that only when Davis and Clarke became the driving force and the combined mature leadership for team work on passing and other technical aspects of the relay, was the foundation properly put in place. The 'Original Golden Girls' spent their personal funds over and over to meet and practice to maximize their potential.
They well understand the need for them to come together in camp in order to be best equipped to deal with the rest of the world. After having to settle for silver behind the United States at the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games, they went on a mission that was to make them World Champions (1999) and Olympic Champions (2000), reigning as the best in the world (with the same group) perhaps longer than any other unit.
It was an incredible collective undertaking. The leaders of this country have never adequately compensated the 'Original Golden Girls' and it is unlikely that situation will ever be balanced. They established the template however for the future.
There have been some success since Davis-Thompson and Clarke-Lewis retired following the 2000 Sydney Olympics. With Timicka Clarke, Sturrup, Ferguson-McKenzie and Fynes, The Bahamas won gold at the 2002 Manchester, England Commonwealth Games. Then, in 2009 at the International Association of Athletic Federations (IAAF) World Championships, Sturrup and Ferguson-McKenzie teamed up with the young Sheniqua Ferguson and Christine Amertil to win the silver medal. The parts have not always been in place for continuity of success.
Now though, with the 40-year-old Sturrup rounding out into fine form following a year off, Ferguson-McKenzie remaining a vibrant world force and Sheniqua Ferguson running faster and faster, there is an available nucleus that presents a feel-good situation. There are the young guns Anthonique Strachan, Shaunae Miller and Tynia Gaither.
There are the ladies in waiting, Nivea Smith, Cache Armbrister and Krystal Bodie. Amertil, the 400 meters specialist (like Miller), is coming back after taking a year off. An excellent coach (Bahamian Henry Rolle) has been assigned by the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations (BAAA), the task of getting our relay teams ready for London 2012 later this year. There are just two pieces missing from the puzzle.
I now put them forward for the BAAA and the Ministry of Sports. Firstly, the BAAA should have a few meaningful sessions with the 'Original Golden Girls' to find out just how they did it. They are available. Take advantage of the opportunity. Secondly, a way must be found, and funds supplied to establish a camp for our relay athletes, all of them. The BAAA and the sports ministry are so challenged.
Please, let's not miss this grand opportunity. I firmly believe that if everything gets put in order for our relay athletes, The Bahamas could win the women's sprint relay gold and also the men's 1,600 meters gold in London at the 2012 Olympic Games.
(To respond to this column, kindly contact Fred Sturrup at sturrup1504@gmail.com)

read more »


News Article

August 11, 2011
US-Bahamas Professional Exchange Highlights Cultural Preservation

WASHINGTON, DC -- After participating in the US Department of State-sponsored International Visitor Leadership Program (IVLP), veteran educator, Junkanoo proponent and cultural advocate Arlene Nash Ferguson expounded on the necessity for The Bahamas to participate in professional exchange, especially in the area of cultural preservation. 

read more »


News Article

August 11, 2011
US-Bahamas professional exchange highlights cultural preservation

WASHINGTON, DC -- After participating in the US Department of State-sponsored International Visitor Leadership Program (IVLP), veteran educator, Junkanoo proponent and cultural advocate Arlene Nash Ferguson expounded on the necessity for The Bahamas to participate in professional exchange, especially in the area of cultural preservation.

"It is very important," she said. "It demonstrates our eagerness to be a part of the world community and work with other nations toward common goals.

Programs such as this broaden our horizons, exposing us to new ideas and thinking in international circles, and this inspires us to bring new ideas home and adapt them where applicable and where needed to our local circumstances.

"The experience also deepens our appreciation of what we do have in the area of cultural heritage, and serves to underline the critical importance of preserving it."

"The program," she added, "also allows us to establish links not only with persons in the same area in the United States, but also around the world: there were 18 participants in my program and only three nations from the Western Hemisphere were represented - Mexico, Guyana and The Bahamas."

read more »


News Article

June 22, 2011
Paving the Way in Real Estate Marketing

***image1**

Nassau, Bahamas - Every
once in a while an exceptional idea comes knocking on your door. For
17-year real estate veteran Carmen Massoni, the notion came in the form
of 'Street of Wonders' - a collage of art, architecture, cuisine and
fashion with Turnberry Townhomes at Charlotteville as a fitting
backdrop. This Saturday and Sunday, June 25-26, visitors to the gated
community in western New Providence will have a chance to tour art and
food exhibits throughout model townhomes in the neighbourhood. Entry
fees and proceeds will benefit The Seahorse Institute and The Bahamas
Humane Society.

"We
felt the need to give back to our community and offer local artists and
designers a unique venue to showcase their incredible talent," said
Massoni. "Street of Wonders makes the selection of townhomes at
Turnberry more engaging for our customers. Instead of driving around to
visit several homes within the same area...

read more »


News Article

February 21, 2012
The so-called silly season

The term silly season is often used to describe the lead-up to a general election and the ensuing election campaign.  It is a favorite of some journalists who apply it dismissively in discounting what they view as boilerplate rhetoric from politicians.
Unsurprisingly, the term has a history, obscured by its indiscriminate application by the self-same journalists who wield it to chide and caricature the political class.
Originally, the silly season referred to the period of the late summer when news was scarce.  In response to this slow period, newspapers utilized attention-getting headlines and graphics, and printed exaggerated stories on frivolous and "silly" topics to boost circulation and advertising.
Silly seasons are a human phenomenon and not the provenance of any professional group, be they politicians or members of the press and media personalities.
There is a group of celebrity journalists who work in the print and broadcast media and also play pundit on talk shows.  Some of these media figures look in the mirror and beam: "Mirror, mirror on the wall, who's the best journalist of them all?"
Perhaps more editors, producers and senior journalists may look in that proverbial mirror and ask how they can more comprehensively, intelligently and creatively cover the 2012 election cycle.
 
Secret
The little secret many journalists won't admit to publicly is that they enjoy the entertaining elements of politics and general elections as much as their readers and viewers.  Good for them.  Still, they have an obligation to inform and educate the public beyond what is said by the speakers at various political events.
The defining outline of the 2012 general election is clear.  In making their choices of party and leader, voters will assess and compare the records of the Progressive Liberal Party (PLP) and its leader, Perry Christie, from 2002 to 2007 and that of the Free National Movement (FNM) and its leader, Hubert Ingraham, from 2007 to 2012.  This comparison and assessment will serve as the basis for who voters believe may best lead the country for the next five years.
It is essential for journalists to be objective.  In the interest of objectivity many journalists operate under the rubric of "fair and balanced", an important principle.  Still, it is a principle with a goal in mind, namely to get to the facts.
The misapplication of the notion of fair and balanced has been lampooned by the fictional example of a television anchor promoting a news segment.  The segment includes a politician who believes that the earth is round.  Of course, in the interest of fairness and balance, there will be a politician who believes that the earth is flat.
The veteran and now deceased American political journalist Tim Russert served for 16 years as the moderator of the highly-respected NBC Sunday morning news program, "Meet the Press".
Russert was legendary for being generally "fair and balanced".  He was respected by Republicans, Democrats and independents, liberals, moderates and conservatives.
His "Meet the Press" table was a must-stop for those who sought and won the presidential nominations of their respective parties.  Presidential aspirants, powerful Congressional leaders, governors, Cabinet secretaries and business moguls were interrogated by Russert.
Getting through a Russert interview without a major fumble was a badge of honor.  Before going on "Meet the Press", interviewees did serious preparation, which often included mock interviews and combing through briefing books.
Tim Russert's method was as simple as it was compelling.  He did his research and held politicians accountable for their words.  The Russert method was simply good journalism.  Perhaps the media can better employ such journalistic methods during this election cycle.
 
Promises
As a start, one of the dailies may consider making a master list of the promises made by the PLP and the FNM in their election manifestos and speeches from the throne, and see how well or poorly they kept their promises.
The period in question for the PLP would be 2002 to 2007 and for the FNM, the period from 2007 to 2012.  The reporting would simply hold each party accountable for their own words.  This would be of considerable service to voters who do not have the time to do such research.
The press may also hold political leaders accountable for their new promises.  For example, Ingraham has promised to expand the National Prescription Drug Benefit.  A newspaper like The Nassau Guardian may ask how much such an expansion would cost.  Similarly, Leader of the Opposition Perry Christie may be asked how he will pay for his promise to double the national budget for education.
This is the kind of good research journalism that is sorely lacking.  Quite often nowadays, many editors and reporters are so caught up in getting the juiciest headlines that they fail to do the important research pieces that are necessary, and sometimes they miss important aspects of a story.
This journal has done work of this nature in reporting on how MPs spent their constituency allowances.  More such work would be welcome and a good way to improve the quality of political journalism in the country.
 
frontporchguardian@gmail.com
www.bahamapundit.com

read more »


News Article

August 13, 2011
The creepy crawlers of summer

She's the mother of three accident prone children all under the age of six. She's a former morgue assistant, ambulance dispatcher, pre-school teacher and even a volunteer animal rescuer and as a result, has had to deal with everything from gushing blood to dead people, injured animals and grossly sick children, you'd think nothing would phase this 35-year-old.  But there is one thing that can make K'Andrea Moxey-Wright cringe and it's those creepy crawly insects.  Nothing frightens her more than the multi-legged creatures that invade people's living spaces during summer time.
"When I know summer is almost here I get nervous because I know all those bugs that hibernated for the cooler months are coming back to torment my soul," says the mother who says her house is in desperate need of extermination.  As a mother, she knows all too well about having to cut corners, but learned her lesson after getting "burned" on an extermination gone bad a few years ago.  She hired someone at a "good price" to rid her home of termites.  She later found out that the price was too good to be true after the termites came back and the other insects seemed to multiply.  Moxey-Wright says she now knows better and is looking for a good company to rid her home of its insect problem as the temperatures continue to scorch warming the ground and making the insects swarm.
"The warm temperatures in the country, especially around summer time is perfect for insects of all kinds to grow and swarm as they come out to forage and stock up for the winter months," says Handfred Rolle, proprietor of Pioneer Exterminators, who says if you are not willing to share your living space with these creatures -- roaches, termites, ants, bees, centipedes -- then it is the best time to get an exterminator before the problem gets too bad."
In his line of business Rolle says he has noticed that many people tend to shy away from doing regular exterminations of their home because they assume their house will have to be covered in a tent for days and the family will have to find an alternative living space, while this is being done.  He says this is not necessarily true in all instances, as there are many problems, and just as many solutions for the infestations.  And he says solving the problem may have to be more than the old-fashioned, do-it-yourself remedy some people adopt, like swatting, spraying and baiting the insects.  Rolle says this may work for small confined problems, but says sometimes it is better to call in the experts to solve the problem.
The 17-year veteran says it is often better to get a exterminator rather than attempt to eradicate a major  problem yourself.  While it is common for the average homeowner to purchase over-the-counter pesticides, he says some of them tend to be more harmful than good and that bug sprays for example are toxic especially in the excessive amounts that people use and often inhale accidentally.  And if you have a recurring problem with roaches or termites you definitely need to call in an exterminator as there is obviously a bigger problem than you are seeing.
Rolle says the chemicals an expert will use to get rid of indoor pests are water-based and less likely to be inhaled or consumed than the aerosol insecticides the average person uses.  Other hazardous situations  you put yourself into by being a "weekend warrior" is purchasing rat poisons over-the-counter and not considering the amount of yard space you have.  Doing this he says can result in over or under-treating the problem, and if you have a pet or the yard is easily accessible to neighborhood animals you can also end up killing them.  He says a proper exterminator will consider all of these factors and find the best route of extermination for your situation.
"It doesn't benefit you or anyone if you opt to experiment and prolong doing a proper extermination," says Rolle.  "There are some things you can live with and others that you shouldn't.  Sugar ants and lizards are generally harmless, but things like roaches, ticks, fleas and termites are things you need to deal with immediately.  Roaches can carry diseases and can generally infect surfaces.  While you do love your indoor pet, the ticks and fleas they attract can carry lime disease which you don't want to contract much less your children.  To save your home from prematurely rotting you will want to get rid of termites as quickly as you can too."
The exterminator also says people should not believe the "old-wives" myths that are bandied about as to how to solve their insect problems, because they don't want to spend the money on a professional.  A common practice he has come across time and time again is the use of diesel to treat a pest problem.  He says he has heard many people swearing by it.  As an exterminator he says he has yet to find any merit in it.
Another popular myth he has heard involves burning a termite's nest that is on the ground to solve the  problem.  This he says is not true as the nest is sometimes underground as well and after a month if not a few weeks, the problem will return again.  He says if you have a termite problem it is important to get an expert rather than believe you can treat it on your own.
"People need to be aware that it doesn't pay to take shortcuts.  You will find people who will give you a seemingly good price for relatively costly exterminating jobs like dealing with drywood termites and subterranean termites, but with these bugs you need the problem to be done thoroughly.  Drywood termites, especially if they are throughout a building, require you to fully tent the structure and then pump gas in to properly exterminate.  If someone tells you they can do it without tenting you are looking at the problem coming back in no time and still having to pay an expert to do it properly.  Similarly, with subterranean termites, you will need to drill the walls so chemicals can be put in to get to the root of the problem.  If someone says they can do it without drilling, or only [drilling] one or two holes, you are looking for the problem to come right back."
The exterminator says it is also important for people to know that not every insect with wings that isn't a roach, wasp or bee is a termite.  He says there are many different types of ants and other bugs that have wings that can be an annoyance and you may hire the first guy who says he knows what he is doing to kill termites when the problem was never termites.
Rolle says he has met many people who say they hired an "exterminator" a year or even months before only to have the problem they thought was taken care off, reappear in no time.  He encourages homeowners to call different exterminating companies, allow them to come into the home to assess the problem and give a quote, to give themselves options to best deal with the problem, with the company that has a good record.  He says forget about your cousin's brother's friend who will just charge you a few bucks, and says you save yourself stress by hiring a reputable expert or company to do the job right the first time.

read more »


News Article

August 15, 2011
Prizes Fit For A Gospel Queen

The new Miss Gospel Bahamas 2011/2012, Lavette Smith was showered with fabulous gifts at a recent prize-giving ceremony held at the Poop Deck Sandyport.

The queen received three scholarships - one sponsored by Galilee College, another by Synergy Bahamas and a third from Toya's Educational Institute.

read more »


News Article
New stars shine at gymnastics summer camp
August 16, 2011
New stars shine at gymnastics summer camp

Twinklers, sparklers, rising stars and star achiever squads glittered the night with gymnastics routines and riveting performances. The Starmania Summer Camp's PreCompetition Judging and Exhibition was co-sponsored by Bahamas Star Gymnastics (BSG) and Bahamas Gymnastics Booster Club.

read more »


News Article

August 15, 2011
Two CIBC First Caribbean Sponsored JA Firms Win 'Company of the Year' Awards

TWO Junior Achievement companies sponsored by CIBC FirstCaribbean International Bank were announced as winners of the coveted JA Company of the Year award.

FirstCaribbean managing director Marie Rodland-Allen said: "The winnings of our JA teams in Nassau and Abaco, and the bank's continued support of JA, are excellent testaments of the bank's engagement of communities in which it operates with a view of making them better.

read more »


News Article

August 15, 2011
Disc injuries

By Susan Donald D.C.

While the intervetebral disc is a common culprit in spine related health problems, its function is widely misunderstood.

The disc is a small cartilage pad that is situated between spinal bones. The soft jellylike center is contained by surrounding layers of fibrous tissues call the annular fibers. Each disc serves as connector, space, and shock absorber for the spine. When healthy, discs allows normal turning and bending.

Since spinal discs have a very poor blood supply, they depend upon the circulation of joint fluids to bring in nutrients and expel waste. If a spinal joint loses its normal motion or position and this pumping action is impaired, the health of the disc ...

read more »


News Article

August 16, 2011
A Queen's Homecoming

For more than a decade, Sunday school teacher Lavette Smith attended Lakeview Church of God, but this past weekend marked the first time she received a red carpet welcome. On Sunday, August 14, the 24-year-old was officially presented to her church as the new Miss Gospel Bahamas 2011/2012.

The church's foyer was decorated for her joyous homecoming. A "Congratulations" banner dangled from the ceiling. Underneath it were three of the garments the queen wore the night she was crowned: the 'Esther' outfit which won her...

read more »


News Article

August 17, 2011
Pelican Bay at Lucaya Announces Appointments

Pelican Bay at Lucaya has announced the appointments of Della Bridgewater as Operations Manager and Yvette Evans as Security Manager.   Also announced was the appointment of Chic Weddings Bahamas, under the direction of Marva Munroe, to plan and design weddings at the hotel.

read more »


News Article

August 17, 2011
Barry Wins Fourth RBDF Ironman Title

When competing in the Royal Bahamas Defence Force (RBDF) Annual Ironman competition, Lieutenant Ricardo Barry continues to prove that he is the man to beat. To be considered the best all-around athlete in the Defence Force, a number of individuals once again competed for the prestigious Ironman title.

Now in its 11th year, two new champions were crowned during the annual competition at the Coral Harbour Base. Lieutenant Barry literally ran away with the competition for a record fourth time after not competing last year. Woman Marine Rikeisha Thompson captured the crown in the open female category.

read more »


News Article

June 22, 2011
Realtor drives theStreets of Wonder

Every once in a while an exceptional idea comes knocking on your door. For 17-year real estate veteran, Carmen Massoni, it came in the form of 'Street of Wonders' - a collage of art, architecture, cuisine and fashion, with Turnberry Townhomes at Charlotteville as the backdrop.

This coming weekend, from June 25-26, visitors to the gated community in western New Providence will have a chance to tour art and food exhibits throughout model townhomes in the neighbourhood. Entry fees and proceeds will benefit the Seahorse Institute and the Bahamas Humane Society.

"We felt the need to give back to our community and offer local artists and designers a unique venue to showcase their incredib ...

read more »


News Article

August 18, 2011
Challenges ignite boxing fraternity

The return of professional boxing to the Nassau Stadium last Saturday was ample proof that there is a thirst for the sport. The Charlie Major Jr. card was not widely publicized and there were a few glitches that resulted in a late start.
Nevertheless, some 200 persons came out despite the threat of rain and it was an enjoyable evening of boxing. The amateur segment at the beginning was exciting. In the pro program, Anthony Woods and Kato Ferguson engaged in a spirited four-rounder. Then, Dencil Miller looked sharp in a clash with John Wesley. Miller packed too much power. He used a crushing left hook and on-target right hand shots to overpower Wesley in three rounds. The two lead bouts were more appealing than the main event.
Meacher Major had no problems at all with the veteran Cuban Alex Perez. The visiting boxer did not land one solid blow and spent much of his time covering from an aggressive Major. In round three when Major scored with a solid body blow, Perez dropped to a knee and took the count.
There was a sidelight incident, however, that added as much excitement as the actual ring action. Former Commonwealth Super Middleweight (168 pounds) Champion Jermaine Mackey and 9-0 up-and-coming light heavyweight (175 pounds) boxer Ryan McKenzie got into a verbal battle. They both declared an interest in fighting at any weight. McKenzie said he would come down to the super middleweight division.
Bulking up to a light heavyweight might be a stretch for the lanky Mackey but he could get to 170 or so and still be comfortable in the ring. It's a match ready to be made and Major Jr. seems quite interested. He was eagerly listening to the back-and-forth boastful statements. Thus, there is the prospect of a Mackey/McKenzie encounter.
Also, former double Commonwealth Bantamweight Champion Ray Minus Jr. is set to come out of retirement. He has not fought for 10 years, but the 47-year-old looked a bit smaller on Saturday as he worked the corner for some of his fighters and moved around giving a hand with the tightening of the ring ropes.
He is getting ready for Meacher Major. For Ray Minus Jr., the only obstacle is being declared medically fit and ready for ring action. The two challenges have sparked new enthusiasm for pro boxing. A Mackey/McKenzie bout will be a big encounter, a major sports happening. A Minus Jr./Major match will be just as highly anticipated.
The excitement has returned to pro boxing.
(To respond to this column, kindly contact Fred Sturrup at frobertsturrup@gmail.com)

read more »


News Article

September 04, 2010
Eudeva sails to victory!

By KELSIE JOHNSON
NG Sports Reporter
kelsie@nasguard.com

The Eudeva sailed away with top honors in the B-class of the first'King'Eric Gibson Regatta, which was held over the weekend at Montagu Bay.
The B-class was the only class to complete all three races, as races in the A-class were postponed due to inclement weather and timing. Sailing will continue next Saturday and Sunday.
As for the Eudeva, the sloop won the last two of the three-race series. Capturing the first race was Ant's Nest, which finished second overall. Veteran sailor Gibson thanked all the skippers for participating and the large Bahamian crowd which was on hand to watch the races.
Gibson said:"This is the b ...

read more »


News Article

April 21, 2012
Cherry seeks to move back to top ratings

Edner Cherry is one of the finest boxers born here in The Bahamas. His entire boxing career however was developed in the United States where he moved at the age of 11. He thus is not considered to be in the mainstream of the Bahamian boxing fraternity. Still, I feel obligated at times to provide an update about Cherry and his career.
It is worth emphasizing also, that despite a physical disconnect between Cherry and the land of his birth, he nevertheless makes it a point to associate himself with The Bahamas during interviews. I have heard his salute to this country.
The Bahamas Boxing Commission officially lists him and so do the major boxing organizations around the world. Eight years ago when I first became a director of the Commonwealth Boxing Council, I was pleasantly surprised when other veteran members expressed high regards for Cherry and his Bahamian background. Quite frankly, prior to that occasion, the Bahamas Boxing Commission had no relationship whatsoever with Cherry.
He was contacted and from the outset it was clear that he loved being able to represent The Bahamas in rings around the world.
Well, at age 29, he is still doing quite well.
Cherry is well on the way back to the top world boxing official ratings. He has had a quality career thus far with a 30-6-2-1 (won-loss-drawn-no contest) record. He has owned a number of regional titles, including the WBC United States; the North American Boxing Federation; the North American Boxing Association; and the WBC Caribbean Boxing Federation (CABOFE) lightweight titles.
Cherry has also fought for the World Boxing Council Light Welterweight crown, losing to Tim Bradley. That decision loss over 12 rounds was the last time he came out on the wrong end of the verdict. He has had seven matches since and was most convincing in all of them. He ran off a streak of four wins after the Bradley bout and his last two bouts ended in victory.
Last September he fought Eric Aiken at the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel and Casino in Hollywood, Florida. Cherry unleashed a barrage at the bell to end round one and Aiken was unable to continue. It was officially ruled that Aiken was hit after the bell so a "no contest" was recorded.
Being undefeated since 2008 lines him up now for top world ratings. He remains confident that another world title fight will come before he is finished with the ring.
His preference is to fight as a lightweight.
"I'm comfortable fighting at lightweight and I believe my best opportunities are in that division. However I've gotten some chances for good fights at the light welter limit. To get to where you want to be, you have to take those matches.
"I want to fight always to make my people in The Bahamas proud. I believe I can win a world title," he has said to me.
He certainly has the ability to wear a world title belt.
Continued best wishes Edner!
You are somewhat distant to the boxing scene here in your country, but a Bahamian at heart and very much an important contributor to our sports power image.
To respond to this column, kindly contact Fred Sturrup at sturrup1504@gmail.com.

read more »


News Article

June 21, 2011
Man gets life for the murder of young woman

THE family of a young woman whose body was dumped in a grave after she was killed expressed joy yesterday after the man convicted of her murder was sentenced to life imprisonment.

"Thank God it's over and he won't have an opportunity to do it to another person," an emotional Carol Fisher-Kemp, the mother of 19-year-old Shanice Adderley said yesterday. Angelo Poitier, 26, was convicted last October of the murder of his former girlfriend Shanice Adderley, 19. The young woman's body was discovered inside a grave at the Bahamas Veteran's Cemetery on Infant View Road on May 27, 2009. According to an a ...

read more »


News Article

August 18, 2011
Marilyn Olive Isolonoise Kelly, 73

Funeral Service for Marilyn Olive Isolonoise Kelly affectionately called"Ma"
age 73 of Lower Bogue, Eleuthera, who died at her residence August 8th, will be held on Saturday 11:00 a.m. at Charles Wesley Methodist Church, Lower Bogue, Eleuthera. Rev. John Baldwin II assisted by Pastor Ednol Cash and Bishop Dudley Kelly will officiate and interment will follow in the Public Cemetery, Lower Bogue, Eleuthera.

Precious memories will linger in the hearts of Children: Wilson & Claudia; Leroy & Claudina; Tredville & Merelyn; Jerold & Thayla Kelly;  Michael & Sherry Fulford and Merelyn Symonette.
Grandchildren: Claudia & Vernon Neilly; Royanna, Tremarva, Trenique, Gerneska and Jerold Kelly, Lavonia & Don Johnson, Antonia, Stevette & Latanya Symonette and Joseph Cartwright Jr. & Travis Roker; Great-Grands: Vernon Jr. & Roy' Keem Neilly, Dante Johnson, Nevaeh Beckford, and Latrell Symonette; Sister: Frizzy Williams; Adopted Sisters: Rose Johnson, Veronica Seymour, and Agnes Hepburn; Brother: Eardley Neilly; Aunt: Earlene Albury; Uncles: Fred Neilly and Ezekiel Cash; Neices and Nephews: Marietta & James Major and children, Stanley, Whittington, Royal & Victor  Williams and children, Rosette & Sam Johnson and children, Pedro, Frank, Tamaka Neilly & family, Cindy Moss & family, Vanesha Joseph & family, Doris, Shawn, Sherwin, Bernadette; Adopted Neices & Nephews: Monette, Charles, Marvin and Kazin Woods; Brothers and Sisters-in-law: Bishop Dudley & lonie Kelly and children, Bishop Curtis & Almeta Kelly and Children of Delray Beach, Florida, Clayton & Gladys Kelly and children, Mercia & Bishop Crestwell Cash and children, Ina & Julia Kelly  and children; Godchildren: Marie Andrews, Rowena & Sharmaine Johnson and Dedire Dean, Dino Ferguson; Cousins: Prescola & Preston Neilly and children, Majorie Wallace and daughter, Basil Neilly, Emerald & Pastor Ednol Cash and children, Alvin, Beryl Neilly and children, Branhilda and children, Vernencha and children, Phylis, children of the late Myrtis Neilly, Raymond & David Fowler, Ronald, Malvina, children of the late Sarah and Cambell Neilly, Valarie & Sherman Albury and children, Randy, Darrel and Edith Neilly and children Rev. Fredrick, Franklyn and Dorothy Kelly and family, Gladys Saunders and children, Dency Moss, children of the Iate Corens Barry; Katrina Neilly and children, Bruce & Lucinda Deveaux and children, Ona & Candace Kelly and children, Paula, Sandra, Sidney, Lester Albury and children, Cleomie Culmer and children, Joseph & Pandora Cash, Olga Frazier and children, Maria Carey and children, children of the late James and Nollie Cash, Lyman & Bloise Cash and family, Alice Newton and children, Joyce Neilly and children, Calvin Neilly and family, Helena, Sharon & Clinton, Eloise & Willamae Albury and family, Vera Cash, Oralee Saunders; Other relatives and Friends: Rosalie Albury & children, Linda Ferguson (hairdresser); the children of the late Jerome and Elsie Hunter, children of the late Samuel Barry of Harbour Island, Harrison & Geneva Kelly and children, Zerlene & Sybil Cash and children, Inez Kelly and children, decendants of Pearl Johnson, and Oswald & Valderine Frazier,Thelma and children, Maragret, Geneva, Carlton, Harry & Velma Cash and children, decendants of the late Ralph and Enuice Albury, Harcourt & Rosemary Johnson and children, defendants of the late Arthur and Gwendolyn Albury, Joyce(big mama) & Bernard and children, Michael and Weeann Johnson, Richie & Ismae Albury and children, Yardy, Cleveland, Whitfeild Brown and family, Ivan Neely and children, The Fulford family of Turks and Caicos, the Arthur family, George & Alfred Cash and family, the Bain, Moss, Johnson, Cash, and Albury families of Lower Bogue, the Brown, Kelly, Munroe and Kemp families of Current Island, the Symonette, Eldon, Weech and Neely families of Current, Nurse Knowles and staff of Lower Bogue Clinic, Charles Wesley Methodist Church family, Eastern Star Delcina Chapter #61 and a host of other friends from the community of Spanish Wells and Bluff ,Eleuthera.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at THE CHAPEL OF MEMORIES COMMONWEALTH FUNERAL HOME on Friday from 10:30-2:30 p.m. and at the church in Lower Bogue on Friday from 6:00 p.m. to service time on Saturday.

read more »


News Article

August 18, 2011
Dwinya Rebecca Black, 14

Funeral Service for Dwinya Rebecca Black, 14, of Montell Heights will be held on Saturday, August 20, 2011 at 2:00 p.m.

Church:

New Bethany Baptist Church
Address:

West Avenue
Officiating:

Pastor Victor Cooper
Assisted by:

Bishop Elfredo Burrows
Interment:

Woodlawn Gardens Cemetery

She

is survived by: her Parents: Emmanuel & Alice Black: 4 Brothers: PC #2772 Tamiko Black; Renaldo, Zhavargo & De Anglo Black; Grandparents: Alvetha Black, Anthony & Alice Prince; 10 Uncles: Vernal, Cedric, Chris & Shervin Mun ...

read more »


News Article
Alexander Evans, 67
August 19, 2011
Alexander Evans, 67

Funeral Service for Alexander Evans, 67, of Mangrove Cay, Andros will be held on Saturday 20th August, 2011 at 10:00am at St. Barnabas Anglican Church, Baillou Hill and Wulff Road. Officiating will be Father Roderick Bain, assisted by Father Andrew Toppins and Father Stephen Davies. Interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soilder Road.

Left to cherish his precious memory are Two sisters: Louise “Gomese” Evans and Annamae Newbold; One brother: His twin George Evans; Eleven nieces: Evamae Evans of Delray Beach, Florida, Lovestine Smith of Newburg, New York; Fercena Burrows, Ivy Deveaux; Patricia “Patsy” and Yvette Newbold, Tameka Lundy (Godfrey); Gayle Davis (J ...

read more »


News Article

June 21, 2011
Street of Wonders

Every once in a while an exceptional idea comes knocking on your door. For 17-year real estate veteran Carmen Massoni, the notion came in the form of 'Street of Wonders' - a collage of art, architecture, cuisine and fashion with Turnberry Townhomes at Charlotteville as a fitting backdrop.

This Saturday and Sunday, June 25-26, visitors to the gated community in western New Providence will have a chance to tour art and food exhibits throughout model townhomes in the neighbourhood. Entry fees and proceeds will benefit The Seahorse Institute and The Bahamas Humane Society.

"We felt the need to give back to our community and offer local artists and designers a unique venue to showcase th ...

read more »


News Article

August 30, 2010
Nicki Kelly's major boo-boo

Dear Editor,

I write to comment on an item recently in the print media. Writing inThe Punchlast week, August 23, veteran journalist and columnist Nicki Kelly made a rookie mistake. As of her Thursday, August 26, column she failed to correct her mistake.
She wrote:"Senator Dr. Jacinta Higgs, appointed by the FNM government to replace PLP appointee Sean McWeeney, has also been replaced as chairman by insurance executive Orry Sands."
Orry Sands replaced Dr. Davidson Hepburn as chair of the Antiquities Monuments and Museums Corporation. Dr. Higgs continues to serve as chair of the Clifton Heritage Authority, where she is leading a master planning process that will make Clifton a heritage par ...

read more »


News Article

August 19, 2011
Bahamas shines at International Talent Showcase

THERE were just nine Bahamian participants among 150 at this year's International Talent Showcase competition in Boca Raton, Florida, but that small group really made its presence felt - walking away with nine division honours.

In fact, one young Bahamian, Chase Carter, won the coveted title of Top Overall Female Fashion Model.

This year's Bahamian International Talent Showcase (ITS) group was organised by Pia Rolle of PTG Modeling Agency, who is also the regional director for ITS in the Bahamas.

Ms Rolle said: "The International Talent Showcase is an organisation whose primary objective is to promote and increase the standards of training and education in the modelling and perform ...

read more »


News Article

June 22, 2011
Murderer escapes death sentence

A judge on Tuesday imposed a life sentence on a murder convict, one week after the Privy Council clarified which murder cases deserve the death penalty.

However, that does not mean Angelo Poitier, 26, will spend the rest of his natural life behind bars for the May 27, 2009 murder of his girlfriend Shanise Adderley, as he could be released on parole.

Unlike in England, judges in The Bahamas do not have the statutory authority to determine how many years a prisoner must serve before he is eligible for parole. Persons sentenced to life imprisonment have served from 10 years to their entire lives in prison.

Poitier choked Adderley to death after an argument in which he accused her of "playing with his emotions, his mind and his heart."

In his police statement, which was admitted during the trial, Poitier said Adderley fell to the ground when he released the grip on her neck, which he held for 30 minutes. He said he became afraid after he realized she had no pulse and placed her body in a grave in the Veteran's Cemetery with the help of a friend.
Justice Vera Watkins said she did not consider imposing the death penalty because his crime did not "fall into the category of those that warrant the most condign punishment of death."

Justice Watkins said she considered the Privy Council decision, which overturned Maxo Tido's death sentence, in determining an appropriate punishment.

She noted that the Privy Council did not believe that Tido's crime was the "worst of the worst" although his victim had severe head injuries, inflicted either by a large rock or by being rolled over by a car, and her body had been burned.

She said based on the guidelines enunciated by the Privy Council in the Tido case last week, "It is apparent that the circumstances in the present case do not fall into the category of 'the worst of the worst' or the 'rarest of the rare' cases of murder.

"There is no evidence that the killing of the victim was carefully planned or that it was carried out in furtherance of another crime such as armed robbery, rape, drug smuggling, drug wars, gang enforcement policies, kidnapping or preventing witnesses from testifying.

"There is nothing to suggest Poitier is a serial killer and there is nothing to suggest that Poitier killed an innocent victim for the gratification of base desires such as a sadistic murder of a child for purposes of sexual gratification, a terrorist atrocity, causing multiple deaths or a contract killing."

Justice Watkins said it was reasonable to conclude that the decision to choke Adderley was "made on the spur of the moment."

She said although Poitier held Adderley's neck for an inordinate period, the pathologist said she may have lost consciousness after 20 seconds.
The judge reasoned: "This is an indication that it is highly likely that the victim did not suffer pain for much longer than 20 seconds."

Justice Watkins said Poitier showed a "total disrespect for human life" and an "absolute lack of dignity" for Adderley after he had choked her.
According to Poitier's statement, he choked Adderley after she pointed her hand in his face when he questioned her about what she had worn to work. Justice Watkins said that Poitier's reaction showed that he had difficulties controlling his emotions and/or dealing with conflicts.

Justice Watkins also noted that neither the probation report nor the pyschiatrist report suggested that Poitier was a danger to the public.
Justice Watkins said she considered the views of the Privy Council in the Tido case, the mitigating factors for Poitier and the callous and cold-hearted circumstances in which Adderley was killed in deciding on a life sentence.

Terrell Butler represented Poitier. Sandradee Gardiner appeared for the Crown.

read more »