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News Article

September 01, 2012
The reemergence of Carl Bethel

Dear Editor,

Now that the former member of Parliament for the Golden Isles constituency and former minister of youth, sports and culture in the Ingraham regime, Charles Maynard, has passed away, the opposition Free National Movement (FNM) must now decide who it wants to be its new national chairman.
The FNM, it seems, has gotten over the sudden and tragic passing of Maynard. Now the official opposition party must regroup if it hopes to hold onto the North Abaco seat in the upcoming by-election. Maynard's passing has left a huge, gaping void in the opposition. But the party must now find a replacement who would be able to fill the giant shoes that were left by the late FNM chairman. Contrary to what the deputy chairman of the FNM, Dr. Duane Sands, recently said to The Tribune about it being too soon to select a successor to Maynard, I believe the party must immediately find a replacement. Maynard's passing was tragic. But life goes on. I was surprised after reading a report in one of the Nassau dailies that FNM Leader Dr. Hubert Minnis is in favor of former FNM Chairman Carl Bethel being selected to the vacant chairmanship post. I wholeheartedly agree with the FNM leader when he told the press that Bethel has a lot to offer. He is one of the most consummate politicians in The Bahamas. Even though many of his political detractors have been very critical of the former member of Parliament for the Sea Breeze constituency, he has maintained his composure, patience and dignity.
I have never seen a Bahamian politician who is more diplomatic than Bethel. Rather than stoop to the level of his critics, Bethel has remained steadfast in his professionalism, even after suffering a crushing defeat at the polls on May 7 at the hands of an individual who had never been a member of Parliament.
Bethel is a true statesman. Despite what the critics say, I still believe that there is a future for him in frontline politics, especially in the FNM. Perhaps few were surprised that Bethel had lost his contest. It was the second election loss for him in as many as 10 years. In 2002, he lost his seat to a political novice. Many so-called political analysts were predicting that Bethel would go down again in defeat in 2012, and they were right. His last election defeat was another unfortunate setback in his celebrated political career. But I don't really fault him for his loss. What happened on May 7 was a wholesale rejection of the FNM by fed up Bahamians. Bethel lost his seat because he just so happens to be an FNM. I don't think it had anything to do with his individual performance in Sea Breeze. While he was the minister of education, he had taken a lot of flack for several child abuse allegations in the public school system.
His critics were adamant that that was one of the reasons for his removal from that ministry. They have chosen to interpret his removal from that post as a firing. However, FNMs saw it as a much needed restructuring for the betterment of the party. Be that as it may, no one can deny that Bethel is a quintessential FNM who worked himself up through the ranks of the party. During the disappointing eighties when the FNM was so accustomed to losing to the Progressive Liberal Party (PLP) and Sir Lynden Oscar Pindling, Bethel was there. He is no johnny-come-lately to the FNM. The current leadership of the FNM should not discard him or second generation FNMs like Tommy Turnquest to the political bone yard.
The last five years have not been easy for the former FNM parliamentarian. Not only was he removed from the Ministry of Education under the former Ingraham administration, he also had failed to hold on to the chairmanship post of the FNM in May. What's more, he was the sitting chairman of the governing party that was nearly wiped out of Parliament. But now it looks like he is about to make a comeback to frontline politics. Minnis was dead-on when he told the press that Bethel has "institutional knowledge" that he would not ignore. He is a walking political history book. I think one example of Bethel's erudition will suffice.
I was glad to hear the former FNM chairman, Michael Foulkes and Janet Bostwick defend the record of the FNM on the Wendell Jones radio program, "Issues of the Day", on Love 97.5 FM, some months before the May 7 general election. As I listened to Bethel on the program, I came to the conclusion that he is very knowledgeable on Bahamian history. The trio reminded the host and the listening audience of what The Bahamas was like during the 1970s and 1980s. During that interesting period in Bahamian history, few understood what true democracy was. I was astounded to learn that a Cabinet official wanted the government to rusticate its political opponents to the island of their births. This was nothing short of dictatorship. I am equally amazed that The Bahamian people stood idly by and allowed the then administration to get away with such a dangerous proposal. That the Bahamian people would even allow such a dangerous proposal to even be entertained in the modern Bahamas tells me that they were so afraid of the then opposition FNM and elements of the defunct United Bahamian Party (UBP), who had joined up with Cecil Wallace-Whitfield and his fledgling political organization in the early 1970s, that they were willing to tolerate almost anything from the hierarchy of the then government.
I am glad that this plan never saw the light of day. Obviously somebody within the then government had put a stop to it. The FNM is now, for all intents and purposes, in a rebuilding mode. It has two new leaders, Dr. Minnis and Loretta Butler-Turner. Moving forward, however, the party must see to it that veteran FNMs such as Bethel and Turnquest have a meaningful role to play in the party. The two still have a future in frontline politics. And the FNM needs them.

- Kevin Evans

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News Article

August 10, 2012
South Africa's re-instated to run in final with The Bahamas

LONDON, England - If South Africa wins a medal in the men's 4x400-meter (m) final tonight, it could potentially create a serious uproar at these 30th Olympic Games.
According to reports, the South Africans were re-instated into the relay and allowed to run the final after it was ruled that their second leg runner, Ofentse Mogawane, was tripped by the Kenyan runner in the heats. Kenya was taken out of contention, and South Africa didn't even finish the race. This immediately raised the question as to why the South Africans should be allowed to run in the final, if they didn't complete the race.
Mogawane was injured in the collision, suffering a dislocated shoulder, and had to be helped off the track. 'The Blade Runner', Oscar Pistorius, was set to run the third leg for South Africa and will undoubtedly run in the final tonight, fuelling speculation that the team was only re-instated because of the marketability of the no-legged star, and the global attention he attracts. Pistorius is a media darling wherever he goes, quite frankly because of his ability to compete at this level. He is the first double amputee to compete at the Olympics.
"The ruling is certainly unusual," said Bahamas Olympic Committee (BOC) Secretary General Romell 'Fish' Knowles. "I think that it certainly puts the other teams at a competitive disadvantage going into the final, but it's a decision that we will have to live with, and just wait and see what happens."
Knowles said that he's unsure if The Bahamas can again protest the decision that was handed down, but added that is something that they will certainly explore.
"I think that it is a decision that has to be protested now, but I'm sure that the coaching staff and the Chef de Mission will review the decision that was made," he said. "To get a pass to the final begs the question of what would have happened if the shoe was on the other foot. Would we have been so fortunate if that was us?"
As for 'The Blade Runner', he was given the name because of his iron prosthetic legs. He will apparently run the third leg for the South Africans in the final tonight. They will run out of lane one.
There are some runners who are of the opinion that double amputee Pistorius shouldn't be running with athletes who are not disabled, because it could create an unfair advantage in either direction. For instance, they say, it could be looked at that he is able to accomplish something with no legs that most can't do with two, because of hard work and dedication; but at the same time, he is immune to injuries related to the Achilles and foot, unlike able-bodied athletes. Be that as it may, after a successful protest, Pistorius and South Africa will run in the final tonight.
After the decision was handed down, Pistorius tweeted: 'It's on. We're in the final.'
According to the protest committee, Kenya was disqualified when the official ruled that the Kenyan runner, Vincent Mumo Kiilu, cut across too soon and caused Mogawane's fall.
Only the top three finishers from each semi-final heat and the next two fastest finishers were initially entitled to run in the final. The Bahamas finished as the top qualifier in its fourth fastest time ever, 2:58.87; the United States matched that time to also automatically qualify, and the other finalists are Trinidad & Tobago, Great Britain, Cuba, Belgium, Russia and Poland.

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News Article

June 08, 2012
Celebrating the crab

Whether it's by boat or plane, people in the know are making their way to Fresh Creek, Andros, this weekend for the 15th Annual All-Andros Crab Fest.
From the iconic release of thousands of white and black crabs, which people make a mad dash to catch, to the crabby games, to a special corner set up just for the kids, and the many ways to indulge in crab cuisine at Queen's Park, Crab Fest is a festival to be enjoyed by all.
And nothing could possibly be better than giving Bahamians a native crab treat to enjoy while listening to the sounds of some of the country's hottest performers. Ira Storr and the Spank Band, Elon Moxey, Veronica Bishop, Stileet, K.B., Terez Hepburn and Geno D are all expected to take to the stage at some point during the June 8-10 event, to wow the crowd with their performances that always prove to be energetic. Sealing the musical deal will be hometown favorites the Soulful Groovers, Foxy and the Boys and steel pan player Francis Henry.
So for those people jonesing for a down home affair, Crab Fest is the place to be.
It is clear that the festival, which originally was formed as a means to boost the local economy, while reuniting family members and friends from Central Andros in the traditional style of a homecoming, has now escalated into the most anticipated cultural event of the year in Andros.
"Over the years, the All-Andros Crab Fest has gone from being just something only locals came out to support, to people from other areas of Andros boating in to see to what we have now. Hundreds of people flood in from the capital and other islands to be a part of this spectacular display of culture," said Peter Douglas, founder of the Crab Fest. "This has grown into something people from all walks of life thoroughly love. There is nothing like this in The Bahamas with all the cultural and natural things that will be on display."
No matter how sweet the music at Crab Fest though, the main attraction is always the crab catching event and other crab inspired games for people to participate in.
"Crab catching is always a big hit. We let go thousands of crabs in the park, and the people go wild. It's a mad dash to catch those crabs and see who can catch them the fastest. It's always a lot of fun."
There will be a crab release twice -- once on Friday evening and again on Saturday evening -- to see who can catch the most crabs and who can catch the biggest crab,
Other crab events to look forward to will be the crab race, crab clipping contest, the crab dance and even the crab bag race. Competitions like coconut barking, cane peeling and onion peeling will also be featured.
Some 2,000 crabs will also be held in a crab habitat (with a man-made creek) constructed at the Crab Fest site for the occasion to showcase crabs living in natural quarters. The educational exhibit will give an accurate show of how the crabs that Bahamians love to eat, live in nature.
And for the children, there will be a crab slide show, nature walks, crossword puzzles, craft corner and crab games like pin the legs on the crab and crab hoopla to keep them excited. A bouncing castle and face painting will also hold their interest. They will even be able to learn how to catch crabs in a kid friendly crab-catching class.
To further deepen the cultural experience, there will also be a craft corner where local artisans will display and sell their works from straw hats, bags, shell jewelry, beaded bracelets, necklaces, handcrafted shoes and Androsia products.
Of course with all that activity you are bound to get hungry, but not to worry, there will be lots to eat and drink. There will be many crab dish variations that Androsians boast they have learned to cook -- crab and rice, crab and dough, crab fritters, crab soup, deep fat fried crab, garlic crab, ginger crab, curry crab, crab and grits, crabby patties, crab cakes, stew crab and minced crab.
And for the few people that don't partake of crab delicacies, there will be the non-crab favorites like fried fish, and all the chicken and seafood dishes they can consume, with of course, all of their favorite sides, and pastries. And you can wash it all down with the likes of sky juice and natural fruit drinks. No matter what you head to Andros for, you will definitely leave with a belly full.

All-Andros Crab Fest
When: Friday, June 8 - Sunday, June 10
Where: Queen's Park, Fresh Creek
Time: 9 a.m. - until, daily
Cost: $10 admission

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News Article

June 15, 2012
BAAA Olympic trials all set

Two local companies have officially thrown their financial support behind the Olympic trials for the sport of track and field.
The generous donations from communications giant, the Bahamas Telecommunication Company (BTC) and Scotiabank Bahamas Limited will ensure that the Olympic trials, hosted by the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations (BAAA) will run smoothly. The two-day meet, which will feature several head-to-head competitions, is now being referred to as the BTC/Scotiabank Olympic Trials.
The meet will be held June 22-23 at the Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium. It is a mandatory event for all persons hoping to be named to the squad. The official team will be named that Sunday.
"The Olympic fever has begun in The Bahamas with the London 2012 Olympic Games being just 43 days away," said Kevin Teslyk, managing director at Scotiabank. "Scotiabank is again proud to be partners with the BAAA as we showcase the very best of track and field in The Bahamas, at the BTC/Scotiabank Trials 2012."
The trials will also serve as the last opportunity for many of the junior athletes wanting to meet the qualifying standards for the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) Junior World Championships. With so many of the local junior athletes ranked so high in the world, president of the BAAA Mike Sands is confident that the mixture will add the much needed flavor to the meet.
Young Anthonique Strachan has the fastest time in the world, for junior female athletes, in the 100 meters (m). Strachan has already qualified for the Olympic Games with her season's best of 11.22 seconds. She will contest the 100m dash with fellow training partner Sheniqua Ferguson and veteran sprinter Chandra Sturrup, both of whom have posted fast times this year, and have qualified for the London Games.
In the half lap event, on the junior circuit, Strachan follows Shaunae Miller who has a best of 22.70 seconds. Both are a shoe-in for the Olympic Games and the IAAF Junior World Championships, Strachan has a best of 22.75 seconds.
It is not certain if Miller will contest the loaded 200m, which will include national record holder Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie and Sheniqua Ferguson, among several others. However, she will line up in the 400m with Christine Amertil, an Olympic finalist in the event.
Junior quartermiler O'Jay Ferguson's name is ranking among the elite athletes. He is one of the favorites going into the 400m event, during the trials. Chris Brown, Michael Mathieu, Demetrius Pinder and Avard Moncur should not be counted out. Ramon Miller and Andretti Bain have also entered the stacked field.
On the field, national record holder in the men's triple jump event Leevan Sands will be challenged by Lathone and Latario Collie-Minns. Raymond Higgs has moved over the long jump clearing the way for Ryan Ingraham, Trevor Barry and Donald Thomas.
Barry has already met the qualification standard of 2.31m, which is the A level set by the IAAF. The B standard is 2.28m and Ingraham has cleared that.

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News Article

April 30, 2012
The L.I.S. annual Fishing Fling Tournament: Come and catch some fun!

Freeport, Grand
Bahama Island - Lucaya International School is proud to announce its
annual favorite fundraiser, the Fishing Fling Tournament on May 26th.
Fishing can begin at 6:00am, weigh-in from 6:30-8:30pm, followed by a
celebration of the day's catches at our Splash Bash! Come to fish,
party, or both! The festivities will take place at the GB Sailing Club,
and will include a cash bar, dinner and dancing.  Bring your party shoes
along with your rod and reel!

This year we are thrilled to
announce Jamie Rose, of OBS Marine Ltd. as our Tournament Director.  In
addition to a grand cash prize, winners will have a chance to win
merchandise prizes from OBS...

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News Article

May 15, 2012
Dealing with Tailor's bunion

Most people have heard of or seen a bunion at some time on the foot. When there is a bump on the outer side of the foot near the little toe, it is a Tailor's bunion. It is also called a bunionette. This foot deformity received its name centuries ago, when tailors sat cross-legged all day with their feet rubbing on the ground, which led them developing a painful bump at the side of the little toe.
A Tailor's bunion is an enlargement of the head of the long bone behind the little toe. This produces a pressure area and callus at the bottom of the fifth toe.

Causes
Tailor's bunion is caused by inherited faulty mechanical structure of the foot. Constant pressure causes changes in the bony shape of the foot, resulting in the development of the enlargement. The fifth metatarsal bone starts to protrude outward, while the little toe moves inward. This shift creates a bump on the outside of the foot that becomes irritated whenever a shoe presses against it. Sometimes a Tailor's bunion is an outgrowth of bone on the side of the fifth metatarsal head. Regardless of the cause, the symptoms of a Tailor's bunion are usually aggravated by wearing shoes that are too tight in the toe, producing constant rubbing and pressure.

Symptoms
The symptoms of tailor's bunions include redness, swelling, and pain at the outer side of the foot. These symptoms occur when wearing shoes that rub against the bump, irritating the soft tissues underneath the skin and producing inflammation. Constant rubbing and pressure on the skin forms a callus and the tissues under the skin also grow thicker. Both the thick callus and the thick soft tissues under it are irritated and painful.

Diagnosis
Tailor's bunion is easily diagnosed on physical examination.

However, x-rays may be ordered to help the podiatrist determine the cause and extent of the deformity and will help if surgery is necessary later.

Non-surgical treatment
Initial treatment for a Tailor's bunion begins with non-surgical therapies. Your podiatrist may select one or more of the following:
o Shoe modifications. Choose to wear shoes that have a wide toe box, and avoid those with pointed toes or high heels.
o Remove the callus. For pain relief, the podiatrist can also remove some of the built-up callus and hard skin in the area. This is an important step to prevent pain and even ulcers from developing at the site of the Tailor's bunion.
o Padding. Bunionette pads can be placed over the area to help reduce pain.
o Oral medications. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), may help relieve the pain and inflammation.
o Icing. An ice pack may also be applied to reduce pain and inflammation.
o Injection therapy. Injections of corticosteroid may be used to treat the inflamed tissue around the joint.
o Orthotic devices. In some cases, custom orthotics devices may be provided by the foot and ankle surgeon.

Surgery
Surgery is often considered when the pain continues regardless of treatment efforts. Based on the extent of the deformity, a corrective surgical procedure will be selected. The podiatrist will take into consideration the extent of the deformity based on the x-ray findings, the age, the activity level, and other factors. Surgery usually involves removing the prominence of bone underneath the bunion to relieve pressure. Before deciding on the procedure extra bone is removed and the fifth toe and joint is straightened. The recovery time after surgery, will vary, depending on the procedure or procedures performed.

oFor more information, email me at foothealth242@gmail.com or visit www.foothealth.org or apma.org. To see a podiatrist, visit Bahamas Foot Centre on Rosetta Street, telephone 325-2996 or Bahamas Surgical Associates on Albury Lane, telephone 394-5820.

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News Article

May 01, 2012
The L.I.S. annual Fishing Fling Tournament: Come and catch some fun!

Freeport, Grand
Bahama Island - Lucaya International School is proud to announce its
annual favorite fundraiser, the Fishing Fling Tournament on May 26th.
Fishing can begin at 6:00am, weigh-in from 6:30-8:30pm, followed by a
celebration of the day's catches at our Splash Bash! Come to fish,
party, or both! The festivities will take place at the GB Sailing Club,
and will include a cash bar, dinner and dancing.  Bring your party shoes
along with your rod and reel!

This year we are thrilled to
announce Jamie Rose, of OBS Marine Ltd. as our Tournament Director.  In
addition to a grand cash prize, winners will have a chance to win
merchandise prizes from OBS...

read more »


News Article

March 15, 2011
Keeping tabs on local fashion blogger Vuitton Bain

Bank teller by day, sought-after fashion blogger by night. Twenty-three year-old fashion enthusiast Vuitton Bain recently returned from a whirlwind trip to Paris for Paris Fashion Week and he’s giving us the dish on his ultimate fashion adventure.
A blogger for online fashion blog fashionbombdaily.com for more than two years and a writer for local entertainment magazine ELife242, Vuitton gives the rundown on his recent trip to Paris, his views on the local fashion industry and how aspiring fashion bloggers can break into the industry.

Q:How did you get your position at fashionbombdaily?

A: “It’s a funny story. I think I was googling a pair of shoes for a fri ...

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News Article

April 22, 2014
Pump bumps are more common in young women who love to wear high-heeled shoes

Wearing high fashion shoes, such as stilettos or pumps, can cause pain in your feet. If this is the case you could have a pump bump.
Pump bumps are painful, swollen bumps behind the heel, just where the shoe rubs against the back of the ankle. They are more common in young women in their 20s and 30s, who love to wear high-heeled shoes. The official name for this bump is Haglund's deformity; it is an extra bone growing on the back of the heel bone. The soft tissue near the Achilles tendon (heel cord) becomes irritated when this bone rubs against shoes.
The rigid backs of pump-style shoes cause pressure that irritates the area when walking. Persons with high arches, a tight Achilles tendon and a tendency to walk on the outside of the heel are at higher risk for developing a pump bump. The shape of the calcaneus (heel bone) can also cause this condition.
Haglund's deformity can occur in one or both feet. Most persons with this condition complain of pain at the back of the heel, especially in the area where the Achilles tendon attaches to the heel bone. Over time, the tissues over the bony bump thicken, causing a callus to form. The area becomes inflamed while wearing shoes. The bursa on the back of the heel may also become red, swollen and inflamed, causing bursitis.
Prevention
You can prevent a pump bump by wearing appropriate shoes and avoiding shoes that are hard in the back of the heel, using arch supports or orthotic devices to raise the heel above this part of the shoe, performing stretching exercises to prevent the Achilles tendon from getting too tight and avoiding walking in your bare feet, running on hard surfaces and uphill.
Diagnosis
The podiatrist will diagnose the problem starting with a complete history and physical examination. Usually the bump is obvious and is easily seen on the back of the heel. X-rays will be taken so the podiatrist can see the shape of the calcaneus (heel bone) and to make sure there is no other cause for your heel pain.
Non-surgical treatment
Non-surgical treatment of a pump bump is aimed at reducing the pain and inflammation of the bursa. While these methods can help the pain and inflammation, they will not shrink the bony enlargement of the heel bone. One easy way to remove the pressure from the backs of the heel is to wear sling-back shoes, or shoes completely without backs, such as clogs. If you must wear shoes with backs, heel pads placed over the backs of the heel may provide cushioning and give some relief. Going without shoes as much as possible will usually reduce the inflammation and the bursitis.
If the pain continues, see a podiatrist who will treat the condition. Oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), may be recommended to reduce the pain and inflammation. Ice can be applied to the inflamed area to reduce swelling. Use ice for 20 minutes and then wait at least 40 minutes to an hour before icing again several times a day. Stretching exercises are vital and help relieve pulling from the Achilles tendon and increase its flexibility. Heel lifts placed inside the shoe can also decrease the pressure on the heel. Ultrasound and other therapies can help to reduce inflammation. Insoles or orthotics (custom arch supports) help control the motion in the foot and relieve some pain.
Surgical treatment
If non-surgical treatments do not solve the problem and relieve symptoms, surgery may be needed. The surgical procedures designed to treat Haglund's deformity will shave or cut off a part of the enlargement to the heel bone. This will decrease the pressure from the shoe and prevent the pain. Over time, the thickened tissues will shrink back to near-normal size because the pressure has been removed.
o For more information on pump bumps, email foothealth242@gmail.com or visit www.orthogate.org or www.foothealthfacts.org. To see a podiatrist visit Bahamas Foot Centre on Rosetta Street, telephone 325-2996 or Bahamas Surgical Associates on Albury Lane, telephone 394-5820.

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News Article

April 13, 2012
Armed robbery case dropped

For the second time in a week, prosecutors have offered no further evidence against a man accused of armed robbery.
Camario Miller appeared before a different judge yesterday but the result was the same.
Prosecutor Vander Mackey-Williams told Justice Roy Jones she had been instructed to drop the case against Miller and his codefendant Basileus Cameus.
The men were accused of robbing Jaynell Pierre of $600 at gunpoint on May 5, 2009.
On Tuesday, prosecutor Terry Archer informed Senior Justice Jon Isaacs that a decision had been made to drop a case against Miller and Brent McPhee.
They were accused of the April 30, 2009 hold-up of Monique Olcerin.
She was robbed of $50 that belonged to Bounty Hunter Shoe Store on Robinson Road.
Miller has several other pending robbery cases.

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