Search results for : computers

Showing 1 to 10 of 1000 results


News Article

August 26, 2010
Woman in Action: Robust Robbin

The popular bi-weekly newspaper of The Bahamas,

The Punch did a feature on me today for their "Woman in Action" column. I'd like to share it with you. Here is what they wrote:

(The Punch, August 26, 2010) Robbin Whachell ls the editor,
administrator, and co-founder
of TheBahamasWeekly.com,
an online news, community,
events, sports, arts, culture,
entertainment and Information
source about The Bahamas
which also provides a weekly email to Its subscribers.
When asked why she choose
this career path she notes:" My
career chose me. I moved to
Grand Bahama Island during
the time when everyone was
getting computers and painfully
learning about viruses and email
etiquette. I felt compelled to
share information with my friends on my email address list. As I
shared information my list grew..."

read more »


News Article

August 29, 2011
Seminar to highlight need for businesses to have disaster plan

The damage caused by the passage of Hurricane Irene has demonstrated the effect a disaster can have on our lives and businesses.
According to Gamal Newry, a senior consultant at Preventive Measures, an asset-loss prevention firm, preparation is crucial in mitigating the damage any disaster can have on a business.
Newry said it is important for businesses to have a plan to ensure the continuity of their operations in the face of catastrophe.  He said that the better prepared you are for an emergency, the better prepared you would be for a disaster.
While the attendant damage of Hurricane Irene is at the forefront of most people's minds, Newry reasoned that other events like fires could be more devastating.
He said, "In my opinion, a fire is more damaging than a hurricane.  With hurricanes, we know when the season begins and ends and we know when a system is approaching.  A fire is unexpected and can occur on any day of the week."
Referring to the 2001 fire that destroyed the Bay Street Straw Market, Newry said a risk assessment of the building, where vendors sold flammable T-shirts, wood and straw craft, would have highlighted the need for fire extinguishers and a fire suppression system.
Newry pointed out that some businesses may have these devices, yet they neglect to hold fire drills for staff.
Newry said that people often give little thought to preparing for possible catastrophes until danger is imminent.  He said, "As a culture, which is not unique to The Bahamas, [a disaster plan] is not important until something happens.  It also has to do with a lack of education.  People think that you can't do anything [to minimize the impact]."
To this end, Newry has teamed up with international consultant Lynden Bird to offer a business continuity seminar from October 4 - 6 at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel.
The seminar seeks to educate business owners on how to develop a feasible plan to deal with extended power outages, computer virus attacks, theft, fire, severe weather, illness of key staff or an IT system failure.
Newry said, "We're not introducing disaster preparedness in The Bahamas.  We are just saying assess what you are doing.  There may be something you could do differently."

read more »


News Article

August 21, 2012
Help your children avoid cyber-bullying

You have to remember kids will be kids. And adults have the responsibility to help protect and teach your children how to understand the world. It is really straightforward and simple, but how can some adults help their children when they are completely unaware of the threats and benefits of the Internet and social media networks?
New technology is born every day and the Internet is full of potentially good information. But it also has plenty of bad information and negative outcomes. One thing you have to remember is that technology and the Internet itself is not good or bad - it is how you wish to use it.
Today's craze for young children is Facebook and Twitter. Most parents don't even know that there child is using these social media networks. Both have a minimum age restriction which is 13 years old. And there are good reasons for that.
One of the most negative results from social media is 'cyber-bullying' where normally young children between the ages of 12 to 18 harm other people, in a deliberate, repeated or hostile manner.
Social media networking continues to rise amongst teenagers, making it all the more important to keep our kids safe. A recent study shows that 22 percent log on to the social sites more than 10 times a day and 75 percent own Internet-enabled smartphones.

The good stuff
o Improved communications via email, instant messaging, Internet phones and video
o Data storage and sharing across the world
o The potential of networking ideas and knowledge without boundaries
o The democratization of information
o The ability to learn more and more instantly

The bad stuff
o Internet crime such as online scams
o Misuse of information for negative results
o Character attacks and 'cyber-bullying', which is a big problem in The Bahamas
o Exploitation of children and child predators

Some tips
o Always monitor your child's Internet usage
o Create ground rules
o Ask your child for the password to their social media accounts and email. It is not for you to check, but the child knowing that you have it makes them aware of what they are doing and saying.
o Be a friend on your child's Facebook and Twitter account with full access.
o Don't allow your child who is under 13 to have a Facebook account. It is their rules and the law in the USA and most of the world.
o Use filtering software such as www.NetNanny.com, PureSight PC
o Keep the computer in a central location, not your kids' bedroom
o Tell your children NOT to fill in questionnaires and free giveaways

o Online Edge is a weekly feature aiming to improve how you interact with technology. For more information on this article, you can send an email to customerservice@bahamaslocal.com or call 676-2682

o Bahamaslocal.com is a user-friendly search engine with exclusive listings on businesses and community organizations in The Bahamas. It includes information pertaining to local business, news, classifieds, movie listings, TV movie listings, jobs and local events.

read more »


News Article

August 25, 2012
Olympian opens sports store

Olympian Andretti Bain is seeking to make the transitional step from competing to becoming his own boss.
The 26-year-old has opened a sports and lifestyle nutritional store, located on Farrington Road and George Street, designed to provide Bahamians with another option for healthier living. Bain sees the opening of his store as the first step of his transition from an athlete to a businessman. The Olympic silver medalist also wants to move back to The Bahamas.
He said: "I really would like to be home training. It was always my goal to do that but there are certain things that we are lacking here that really prevent me and other athletes from doing so. Some of the things were the availability and the affordability of proper sports and lifestyle nutritional products. It is very important to have your supplements and vitamins. I figured that in trying to fulfill a personal need that I have that I will go ahead and create a store to do that. It is one less hurdle I will have to clear when it comes to making that transition from training in the states to training home."
The store will serve and provide all multi-vitamins, be they for sports, recreation or everyday use. Diet and weight loss products as well as consultative services on sports and lifestyle nutritional products or dietary weight loss exercise programs.
Bain said that opening this store is just one of the many business ideas he plans to execute. The nutrition store was a priority he said and took about two months to put into operation. The 400-meter runner used the time off, after not qualifying for the London Olympic Games, to start up the store.
"With my busy schedule training and competing, I didn't have the time to do it in the past," said Bain. "After I wasn't able to make this year's Olympic team, I finally had two months free from track and field where I could pursue other goals. The blue print was already set and the business plan was in place. After I had this entire summer, it was just a matter of me getting focused and going to work, doing all the physical labor when it comes to the store.
"Because of my experience in professional athletics, I am very knowledgeable when it comes to what type of supplements and vitamins athletes will need to take. Anything that I don't know, there are computers in the store where we will be able to do the research. I will also have nutritionist and dieticians on call who will provide advice. The advice is not something that I am selling, it is more or less for the product. This is a business that I have set out for a while to do. My transition from track and field to life after [is the store and] all the research needed to run and operate a sports and lifestyle nutritional store."
Bain made sure to clear the about his future in track by assuring that he is not quitting, but rather he plans to compete until the 2020 Olympics. He plans to continue training.
The quartermiler made his first Olympics team in 2008. He advanced into the semifinal of the Beijing Games after clocking 45.96 seconds in the opening rounds. Bain placed seventh in the semifinal in 45.52 seconds. As the lead off runner for the men's 4x400m team in 2008, Bain teamed up with Michael Mathieu, Andrae Williams and Chris Brown to capture the silver medal in 2:58.03. The United States of America won the gold in 2:55.39.
He added: "As much as track and field is a part of my life, track and field is not my life."
Bain is giving his stamp of approval for all the supplements and other products that are in his store. He said all the products are authentic and meet international, regional and local medical standards.

read more »


News Article

December 15, 2010
Leaving the Island Sale, Grand Bahama - December 18th

Freeport, Grand Bahama Island -

Leaving the Island, so Everything must go! 

Saturday, December 18th from 9am to 3pm; and

Sunday, December 19th from 9am to 12noon

Furniture, computer equipment, printers, hundreds
of movies, books, kitchen equipment, linens, storage, shelving,
decorative items, etc.

No. 3 Bentley Drive, Bahama Terrace off of Lunar Drive (near Stop and Shop)... 

read more »


News Article

August 24, 2012
Purpose of education

Dear Editor,
Earlier this month, the Minister of Education Jerome Fitzgerald announced this year's BGCSE and BJC exam results. The Nassau Guardian's headline read, "Dismal exam scores continue". Dismal might be an understatement. The results were abysmal.

read more »


News Article

October 15, 2014
Red Ribbon Ball set for Nov. 22

President of The Bahamas AIDS Foundation Camille, Lady Barnett announced yesterday that the 21st annual Red Ribbon Ball will be held on Saturday, November 22 in the Grand Ballroom of the Atlantis resort.
"For those of you who missed the 2013 ball, l advise you to get your tickets for the 2014 Red Ribbon Ball now. The 2013 ball was fabulous and 2014 will be even better," said Lady Barnett at a press conference at the Hilton hotel in Downtown Nassau.
"Last year, we raised $80,000.00. This year, we hope to raise even more funds. We need to raise more funds to support the work of the foundation especially three of our most important and costly programs."
Lady Barnett pointed to the outreach program for adolescents infected and affected by HIV/AIDS.
This program is holistic in nature and as such provides academic, psychosocial and financial support along with food, clothing, life skills, job training and preparation skills, computer access and peer support.
The annual cost per child for the outreach program is $2,000. The foundation currently works with 50 adolescents.
Another program is the purchase of medications. These are not the generic medicines currently provided free of charge by the Ministry of Health, but special medications that some patients need.
These medications are more costly, Lady Barnett noted.
She said the foundation has made a commitment to provide these medicines for four patients.
"That is all that we can presently afford to support," she said. "This program costs $24,000 a year."
The final program is "Combatting HIV and AIDS through a culture of reading".
This program is intended to sensitize primary school children to HIV/AIDS with age-appropriate storybooks.
The books are donated annually to primary schools throughout The Bahamas, and in some cases, guest readers read the stories to the students.
This year, the foundation has included a slogan and jingle competition that will coincide with World AIDS Day on December 1.
"As you can see, the proceeds from the Red Ribbon Ball are vital to the work of the foundation," Lady Barnett said.
"I encourage the community to support the ball, come and have fun and know that you are supporting a worthy cause."
Lady Barnett thanked the foundation's "loyal and generous partners", including Cable Bahamas, Zamar, John Bull, Hilton Hotel, Colina, Bahama Fantasies, Pictet Bank, BTC, JetBlue, Atlantis and Scotiabank.

read more »


News Article

December 13, 2010
Leaving the Island Sale, Grand Bahama

Freeport, Grand Bahama Island -

Leaving the Island, so Everything must go! 

Saturday, December 18th from 9am to 3pm; and

Sunday, December 19th from 9am to 12noon

Furniture, computer equipment, printers, hundreds
of movies, books, kitchen equipment, linens, storage, shelving,
decorative items, etc.

No. 3 Bentley Drive, Bahama Terrace off of Lunar Drive (near Stop and Shop)... 

read more »


News Article

August 31, 2011
Irene cost govt 37m

Hurricane Irene caused nearly $37 million in government losses in The Bahamas, a regional insurance body has estimated.
But the country will not receive any payout from the Caribbean Catastrophe Risk Insurance Facility (CCRIF) as the damage is not considered significant enough for The Bahamas to qualify, according to Simon Young, CEO of Caribbean Risk Managers, the facility supervisor of CCRIF.
The CCRIF, which is a non-profit risk pooling facility owned and   operated by Caribbean governments, said its board and team share the belief of the Bahamian government that the impact of Hurricane Irene was not as bad as had been feared.
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham declared last week that the country was not devastated by the storm.
"Early damage reports indicate low to moderate impacts except for some southern and eastern islands in The Bahamas, which lay directly on Irene's path," said a statement from CCRIF.
"Critical tourism infrastructure, on which these countries largely depend for economic activity, was not badly affected. The Bahamas Ministry of Tourism indicated that the major tourism areas of Nassau/Paradise Island and Grand Bahama have seen a quick return to normal operations."
Speaking from his office in Jamaica yesterday, Young explained to The Nassau Guardian that CCRIF policies feed off of the loss estimates that it makes within a catastrophe loss model.
"The computer models use wind speeds, storm surges and waves across The Bahamas through the whole of the storm then it calculates what the estimated loss would be for the economy of The Bahamas with particular focus on things that the government will have to pay for. Then it comes up with a national loss number for The Bahamas as a whole.
"So what happens, because The Bahamas covers such a large geographical area, what we saw with Irene was a relatively high level of damage on the Family Islands. But because their value in terms of the national economy is not very large then that doesn't turn out to be a big loss proportionate to the whole Bahamas."
He explained that because the Bahamian government has a policy for the entire country, losses need to be significantly higher.  "The hurricane needs to affect areas with more contribution to the economy than just the Family Islands, which is what Irene impacted," Young said.
CCRIF estimated the government losses to be somewhere around $36.8 million, Young said.
Asked what amount of damage would be needed to trigger the policy, Young said the information was classified. However, he said the $36.8 million is "quite far from the trigger level."
Young said with New Providence and Grand Bahama being the major economic hubs in the country, it's unlikely that the country's policy would be triggered unless those islands are severely impacted.
"It would be very difficult to get enough losses in the Family Islands to trigger the policy," he said, adding that even if the Family Islands were wiped out some damage may still be required on New Providence or Grand Bahama.
Most of the damage in the Family Islands was done to private homes and buildings.
Young explained that the policy is not designed to cover private structures.
He added that CCRIF will discuss with the Bahamian government whether an additional policy is needed specifically to cover the outer islands.
In the meantime, he said CCRIF has already contacted the government to see what other ways it may be able to assist, for example through CCRIF's technical assistance program.
The Bahamas was one of six member states in the region impacted by the storm.  Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Haiti, St. Kitts and Nevis and the Turks and Caicos Islands (TCI) will also not benefit from the policy.  The CCRIF noted that of these territories, the highest losses were determined for The Bahamas and TCI.
None of the other four territories was "impacted by more than lower tropical storm force winds (under 50 mph)."
CCRIF reported that it contacted the governments of TCI and The Bahamas to advise them that their policies were not triggered.
"Turks and Caicos' financial secretary confirmed that the damage was not as significant as was expected and indicated that the damage was primarily associated with flooding," the CCRIF statement said.
Since CCRIF's inception in 2007, the facility has made eight payouts totaling just under US $33 million to seven member governments.

read more »


News Article
Steve Jobsí resignation as Apple CEO could change mobile dynamics
August 29, 2011

With Steve Jobsí resignation today as CEO of Apple Inc., the man who changed the face of computing and then went on to repeat the performance with mobile leaves the field just when smartphones and tablets are beginning to turn the worlds of commerce, content, communication and marketing upside down.

read more »