Search results for : curry

Showing 141 to 160 of 846 results


News Article

May 09, 2012
Christie not surprised by Ingraham's exit from politics

Prime Minister Perry Christie said yesterday he is not surprised former Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham has decided not to take his seat as the Member of Parliament for North Abaco.
The Progressive Liberal Party (PLP) beat the Free National Movement (FNM) in a landslide victory on Monday.
"I tried very hard to beat him. I was hoping that I would have defeated him in the North Abaco constituency," Christie told reporters shortly after he was sworn in at Government House yesterday afternoon.
"I'm not surprised that he would have made a decision not to come back to Parliament because it would be difficult for him to sit on that side and look at me on the other side, given some of the things he's said about me."
Ingraham made several claims against Christie on the campaign trail, which was bitter to the very end.
During the final days before the general election, Ingraham claimed that Christie is an oil lobbyist. Ingraham made that claim after Christie confirmed that Bahamas Petroleum Company (BPC) benefited from advice he provided while he was a consultant for Davis & Co. law firm, which represents BPC.
Christie said Ingraham's claim was an FNM ploy to distract Bahamians from the issues and added that no drilling will happen in The Bahamas unless the necessary safety measures are in place and it is something the Bahamian people want.
"It is a great tragedy what Hubert Ingraham tried to do with the character of myself and [PLP Deputy Leader] Mr. [Philip] Davis. It was totally unacceptable," Christie said.
"We are two persons who were his law partners, who he knows protected the integrity of the firm and whom he had an 18-year working relationship. To try and make us out to be crooks in this country was unacceptable."
As for the by-election that will take place following Ingraham's resignation, Christie said it may be some time before another representative is elected.
"Mr. Ingraham has to resign and before he can do that there has to be an appointment of the Speaker of the House of Assembly," the prime minister said.
"And so the process will take some time moving forward. He has given quite rightly the country a full indication of what he intends to do. I anticipate that he will move as quickly as the process allows him to."
He added that the PLP will likely run Renardo Curry again in the North Abaco constituency.
Ingraham won the constituency with 2,233 votes. Curry got 1,854 votes and the Democratic National Alliance's candidate Sonith Lockhart received 39 votes.
Under the Bahamas Constitution, if a member resigns from the House of Assembly the speaker has to notify the governor general and a by-election must be held within 60 days.

read more »


News Article

June 28, 2012
Small takes top prize at Jack Rogers tourney

Last weekend was a great weekend for chess in The Bahamas. A total of 14 players, ranging from high school students to seasoned adults, took to the boards at C.W. Sawyer Primary School to play in the 2012 Jack Rogers Summer Splash Tournament.
The two-day event - a new entry to the Bahamas Chess Federation's (BCF) calendar - was organized as a four-round Swiss game in 60 minutes, and was held June 23-24.
Round 1 went according to form, with all higher-rated players defeating their opponents.
Round 2 is when the competition heated up. Lemaro Thompson, returning to federation action after an extended period of university studies, secured a clear advantage over former two-time National Champion Byron Small, but failed to convert before his time expired and fell in bitter defeat.
Also in Round 2, Kyle Curry, a College of The Bahamas student and new federation player, crushed veteran Andre White in a match that would earn Curry the "Biggest Upset" prize.
Round 3 saw Byron Small win against defending National Champion Ken Gibson, setting the stage for Small to win the top prize with one more victory.
Paired in the fourth round against the young talent of Sandeep Gali, Small played an aggressive gambit line that required extremely accurate play on the part of Gali.
For most of the match, Gali was able to fend off Small's incessant pressure, but ultimately the weight of the position was too much to bear.
Small uncorked a simple but vicious knight move that spelled doom for his opponent. Gali was forced to give up material to extend play, but with the result all but decided, Gali eventually resigned, handing Small his fourth win of the tournament and the first-place trophy.
By placing third in this event, Lemaro Thompson automatically qualified for play in this year's national championship, scheduled for November.
The federation's Grand Prix standings with four events to go have Yan Lyansky and Byron Small tied for first place.
Competition is proving to be extremely fierce in 2012, and the remainder of the federation's calendar will be intriguing to follow.
For more information on the Bahamas Chess Federation and its scheduled events, the public is asked to visit the federation's website or its Facebook page.

read more »


News Article

June 16, 2011
Esther Marva Davis, 75

A funeral service for Esther Marva Davis, affectionately known as 'Essa', 75, of Harbour Island, who died June 8th at the Princess Margaret Hospital will be held on Saturday, 10:30 a.m. at St. John's Anglican Parish, Harbour Island. The Rev'd Father Kirkland Russell Jr. assisted by The Rev'd Father Oswald Pinder will officiate and interment will follow in St. Catherine's Cemetery Harbour Island.
Precious memories will linger in the hearts of: 5 sons: Michael Saunders, Duke, Robert, Stan and Basil Davis; 7 daughters: Linda Lewis, Lavaughn Percentie, Marilyn Morris of Jacksonville, Florida, Irma Virginia (Tee-Jay) and Elizabeth Davis, Claire Percentie, and Kayla Davis; One adopted son: Glenroy Aranha; One  adopted daughter : Lisa Thompson; One brother: Howland Bethel of New York; Two sisters:  Alfreda Johnson of Nassau and Reatta Young;  Two adopted sisters: Ruby Percentie and Margaret Grant; 36 grandchildren: Preston, Oral, Gayle, Cedric, Marcus, Sophia, Sippreana, Vernanchia, Michella, Michaela, Michael Jr., Tamara, Tyrone Jr., Jamal, Harrington, Barrington, Javaughn, Ledaunne, Gusty, Gannon, Simone, Richette, Chanella, Anderze, Randernisha, Aldon, Dukell, Andrew, Kristano, Shelby, Trae, Traevon, Blaire, London, Brooklyn and Kaylen; Thirty-two great-grand children: Renaldo, Shyanne, Olivia, Andrew, Nicholas, Dana, Shanyha, Seraiah, Keziah, Marcus, Erin, Colby, Chandler, Marquis, MarKya, Brajhae, Tamia, Valentino, Octorria, Detorria, Netorria, Nera, Amarion, Donovan, Chanel, Serinity, Christia, Arryanna, KJ., Basha, Tamero, Lotus and Fantasia; One great-great-granddaughter: Yonka Grant; One Aunt: Barbara Johnson; Seven nephews: Junior, Joey, Freddie, Kirk and Benjamin Bethel, Andrew and Dahl; Thirteen nieces: Julie, Joanna, Arlene, Carmelita, Inez, Sherol, Jackie, Debbie, and Tracey, Lashane, Melissa, Linda, Gina Ritchie and Jay Fernando; Two daughters-in-Jaw: Florine Saunders of Bimini and Denise Davis; Four sons-in-law: Gustone Lewis, Richard Percentie, Tyrone Bethel Sr. and Ashley Percentie; Godchild: Violet Roberts; Special Friends: Sharon Duncombe, Doreen Albury, Don Purdy, Jessielee Mackey, Bishop Samuel Higgs, Casper Johnson, Corporal 1995 Cletis Dean of the Royal Bahamas Police Force, Lucy Johnson Neely, Gayle Cleare, Tootsie Albury, Theresa Fairweather, Sister Cecila Albury, Patricia Mortimer, William Mather, Sunnyboy Johnson and Vhaul Thompson; Numerous cousins and a host of other relatives and friends including: Auston Mullin, Rapunzel Pinder, Debra Roberts, Stanis Grant, Percival Johnson and family, Anita Curry and family, Jeffrey Johnson and family, Penelope Cleare and family, Sheila Francis and family, Leonie Neely and family, Stephanie Roberts and family, Coralee Percentie and family, Jacqueline Percentie and family, Annseton Barry and family, Francine McQueen and family, Philip Roberts and family, Joyce Cleare and family, Cedric Pennerman and family, Melvina Davis, Terry Deveaux and family, Raymond Rolle and family, Florene Major, Terry Cash, Richard Malcolm and family, Junnamae Thompson and family, Joseph Saunders and family, Irene Davis and family, Alfred Albury and family, Aunt Eva and family, Eloise Johnson and family, Percival Johnson and family, Bertram Sawyer and family, Susan Johnson and family, Dencil Higgs and family, Kevin and Paulamae Johnson, Lona Major and family, Lona Culmer and family, Pearl Lewis and family, Carl Higgs and family, Patrick Barry and family, Edwin Hutchinson and family, the Grant family, Sybil Cleare and family, Healias Oliver and family, Silvia Saunders and family, Beverly Cleare and family, Spooner Grant and family, Miriam Rolle and family, Eloise Knowles and family, Aurilee Thompson and family, Cody Cartwright and family, Jeremiah Neely and family, Leon Johnson and family, Staff of The Rock House, The Zulu Dancers and family, Dr. John Mensah and the Harbour Island Clinic Staff, St. John's Anglican Church family, the Administrator's Office staff, The Harbour Island District Council, The Lighthouse Church Of God family, the Roman Catholic Church family, the Prophecy Church family, God's Living Word Teaching Centre, Reggie and Danny Major, Ralph Sawyer, Sean Adderley, Bernard Higgs and a host of other friends too numerous to mention.
Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at THE CHAPEL OF MEMORIES COMMONWEALTH FUNERAL HOME INDEPENDENCE DRIVE on Thursday from 4:00-7:30 p.m. and at the church in Harbour Island on Friday from 4:00 p.m. to service time on Saturday.
 

read more »


Event
Shakespeare In Paradise Speak the Speech
Shakespeare In Paradise "Speak the Speech"

Wednesday 10th October 2012  8:00 PM

Shakespeare In Paradise is pleased to announce the first two productions for its fourth annual Theatre Festival, Opening October 5th and running through October 13th, 2012. Speak the Speech is a new Bahamian historical work created by our Artistic Director, Philip A. Burrows and compiled by our Festival Director Nicolette Bethel. Research for this work comes mostly from Bethel and her colleagues at the College of The Bahamas like Stephen Aranha, Christopher Curry, Clifford Rahming and Michael Stevenson. Other research assistance was provided by Reva Cartwright-Carroll, Dr. Gail Saunders and Philip A. Burrows. The production consists of speeches and correspondences beginning with the 1492 landfall to Bahamian Independence. Toni Francis, Nicolette Bethel and Philip A. Burrows will stage this work and it will feature COB students and a few surprise guest speakers. Speak the Speech will take place at The Bahamas Historical Society on the following dates and times: Wednesday, October 10th – 8:00pm – Bahamas Historical Society Thursday, October 11th – 8:00pm – Bahamas Historical Society Saturday, October 13th – 8:00pm – Bahamas Historical Society Calender:

Our signature Shakespeare production, simply titled Merchant, is Shakespeare’s classic Merchant of Venice, adapted for a 21st century Bahamian setting. Shylock is a Haitian numbers-runner in this tale of prejudice, greed and justice. The work has been specially imagined for the Bahamian landscape by Gordon Mills, who also directs. Our signature Bahamian production is An Evening of Two One-Acts by Jeanne Thompson. The renowned author of The Fergusons of Farm Road and numerous plays for the stage returns with a new play, Back of the Moon, set in the New Providence of the 1950s, that heady era leading up to majority rule. A feisty domestic servant accuses her boss, a white English minister of religion, of fathering her child, and attempts to enlist the middle class black community to back her in her cause. The play is a window into a bygone Bahamian era. Father’s Day, Thompson’s classic study of a Bahamian man navigating his relationships with his wife and two sweethearts, rounds out the evening. Shakespeare In Paradise will also salute our Caribbean neighbours Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago on their 50th anniversary of Independence, and will offer a work from each nation. Other local works are also in development, including an exciting historical docudrama. You can expect to hear a lot more from us as we announce audition dates for all of the shows being directed by Shakespeare In Paradise directors and we will let you know how you can become involved in the festival, either as a performer, a backstage worker, front of house or many of the other areas where volunteers would be needed throughout the festival. You can find out more information, get in touch with us or keep up to date with what’s going on with the festival online at these various sites: Shakespeare In Paradise Official Site: http://shakespeareinparadise.org/ YouTube: ShakespeareParadise: http://www.youtube.com/user/ShakespeareParadise Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ShakespeareInParadise Twitter: shakesparadise: http://twitter.com/shakesparadise


News Article

March 19, 2014
Fox Hill murder case sent to Supreme Court

Three men who police allege killed four people and seriously wounded seven others when they opened fire on a crowd gathered in Freedom Park, Fox Hill, had their case transferred to the Supreme Court yesterday.
Peter Rolle, Justin Williams and Jermaine Curry are accused of the December 27, 2013 mass shooting.
They are accused of the murders of Shaquille Demeritte, Claudezino Davis, Shenique Sands and Eric Morrison and the attempted murders of Samuel Ferguson, Leroy Taylor, Janet Davis, Chino Davis, Jermaine Pratt, John Davis and Benjamin Demeritte.
Detectives had questioned more than 60 people as they tried to figure out who was responsible for the drive-by shooting.
Chief Magistrate Joyann Ferguson-Pratt told the men they will be arraigned on the charges before Senior Justice Jon Isaacs on May 2.
At that time, they will receive a trial date and enter pleas to the charges.
Meanwhile, the three men remain on remand at Her Majesty's Prisons.

read more »


News Article

March 25, 2014
24-member reparations committee announced

Minister of Foreign Affairs and Immigration Fred Mitchell has appointed The Bahamas' National Reparations Committee ahead of a formal push by CARICOM heads to get reparations, debt cancelation, and an apology from former European colonizers.
During a press conference at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs yesterday, Mitchell announced that former Attorney General Alfred Sears and former member of Parliament Philip Smith are co-chairs.
Mitchell said he expects the committee to present its preliminary research and recommendations by June.
He said the committee will carry out a wide public education campaign as it seeks to illustrate links between historic and modern-day discrimination and outline racial discrimination resulting from slavery in areas of health, education, living conditions, property and land ownership, employment participation and migration.
"I believe that the public discussion that will ensue...will be instructive and I think that is what the government hopes in its essence takes place; that there is a national discussion and dialogue on this, which has been treated as a silent subject for too long," Mitchell said.
"And those of us who were raised in the 1950s and 1960s and saw the struggles pre-1967 in this country are somewhat astounded at how polite of a society we have become on this subject."
Sears and Smith attended a CARICOM reparations commission meeting in Barbados in January.
Sears said Martyn Day, the lawyer leading CARICOM's claim, will more than likely lodge a claim in the International Court of Justice.
Mitchell said before CARICOM heads make any legal claim they have agreed to convene a conference with the European countries.
Asked to respond to those who may disagree with seeking reparations, Mitchell said it is in the best interest of the country to have the research done.
"I think what often happens with these things is as it unfolds it turns out that people will come to accept that it is the right thing to do," he said.
"I think you are going to have naysayers either way you look at it."
Following a CARICOM heads meeting earlier this month in St. Vincent and the Grenadines, The Bahamas and other member states agreed to establish a 10-point plan that would seek a formal apology, some form of debt cancelation and reparations.
Other members of the committee are College of The Bahamas (COB) historian Dr. Chris Curry; COB historian Dr. Gail Saunders; rector at Mary Star of The Sea Catholic Church Father David Cooper; rector at Trinity Methodist Church Rev. William Higgs; attorney Marion Bethel; pastor of Bethel Baptist Church Rev. Timothy Stewart; COB researcher Keisha Ellis; Chamber of Commerce chair in Exuma Pedro Rolle; Sojouner Douglass College President Theresa Moxey-Ingraham; COB Sociology Professor Dr. Niambi Hall-Campbell; businessman Michael Symonette; COB Law Professor Michael Stevenson; Director of Archives Elaine Toote; Pompey Museum Director Kim Outten-Stubbs; Oral and Public History Director Dr. Tracy Thompson; Rastafarian movement representative Whitman McKinney; Bar Association President Elsworth Johnson; attorney Bianca Beneby; journalist and businesswoman Alesha Hart; journalist Travis Cartwright-Carroll; retired educator Cecil Thompson and an attorney from the Office of the Attorney General, who has yet to be announced.

read more »


News Article

May 03, 2012
Remarks by Philip Brave Davis at PLP mass rally in Abaco

ABACO, Bahamas - The following are remarks by Philip 'Brave' Davis at the PLP ABACO MASS RALLY on May 2, 2012:

Good
Evening Abaco!!! Are you ready? Are you ready to help the PLP get rid
of this worthless, uncaring and corrupt FNM government?

Are you ready to elect Renardo Curry as your next Member of Parliament and send PAPA CLOWN into retirement?

Are you ready to give us Gary Sawyer in the South and Central Abaco?

read more »


News Article

April 20, 2012
It is all about leadership

Dear Editor,

Hubert Ingraham and the Free National Movement (FNM) have tried desperately to make this political campaign a referendum on his leadership. They have attempted to compare his leadership record and style to that of Perry Christie's. All things being equal it may have worked; apparently it did work in 2007. We now have a track record of both leaders taking political office after a recession.
Firstly, any credible leader would leave his country better off than he met it. Can Bahamians honestly declare that they are better off in 2012 than they were in 2007? I think that most reasonable people will concede that Christie left The Bahamas in better condition in 2007 than he met in 2002. Better condition refers to the quality of life of Bahamians. Let us examine some of the indices that underpin quality of life and form the basis for Ingraham's hubris.
Here is what the prime minister promised in an earlier Speech from the Throne: "My government will restore fiscal discipline to the public finances of the country, and will ensure that value is obtained for public expenditure and public business."
Time has proven that Hubert Ingraham cannot credibly lecture anyone on his leadership merits when it comes to fiscal discipline. When he returned to office in 2007, Hubert Ingraham met the national debt at $2.9 billion. It has now ballooned to $4.6 billion and by the end of this fiscal year the national debt is expected to be in the area of $5 billion. That is a net increase of some $2.1 billion in just five years. What kind of leader would make such a promise and then explode the national debt by over $2 billion in just five years?
One of the most important indicators of a nation's quality of life is the safety of its citizens. Can Bahamians truthfully claim that crime and the fear of crime are less now than they were in 2007? How can you boast of your leadership prowess after having presided over the most murderous and violent era in the history of The Bahamas?
Over 457 murders over a period of less than five years! Additionally, every other category of violent crime increased during this glorious leadership reign. A true leader would have taken measures necessary to reduce the incidents of violent crime and the fear of crime. Hubert Ingraham and the FNM have not demonstrated the kind of leadership needed in mobilizing and uniting communities in the fight against violence and criminal behavior.
Other areas where Hubert Ingraham's leadership has failed miserably are education and immigration control. These are issues vital to the quality of life of Bahamians. The FNM under Hubert Ingraham's leadership has failed to improve the education system institutionally, structurally or systemically and his leadership has failed to adequately prepare Bahamian students for the world after school. This is a terrible indictment on leadership.
Moreover, Bahamians feel that because of the immigration policies implemented by the FNM they have very little stake in the ownership of the county's economy, nor are they permitted to compete fairly in their own country. The immigration policies seem to curry favor foreign labor and foreign investors. This state of affairs does not bode well for the stability of the society.
Most failed leaders look to something or someone to blame for their failure. The global recession has been a convenient whipping dog for Hubert Ingraham and the FNM. However, Hubert Ingraham once pronounced that any leader worth his salt would anticipate a future recession and take corrective measures to mitigate the impact of that recession. Here is what he had to say in one of his earlier budget communications: "Furthermore, these budgetary problems were allowed to develop at a time when a prudent government would have recognized that cautionary measures should have been in place to meet any likelihood of a major recession in the U.S. economy, and to cushion the resultant impact on our tourism-driven economy."
How prudent was Ingraham's government? He went on to indict the Progressive Liberal Party (PLP) government by pronouncing: "It cannot be said that those who were responsible for managing the economy did not know hard times were coming, they just chose to ignore all the indicators."
Surely in 2007/2008, Ingraham knew a recession and resulting hard times were approaching? All fiscal and economic indicators pointed to it. Judging by his reckless response to, and the irresponsible choices made during, the recession Ingraham appeared to have been caught off guard by the recession. So much for leadership!
Leadership in government is about building and strengthening institutions that enhance democracy and improve the quality of life for citizens. Leadership in government is about inspiring people to achieve their dreams and ambitions. It is about building national consensus and compromise. Leadership is about mobilizing and consolidating the resources and talents of citizens toward national development. Leadership is not about demagoguery; it is not about power, intimidation and bullying.
So if I were the PLP or Democratic National Alliance, I would welcome a campaign based on leadership. I would put Ingraham's record, all of it, against the acid test of true leadership. I would seek to determine whether his five years of leadership improved the quality of life of Bahamians. I would simply ask if Bahamians were better off in 2012 than they were in 2007 - a simple and measurable reality - and let the people decide.

- Eric Gardner

read more »


News Article

January 08, 2014
Second man charged with Fox Hill murders

A second suspect in a drive-by shooting that left four people dead and seven injured was charged with murder and attempted murder in the absence of his lawyer yesterday.
Jermaine Curry, 25, of Dorsett Street, Fox Hill, is accused of the murders of Shaquille Demeritte, Claudezino Davis, Shenique Sands and Eric Morrison and the attempted murders of Samuel Ferguson, Leroy Taylor, Janet Davis, Chino Davis, Jermaine Pratt, John Davis and Benjamin Demeritte.
The victims were at Freedom Park in Fox Hill on December 27 when the occupants of a gray car opened fire on the crowd.
Detectives had questioned more than 60 people as they tried to figure out who was responsible for the shooting.
Curry's co-accused, Peter Rolle, 29, of Bernard Road, was charged on Monday.
Curry made his initial appearance before Magistrate Andrew Forbes.
Forbes conducted the arraignment before Curry's lawyer, Devard Francis, arrived.
Forbes instructed policemen to allow Curry a phone call to advise his lawyer of the March 18 adjourn date for the presentation of a voluntary bill of indictment, which will transfer the case to the Supreme Court.
He promised to make recommendations to the prison superintendent after Curry raised concerns about his safety.
Curry said he was concerned that relatives of the victims may be detained at the prison.

read more »


News Article

July 24, 2012
FNM picks North Abaco candidate

The Free National Movement (FNM) last night ratified Greg Gomez to run on the party's ticket in the highly anticipated North Abaco by-election.
A by-election must be called within 60 days after former Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham's resignation from the House of Assembly becomes effective on August 31.
After almost 10 hours of deliberations at FNM headquarters on Mackey Street yesterday, the FNM's National Central Council picked Gomez over Perry Thomas, of Fox Town, North Abaco; Jackson McIntosh, a former administrator for Cooper's Town, and Cay Mills, a taxi driver who also resides in North Abaco.
Gomez, an educator, told reporters that if successful in becoming the new member of Parliament for North Abaco he would work aggressively to continue Ingraham's legacy.

"I plan to bring the entire North Abaco constituency together," he said. "We are all one family and we are all together.
"I plan to continue on the legacy of the former prime minister, Hubert Ingraham. That legacy is not over."
He continued, "We also will galvanize the youth of Abaco and push them forward by empowering them. The youth of North Abaco, especially in the Crown Haven and Cooper's Town areas, mostly rely on fishing and agriculture and we will empower them in those areas."
Ingraham recently delayed his resignation to allow Gomez to sort out a residency issue that would have prevented him from successfully nominating.
Ingraham said he wanted Gomez to have a fair chance at the nomination.
Gomez previously lived in the United States and returned home last August.
Under the constitution, a candidate must be ordinarily resident in The Bahamas for at least a year prior to nomination.
Though not considered a politician at heart, Gomez, 39, will run against Renardo Curry, the Progressive Liberal Party's (PLP) choice again for North Abaco.
Although under his leadership the FNM lost the May 7 general election, Ingraham secured his seat with 2,235 votes, beating Curry, who had 1,856 votes.
The Democratic National Alliance (DNA) candidate Sonith Lockhart got 39 votes.
DNA Leader Branville McCartney confirmed that the DNA will not run a candidate in the by-election, after failing to secure a single seat in the general election.
But with fewer that 400 votes between Ingraham and Curry, PLPs believe he has a strong chance of winning the seat.
The PLP won 29 of the 38 seats in the House of Assembly and the FNM secured the remaining nine.
The North Abaco by-election is considered a significant test for the FNM, one that the party's chairman, Charles Maynard, said would prove the effectiveness of the party.
Minnis said last night the FNM's objective is to win the seat once again, but by an even larger margin this time around.
Asked whether Gomez was at a disadvantage compared to Curry, who has had more time to campaign, Minnis responded, "Mr. Curry may have been there longer than he has, but we are not concerned about that. We feel we have a better candidate and our candidate will prove victorious."
Minnis said the potential candidates for the constituency began campaigning shortly after Ingraham announced his resignation.
The hierarchy of the FNM will travel to North Abaco today to formally introduce Gomez as the ratified candidate and begin officially campaigning with the theme 'All Together'.

read more »


News Article

October 07, 2011
Eloise Cleola Curry, 84

Funeral service for Eloise Cleola Curry, 84 yrs., a resident of Podoleo Street & formerly of Norman's Castle, Abaco, who died on 24th September, 2011, will be held at United Apostolic Church, Honeycombe Street off Hay & Flint Streets, on Saturday at 11:00 a.m. Officiating will be Pastor H.G. Ferguson, assisted by Minister Johnson Blanc. Interment follows in Lakeview Memorial Gardens & Mausolem, J.F. K. Drive.
Fond and Precious Memories will forever linger in the hearts of her: two sons: James Minnis Jr. of Union, New Jersey & Wesley Emmanuel Sr.; two adopted daughters: Patricia Wilson & Princess Minnis; one daughter-in-law: Alexis Minnis of Union, New Jersey; one adopted son-in-law: Patrick Wilson; eleven granddaughters: Prison Sergeant Shemeese Rigby, Juliette Minnis, Kimberly Minnis-Hinds of Collegeville, Pennslyvania, Taryn Minnis of Union, New Jersey, Tanesha & Wesinique Emmanuel, Merle, Ethlyn, Rubyann, Kimberley, Shornise; nine grandsons: Jermaine Minnis & Wesley Emmanuel Jr., Errol, Patrick Jr., Stefan, Adonai, Shawn, Sylvester and Lorenza; two grandsons-in-law: Donald Rigby & Gavin Hinds of Collegeville, Pennsylvania; 9 great grandsons: Davardo, Dondre & Police Constable 3490 D'Andre Rigby, Jamie Emmanuel, Ahmir Minnis & Jacob Hinds of Collegeville, Pennslyvania, Jaron & Labron Minnis & Lucas Miller; six great granddaughters: Donnalee, Donneisha & Da'Neicea Rigby, Shornette & Jashornia Williams, & Wesinique Emmanuel; one great great grandson: Davardo Rigby Jr.; one great great granddaughter: Davaria Rigby; five nieces: Barbara Marshall, Sylvia Smith, Geraldine Ward & Sybil Ferguson & Almeta Sands of Abaco; three nephews: Hastin Marshall, Leroy Pratt, Dwayne Curry; three nephews in laws: Victor Cornish, Sultan Sands and Joseph Ferguson; twenty-five grandnieces: Carol, Sandra, Kim, Maria, Natasha, Carnetta, Isadora, Melba, Jonice, Andrea, Kendra , Janice, Marva, Keva, Claudette, Stacey, Portia, Marcia, Patricia, Germaine, Patsy, Meoshie, Almeta, Earlin, Vanessa; twenty-three grandnephews: Garfield, Marvin, Antonio, Devon, Kevin, Robin, James, Andrew, Roscoe, Mark, Marco, Craig, Don, Chino, Wendall, Jeffrey, Don, Sonith, Haddon, Kevin, Randy, Bradley, Terrance, numerous grandnephews (including Christopher, Perry & Patrick) and grandnieces-in-laws, great-great-grand nieces and nephews, her cousins: George and Leotha Bonaby; godchild: Regina Beneby and numerous other relatives and friends including: Avis and Grachion Sands, Pastor Humphrey and Lenora Ferguson and family, The United Apostolic Church family, Paula Russell and family, Vernita Sweeting and family, Patricia Higgs and family, Judy Knowles and family, Katurah Ferguson and family, Alma Rigby and family, Sylvia McKenzie and Family, Pastor Roderick McIntosh and family, Mary Sears and family, the Abaco, Podoleo Street, Woods Alley, Smith's Lane and Millennium Gardens families, Mrs. Glorian Storr and staff of the Mary Ingraham Generational Centre, Thelma Kerr and family, Mrs. Eddamae Weech and family, Aiden Nairn and family, Talya, Monette, Sophia, Rolean, Edward, Dave and Ethegra and families, the Richardson family, Mrs. Evelyn Parker and family, Bishop Tony Leroy and Nancy Hanna and the New Redeemeed Tabernacle Church of God in Christ family, Rev. Dr. Everette Brown and the New Bethlehem Baptist Church family, Rev. Dr. Charles Ephraim and Laverne Rolle and family, Dr. Elliston Rahming, Superintendent of Prisons and staff of Her Majesty's Prisons, "A" Recruit Squad 1996 - HMP, Ellison Greenslade Commissioner of Police and staff of The Royal Bahamas Police Force, Superintendent of Police Morey Evans, Asst. Superintendent of Police Bradley Sands and staff of the George Town, Exuma Police Station, Management and staff of Galleria Cinema, Doctors, nurses and staff of the Princess Margaret Hospital Female Medical Ward 2, Accident & Emergency and Female Surgical 1 and many more too numerous to mention but we do recognize and appreciate.
Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

read more »


News Article

December 16, 2013
New location for AG's office

The move of the Office of the Attorney General to John F. Kennedy Drive will not create inefficiencies in the administration of justice, according to Attorney General Allyson Maynard-Gibson.
The office's previous location on East Hill Street was within walking distance of the Supreme Court, Court of Appeal and the criminal and civil registries.
It took The Nassau Guardian 15 minutes to drive from the new location on a Sunday afternoon with minimal traffic.
Although the office has two vans and other vehicles to ferry lawyers and witnesses to and from court, fed up lawyers often walked to the office because of long waits for transportation.
However, Maynard-Gibson told The Nassau Guardian yesterday, "Everything is in place to ensure that there will be no problems with transportation."
Citing security reasons, she declined to outline those measures.
Maynard-Gibson said she did not envision a problem with documents being filed on time due to the move.
In an earlier interview, Bar Association President Elsworth Johnson said, "If there were some difficulties at the post office in terms of ferrying lawyers to and from court, and filing documents, we don't want that to be transplanted to [the new location]."
Johnson said necessary steps ought to be put in place to ensure that lawyers get to court on time without having to use their personal resources.
He suggested that arrangements should be made for clerks to file documents "so that distance does not affect the role they have to play as ministers of justice".
Johnson noted that at East Hill Street "lawyers are often scurrying down the hill with their bags in their hands to file something".
"They should not have to use their personal vehicles to do these things. There should be a messenger or courier service put in place so that attorneys don't have to jump in their cars to get things done."
Johnson said lawyers in the Office of the Attorney General provide an invaluable service to the country for which they are overworked and underpaid.

read more »


News Article

October 25, 2012
Renardo Curry makes history as new North Abaco MP

FOR the first time in more than 30 years, a new Member of Parliament for the North Abaco constituency, the PLP's Renardo Curry, was sworn into the House of Assembly, rewriting Bahamian politics.

read more »


News Article

June 12, 2012
The North Abaco test

If North Abaco member of Parliament Hubert Ingraham does not change his mind about retiring, we should have a by-election in that constituency this year.
It will be quite a battle for the new leader of the Free National Movement (FNM), Dr. Hubert Minnis, and the new prime minister, Perry Christie.
The results of the recent constituency election should provide hope to both sides. Ingraham won the seat by 379 votes. The Progressive Liberal Party (PLP) candidate Renardo Curry, however, won five of the 12 polling divisions in the constituency.
For Dr. Minnis the issue is simple. He has to lead the effort to retain an FNM seat. For Christie, he must try to keep the election momentum alive. His party won 29 of the 38 seats being contested. PLPs are excited to again be in the seat of power after spending five years watching Ingraham govern as prime minister.
A victory for Dr. Minnis would give him more clout in his party in a difficult situation. Though the FNM has held the seat since the early 1990s when Ingraham came to the party, history indicates that it might be hard to retain such a seat after a crushing defeat, seatwise, in a general election.
In the 1997 general election Sir Lynden Pindling won the South Andros seat even though his party lost the election by a landslide margin. He retired shortly after the defeat. In the ensuing by-election the FNM picked up the seat.
Dr. Minnis will have to prove to FNMs that there is a point to them coming out to vote. This is often the challenge in by-elections. If Abaco FNMs think it doesn't matter if they vote, and eager PLPs swarm to the polls to take "Ingraham's seat", the PLP would move to 30 seats in the House of Assembly.
But if Dr. Minnis and his party are able to select the "right" candidate and find the resources to mount a strong campaign, they would demonstrate to the PLP and the country that they are still forces to be reckoned with.
Ingraham said that he will retire from politics on July 19. If that does happen we will be back in election mode shortly. The people of North Abaco would then have in their hands the power to weaken a new FNM leader or a new prime minister. The eyes of the nation will be on that contest.

read more »


News Article

April 12, 2012
George Franklyn Rolle, 66

Funeral Service for George Franklyn Rolle age 66 years a resident of Nicholls Town, Andros  will be held on Saturday 14th April  2012,  11:00a.m. at Mispah Baptist Church, Nicholls Town Andros. Officiating will be Rev'd Dr John E Newton assisted by other Ministers .  Interment will be made in Nicholls Town Public Cemetery, Andros.
George's presence will forever live in the hearts of his three sons Kevin, Keith and Beacher  Rolle; one  daughter Chrystal Rolle; four Grandchildren Kevin Jr, Keithra, Arakeitha and Angel, daughter in law Portia Rolle; three sisters Sylvia Bethel of Mt Vernon New York, Beatrice Adderley, and Deaconess Margaret Rolle; four brothers Harold, Fletcher, Bill and Police Corporal # 60 Edwin Rolle, one brother in law Kelly Adderley; one Adopted brother Elkimo Munroe; sister's in law Sheila Rolle, Judy and Ida Mae  Rolle; one Aunt Myrtis Colebrooke; Ten nephews Benjamin, Scott of New York, Nathan Pearson, Ernest Tynes of Freeport Grand Bahama, Anthony, Andrew, Harold, Elvis, Craig, Natico, and Hansel Rolle, eleven nieces Donna Ferguson, Wendy Claire of Mt Vernon New York, Linda Gaitor, Sharon Mallita, Sylvia, Francine Farquharson, Ernesta Tynes of Freeport Grand Bahama, Cutell, Natassia, Jasmine and Shornique Rolle; four nieces in law Kinberly Pearson, Roxanne Tynes of Freeport Grand Bahama, Lorie and Ladera Rolle, five nephews in law Alfonso Ferguson, John Mallita,  and Levi Cleare of New York, Wendall Gaitor, and Gary Farquharson of Freeport Grand bahama; 14 Grand nephews, 18 Grand nieces, other relatives   and friends including Daisy, Michelle, and the Bowleg family, Una Smith, Dave Rolle, Rev Weehaza Cooper, James Russell, Reginald Dames, Evangelist Alberta Dames and family, Jane Brown, Irene Rolle, Althea Wallace and family, Carla Hutchinson & family, Bennet Knowles & family, Naomi Brown & family, Bill Lightbourne & family, Sonia Russell & family, Florida Cooper & family, Ashwell and Deborah Wilson, Janice Pickstock & family, Ivan Evans, Olive Pickstock & Family, Arlington Evans, Paul White, Anthony Pinder, Chris Curry, Nurse Nela Dames, Ralph Cooper & family, Andrew Ferguson, Tyatish Walkes Vernice Scott, Sidney Scott and family, Tommy Neely, Edith Reid, Mae Evans, Kirk Pedican, Fred Curry & family, Lucy Evans, Rozena Evans, Frederick Wells, Phillipa Christie, Shell Treco, Vanria Rahming, Kenria Evans, the Hutchinson family, Helen Lord, Michelle Lewis, Welma Adderley, Dorothy Walkes and family, Samantha Hanna,  the entire Water and Sewerage Corporation, Pinks Gilbert, Estella, Cheryl, Keisha Hunter, Malco Evans,  Christina Christie, and others too numerous to mention.

 Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest Funeral Home, Robinson Road & First Street on Thursday from 12:00 noon to 6:00p.m. and  at  the church in Nicholls town on Friday from 4:00p.m. until to service time on Saturday.

read more »


News Article

August 26, 2013
Concern AG's Office move could affect administration of justice

The much-touted move of the Office of the Attorney General to a multimillion-dollar building on John F. Kennedy Drive could negatively affect the administration of justice if certain provisions are not put in place. Bahamas Bar Association President Elsworth Johnson told The Nassau Guardian that he welcomed the move from the General Post Office building on East Hill Street, which has a number of "environmental concerns", but he raised concerns about whether the relocation would affect the administration of justice.
The Office of the Attorney General is presently within walking distance to the Supreme Court, Court of Appeal and the criminal and civil registries. It took The Guardian 15 minutes to drive from the new location, which will be occupied later this year, on a Sunday afternoon with minimal traffic.
Johnson said yesterday that the Bahamas Bar Association does not want the move to militate against the smooth running of the judicial system.
"If there were some difficulties at the post office in terms of ferrying lawyers to and from court, and filing documents, we don't want that to be transplanted to Thompson Boulevard."
Johnson said that necessary steps ought to be put in place to ensure that lawyers get to court on time without having to use their personal resources.
He suggested that arrangements should be made for clerks to file documents "so that distance does not affect the role they have to play as ministers of justice".
Johnson noted that at the present location "lawyers are often scurrying down the hill with their bags in their hands to file something".
"They should not have to use their personal vehicles to do these things. There should be a messenger or courier service put in place so that attorneys don't have to jump in their cars to get things done."
Johnson said that lawyers in the Office of the Attorney General provide an invaluable service to the country for which they are overworked and underpaid. He said that he welcomed improved working conditions for the lawyers.

read more »


News Article

June 14, 2012
Search for 'Glory Time' captain continues

The search for the captain of the vessel that capsized in waters off North Abaco earlier this week continues, according to Commissioner of Police Ellison Greenslade.
The commissioner claimed the captain is known to police.
At least 11 people died when the 'Glory Time' went down Sunday night.
Seven people reportedly survived the disaster, which police claim was the result of an illegal smuggling operation.
Ten people are still unaccounted for and feared dead.
Greenslade noted that the captain, if caught, would likely be charged for the deaths.
"It's a tragedy that should not have happened, but it speaks to this business of human smuggling and the challenges and risk associated with [it]," said Greenslade. "[It's] very unfortunate that children have lost their lives and adults have lost their lives because of that criminal activity."
Minister of National Security Dr. Bernard Nottage said Tuesday that according to reports the passengers of the sunken 25-foot vessel paid $5,000 a head for the journey to the United States.
Superintendent Noel Curry said on Tuesday that police hope that some survivors were able to make it to one of the Abaco cays.
He said of the seven survivors, one person has come forward.
Curry said the male, who is in his late teens, reported that he along with six other males swam to shore.
The survivor said the captain was not among that group. Curry said the teen provided the identity of the captain to police. Curry identified the captain only as a "known sailor".
He said the survivor was assisting police with their investigations.

read more »


News Article

April 05, 2012
Paul Anthony Knowles, 64

Funeral Service for the Late Paul Anthony Knowles, 64 years of Virginia Street, will be held on Saturday March 31st, 10:00 a.m. at Christ Church Cathedral, George Street. Rev. Fr. Colin Saunders assisted by the Very Rev'd. Patrick Adderley and Rev. Colin Humes will officiate. Interment will follow in the Western Cemetery, Augusta Street.

He is survived by 1 Son: Paul Knowles II; 1 Daughter: Chauntell Knowles-Williams,
1 Adopted Brother: Frank Gallagher; 4 Sisters: Alma Albury-Thompson, Maud Antoinette Outten, Berthlyn Culmer and Rose Gibson; 1 Son-in-law: Anthony Williams Sr.; 1 Brother-in-law: Naaman Culmer; 1 Sister-in-law: Pamela Knowles
Grandchildren: Anthony Jr., Julia, Shaniah & Antoine Williams, Perez Hepburn, Janine "Angel" McKenzie, Pedrareka Morley, Quindesha, Rahae, Rashean, Paul III, Saffron, Devonique, Elzorien, Elzoriea and Collier Knowles Jr.; Great grandson: John Knowles Jr.; Nieces & Nephews: Janet Thompson, S. Dianne Miller, Alfred and Alma "Kiki" Albury, Raymond & Althemese Darling, Weston & Andrea Saunders, John & Peggy Knowles, Caroline Abdulle of Florida, Anthony & Simone Outten, Andrew & Gayle Moncur, Andrew Knowles of New York, Andrea & Rochelle Knowles, Leisa Knowles, Philip Morris -Knowles, Derek Knowles, Ricardo , Dewitt & Stephanie Culmer, Ruthie, Brenda, Berthlyn, Diane, Elroy & Lynden Knowles, Don Brice, Talva & Barry Flowers; Grand Nieces & Nephews including: Anika Wright, Darlene Thompson, D'Ondré, Devonnia & Danielle Miller, Paul R. Thompson III, Shanto & Rolanda Albury, Amiel, Tomico, & Adriel Albury, Kendra & Rolando Thomas, Rayneth, Jamon, Raemiesh, Ajna, Jamaal, Rashad & Rashan Darling, Asher Johnson, Tinika & Vernard Pinder, Tikeisha, Tikira & Weston Saunders Jr. , Terria Strachan, Jaynae and Zane Knowles, Chadae & Durrell Peterson, Andrew Jr. & Adriann Moncur, Alexandra, Michelle & Rachel Outten, Phyleece, Adrian, Antoine, Brittany, Dominic, Deranique, De'antez & Deantonique Knowles, Rickea & Ricardo Culmer Jr., Toni & Stephan Griffin; Great Grand Nieces & Nephews too numerous to mention.

Other Family Members & Friends include: Karen Clarke, Retired Asst. Commission of Police Paul Thompson Sr., Dr. Colin Bullard & Family, Dr. Herbert Orlander, Virginia Bullard & Family, Elmor Archer & Family, Sybil Miller & Family, Philip Evans & Family, Howard Russell & Family, Sonia Reece & Family, Alfred & Deann Marshall & Family, The Curry-Rahming Family, Vangie Zervous & Family, Marita Roberts, The Moss Family, The Adderley Family, The Todd Family, Jackie Christophilis, Naomi Adderley and Family; Euryale McKenzie & Family, the Richie Family, Mary Davis & Family, Idris Reid & Family, The Simon Family, Dean Patrick Adderley, Father Colin Saunders, Father Colin Humes, Anthony & Marjorie Knowles, Marva Mackey, Billy Brown, Val of Virginia Street, Stephen "Oggie" Pinder, Troy Richie & Family, Shirley Morris; Willittee Burrows , Nathalie & Marcia Dorsette, Lloydia Dorsette, Kaymora Dorsette; Lady Edith Johnson and Marco Johnson; Raymond Ferguson; Straw Market Family and Taxi 244 Richdardo.

Pre-Cremation. There will be no viewing.

read more »


News Article

May 07, 2013
Bahamas at 40 conference aims to impact policy development

The window is slowly closing on the opportunity for the younger, post-independence generation to engage the persons who fought for The Bahamas' independence. As the 40th anniversary of independence draws near, an examination of issues that impact national identity and progress remain crucial priorities.
The impending Bahamas at 40 Independence Conference, the brainchild of The College of The Bahamas (COB) School of Social Sciences, will provide a critical platform to explore the issues that have significant implications for the country's development. The conference will be held June 12-14 at the college's Oakes Field campus in collaboration with the Government of The Bahamas and the Inter-American Development Bank under the theme "The Bahamas at 40: Reflecting on the past, envisioning the future".
More than merely a platform for critical analysis and debate, the conference will give academics, researchers, activists and community leaders the opportunity to dissect the issues that impact national development and offer recommendations and guiding principles for decision-makers and those who craft and implement national policies.
Co-chair of the conference planning committee and head of the History Department at the college, Assistant Professor Dr. Christopher Curry, explained at a press conference held yesterday why such a critical discourse must happen as The Bahamas observes its 40th anniversary of independence.
"The Bahamas at 40 conference provides a unique opportunity to engage in a critical debate about the Bahamian nation's past, present and future. The debate at this juncture in Bahamian history is all the more relevant given that there are few surviving members of the founding generation of actors and actresses engaged in the movement for Majority Rule and Independence," said Dr. Curry. "Thus the conference will function as a bridge for dialogue between the members of the founding generation who are still with us, the generation born into and who grew up in an independent Bahamas and the younger, current generation who are in the process of maturing into adulthood."
Dr. Curry explained that plenary sessions will focus on: Nation Building in a Global Age; Community in an Archipelagic Context; Economic Dependence and Global Capitalism and Small Island Sustainability, matters imperative to future growth and development.
"It will be an important think tank for developing policies, procedure and vision for national development," he said.
The college's School of Social Sciences has often been at the vanguard of discussions on matters of national development and identity, helping to uncover new knowledge on social, political, economic and criminological issues in The Bahamas.
President of COB Dr. Betsy Vogel Boze said The Bahamas has much to be proud of and it is imperative for the college and the wider community to look back on historical achievements and the persons who helped to develop the country.
"At age 40, the country ought to celebrate and reflect upon the history and the education of its citizens. At The College of The Bahamas, we have been a transformative agent in producing citizens that have made advancements in politics, business and education. The aim of the conference is to examine the context and construction of the Bahamian nation; to investigate the challenges emerging in the post-independence period; to discuss contemporary social, cultural, economic and political issues and to explore future prospects for nation building and development," she said.
The Bahamas at 40 conference is one of the events on the official government calendar to commemorate the 40th anniversary of Bahamian independence. Head of the Secretariat for the National Independence Commission Jack Thompson, is working closely with the planning committee to ensure that the event is successful.
"It is both timely and fitting that we pause at this point on our history, in our country's history, to re-evaluate, re-assess and re-examine our traditions and values and those things which make us uniquely Bahamian. I cannot think of any better institution, any group of persons other than The College of The Bahamas to stage this wonderful, impressive, dynamic and most needed conference," said Thompson.
"In the midst of all of the social gatherings, what can be more important than this dialogue? This is critical. This is very important and I know the prime minister really wants to see this happen. We are prepared to do all we can to encourage maximum participation."
According to Associate Professor Dr. Nicolette Bethel, one of the members of the conference planning committee, impacting the culture of policy development in The Bahamas is a fundamental desired outcome.
"It would be fabulous if what came out of what we would have discussed could be applied to policy, because I think, If I may speak somewhat freely, we tend to rely on other people's ideas of what The Bahamas should be in terms of developing our policy and we have an institution right here where we are doing the work, where we are looking at The Bahamas. That is our primary interest and focus and it seems to me that developmental policy should come out of this institution," she said.
Co-chair of the National Independence Commission Dr. Tracey Thompson said there is an opportunity to work with the Ministry of Education to ensure that information shared at the conference is shared with local schools and incorporated into the curricula in order to expose students to various intellectual perspectives about The Bahamas and its development. In fact, the college and the Independence Commission are to continue working beyond the conference to develop collaterals and multimedia materials for national consumption.
Prime Minister Perry Christie is expected to officially open the event on Wednesday, June 12 and Winston Dookeran, Minister of Foreign Affairs, the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago, will deliver the keynote address.
Lead partners for the conference are the National Independence Commission, the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and the Bahamas Ministry of Tourism. Sponsors include, Colina Insurance Limited and BTC.
Detailed information on the conference is available online at: www.cob.edu.bs/conferences/bahamasat40.

read more »


News Article

March 30, 2012
The founding mothers' legacy

In her 1959 speech before the Members of the House of Assembly, Dame Dr. Doris Johnson described the women's suffrage movement as "a revolt in the hearts of Bahamian women." In recognition of these heroines, who were first allowed to exercise their right to vote 50 years ago, the College of The Bahamas, from March 6 to 9, 2012, hosted a symposium under the theme, "Commemorating the past, reflecting on the present, envisioning the future: 1962 and beyond".
Connecting past, present and future, afforded the symposium's panelists and audience the opportunity to analyze the development of gender issues in a broader context, thereby igniting a national discourse on the subject. Arguably, this approach is indeed a most befitting memorial to the suffragettes and their legacy. During the symposium, Dr. Christopher Curry, assistant professor of history, argued passionately that the women's suffrage movement never saw the vote as an end in itself, but only as a tool for transformation. Only if women were given a voice in politics, could women expect their concerns to translate into policies that would recognize them as being of equal value; that would grant them equal opportunities; and that would offer them equal protection under the law.
However, it was also argued that when women finally gained the right to vote in 1961, and when they were finally able to exercise this right in 1962, these objectives had to take the backseat because other issues were seen as more pressing at the time. It was the decade during which majority rule was achieved; it was the decade leading up to independence; and the womens' vote was seen as crucial to achieve the numbers necessary to realize these aims at the polls. The female vote had become instrumentalized in the race and class struggle of the 1960s.
Nonetheless, progress has been made since then. E'Thegra Symonette, assistant professor of criminal justice, pointed out that mechanisms to prevent, or at least prosecute, domestic violence are a direct result of the right of women to vote. Yet only minutes later, the audience was reminded of other realities which paint a grim picture of gender discrimination in the 21st-century Bahamas. Dr. Nicolette Bethel, assistant professor of anthropology and sociology, demonstrated how our citizenship laws classify women as second-class Bahamians, a discrimination Bahamians, male and female, chose to reaffirm in the 2002 referendum. Furthermore, Margo Blackwell, associate professor in the school of education, presented data showing that women with bachelor's degrees get paid as much or as little as men with associate degrees, and women with master's degrees receive about the same as men with bachelor's degrees. So, while Bahamian women outperform their male counterparts in educational achievement, they do not reap the rewards.
Gender inequality problems persist
Gender inequality is still a problem in the 21st century Bahamas, and it often goes unnoticed. In his presentation on "Law, Gender and Institutional Structures," Michael Stevenson, associate professor of law and criminal justice, analyzed how seemingly gender neutral language in Bahamian law can in fact perpetuate the oppression of women. It was not long ago that we saw a heated, sometimes deceptive, debate about "marital rape," which I am forced to put in inverted commas, as, legally speaking, it does not exist in this country even though it is a reality.
Marital rape is one of many forms of domestic violence, and the victims of domestic violence are predominantly women. By not recognizing marital rape as such, Bahamian law fails to give women the protection that every Bahamian citizen deserves; and by accepting this legal inequality, we accept our society as discriminatory. The tools for transformation may therefore indeed lie in the past. To honor the women's suffrage movement's legacy, whose rational political acumen and strategic approach helped shape the nature of the Quiet Revolution and thereby the genesis of our democracy, we ought to make the pursuit of its unfinished agenda our mission.
Marcus Garvey, founder of the pan-Africanist Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League, said, "A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots."
Herein lies the cause of what some describe as the current crisis in Bahamian national identity, because, when the British left The Bahamas in 1973, they left us with a system of government, but we did not have a nation.
The role of the college
Nation building is an ongoing process; thus Bahamian identity should be in fluid motion. One of the most acute commentators on Bahamian social issues today is Joey Gaskins, a doctoral student in sociology at the London School of Economics, who followed the events online. In his Twitter feed he described "national cultures" and "national identities" to have been "scripted to exclude". I would like to posit that at the end of our "identity crisis," we might emerge to define being a "true Bahamian" as something to aim for, a vision for the future if you so will, that requires a conscious effort aimed at inclusion and expanding horizons, as opposed to an existing state of mind satisfied with the status quo. To this end, The College of The Bahamas, as the country's national tertiary institution, has a role to play.
The college's mission is "to support and drive national development". Unfortunately, there exists a disconnect between the academe and the Bahamian public that sometimes looks upon the college as a hermetically sealed ivory tower, when in fact our students and our staff, academic and non-academic, are all woven closely into the Bahamian social fabric. Symposia such as this one, however, can bring us together. They create a space for the exchange of ideas, and they are indeed the motor of a Bahamian discourse on matters relevant to the building of our nation.
Given the interest shown in the symposium's themes, the event must be considered a success. The last day saw presentations from local and international scholars exploring current issues of gender and identity not only in The Bahamas, but in a wider Caribbean context. The college's symposium has furthered the national discourse and shown that the right questions are being posed. Now it takes the entire body politic to ponder these questions and explore possible answers. Indeed, this is what universities do.

read more »