Search results for : computers

Showing 1 to 10 of 1000 results


News Article

July 18, 2012
Developing kids with character

Activities like art, sports and drama may be the draw for parents when they determine which summer camp to send their children to, and at Meridian School's Adventure Camp, they are among the list of activities, but it's at this camp that children are also taught to be mannerly and respectable citizens.
Honesty, integrity, respect, discipline and responsibility are character traits that the 100-plus campers learn daily at the camp under the theme "Character Count" as instructors teach children that they should strive to be people of character, no matter their age.
From the littlest two-year-old camper to the older and more mature 12-year-olds finding ways to incorporate character building exercises in their daily activities is critical according to camp facilitator, Terez Cleare. She said while children want to have fun, teaching them something they can use in school and at home in the future was also key at their camp.
"Teaching the children how to be people of character early in life is key to their growth and development," said Cleare. "We can never have too much character and it's important for parents and teachers to really push their students to be responsible and respectful now rather than later. During the school year we normally ensure to teach students how to be honest and accountable for their actions, and we are doing the same thing in our summer camp because we want them not only to be academically bright, but also to have character."
For 10-year-old Ethan Moss who has attended the camp since it started on June 25, learning to be a more caring, respectful and responsible individual is a key reason he likes attending the camp, which ends on July 27.
"I've been to this camp for a while now and I like how much we are encouraged to respect one another and be better people generally. I like that so much of what we do, we can use in our daily lives and we can learn now to be better in school, at home and around friends. I like the character games and activities we do because they really make the camp different," said Ethan.
But just like any other summer camp there are many fun aspects of it that have students geared up to attend from day-to-day.
Eight-year-old Ishan Roy, a fourth grade student at Queen's College is excited about the swimming classes at the Meridian camp. He said he wants to use the skills he is learning to swim at home.
"I really like the different things at the camp like the drama, art and computer, but I really like the swimming classes the most. My mom will let me swim in a pool that is nine feet deep by myself if I can learn to swim, so I am really excited about that. I am learning everything I can," he said.
Being able to dramatize and express herself in the drama and media classes is what grabs 10-year-old Meghan Rolle about the camp and makes her look forward to summer school everyday. The Tambearly student said she likes that she doesn't have to be limited by what she can do.
Having something different to do daily is what keeps 10-year-old Johnathan Weech motivated.He likes that the camp is not just sports or academics based. He said it is great to be able to do other things he normally doesn't do like art, drama and swimming.
"We play kick ball and basketball and I have so much fun. I would really tell other kids to come here too because you can learn so much and have fun in so many ways," said Weech.
But to keep the balance of academics and fun, the camp also offers academic classes daily to keep students on top of their studies. The teachers aim to make learning fun and most of the time the students are not aware they are learning because of the creativity of the facilitators.
"We know how important it is to keep students academically focused during the long summer break, so this is why a lot of our activities are academically based as well," said Cleare. "For instance we may get students to use the computer -- which they love, and while they think they are playing around they are doing activities that will help them in their reading, computer skills and other areas of their academics. We get students to improve their writing by telling them to write essay or dramas on topics they like. They get so caught up creating their characters they don't notice their writing is improving, and they aren't as out of touch when school reopens," she said.
At the end of the day Cleare feels that parents should be able to see that their children have not slacked off academically, physically or in terms of their manners because the camp attacks all of these areas. The holistic approach to the camp engages the students and prepares them in more ways than one to face the world, and be individuals people would love to know.
To show parents the character activities conducted in the camp as well as how students interpreted the different character traits, a movie depicting student efforts and activities will be aired on Thursday, July 27 at the Galleria Cinemas on John F. Kennedy Drive. People interested in seeing the culminating project of "Character Counts" can contact the school for tickets at 328-1151.

read more »


News Article

June 22, 2012
An evening that will be the talk of the town

Jazz music will never sound the same again after listening to the diverse style and expertise of the amazing line-up that has been set for the musical spectacular that will be the Ralph Munnings Jazz Band Concert.
Ronnie Butler, Duke Errol Strachan, Freddie Munnings, Naomi Taylor, Osano Neely and Anushka Wright headline the Saturday, June 23 event at Old Fort Bay Clubhouse which will be the talk of the town, as it celebrates jazz saxophone legend Ralph Munnings. The evening kicks off at 7 p.m.
Adding even more flavor to this jazzy affair, the legend himself -- Ralph Munnings will perform.
"This is going to be a great occasion. I have always been passionate about my work and I intend to bring that same love and talent I've always displayed to this upcoming event," said Munnings.
"This event will be really special to me, not only because I'm being honored which is an amazing thing to me, but also because I will be playing in concert with some old friends from when I first started as well as meeting up with some new musicians who I've had different opportunities to play with."
He said the concert will be a treat for jazz enthusiasts and even those who will listen to the music for the first time.
"It will truly be an evening of entertainment, relaxation and sensation. The level of talent that will be displayed throughout the event is not something one sees everyday and the fusion of more modern jazz fusions should be an exciting experience," he said.
Concert organizer, Naomi Taylor, believes the evening will be a sensational, classy and elegant way to spend a Saturday evening.
"It will be a black tie affair with wonderful hors d'oeuvres, beautiful music and singing, great company and a great environment," she said. "Not to mention honoring Ralph Munnings in this way is something special. He has really done a lot to influence the current generation of musicians and we should honor him for what he has done. It's time to recognize the men and women who have paved the way for us in this industry and give them their accolades while they are alive."
The fusion of youth and maturity, old-school jazz to modern mixtures will add an extra pop of character and intrigue to the event according to Taylor. As one of the featured vocalists she said she feels honored to be a part of the melting pot of talent that will be performing on Saturday night.
"You can expect a wide array of talent and style with the performers all evening long. It has been well organized and the execution will be flawless. You can expect to hear different jazz and music styles from Latin jazz, classic jazz, blues and even famous Bahamian ballads. This will be dynamic and beautiful. You do not want to miss out on this event."
Adding more vibrant flavor to the show will be musicians like pianist Clinton Crawford, bassist Adrian D'Aguilar, drummer Neil Symonette, alto saxophonist Tino Richardson, tenor saxophonist Dion Turnquest, trombonist Teddy Russell, trumpeter Lamont Gibson, and percussionists Peanuts Taylor and Kevin Dean.
Proceeds from the night that is expected to be the talk of the town will go to the Ralph Munnings Musicians Mentoring Fund which was recently established to encourage upcoming musicians. With the new program Munnings will be coming to New Providence to do monthly master classes in woodwind instruments for interested youngsters.
The classes are a way for Munnings who began his career in music in the 1950s and has played with the likes of Nat King Cole, Harry Belafonte and Ben E. King to give back, and train the next generation.
"It would be a crime to let musicians like Munnings die out and the younger generations not benefit," said Taylor.
Tickets for the jazz concert can be purchased at Custom Computers locations in the Cable Beach Plaza and Harbour Bay Shopping Centre.

Jazz Concert
When: Saturday, June 23
Where: Old Fort Bay Clubhouse
Time: 7 p.m. for cocktail 8 p.m.
Cost: $75

Performers
Headliner
Ralph Munnings
Vocalists
Duke Errol Strachan
Osano Neely
Anushka Wright
Naomi Taylor
Freddie Munnings
Ronnie Butler
The core band
Clinton Crawford - pianist and musical director
Adrian D'Aguilar - bass
Neil Symonette - drums
Guests instrumentalists
Tino Richardson - alto sax
Dion Turnquest - tenor sax
Teddy Russell - trombone
Lamont Gibson - trumpet
Peanuts Taylor - percussion
Kevin Dean - percussion

read more »


News Article

July 11, 2012
Being a brain pays off

Rickeem Butler is a "brain" and it's paying off.  The 18-year-old was given the opportunity to participate in the Behavioral Research Advancement in Neuroscience (BRAIN) summer research and development internship with experts in the field of neuroscience.
 
The 10-week program, which runs May 23-August 4, is being held at Georgia State University for undergraduate students.  It is comprised of daily workshops on various science-related topics, and allows students to participate in research projects with acclaimed scientists and researchers.
 
Research topics students may have the opportunity to be a part of include molecular biology, cellular communication, neural systems analysis, behavioral investigations, comparative studies, clinical and biomedical application and computer modeling.
 
Science majors are encouraged to take advantage of the program in order to develop strong research skills, improve their scientific thinking, gain experience with cutting edge research techniques, become comfortable in a research environment, benefit from attentive monitoring and earn a competitive edge for graduate programs.
 
"I feel so honored to be in this program.  It has been really enlightening and just amazing so far," said the young man who is studying biology and chemistry with a minor in neuroscience.
Butler, who has completed his freshman year at the prestigious Morehouse College, in Atlanta, Georgia, and who aspires to be a surgeon, said the internship is perfect for him because it had been his goal to participate in an internship after his first year.  When he heard about the BRAIN program he said he knew he had to apply for it.
 
"Knowing that over 1,200 students generally apply to the program annually, some with really impressive resumes or others who are at least seniors in their BS [bachelor of science] program, really made me think my chances were slim to get in, so it was a shocker for me to be accepted as a freshman to this amazing program," he said.
 
In the six weeks that he's been in the program Butler said he has been learning about topics that he hasn't even touched on in college yet, like electrophysiology, behavioral pharmacology, microbiology and molecular biology.
 
"I have been learning so much in these last few weeks. It's a lot of information and I'm learning invaluable lessons in research techniques and getting an inside look at current studies in neuroscience.  It's just amazing.  I have done general biology so far, but in the series of workshops I am undergoing with the internship I am learning a plethora of topics," he said.
 
Butler believes the experience will be a boost for his continued studies at Morehouse College, and that the research techniques he is learning now will be an asset to his future resume and career in neurosurgery.  His time in the program has already started to influence his career path, as he now hopes to not only be a neurosurgeon but to also do research in neuroscience, particularly in improving treatments for degenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.
 
"I've really been inspired to not only do the practical or hands on side of neuroscience which is surgery, but I want to also do the theory and research," said Butler.  "I really would like to make a difference in this field.  I believe I have a lot to offer and I am becoming more and more passionate the deeper I get into my program and now even this summer research experience.  At the end of the day when I am done with my medical studies I would hope to be able to return home and really contribute to neuroscience in the country."
Butler is one of 40 paid interns at the summer institute.
 
Students eligible for the program are those who are interested in a neuroscience research career and are included in any of the following groups: Students with documented disabilities, first-generation college students, Pell grant-eligible students, racial and ethnic minorities currently underrepresented in neuroscience, students from Georgia State University, Agnes Scott College, Emory University and Spelman College.
 
The science major thinks his 3.81 cumulative grade point average, along with his research background (Butler along with his professor and classmates discovered a unique protein in the blood of diabetics. The findings are currently being copyrighted) and passion for the field got him accepted.  He believes the call he put in to the program's directors about why he would be a good candidate for the internship despite his limited experience also helped.
 
 In time, Butler hopes to continue to achieve in all he puts his mind to.  He has many more dreams that he has yet to put his full attention to, and he expects with more motivation and determination he will be able to achieve whatever comes his way.
 
But no matter how far he goes, or how much he achieves, Butler said he will never forget his roots.  The 2011 St. Augustine's College graduate, who walked away with the Deacon Leviticus Adderley award for the most outstanding male, was also the National Merit Scholarship winner that year.  His mother, Verneki Butler, advised him to turn the $30,000 down because he had already started school at Morehouse College on a full four-year scholarship.

read more »


News Article

June 21, 2012
400 accused murderers on bail an abysmal system failure

Dear Editor,

The attorney general of The Bahamas, Allyson Maynard-Gibson, said recently that there are over 400 accused murderers on bail. This figure represents more than half of the murders committed in The Bahamas over the last 10 years and could be one of the major reasons for the escalation in serious criminal offenses that occur in our country.
Looking at the factual information above, the average citizen can easily deduce that something is wrong with our current system for prosecuting alleged murderers. We have an endemic problem and this type of incompetence seems to be supported by corruption at the highest levels.
The word on the street is that murder raps are easier to beat than armed robbery. Young men today are more fearful of getting caught for committing an armed robbery than they are of committing murder. For every 875 Bahamians, one accused murderer walks freely amongst us. This does not even take into account the murderers amongst us who have not been charged as yet.
The adverse spinoff effect of having accused murderers out on bail is beyond measure. Can you imagine the negative effect this has on our young men who see these thugs commit murder and then within one to two years these thugs are back on the streets? The abysmal failure of our criminal justice system continues to strengthen the resolve of criminally-minded persons who will as long as possible terrorize our communities. These criminals are revered for their illicit acts and young men know that if they perform an act equally as heinous they can also earn a reputation and be "rated" on the streets.
Gibson mentioned that the case files for accused murderers have been poorly kept and she said that this is one of the reasons why so much of these men are out on bail. I have been unable to fathom how a case file for an alleged murderer out on bail can be poorly managed given the fact that we are well on our way to a fifth murder record in six years in The Bahamas.
I hope Gibson sees the wisdom to further investigate this matter, as it seems criminal to me that an accused murderer is allowed to go out on bail because records were poorly kept given the present capabilities that computer programs provide. The protocol standards have not been exercised and as such those responsible need to be held accountable. The investigation of this intentional administrative failure needs to commence as soon as possible and the criminal case should be fast-tracked to the Supreme Court. This needs to be done in the public's best interest.
Gibson also reiterated that the re-introduction of the swift justice program will resolve this apparent "administrative malfunction" and will net positive results going forward.
I say to the attorney general that good and right-thinking Bahamians are supporting her in the government's efforts to bring this mammoth crime problem under control. Many of us want The Bahamas to be a safe haven again for all citizens and if Project Safe Bahamas, Urban Renewal 2.0 or the swift justice program can keep criminals where they belong and then perhaps act as a crime prevention tools, then we are behind you 110 percent.
Successive governments are to be blamed for our current state of affairs and the ball is now in Perry Christie and Gibson's court to deliver. One accused murderer out on bail is too much, but we now have over 400. These accused murderers pose a great risk to the general public because of their willingness to harm others and to themselves because of vigilantes who are constantly seeking street justice.
I say to you Mrs. Gibson, to let's see how fast we can bring these cases to trial and let the chips fall where they may. We will wait and see the results of swift justice and judge its effectiveness accordingly.

- Dehavilland Moss

read more »


News Article

May 21, 2014
CIBC FirstCaribbean suffers temporary system shutdown

CIBC FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) customers countrywide were unable to access their money for a portion of yesterday after the bank's system suffered a failure.
Angry customers said they were unable to access funds from the bank's automatic banking machines (ABMs), from other banks' ABMs, or from CIBC FirstCaribbean's tellers within its branches.
The bank's Managing Director Marie Rodland-Allen said that the situation resulted from a "power outage" and all ABMs were "up and running" by 3 p.m. yesterday afternoon.
Asked how long the system was down for, and whether there would be an investigation into the failure or possible compensation to customers, Rodland-Allen did not comment further.
The system failure came days after bad news for the bank, in the form of reports that it recorded a net loss of $174 million in The Bahamas over the past six months. Incremental loan losses of $75 million represented over half of the total loan losses experienced by the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC) in its Caribbean unit as a whole.
The bank noted, however, that had it not recorded these loan losses and a $115 million non-cash goodwill impairment charge in The Bahamas, it would have generated $16 million in net income for the period.
"I am certain the bank will be distressed with the (system failure) coming almost immediately after their announcement," said an industry insider, speaking on condition of anonymity.
One customer, speaking on condition of anonymity yesterday, said: "It surprised me because I would have thought the bank would have had contingencies against such things. Here it is, I badly needed to make a withdrawal and instead I'm being told that I cannot get my money. It really upset me. I understand that sometimes computer systems fail, but there must be fail-safes to ensure that people can still gain access to their money."

read more »


News Article

July 04, 2012
PLP made Bahamians jobless

Dear Editor,
Prime Minister Perry Christie once said (Clifford Park, April 4, 2002): "There will be no payback time under my administration. I am a democrat not a tyrant. I will be too busy helping people to have any time for hurting people. And it's just not in my nature to do it anyway. And when I speak about this, I speak on behalf of the entire government I will lead. If I hear about any minister of mine trying to practice any victimization on anybody the next time he hears from me, it will be to tell him to clean out his desk and head for the door. Victimization is an evil I put on par with corruption in high places. Neither will be tolerated under an administration headed by Perry Christie. Of that you can be assured."
The termination of 80 urban renewal staff in Nassau and Freeport was victimization. They were terminated because they were perceived to be supporters of the Free National Movement. They are all Bahamians, mostly mothers and grandmothers who head their families and are totally dependent on their incomes from urban renewal for the survival of their families.
This act of victimization has contributed to urban decay and social instability.
The programs that they organized for the last five years range from senior citizen programs to youth programs to marching bands to computer classes. In all, some 21 programs, seminars and activities were organized by the 80 terminated officers in 16 urban renewal centers in Nassau and Freeport.
These programs touched the lives of thousands of Bahamians on a daily basis. The PLP government brought all of this to an abrupt end on May 8.
Instead, the PLP government replaced these urban renewal officers with police officers who are now performing menial day-to-day chores such as purchasing and delivering office groceries and supplies to the urban renewal centers.
I once again appeal to Prime Minister Perry Gladstone Christie and Minister Phillip Brave Davis to end this act of victimization and restore the 80 urban renewal officers to their previous positions.
It is the right thing to do.
- Dion A. Foulkes

read more »


News Article

November 24, 2010
Teens accused of series of robberies

Two teenagers accused of a series of robberies across New Providence were arraigned before a magistrate yesterday.
Raymond Pratt Jr, 18, of Fourth Street, Coconut Grove, and Roderick Strachan, 19, are accused of the attempted robbery of?Super Wash, Robinson Road on November 17.
They are also accused of the attempted robbery of Eugene Coakley and the robbery of Charles Sweeting. Sweeting's wallet, containing $50, was stolen. Pratt is accused of receiving Sweeting's property.
Pratt alone is accused of robbing Sabrina Heastie on September 9 of $2,500, three cell phones, sneakers and a laptop computer that belonged to the Sport House.
Pratt is further accused of robbing Dorcell McKinney of his ...

read more »


News Article

August 17, 2010
Custom Computers answers family's prayers just in time for back to school

Nassau, Bahamas - A
grandmother's prayer for a brand new computer for her 10-year-old grandson was
answered by Custom Computers. The
company held a special drawing to announce the winners of its Third Annual A's
for Excellence Program on Saturday, August 14 at its Cable Beach Store, before
a jammed-pack crowd of excited students and parents.

As 10-year-old Kamal Hudson's name was
called, declaring him the official winner of the Primary School Category, his
family members all leaped for joy. The sixth grade student from St. Thomas More Primary School
was presented with a brand new Disney NetPal laptop computer...

read more »


News Article

June 12, 2012
Treating wounds to the foot or lower leg

The skin is a barrier, designed to protect the body from attacks, infection and injury. A wound or ulcer is a break in the skin. There are several other words used to describe a break in the skin including cuts, scratches, abrasions, lacerations, sores and of course wounds and ulcers.
Many wounds are superficial and require only local first aid for them to heal. On the other hand, some wounds are deeper and need special medical attention to prevent infection and damage to underlying tissues like the bone or muscle, to help wounds heal and prevent complications. Ulcers can have many detrimental effects on the lives of persons with them. Ulcers are often painful, decrease the quality of life, especially if ulcers are chronic, they control your life in terms of what you can do and where you can go, they can smell and can be embarrassing. Here are some tips on what to do if you have a wound on the foot or lower leg.

What causes leg ulcers?
There are different types of wounds based on the size, depth and cause of the wound. Leg ulcers are much more common in people as they get older due to poor circulation in aging limbs. Two conditions that add to the complications of leg ulcers in the elderly are obesity and diabetes. Wounds or ulcers can be caused by pressure, damaged veins, poor blood flow, diabetes and as the result of trauma. People with sickle cell anaemia and other medical conditions may also be at high risk for developing leg ulcers.
There are many other causes of leg and foot ulcers including rheumatoid arthritis, hypertension, renal (kidney) failure, lymphedema, inflammatory diseases (Lupus), high cholesterol, heart disease, sickle cell anemia, bowel disorders, a history of smoking, trauma, burns and even some medications. Ulcers can also be associated with depressed or lowered immune systems and poor nutrition. Leg and foot ulcers can also get worse when they become infected with bacteria.

Symptoms
Regardless of the type of wound you have on your feet or legs, there are common symptoms seen in all ulcers and then there are symptoms that are specific for the type of ulcer you may have. With all ulcers there is a loss of some or all of the layers of the skin and the underlying subcutaneous tissue is exposed.
Venous ulcers are the most common leg ulcers accounting for more than 80 to 90 percent of all leg ulcers.
Years of research have shown that the usual cause of these leg ulcers is not a problem with the skin itself, but rather with blood not flowing properly through the veins under the skin. This is caused by high blood pressure in the veins. People with venous ulcers also experience leg pain and heaviness, swollen ankles, prominent veins and the ulcers are commonly located below the knee, on the inner part of the leg, just above the ankle. The skin around the ulcer darkens and can even become hard. Ulcers can be on one or both legs.
Diabetic foot ulcers are usually located on the bottom of the feet where there is increased pressure from changes in the shape of the foot and walking. Diabetics often lose the feeling in their feet and because they are unable to feel, they continue to walk on the foot causing more friction and pressure until eventually calluses and then an ulcer develops. Diabetic foot ulcers are often complicated by poor blood flow and infection and can result in amputations.
The blood supply to the feet is crucial. Ulcers can occur as a result of poor circulation to the feet. They can be very painful because of the limited blood supply. These ulcers usually occur between, or on the tips of the toes. The feet can be very cold or turn blue, black or gangrene.
Pressure ulcers are caused by prolonged pressure or friction to the feet -- especially on the heel of people who are confined to their beds and cannot change their position regularly. This pressure damages the skin and causes it to break down.

Care for wounds at home
Keeping a wound clean is the best way to avoid infection. Any superficial or shallow wound can be cleansed with mild soap and water while deeper wounds should be cleansed with saline. Often times people may tell you to leave the wound open to the air to help it heal faster, but this is incorrect. In fact, leaving the wound open to air will slow down its healing. Wounds heal best when they are moist and covered. After cleaning the wound, cover it with a clean gauze, tape or bandage. You can also put antibiotic cream or ointment on the wound before bandaging it.

When to see the doctor
Most wounds can be treated at home with routine first aid including thorough washing and dressing to prevent infection. Small, superficial wounds on young, healthy people can be treated at home and are expected to heal fairly quickly. For elderly people with chronic health conditions, having an ulcer or wound is a problem with potential for serious complications. This should motivate them to seek medical attention right away. Any diabetic with a wound should see the podiatrist right away. If you have poor circulation, venous problems or other medical conditions that contributed to the development of the wound, you also need to seek medical attention right away. If there is any sign of infection including redness, swelling, increased pain, odor and pus at the wound site, seek medical attention right away.

Diagnosing leg ulcers
Diagnosis is usually made based on symptoms, location and characteristics of the wound. It can be based on the patient's medical history and a physical examination by a wound specialist or podiatrist. Laboratory tests and imaging studies such as x-rays, MRIs (magnetic resonance imaging), CT (computed tomography) scans and non-invasive vascular studies may be ordered to help develop a treatment plan.

Treatments for leg ulcers
Successful treatment of foot and leg ulcers is directed toward correcting the cause of the ulcer and not just the ulcer itself. Once the causes of the ulcers are known and under control, (for example the blood sugar level or decreasing foot pressure in diabetes) the ulcer should progress toward healing by itself. Wounds heal at different rates based on the type of wound and the health of the person with the wound.
Other treatment strategies may involve cleaning the wound, wound dressings, reducing pressure, compression socks or stocking, etc. It may also involve weight loss if you are overweight and regular exercise to promote good circulation. For poor blood flow to the legs, a referral to a vascular specialist may be required. Medications may also be ordered to improve wound healing. Good blood supply and good nutrition is vital to ensure wound healing.
Having a non-healing ulcer for long periods of time can be very dangerous and can lead to infections and amputation of the foot or leg. If you have an ulcer on your leg or feet, you should see a podiatrist right away for proper evaluation and treatment.

o For more information, email me at foothealth242@gmail.com or visit www.emedicine.com or www.podiatrytoday.com. To see a podiatrist, visit Bahamas Foot Centre on Rosetta Street or call 325-2996 or Bahamas Surgical Associates on Albury Lane or call 394-5820 for an appointment.

read more »


News Article

July 17, 2012
Embracing 4G technology in The Bahamas

Undeniably, the upgrade of our cellular network to 4G has been plagued with service disruptions causing much frustration. Dropped calls, delayed email and failed messenger services, aggravate both technology savvy and infrequent phone users.
But it is of immense importance that The Bahamas upgrades its network to 4G.
We must move past the political banter on the sale of the Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC) to Cable and Wireless, accept its ownership and welcome the upgrade of technology. The transfer of new technology to The Bahamas improves our competitiveness.
Technology increasingly separates the developed and developing world; failure to keep up would severely limit our future growth potential. Our leaders must accept this and work with the private sector to integrate the latest technology with our aging infrastructure across all industries.
Bahamians are embracing telecommunication technology with vigor. The Samsung Galaxy S III launched over the weekend prompted a line of eager consumers in front of BTC's Bay Street store at 6 a.m. Armed with Blackberrys, Androids, iPhones, the new Galaxy S III, and other smartphones, Bahamians expect and demand access to the same level of service they find in the United States and Europe.
The smartphone is revolutionary and its power to integrate phone, data and location services has yet to be fully recognized here. But the revolution will come. And those unable to adapt will be left fighting for business in a digital world.
Take for example Uber, a taxi service predominately in the United States that allows customers to locate, call and pay for a taxi through an app. In fact, a customer merely opens the app, the closest taxi is located, the driver notified and the passenger watches the taxi approach on the smartphone. No call ever needs to made, no money exchanged and the entire ride is recorded on a smartphone with a credit card receipt emailed.
Uber is responding to the failure in large North American cities for taxis to maintain the level of anticipated service. Uber offers passengers a precise cab location, a safe and recorded ride and ease of payment.
Could Uber come to Nassau? Probably not, though taxis should take note that the app demonstrates the ability for technology to adapt and confront an entire service sector.
Apps have moved past mere entertainment to integrate with services outside the realm of a computer. The Nassau Guardian is moving forward to embrace digital media to allow our listeners seamless access to news and radio via our broadcast divisions.
We look forward to the full launch of 4G and the future potential of smartphone application in The Bahamas and all the change that will result.

read more »