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News Article

September 12, 2012
Volunteers across the Bahamas prepare for International Coastal Cleanup this Saturday

NASSAU, Bahamas -- Volunteers throughout The Bahamas are preparing to take part in the Ocean Conservancy's "27th Annual International Coastal Cleanup (ICC)" on Saturday, September 15th, 2012.  Every year in September, more than half-a-million people in 100 countries remove millions of pounds of trash from beaches and waterways all over the world.

This year celebrates 27 years of volunteerism for a healthier ocean. Over the last quarter-century, the International Coastal Cleanup has grown from a single cleanup on a Texas beach to a worldwide movement to end the threat of trash in our ocean. As such, it not only makes a powerful statement about global concern for the environment, it also empowers local communities to do something about pollution.

"The Bahamas has participated for many years in the Ocean Conservancy's International Coastal Cleanup and we will again this year to make a difference to our marine environment," said Linzi Knowles Belton, Education Supervisor for Dolphin Encounters on Blue Lagoon Island and National Coordinator of International Coastal Cleanup in New Providence.

"Last year, many volunteers in New Providence collected tons of trash which is an extraordinary accomplishment. This year, we will be focusing on Yamacraw Beach, behind Stoke's Cabana from 8:00 a.m. until 12 p.m. and we encourage members of the public to join us. Please wear closed-in shoes, bring water bottle, sunscreen and gardening gloves. Abaco and Grand Bahama are also participating and are hosting clean ups of their beaches."    

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News Article

September 01, 2012
The reemergence of Carl Bethel

Dear Editor,

Now that the former member of Parliament for the Golden Isles constituency and former minister of youth, sports and culture in the Ingraham regime, Charles Maynard, has passed away, the opposition Free National Movement (FNM) must now decide who it wants to be its new national chairman.
The FNM, it seems, has gotten over the sudden and tragic passing of Maynard. Now the official opposition party must regroup if it hopes to hold onto the North Abaco seat in the upcoming by-election. Maynard's passing has left a huge, gaping void in the opposition. But the party must now find a replacement who would be able to fill the giant shoes that were left by the late FNM chairman. Contrary to what the deputy chairman of the FNM, Dr. Duane Sands, recently said to The Tribune about it being too soon to select a successor to Maynard, I believe the party must immediately find a replacement. Maynard's passing was tragic. But life goes on. I was surprised after reading a report in one of the Nassau dailies that FNM Leader Dr. Hubert Minnis is in favor of former FNM Chairman Carl Bethel being selected to the vacant chairmanship post. I wholeheartedly agree with the FNM leader when he told the press that Bethel has a lot to offer. He is one of the most consummate politicians in The Bahamas. Even though many of his political detractors have been very critical of the former member of Parliament for the Sea Breeze constituency, he has maintained his composure, patience and dignity.
I have never seen a Bahamian politician who is more diplomatic than Bethel. Rather than stoop to the level of his critics, Bethel has remained steadfast in his professionalism, even after suffering a crushing defeat at the polls on May 7 at the hands of an individual who had never been a member of Parliament.
Bethel is a true statesman. Despite what the critics say, I still believe that there is a future for him in frontline politics, especially in the FNM. Perhaps few were surprised that Bethel had lost his contest. It was the second election loss for him in as many as 10 years. In 2002, he lost his seat to a political novice. Many so-called political analysts were predicting that Bethel would go down again in defeat in 2012, and they were right. His last election defeat was another unfortunate setback in his celebrated political career. But I don't really fault him for his loss. What happened on May 7 was a wholesale rejection of the FNM by fed up Bahamians. Bethel lost his seat because he just so happens to be an FNM. I don't think it had anything to do with his individual performance in Sea Breeze. While he was the minister of education, he had taken a lot of flack for several child abuse allegations in the public school system.
His critics were adamant that that was one of the reasons for his removal from that ministry. They have chosen to interpret his removal from that post as a firing. However, FNMs saw it as a much needed restructuring for the betterment of the party. Be that as it may, no one can deny that Bethel is a quintessential FNM who worked himself up through the ranks of the party. During the disappointing eighties when the FNM was so accustomed to losing to the Progressive Liberal Party (PLP) and Sir Lynden Oscar Pindling, Bethel was there. He is no johnny-come-lately to the FNM. The current leadership of the FNM should not discard him or second generation FNMs like Tommy Turnquest to the political bone yard.
The last five years have not been easy for the former FNM parliamentarian. Not only was he removed from the Ministry of Education under the former Ingraham administration, he also had failed to hold on to the chairmanship post of the FNM in May. What's more, he was the sitting chairman of the governing party that was nearly wiped out of Parliament. But now it looks like he is about to make a comeback to frontline politics. Minnis was dead-on when he told the press that Bethel has "institutional knowledge" that he would not ignore. He is a walking political history book. I think one example of Bethel's erudition will suffice.
I was glad to hear the former FNM chairman, Michael Foulkes and Janet Bostwick defend the record of the FNM on the Wendell Jones radio program, "Issues of the Day", on Love 97.5 FM, some months before the May 7 general election. As I listened to Bethel on the program, I came to the conclusion that he is very knowledgeable on Bahamian history. The trio reminded the host and the listening audience of what The Bahamas was like during the 1970s and 1980s. During that interesting period in Bahamian history, few understood what true democracy was. I was astounded to learn that a Cabinet official wanted the government to rusticate its political opponents to the island of their births. This was nothing short of dictatorship. I am equally amazed that The Bahamian people stood idly by and allowed the then administration to get away with such a dangerous proposal. That the Bahamian people would even allow such a dangerous proposal to even be entertained in the modern Bahamas tells me that they were so afraid of the then opposition FNM and elements of the defunct United Bahamian Party (UBP), who had joined up with Cecil Wallace-Whitfield and his fledgling political organization in the early 1970s, that they were willing to tolerate almost anything from the hierarchy of the then government.
I am glad that this plan never saw the light of day. Obviously somebody within the then government had put a stop to it. The FNM is now, for all intents and purposes, in a rebuilding mode. It has two new leaders, Dr. Minnis and Loretta Butler-Turner. Moving forward, however, the party must see to it that veteran FNMs such as Bethel and Turnquest have a meaningful role to play in the party. The two still have a future in frontline politics. And the FNM needs them.

- Kevin Evans

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News Article

July 27, 2012
First-time Olympian Mackey full of hope

LONDON, England - Bahamian Trevorvano Mackey was the last Bahamian to qualify for these 30th Olympic Games here in London, England, but he's as comfortable as if he was on the team all along, and as if he's competed at this level before.
These past two nights at separate receptions to honor Team Bahamas, he spoke of how calm he is headed into his first Olympic Games, and how ready he is to compete. Mackey qualified at the 'A' standard for these 2012 Summer Olympics, by running 20.52 seconds in the 200 at the North American, Central American and Caribbean (NACAC) Under-23 Championships in Guanajuato, Mexico, just 30 minutes before the London deadline. Even more spectacular, Mackey ran that time into a headwind.
"Well, I always knew I could do it," said Mackey. "Now that I've qualified, I'm just ready to compete. I feel great heading into competition. We were working on some last minute stuff and hopefully, everything will fall into place.
"I know that I have some big shoes to fill when you look at guys like Derrick Atkins and Dominic Demeritte but I'm prepared to just go out there and give it my best shot. I feel like the sky is the limit for me."
Well said. Mackey has been running well all season long, but really started turning heads at the BTC/Scotiabank Olympic Trials, held at the end of June, at the Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium. There, he ran an impressive personal best of 20.68 seconds to win the national title. Then the questions began to surface... well at least one question in particular. Would he be able to qualify 'A' standard for the Olympic Games?
The Olympic 'B' qualifying time was 20.65 seconds, and the 'A' qualifying time was 20.55 seconds. Mackey needed to run the 'A' standard, seeing that three Bahamians had already made that standard this year. Olympic rules state, that once an athlete from a country runs the 'A' standard in any event, for another person to make that Olympic team in that event, they too would have to run the 'A' standard. So for all intents and purposes, Mackey knew what he needed to do, at what turned out to be the region's final Olympic qualifying meet, and he went out there and did it. He finished fourth in that 200m final in Guanajuato, but accomplished his goal of setting a new personal best and running under the 'A' standard for the games.
"Everything is just coming together at the right time," said Mackey. "I know this is my first Olympics but I'm very excited to get out there and just compete. I feel like I can run much faster and these Olympics present the perfect opportunity for me to do that. I'm excited and just ready to go."
The heats of the men's 200m will run Tuesday, August 7. Mackey will be joined by Michael Mathieu in that event. Mathieu is The Bahamas' national record in that event, running a time of 20.16 seconds in Brazil, in May.
As for Mackey, the sky is the limit. At just 20 years of age, he has personal best times of 10.31 seconds in the 100m and 20.52 seconds in the 200m. He will only run the latter at these 30th Olympic Games here in London.

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News Article

July 28, 2012
Going to meet the man

Dear Editor,

Dr. Hubert A. Minnis (FNM-Killarney), the leader of the official opposition, has his work cut out for him. He has some big political shoes to fill as he seeks to reconstruct and mold the shell-shocked Free National Movement (FNM) in his own image. The ever pervasive shadow and hologram of Hubert A. Ingraham (FNM-North Abaco) loom large over his shoulders.
I have long predicted that Dr. Minnis would emerge as de facto leader of the FNM, even if, for the time being, the former leader is, in fact, the de jure leader of that defunct party. So said, so done. At a recent press conference or was it a one man, as usual, diatribe, Ingraham demonstrated that he is still of the bogus and mistaken view that he is still relevant in Bahamian politics.
The biggest single reason why the FNM went down in flames in the general election is Ingraham and his abrasive style of leadership. Yes, he used to be relevant, bold and fresh. Today, he is irrelevant, timid and stale, with all due respect. His shelf life has expired but he continues to act and believe that Bahamians still want to purchase a rancid loaf of bread.
Dr. Minnis, however, has what it takes to become prime minister of this nation. Some misguided persons think that it is all about being bombastic. Others, just as deluded, believe that a leader must wear his or her mantle on their shoulders like some big and bad bully.
The days of such leaders are over in The Bahamas. What we want today is a mixture of both where compassion is combined with laser-like focus on the issues and concerns which impact ordinary Bahamians on a daily basis. Political insecurity and one-man band scenarios have plagued our country for too long and we must move beyond them. Who is Dr. Minnis the man and is he up to the task of unseating the now resurgent Progressive Liberal Party (PLP) administration?
I am not a PLP and I would not even talk about the FNM. What I am, however, is a true born Bahamian who has an unequalled passion for my country and the orderly advancement of all who call this nation home, bar none. Political tribalism will be the death blow to the hoped for success of the PLP. Far too many so called PLPs believe that God Himself bestowed this nation upon them and to hell with the rest of us who may not belong to their tribe.
Already one is witnessing the return to positions of influence of the "old guard" within the PLP and already one is able to cringe when one sees how contracts and other governmental favors and perks are being handed out, like candy, to those who bow at the altar of Perry Christie and the boneless sycophants who worship the rest of them.
Mind you, don't get me wrong, in politics this is the way it is. I submit, however, that there must be several slices of the collective loaf of bread available for other Bahamians regardless of political affiliation. It is morally wrong and politically unacceptable for the whole hog to be shared amongst only those who belong to a governing party.
This is the difference which Dr. Minnis will bring to the table. He is a self-made man whose means have very little to do with his political posture or the virtue of his being in the House of Assembly. Whatever he might have he earned it the old fashioned way by hard work, focusing on an agenda and by prudent investments with his own income.
Lynden Pindling, Christie and Ingraham, by contrast, never had to really work hard in their natural lives. None of them, God bless them all, has ever had to work "hard" in the private sector for too long.
Dr. Minnis came from relatively humble beginnings and had to go out to work early in his life. Yes, his father may have been able to do something for him, but basically he came up the rough side of the mountain. He has a tenacity and attention to detail that few frontline politicians seem to possess or have the ability to display. His speaking style is adequate to the task at hand and he is a sharp debater in the House of Assembly. His feathers are not ruffled easily.
In going to meet the man called Dr. Hubert A. Minnis, I am of the firm view that he is more than capable and able to stand his ground in any and all circumstances. I am also aware that some of my PLP friends and enemies (and I have a load of them both) will question why I seek to praise and embellish the abilities of the leader of the opposition but I call a spade a spade. I serve at the altar of no tin gods, iron men or Fruit of the Loom women.
"Going to meet the Man" is the title of a book written some years ago by the now deceased, celebrated black American writer James Baldwin. The sentiments expressed therein by Baldwin are applicable, in today's context, to the leader of the opposition. Dr. Minnis, eventually, will reconstruct and mold the now shell-shocked FNM into a force to be respected by its detractors.
If the PLP fails to deliver on its big gold dream, the average Bahamian will be merciless in his/her treatment of that party come the next general election. The immediate task at hand for Dr. Minnis, however, may well be a hopeless one. The upcoming by-election in North Abaco, in my submission, will be lost, big time by the FNM unless they immediately put certain measures in place.
In going to meet the man, Dr. Minnis must rise to the occasion. If he fails to do so, and I am of the view that he is being set up to so do, his leadership momentum will be subjected to severe challenges. Do I know how they in the FNM would be able to retain North Abaco? Absolutely. Will I so advise them?
To God then, in all things, be the glory.

- Ortland H. Bodie Jr.

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News Article

May 15, 2012
Dealing with Tailor's bunion

Most people have heard of or seen a bunion at some time on the foot. When there is a bump on the outer side of the foot near the little toe, it is a Tailor's bunion. It is also called a bunionette. This foot deformity received its name centuries ago, when tailors sat cross-legged all day with their feet rubbing on the ground, which led them developing a painful bump at the side of the little toe.
A Tailor's bunion is an enlargement of the head of the long bone behind the little toe. This produces a pressure area and callus at the bottom of the fifth toe.

Causes
Tailor's bunion is caused by inherited faulty mechanical structure of the foot. Constant pressure causes changes in the bony shape of the foot, resulting in the development of the enlargement. The fifth metatarsal bone starts to protrude outward, while the little toe moves inward. This shift creates a bump on the outside of the foot that becomes irritated whenever a shoe presses against it. Sometimes a Tailor's bunion is an outgrowth of bone on the side of the fifth metatarsal head. Regardless of the cause, the symptoms of a Tailor's bunion are usually aggravated by wearing shoes that are too tight in the toe, producing constant rubbing and pressure.

Symptoms
The symptoms of tailor's bunions include redness, swelling, and pain at the outer side of the foot. These symptoms occur when wearing shoes that rub against the bump, irritating the soft tissues underneath the skin and producing inflammation. Constant rubbing and pressure on the skin forms a callus and the tissues under the skin also grow thicker. Both the thick callus and the thick soft tissues under it are irritated and painful.

Diagnosis
Tailor's bunion is easily diagnosed on physical examination.

However, x-rays may be ordered to help the podiatrist determine the cause and extent of the deformity and will help if surgery is necessary later.

Non-surgical treatment
Initial treatment for a Tailor's bunion begins with non-surgical therapies. Your podiatrist may select one or more of the following:
o Shoe modifications. Choose to wear shoes that have a wide toe box, and avoid those with pointed toes or high heels.
o Remove the callus. For pain relief, the podiatrist can also remove some of the built-up callus and hard skin in the area. This is an important step to prevent pain and even ulcers from developing at the site of the Tailor's bunion.
o Padding. Bunionette pads can be placed over the area to help reduce pain.
o Oral medications. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), may help relieve the pain and inflammation.
o Icing. An ice pack may also be applied to reduce pain and inflammation.
o Injection therapy. Injections of corticosteroid may be used to treat the inflamed tissue around the joint.
o Orthotic devices. In some cases, custom orthotics devices may be provided by the foot and ankle surgeon.

Surgery
Surgery is often considered when the pain continues regardless of treatment efforts. Based on the extent of the deformity, a corrective surgical procedure will be selected. The podiatrist will take into consideration the extent of the deformity based on the x-ray findings, the age, the activity level, and other factors. Surgery usually involves removing the prominence of bone underneath the bunion to relieve pressure. Before deciding on the procedure extra bone is removed and the fifth toe and joint is straightened. The recovery time after surgery, will vary, depending on the procedure or procedures performed.

oFor more information, email me at foothealth242@gmail.com or visit www.foothealth.org or apma.org. To see a podiatrist, visit Bahamas Foot Centre on Rosetta Street, telephone 325-2996 or Bahamas Surgical Associates on Albury Lane, telephone 394-5820.

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News Article

May 29, 2012
Pedicure pointers for diabetics

It's almost summer and most women are looking forward to getting a pedicure and showing off those pretty toenails, but as diabetics, before you kick off your shoes, consider the potential downsides of pedicures.
People with diabetes are at high risk for a number of complications including infections, ulcers and amputations. If there is a break in the skin, it can lead to a leg or life-threatening infection. As podiatrists, we recommend that individuals with diabetes do not receive a pedicure because of the often questionable sanitary conditions of the beauty salon, the skills of the individual performing the pedicure and the cleanliness of the instruments used.
Regardless, many women (and, yes, even men) with diabetes are still heading to salons and spas. Aside from being a relaxing way to spend an afternoon, pedicures can ensure that feet are clean and moisturized, which is important when you have diabetes with dry skin. The reality is that women are going to get pedicures whether they are diabetics or not. If people with diabetes choose to have pedicures. they must be aware of the risk and follow these tips to keep their feet safe.

Know when to skip it: If you are healthy, with your diabetes under control and without complications, getting a pedicure may not pose as great a threat as it does for people with diabetic foot complications. If you have decreased feeling in the feet (neuropathy), an infection or an ulcer, don't book an appointment. An open wound will allow in any bacteria that may be hiding in the foot basin, the water or on the instruments. Further, because of the nerve damage you may not be able to tell if you've been cut or burned if the water is too hot.

Check out the salon: Before scheduling a pedicure at just any nail salon, it is wise to look into the cleanliness of the salon and its practices. It is important to look into all the salon's sanitation practices, the technician's training (make sure he/she is licensed), how the tools are cleaned and how the basin is cleaned. If the salon looks clean, but you're still not sure, don't be afraid to ask them how they clean their basins and instruments.
Foot baths and instruments should be cleaned with a hospital-grade, EPA-registered disinfectant after every client. If the salon or spa does not clean often enough or with the proper chemicals, don't take a chance on going there. There are so many things you can catch at a salon that is not clean including fungus or bacteria. It is recommended that you visit and check out the salon or get a manicure first before getting a pedicure.

Examine the foot bath: Foot baths provide a pool of warm, bubbly water that is relaxing. But they can also be filled with bacteria that can come from the water or from the basin not being cleaned properly after the last client. It is recommended that basins are thoroughly cleansed between each client.

Inspect the tools: Before you let a pedicurist touch your feet, find out how her tools are sanitized. All nail instruments should be cleaned after each use. Dirty instruments used on past customers or soaked in unchanged sterilizing fluid or open containers are very dangerous and can be the source of an infection. Pick a salon that uses stainless steel instruments, which are easier to clean rather than wooden sticks or porous files. To prevent the spread of infection, emery boards and nail buffers should be used once and given to the client or thrown out after each client. To ensure instruments are clean and safe, some people take their own tools to the nail salon. At the end you would take the tools home and clean them yourself.

Give instructions: If you have diabetes it is best to tell the nail technician you have diabetes. Give clear guidelines on how you want them to take care of your feet safely. Tell them that you cannot have your feet soaked in hot water. Request that the technician not clip your cuticles or file your heels or calluses with a blade.

Make sure the water is warm, not hot, and that your toenails are cut straight across. Moisturizing lotions or creams should be massaged into your feet, but not between the toes. Insist that the pedicurist avoid a credo blade or razor on your feet.

Consider the alternatives: These measures may seem a bit excessive, but consider the alternative. Unsterilized instruments can pass bacteria and infections between clients. The first thing to understand when it comes to diabetics is that pedicure risks in healthy people are multiplied in diabetics.
The first thing that a diabetic should do is to consult their podiatrist and ask them if they can have a pedicure. Sometimes patients with controlled diabetes can enjoy pedicures without much more risk than normal healthy people. However, nail technicians must remember that instruments should be cleaned before use and that diabetics are at increased risk for complication and that their skin should never be broken.
In the unfortunate situation that the skin of a diabetic is broken, or if there is pain or soreness you must take immediate steps to clean the wound and place a dressing on the wound. You should see a podiatrist as soon as possible if symptoms persist. When you have diabetes, any injury to your feet is a major concern even if it is caused by the manicurist. An injury is an open invitation for an infection. An infection can lead to higher blood sugars and higher blood sugars can interfere with healing, which can lead to ulcers and potential amputation.
When it comes to pedicures, persons with diabetes must ask themselves if it is worth the risk? People with diabetes should be seen by a podiatrist on a regular basis for routine foot care. It is best to see the podiatrist, regularly so any problem or potential foot complications can be dealt with early.

o For more information, email me at foothealth242@gmail.com or visit www.apma.org or pedicuretip.org. To see a podiatrist visit Bahamas Foot Centre on Rosetta Street or call 325-2996 or Bahamas Surgical Associates on Albury Lane or call 394-5820.

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News Article

April 24, 2012
Defence Force officers called in as sick-out hits prison

Defence force officers have been placed in sections of Her Majesty's Prisons (HMP) since Friday after a significant number of prison officers called in sick, according to Superintendent Dr. Elliston Rahming.
Rahming said 35 percent of the prison's staff called in sick and had not returned to work up to yesterday, although he maintained that operations are normal at the prison.
He revealed that prison recruits, who have entered the apprenticeship program at HMP, have also pitched in to maintain order.
"There is no undue security risk," Rahming told The Nassau Guardian.
"We have a number of prison officers who are turning up to work. They are being assisted, and they are doing an excellent job."
For security reasons, he declined to disclose the number of Defence Force officers stationed at the prison.
At a press conference yesterday, executives of the National Congress of Trade Unions of The Bahamas (NCTUB) and its affiliate, the Bahamas Prison Officers Association (BPOA), said prison administrators, as well as the present and past governments have failed to address the majority of prison officers' concerns.
"The brave men and women charged with overseeing the care and protection of inmates have been subjected to deplorable and dangerous conditions that have caused short and long-term illnesses to the point where they are unable to work," said NCTUB President Jennifer Isaacs-Dotson at the press conference at the Bahamas Musicians and Entertainers Union's headquarters on Horse Shoe Drive.
However, National Security Minister Tommy Turnquest said the government has done "a great deal" to address these concerns.
"I think if you compare what we have done, compared with any other administration you would have to conclude that we have done a great deal," Turnquest said.
This is the third time prison officers have conducted a sick-out "just weeks before a general election", according to Dr. Rahming.
Isaacs-Dotson said the actions taken by the officers are not politically motivated.
She also said the umbrella union will increase its public campaign "and do what it must", including taking legal action to ensure HMP staff work in a "safe and healthy environment".
Last month, NCTUB threatened industrial action over labor issues it claimed were outstanding, such as insufficient drinking water for staff; poorly functioning running water facilities in the prison; the perimeter wall not being completed after more than five years and the roof of the maximum security wing needing repairs.
Rahming claimed many of the issues are longstanding, "beyond the scope of the prison itself and many of them are just outright not true", although he did not elaborate.
Turnquest said the Defence Force officers stationed at the prison have the necessary training and qualifications to properly carry out prison duties.
Defence Force officers were recently called on to work at Lynden Pindling International Airport when the union that represents customs and immigration officers took industrial action over outstanding issues in its industrial agreement.
When asked if the Defence Force was being stretched by the recent actions of unions, Turnquest said: "It means that they can't do their regular duties, but they are called upon to fill in when there are some national security concerns."
He said he was of the understanding that the association's concerns were resolved, or being resolved, and has maintained an open door policy for its executives.

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News Article

May 16, 2012
Lowe looks to rebound from injury and defend title

Defending champion Simon Lowe is hoping to recover from a broken collarbone suffered seven weeks ago to defend his Pineapple-a-thon title on June 2.
The Pineapple-a-thon triathlon covers a 500-meter swim in the beautiful Gregory Town cove, 11 kilometers (k) of hilly biking and a 5k run. Lowe, 29, one of the stars of the growing sport in The Bahamas, set the course record a year ago, in his first-ever pineapple-a-thon. This year, he is just easing back into the sport after the fluke injury that occurred after his shirt got caught in his front wheel.
"I started biking and running again about two weeks ago," Lowe said via Facebook. "I still have not tried any swimming since the accident so I will just have to wing that. My cycling and running is coming back quite fast."
Lowe edged three-time defending champion Ken Bots of Port Orange, Florida, last year winning the race in 52 minutes and 37 seconds. The Pineapple-a-thon course is renowned for 'The Hill' that riders climb four times in the saddle and twice in their running shoes.
"I try to incorporate as much hill training as possible into my routine," Lowe said. "It's not easy in Nassau but I do a bit of bridge running between Nassau and Paradise Island and try and hit the hills around Love Beach on my bike."
The race is part of the annual Pineapple Fest's slate of activities and hopes to match or eclipse last year's record turnout of 37 racers. Racers compete in men's, women's and team divisions for prizes donated by Pineapple Air, Sands Beer, Rainbow Inn, Island Touch Massage, and the Laughing Lizard Café.
Lowe, who also won the inaugural UWC Triathlon in New Providence last September and is a former Conchman Champion (Grand Bahama), said: "I love Eleuthera for many reasons. The relaxed vibe and friendliness of the locals is always a treat. I'm really looking forward to the Pineapple Fest. I had a great time at that event last year."
Also, UWC women's champion Alana Rodgers is expected to compete in her first pineapple-a-thon, and Tennessee native and long-time Eleutheran Abe McIntyre said he's in training for his record sixth pineapple-a-thon.

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News Article

May 11, 2012
T-Connection reloaded

After last year's sold out performance for the St. Augustine's College class of 1971 that left people salivating for more, it was clear to the members of the T-Connection that they had to do it again. The group had to get together for a repeat performance -- even if it was only for one night. So the internationally acclaimed Bahamian music group is doing it again on Friday, May 18 with a performance in the Crystal Ballroom at the Wyndham Resort on Friday, May 18.
"After their concert in The Bahamas last year for SAC's class of 1971 event was a sold out event, it was clear there was still an audience who appreciated the style and grace of this instrumental group," said Nelson Armaly of Paragon Concierge and Event Management. "It was so good people were asking for more which is why we wanted to bring them back."
The group T-Connection was originally formed by Theophilus "T" Coakley in 1973. The funk-fusion group put The Bahamas on the map with its unique meshing of funk, Junkanoo, pop, R&B and jazz music and became one of the country's most famous international music groups.
It was originally comprised of Coakley who served as the group's leader, songwriter and keyboard player, bassist Kirkwood Coakley, drummer Berkley Vanbyrd and guitarist Monty Brown. In 1976 Tony "Monks" Flowers joined the band as the percussionist and in 1977 Dave Mackey was added as the second guitarist.
T-Connection produced hits like "Do What you Want to Do", "Disco Magic" and "Take it to the Limit".
Theirs is a history true music connoisseurs should learn about.
"The 1970s was a magical time back then for us," said Theo who served as the group's leader, songwriter and keyboard player. "We were all under 25 at the time when we started out. We started really small, but really good. We played cover stuff at the Show Club which used to be on Bay Street. And due to the positive reception we were invited to play at the Out Island Bar in The Nassau Beach Hotel. Eventually we were so good we moved our sound to Freeport in 1975 where we played at the Kiki Rouge. But we became so popular the lounge's name was changed to The Connection Room."
But the group's major break came in 1976 when they moved to Miami and inked a record deal with TK Records. Their first international hit was an instrumental called "Disco Magic." It was a hit and was featured in many popular discos in its time. The group followed up that success with another hit, "Do What You Want to Do".
In the late 1970s the group was doing so well they were doing tours with famous American groups like Kool and the Gang, the Isley Brothers and War.
They scored two hits on the Billboard Hot 100 between 1977 and 1979 and had five top 10 hits on the U.S. Hot Dance Music/Club Play chart. In the United Kingdom they posted five entries in the UK Singles Chart.
The group produced eight albums entitled "Magic", "On Fire", "T-Connection", "Totally Connected", "Everything is Cool", "Pure n' Natural", "Game of Life" and "Take it to the Limit."
T-Connection officially disbanded in 1985.
"We are all doing our own thing at this point in our lives. For instance, Kirkwood is freelancing; Dave is running his own media house in Freeport; Tony is a part of Baha Men and I've been doing more jazz duets and I'm even looking to complete my own jazz album later this year," Theo revealed.
For the second year in a row the band is reassembling to put on a local concert that promises to take its fans back in time and introduce a new generation to their iconic flavor.
"This upcoming concert will be very energetic," said Theo. "We rarely get together so when we do get together, it's a lot of energy... It's really going to be electric."
T-Connection's fusion of funk and Bahamian sound will be a nice refresher to the modern forms of music according to Armaly.
"Having a concert by a legendary group like the T-Connection is an amazing opportunity," he said.
Armaly said people who missed last year's concert for the SAC Class of 1971 will not want to miss this performance.
"The era groups like this are from is over, but their sound is classic; so I anticipate there will be a great turnout for this event," he said.
It will be a nostalgic night. The group is expected to perform many of their hits -- "Do What you Want to Do", "Disco Magic", "On Fire", "At Midnight", "That's Love", "Everything is Cool", "Best of my Love" and "Take it to the Limit". Their funkadelic sound is bound to take old school music lovers back a few decades and remind them what "real" music was like. It will be a disco worthy night so people are being encouraged to put on their dancing shoes to take full advantage of the night.
T-Connection, a group that has rubbed shoulders with the likes of Earth Wind and Fire, toured with the Village People, Donna Summers and the Bee Gees will create an unforgettable experience that music lovers will not forget.
"This is not just a concert for the old. This is classic," said Armaly.
To add just the right touch to the evening, Jay Mitchell will be the opening act for the group. He is known for songs like "Another Place in Time", "Jumpin the Streets", "Yellow Bird", "Bahamian Sunshine" and "Freeport Town".
Part proceeds from the concert event will go to the Children's Emergency Hostel.
Cocktail tickets are $50, general admission $85 and VIP $100. For ticket purchases, telephone 376-9939 or email nlarmaly@hotmail.com.

T-Connection in concert
When: Friday, May 18
Where: Crystal Ballroom, Wyndham Resort
Time: Doors open at 8 p.m.
Tickets: $50 cocktail style, $85 general admission, $100 VIP

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News Article

May 01, 2012
The L.I.S. annual Fishing Fling Tournament: Come and catch some fun!

Freeport, Grand
Bahama Island - Lucaya International School is proud to announce its
annual favorite fundraiser, the Fishing Fling Tournament on May 26th.
Fishing can begin at 6:00am, weigh-in from 6:30-8:30pm, followed by a
celebration of the day's catches at our Splash Bash! Come to fish,
party, or both! The festivities will take place at the GB Sailing Club,
and will include a cash bar, dinner and dancing.  Bring your party shoes
along with your rod and reel!

This year we are thrilled to
announce Jamie Rose, of OBS Marine Ltd. as our Tournament Director.  In
addition to a grand cash prize, winners will have a chance to win
merchandise prizes from OBS...

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