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News Article
Shoe Depot is Bahamaslocal.com Business of the week!
Shoe Depot is Bahamaslocal.com Business of the week!

HUGE savings EVERYDAY on ALL footwear.
SAVE BIG @ Shoe Depot!
So don't miss out! on all our new arrivals
And Now carrying ... Apple Bottoms Brand!

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News Article
Skeletal foot found inside shoe and sock

POLICE are investigating the skeletal remains of a foot still encased in a shoe and sock found in Eleuthera.

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News Article
Shoe Store 'Attacked by Arsonists'

ARSONISTS are thought to have set fire to the country's biggest self-serve shoe store early yesterday morning in a second attack on the building since the weekend.

Bani, in Mackey Street, was destroyed in the blaze sparked at around 4.40am, less than an hour after Lincoln Bain, a major shareholder in the business, had abandoned his armed night watch of the store, which is next door to a branch of the Royal Bank of Canada.

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News Article
Miami stars heat up Abaco

LeBron James and Ray Allen traded their basketball shorts for swim trunks, their jerseys for tank tops and their basketball shoes for flip-flops before heading to the Bahamas for a post-season vacation...

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News Article
Cassius Moss inspired resurgence of sloop sailing

Edon Moss is one of those enterprising natives of Acklins. It seems many who came from out of the bosom of Acklins have been synonymous with proactivity. They are inclined to take charge of situations. There is this flourish that they exude. For some observers, the characteristic is too extravagant.
What can't be legitimately argued against however is their ability to attract attention. In the history of the island of Acklins, none of its natives have been as flamboyant, grounded in fanfare, as Edon Moss. Of course, he is much better known as Cassius Moss. The loquacious one was a loud and excitable voice for sports during the mid to last years of the 1960s, into the advent year of Independence (1973) and well beyond into the 1980s. In this special independence sports feature, his role in the post-1973 sports era is saluted.
During much of the 10 years prior to 1973, Moss was the biggest boxing highlight figure in the nation. There were those who were better. None though, had the flair of Cassius Moss. None could put fans into the Nassau Stadium like he did. He modeled himself in the ring after the truly great one, Cassius Clay (who later became known more famously as Muhammad Ali). Moss danced around and wore the red tassels adorned on white boxing shoes just like Clay/Ali. More importantly for Moss and the boxing fan base here in The Bahamas, he was boisterous, boastful and self-promoting just like the American heavyweight champion.
The fact that Moss did not win nearly as much as Clay/Ali did, mattered not at all. The fans came to see him get "put in his place" and certainly there were those who wanted him to succeed. His boxing career basically came to an end when Moss suffered a fractured right wrist during a bout. In surgery, a steel piece was inserted.
He made one unsuccessful attempt to return to boxing, but had to give it up. Boxing's loss was a big gain for sloop sailing. Not to be deterred by the injury that left him incapable of being a fit opponent in the ring or continuing to appropriately turn the stiff steering wheel of his truck, he opted for sloop sailing and the security business.
Needless to say, the Acklins' business zeal enabled him to succeed in security even more so than in the trucking business. As for sports, he was to blaze a new trail in sloop sailing. After him, would come 'King' Eric Gibson and Eleazor Johnson (two other Acklins Islanders) to promote sloop sailing, but it was Cassius Moss who led the way. He built the 'A' Class Sea Plague and transferred his
loquaciousness from boxing to sloop sailing. He packed Montagu Bay whenever his boat sailed.
He inspired the influx of Johnson, Gibson and many others who felt they could do just as well in boosting the sport. There were no others like Cassius Moss however. He was unique, whether with the Sea Plague or the Flying Eagle. He made his mark and is due far more credit than he gets for cementing the resurgence of sloop sailing in the country. Some of his highlights include being honored at the 1975 Family Island regatta as the leading sailing light from Acklins as a participant of the national water sport extravaganza; and capturing the Royal Race during the visit of Her Royal Highness, Queen Elizabeth II in 1895.
In the last two decades, his presence in sloop sailing has been infrequent but what he did to make the sport easily the most popular pastime in the country was immeasurable. It is fitting to pay tribute to his contributions to sports development during the past 40 years of independence. The Bahamian sporting community is indeed indebted to one Edon 'Cassius' Moss.

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News Article
Men charged with murder of police reservist

The two men police believe are responsible for the shooting death of an off-duty police reservist were literally dragged into the South Street court complex to be charged with his murder yesterday.
Clemson Edgecombe, 22, and Andrew Gibson, 28, who appeared to have trouble getting up the steps, were carried up the stairs by officers to appear before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez.
At one point, Gibson stumbled causing his shoes to slip off his feet, leaving him barefoot, as police carried him inside.
Both men were charged with the murder and armed robbery of police reservist Dennis Clarke on May 31.
According to police, Clarke was outside Superwash on Prince Charles Drive last Thursday when the occupants of a silver Toyota in the parking lot reportedly approached and shot.
Gibson was unable to stand as the charges were read. He claimed that the entire left side of his body was in pain.
Meanwhile, Edgecombe was charged with another armed robbery that occurred on May 17.
Police claim Edgecombe robbed Pedro Brennan of $700 worth of goods and $200 cash.
Edgecombe's attorneys told the court that their client was beaten by police and forced to sign a statement.
Gibson's attorney, Stanley Rolle, said his client was also abused and was brought to court barefoot, something he described as inhumane.
Gomez ordered that both defendants be taken to see a doctor immediately. The men were not required to enter a plea today and will return to court on August 22 for service of a voluntary bill of indictment.

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News Article
A govt out of touch with its people

Dear Editor,
The government is out of touch with The College of the Bahamas (COB) - only he who feels it knows it.
I wish to publicly support the College of the Bahamas Union of Students (COBUS) and its president for recent statements made in protest to proposed budget cuts at the college. To borrow a line from the COBUS press release, the proposed cuts in government subsidies to COB are an "autocratic, visionless attempt to cripple the national institution". COBUS added: "This may be the straw to finally cripple our national ability to educate our own citizens."
As a proud alumna of The College of the Bahamas, I can honestly say only he who feels it knows it.
The minister of education was quoted in yesterday's Guardian as stating that the proposed cuts, which are scheduled for COB, "should be done without affecting the college's level of service". That statement proves how out of touch he is. Perhaps he and other ministers who sit in lofty places need to try and put themselves in the students' shoes.
Notwithstanding the stellar education that students obtain at COB, it is no secret that there are administrative issues such as the dated registration process and the unavailability of classes, which continue to plague students. Budget cuts will not solve these longstanding issues.
How can this government, on the one hand, continue to press for the establishment of the University of The Bahamas but yet, on the other hand, ask the college as well as other agencies to, in the words of Ryan Pinder, "review their finances with an eye to cost savings". No doubt the consequence of budget cuts or "cost savings" will be an increase in fees, which will be a rod for the backs of thousands of students.
The government needs to be reminded that for thousands of Bahamians (I was one of them for seven years) The College of the Bahamas is the only place where they will be able to obtain a tertiary education. Going abroad to university is still a luxury for many. Therefore, the government ought to be exercising some intellectual muscle to determine how to financially empower and not financially weaken our great college.
I remain forever grateful for the many years I spent at the college. It was there I was molded into the citizen that I have become. As I watched the president of COBUS' lamentations, I sadly said to myself only he who feels it knows it. This government is clearly out of touch with the students at The College of the Bahamas. This can't be the government who 'Believes in Bahamians' and who promised that it would "double" its investment in education.
The future University of The Bahamas should not fall victim to subsidy cuts while the government is contemplating increasing the salaries and benefits to Parliamentarians; the constructions of a new complex to house the Senate and House of Assembly and the purchase and or construction of a prime minister's residence.
In addition, the government has re-employed a number of retired civil servants, by way of contract - some of whom receive salaries in the high five-figure range. To add insult to injury the re-hires, for the most part, have been assigned positions occupied by tenured civil servants who have either been redeployed to lower level positions while receiving the salary of the previous positions held, or sent home on full salary to await redeployment.
There are numerous other instances of waste, unfettered government spending and incompetent management and deployment of resources which have brought The Bahamas to this place.
Buyer's remorse is growing.
- Heather L. Hunt, Senator

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News Article
Someone who cares

If it weren’t for Mr. Moss, that long ago man with no need for a first name, Rashad Amahad might not have been doing what he’s doing now.
Perhaps Amahad wouldn’t spend his afternoons carving out a space for the children of his community to play and learn safely. Maybe he wouldn’t be so committed to that loftiest of ideals – the ability to actually make a change.
But years ago a man chose to pat a little boy on the head, and send him off to school with shined shoes and a candy, setting in motion a belief in the difference someone who cared could make in the lives of others.
“I never forgot this man,” said Amahad. “Every day ...

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News Article
Fine Threads is Bahamaslocal.com Business of the week!
Fine Threads is Bahamaslocal.com Business of the week!

With the latest in men's formal wear, designer suits, sports jackets and accessories Fine Threads has secured its place at the forefront of Bahamian mens fashion. Visit them at one of there many locations!

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News Article
The Bad Boys of Comedy were really bad -- in a good way

Phat Groove Entertainment's Bad Boys of Comedy show lived up to its name. It was a total laugh fest, so for a comedy lover like myself, the show was a hit.
I arrived at the Rainforest Theater in the Wyndham Hotel a little late, but thankfully the show had started on a mellow note with The Illest reggae fusion band, so I didn't miss any of the comedy action. (And just as an aside, The Illest set the mood appropriately with their song selections, ranging from their originals to contemporary popular songs from artists like Bob Marley and Adele.) They really got the crowd going. And just when you were ready for more host comedian Rayzor got the show started as he put the crowd in a tizzy with his endless jokes about celebrities and the lives they lead.
The first act of the night was Bahamian comedian Demetrius. I didn't know whether to laugh or cry when it came to Demetrius. And before he had even told the first joke he was already a comical sight, prancing onto the stage looking like super baby in a bonnet, poofy shoes and cape.
He regaled us with his humor about raising children and the comical life children lead when with grandparents. While the crowd was in stitches, there were moments during his act when I thought Demetrius tried too hard, because I didn't know whether to laugh at the joke, or at him in general. Nevertheless, he was good.
Then of course there was the Bahamian Mr. Brown, who took to the stage periodically to do his Mr. Brown booty tremble. It was pretty funny, but to be honest I really wanted to see the bad boys.
And the first one to bring it was Johnathan Martin, a comedian who has appeared not only in "Bad Boys of Comedy" but also "Def Jam" and "Comic View". Now talk about hilarious. This dude's show started with energy and he never let up.
He talked about the good old days when life was harder but easier. He talked about being raised by his loving, but thrifty mother and strict, but cheap father. Although he joked that his mother often bought irregular clothes and how he had to suffer wearing them throughout the years and his father often switched religions so he wouldn't have to buy his children presents or food, there was a message in what he was saying, and it was funny. The topics he addressed were something the people could all relate to.
If I thought that Martin was funny, then A.G. White was totally uproarious. He was a Caucasian comedian with an unfamiliar black audience but he was confident with it and threw caution to the wind when it came to telling his jokes.
He went from topics like how to cuss properly, growing up in New York to how stereotypical the world can be generally. And one of the best parts of his act for me was the Jamaican accent he used to add flavor to several jokes. But what really made him stand out to me throughout the night was how he entwined popular songs into his act to make his jokes almost three dimensional. And he was unafraid to cross boundaries and make jokes about himself and black people. But by no means were his jokes racist. They were applicable and I can honestly say he brought tears to my eyes -- that's how hard I laughed.
And just when I thought it couldn't get any better, the headliner, Brooklyn Mike brought the house down. Although his subject matter was limited to sex and relationships, for the most part he was the perfect cap to the event.
Brooklyn Mike's performance was stellar in describing why it's easier on females during a breakup than the male. He went into comedic detail about the crazy things people do for love even during a tumultuous relationship. He acted his jokes out and really got the crowd involved in the joke-telling. The only sore point for me in his performance was when he made a joke about robbery-rape role playing considering the recent headlines in local newspapers. But the crowd didn't seem to get too down on that point and he kept on riddling off hard-hitting jokes. By the end of the night my tummy was aching from the bellyful of laughs. The Bad Boys of Comedy show was definitely one of the best comedy shows I've attended recently. It was on point from start to finish. I was not disappointed.

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