Search results for : antenna

Showing 1 to 10 of 30 results


News Article
Reminder to electronic companies with antennas on the Post Office Building

Nassau, Bahamas -
All electronic companies or individuals with antenna(s) on the roof of
the General Post Office, must have their license regularized by
December 31, 2010.

Please contact the Secretary at 322-3025 or 323-3171 for further information.

read more »


News Article
Reminder to electronic companies with antennas on the Post Office Building
Reminder to electronic companies with antennas on the Post Office Building

Reminder to electronic companies with antennas on the Post Office Building

read more »


News Article
Handset world: Don't speak for us, Steve Jobs
Handset world: Don't speak for us, Steve Jobs

It may be true that no cell phone is perfect, but the handset world isn't taking too kindly to Apple CEO Steve Jobs' public assertion that other smartphones suffer from the same antenna and signal problems that have been widely reported regarding the iPhone 4.

And, in what's turned into an ugly back-and-forth PR mud fight, Apple is firing back by making its internal signal test results public to insist that it's not just pulling rivals' flaws out of thin air.

read more »


News Article
The sociology of choice

In 1973, the year of Bahamian independence, the U.S.-based fast-food chain Burger King launched the "Have it your way" advertising campaign. In a famous jingle the chain promised they could: "Hold the pickles, hold the lettuce. Special orders don't upset us. All we ask is that you let us serve it your way!"
The burger house, like others, was spreading its franchise globally, and adding a critical dimension to its marketing strategy. That dimension was giving consumers a customized product with greater choice, a hamburger made to order satisfying a range of tastes.
Burger King's strategy was the opposite of what the automobile pioneer Henry Ford quipped in 1909 about the mass-produced Model T: "Any customer can have a car painted any color that he wants so long as it is black."
Fast forward many decades. With the introduction of the Sony Walkman in 1979 the audio cassette player went portable. Portability was now taken for granted. Then there was a quick skip from portable CD players to the iPod.
The revolution sparked by the iPod and intensified by smartphones and other mobile smart devices was marrying portability and ubiquity of service to a dazzling array of choices. No matter where we are we can utilize smart devices and a wireless connection to near instantaneously access all manner of content.
We no longer have to purchase an entire CD to get the song we want. Now we can mix Lady Gaga, rake and scrape, and Bach's Piano Concerto in F Minor from the musician of our choice.

Hyperlink
With devices like the Kindle and the Nook, we can hit a hyperlink from an article online taking us respectively to our Amazon or Barnes & Noble account downloading a book through a one-step order process all done wirelessly in 30 seconds. This isn't just choice; its choice on steroids meets instant gratification for bibliophiles or those simply interested in a given subject matter.
Today, we enjoy an extraordinary variety of choice in selecting the content of our liking whether in entertainment, news, general information, pornography or whatever peaks our curiosity or suits our fancy.
The reality of this array of choices engenders what might be called the sociology of choice influencing everything from ethics to education to politics. The worlds of advertising and marketing have an in-depth understanding of this new social ecology, applying it to sell every product or service imaginable from soap to sex.
The new mega churches understand the power of choice, while many traditional churches are still scratching their heads and souls wondering what's going on. The latter are often paralyzed by a static approach to new technologies and how to reach and influence current and prospective churchgoers.
The more cutting edge educational institutions understand the importance of integrating choice and various communications technologies to enhance student learning, such as utilizing experiential education methods employed by programs like the International Baccalaureate.
Meanwhile, many schools in The Bahamas, public and private, are lagging behind in approaches to teaching and learning, failing to connect the daily experience of their students with new approaches to learning.
In the political realm, one of the more important marketing features of the Democratic National Alliance was offering voters a different choice. Whether the DNA was a good or sensible choice is another matter. Still, by offering the idea of a different choice, the party attracted a fair number of voters probably costing the FNM a number of seats.

A price
Those who fail to understand this notion of choice, whether religious groups, political parties or businesses, will pay a price in terms of votes, clients and adherents.
For example, the government-operated postal system is a dinosaur with a near fossilized network of branches. Because it was unable to deliver mail to consumers in a timely manner, thousands of Bahamians now utilize private post boxes for international mail and packages.
The lower level of the Main Post Office downtown where parcel posts can be collected resembles a graveyard. Still painted drab green the sign over that section should read: Rest in Peace.
In promoting a new mission for post offices as government information and services centers, former Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham was attempting to drag the postal system from the 19th to the 21st century.
What many older folks are still getting used to in terms of the new world of choices galore, is second nature to younger people. Shopping at the Mall at Marathon, a 19-year-old is mesmerized by a love song she is hearing in a store playing a recording through its satellite radio service, Sirius XM, which offers the store owner and clients a plethora of musical choices.
The young lady is so enchanted by the sultry voice she is hearing for the first time that she has to know who is the artist pining, "Black is the color of my true love's hair...".
Our 19-year-old holds her smartphone up to the source of the music, hits the Tag button on her Shazam mobile application to identify Nina Simone singing her 1964 recording of "Black is the Colour".
Later at home, the young lady listens to several of Simone's recordings, and then posts a note on Facebook declaring to her over 1,000 "friends" her infatuation with the artist, 10 of whose songs she's already downloaded.
Inspired by her posting, several of her friends have also downloaded some of Simone's recordings, including a friend living in Seattle, who Skypes her that evening to share that she also has a newfound love of the artist.

Interactivity
All of which speaks to the other critical feature of the new world of technology and choice. The world of one-way communication has passed. Choice has been married to interactivity. What both choice and interactivity appeal to is the desire for agency, the ability to express one's desires.
By tapping into choice, a marketer, salesman or public relations expert taps into something fundamental and powerful in the human psyche, namely, the desire for individuality, with a complex of messages from an individual such as: "I matter!", "I'm important!", "Don't take me for granted!", and related messages of individuation.
Today, choice is not just something we appreciate. We demand and expect to have multiple choices. Yet there are a number of ethical dimensions to so much choice, including maintaining an ethic of a common good, how to choose wisely, and how to cultivate good or ethical decision-making and critical thinking in young people.
In terms of the latter, many of our schools are oblivious to the type of experiential education, critical thinking methods, ethical instruction and media literacy absolutely necessary to prepare our young people for a world quite different from when Bahamians needed an antenna on the roof to pick up one of three stations from Florida.

o frontporchguardian@gmail.com www.bahamapundit.com.

read more »


Business Listing

Hi-Technology Communication Systems
Radio Communication Equipment Systems
  • 45 Sears Hill
  • Nassau
  • Nassau / Paradise Island, Bahamas
News Article
BTC Post Hurricane Update

BTC technicians are working around to restore services disrupted by Hurricane Sandy. Here is a the latest on service disruptions across the Bahamas. Here is the latest on service disruptions across the country:

read more »


News Article
Power cuts hit radio stations

RADIO 100 JAMZ and Joy 101.9 went off the air early Thursday morning after a series of power cuts affected the antenna and transmission systems. Engineers were working all day yesterday and late into the night to repair the antenna and restore transmission as quickly as possible.

read more »


News Article
Air traffic controllers considering more industrial action

Just weeks after the Bahamas Air Traffic Controllers Union (BATCU) ended a work to rule that resulted in severe flight delays, union president Roscoe Perpall yesterday threatened further industrial action.
Perpall claimed that contract negotiations with the government have stalled in the weeks since the protest ended. However, Tourism and Aviation Minister Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace told The Nassau Guardian yesterday that the government is working to resolve all of the outstanding issues and will meet with air traffic controllers today.
The union's previous contract expired in February 2008.
Perpall claimed that the BATCU has a litany of problems in addition to the stalled negotiations, including "unsafe" working conditions and a dangerously dysfunctional radar.
"The union is operating on a wing and a prayer," said Perpall during a press conference at the House of Labour.
"We see that the relationship [with the government] has become strained. We expect to meet with Minister Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, and expect him to deliver on the promises that led to the union standing down on the work to rule."
Air traffic controllers were on work to rule during the busy Christmas season after they felt their concerns were not being addressed. Asked if there would be similar repercussions this time around, Perpall said "we can almost guarantee that".
"If the minister fails to meet the demands of the air traffic controllers, then I think that the Bahamian people will understand that the union will have to consider all of the available recourses," Perpall said.
He also said the government has failed to live up to its commitment to carry out long overdue promotion exercises. He claimed that some people have been due for promotions since 1999. Additionally, Perpall said some vacancies have not been filled for years.
"We are no longer able to tolerate this level of disrespect. We call on the prime minister to immediately have these vacancies filled," Perpall said.
Turning to the issues involving the radar, Perpall said it has had problems for some time, but in recent weeks things have gotten worse.
The radar is used to direct and track aircraft. Perpall said sometimes air traffic controllers have to guess where planes are as they often disappear from the radar.
"We do not know when the radar will fail totally but we anticipate it will be soon," he said.
Perpall said he does not think anything will change unless there is an accident involving one of the international carriers.
"We have been out in the wilderness. We've been asking for years for the government to upgrade the system," he added.
Head of the Civil Aviation Department Captain Patrick Rolle acknowledged that over the past few days there was an alignment problem with the radar's antenna, which caused targets to drop off the radar.
Engineers worked with the FAA over the weekend and resolved the issue, according to Rolle, who also said the FAA and Bahamian engineers are doing further checks on the antenna to prevent it from happening in the future. He stressed that the radar would not be in operation if it were not safe. Rolle added that the radar is in the process of being replaced.

read more »


News Article
Power cuts hit radio stations

RADIO 100 JAMZ and Joy 101.9 went off the air early Thursday morning after a series of power cuts affected the antenna and transmission systems. Engineers were working all day yesterday and late into the night to repair the antenna and restore transmission as quickly as possible.

read more »


News Article
Has Cable Bahamas fulfilled its original mission

It is axiomatic to suggest that a modern Bahamas requires modern infrastructure. We appreciate the need for a world-class airport in the capital and second city and that many airports in our islands must be updated to be aligned with the increasing travel demands of citizens and visitors.
There is also an urgent need to maintain our docks for inter-island mail boat transportation and we have recently developed a deeper appreciation for the dramatically improved roadworks that were undertaken by the last Ingraham administration.
A similar observation can be made about the country's desperate attempts to make telecommunications keep pace with the ever-increasing demands that are placed on our monopolistic telecommunications network and of the omnipresent and overwhelming daily challenges that are faced by that service provider.
Then there are the growing demands on every island on our similarly monopolistic electricity supplier and our water and sewerage corporation, both of which are displaying noticeable strain as more and more wonder why we are experiencing power cuts in winter and water pressure problems even though we have been told, here in the capital, we no longer require Andros water to meet our needs.
Therefore, this week, we would like to consider this... what is the status of our television system, another important part of daily life in this country, and are we keeping pace or falling behind the increasing demands of the marketplace?
A historical overview
Television came to The Bahamas in the latter half of the 20th century. Before that time, Bahamians on New Providence and the Family Islands received their news and entertainment by radio.
I can clearly remember getting our very first television. We were among the first in the neighborhood to acquire one and I can vividly recall neighbors coming to our home to view this modern marvel, although in those days the picture on the tube regularly faded in and out and often required an adjustment of the set-top antenna. I also recall my father's friends assisting him in mounting an antenna on the roof of our home in order to improve the reception quality. It was always a childhood treat to go to Miami to enjoy "really good reception" and it was not until the advent of satellite dishes that many Bahamians were able to enjoy an enhanced quality and variety of program offerings.
In the late 1970s and 1980s, satellite dishes were popping out of the ground almost as fast as homes were built so their occupants could enjoy the clear reception that dishes afforded. Grand Bahamians could boast of being able to enjoy better TV than those living in the capital because cable TV came to Freeport relatively early in its development.
Then in the 1990s, Cable Bahamas was awarded a long-term monopoly to provide cable TV throughout the entire Bahamas and numerous satellite entrepreneurs who previously sold such systems experienced a rapid, albeit quiet, demise.
The current state
Today, Cable Bahamas dominates television in The Bahamas. It was, for years, the only legal service provider of cable TV and, although the service is generally consistent, its offerings are not extraordinarily vast. Cable subscribers can purchase various packages depending on their tastes and pocket-books. And while Cable's service delivery is generally above average, there are intermittent periods of programming black-outs and signal distortions as manifested by pixels that are disorganized.
Cable Bahamas is also an internet service provider and its service is as good as that offered by the telephone monopoly, BTC. BTC's cellular monopoly ends this month with the award of an additional license to an as-yet-unnamed second cellular company. Cable Bahamas hopes to win the bid to become the first BTC cellular competitor, and the cellular industry here is expected to be completely liberalized by 2017.
The positives
Some persons applaud the program offerings of Cable Bahamas, maintaining that we receive more offerings in The Bahamas than in many hotels in the United States. Program offerings are often duplicated, especially in the higher channel ranges, with one exception: the United States West Coast satellite feed is available, enabling persons in Eastern time zones to view programs that might have been missed earlier.
Complaints against Cable Bahamas
The most prevalent complaints cited against Cable Bahamas concern loss of signal and loss of signal quality. These instances include frequent freezing of the picture, usually during a moment of high drama or suspense, and the aforementioned mysterious breakup of the picture into what can only be described as "dancing pixels".
Reporting these occurrences to a Cable Bahamas customer service representative is another frustrating experience, replete with long waits. Once you have actually reached a live person, who is usually unfailingly polite, the outcome tends to be unfulfilling, as the representative is not well-informed about the duration or cause of the problem, only knowing that it is "being worked on".
Other complaints pertain to program offerings, including many program previews that are presented in either Spanish or Portuguese, which is useless to persons who do not speak those languages. A senior Cable Bahamas executive has explained that this arises because the Caribbean islands receive the Latin American feed, principally because of the small size of the English speaking Caribbean population, 7% of the Latin American market.
In addition, there are some persons, including this author, who wished that Cable Bahamas had not discontinued the broadcast by Al Jazeera, which offered a refreshingly different viewpoint from that of the often prejudiced spin that American networks place on international news.
Unquestionably the most offensive programming insert is the silly, annoyingly irritating music that is inserted along with the weather, currency rates and stock exchange data on CNN and HLN during commercial breaks. The same senior Cable Bahamas executive to whom we referred earlier indicated that the Caribbean Co-operative of Cable Companies has attempted to address some of these concerns, but again, given the "insignificant size of the Caribbean market", we have to take what we are given.
Completing the mission
In a similar way that BTC's original mission at the turn of the 20th Century included connecting The Bahamas by land lines, which for the most part it has successfully accomplished, the original mission of Cable Bahamas at the turn of the 21st Century was to provide cable TV to the entire Bahamas. The important question that must be answered is: Has Cable Bahamas achieved its original mission? Some would argue that it has; others, especially those viewers in some of our more far-flung islands, will take the opposing viewpoint. Nevertheless, the company now wishes to enter the cellular market.
Cable Bahamas' venture into telephony has, from many reports, not gone without problems. Aside from negative feedback regarding the quality of the sound transmission, its main drawback, when compared to the land line service of BTC, is its vulnerability in the event of power failures. While Cable Bahamas says its phone service comes with a backup battery that will give a few hours of service in the event of a power cut, in our hurricane-prone islands, a few hours is not enough time, given the sometimes weeks-long power interruptions the storms sometimes create. Staying connected in times of emergency like during a hurricane, clearly needs to become more of a priority for Cable Bahamas than it currently is.
Conclusion
Before any consideration is given to granting a cellular license to Cable Bahamas, we would urge an examination of whether this company has fulfilled its primary mission of bringing television to all corners of The Bahamas and maintaining that signal in the best working order. As we have seen in many companies over the years, when a primary mission is not fulfilled and diversification into other areas follows, mediocrity sets in, either with the principal product or the new offerings, or both.
Bahamians have every right to demand the best, and any company, when considering branching out, better be prepared to provide the best in all of its products and services, or deal with the consequences.
o Philip C. Galanis is the managing editor of HLB Galanis & Co., Charted Accountants, Forensic & Litigation Support Services. He served 15 years in Parliament. Please send your comments to pgalanis@gmail.com.

read more »