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News Article

July 28, 2012
Former FNM candidate hopeful lashes out

One of the four men who were considered by the Free National Movement to run on its ticket in the upcoming North Abaco by-election has lashed out at former Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, accusing him of handpicking the party's choice for the race.
Cay Mills, a taxi driver in North Abaco, told The Nassau Guardian he intends to run as an independent.
Mills said Ingraham promised to stay out of the nomination process.
He claimed that "no one but Mr. Ingraham was a part of the nomination process".
Ingraham held the North Abaco seat for 35 years. His resignation from the House of Assembly takes effect August 31.
"He has continued to lead from the backseat while (FNM Leader Dr. Hubert) Minnis is driving the car, but if Minnis wants to truly be the party leader he has to kick Mr. Ingraham out of the car," Mills said.
On Monday, the FNM's National Central Council picked Greg Gomez over Perry Thomas, of Fox Town, North Abaco; Jackson McIntosh, a former administrator for Cooper's Town, and Mills, who also resides in North Abaco.
McIntosh told The Nassau Guardian that he believed Gomez was the favored choice by Ingraham and the Council felt obligated to choose the candidate that had his support.

However, McIntosh admitted that he could not offer the type of "conviction" the FNM wanted in a by-election because he had previously considered opposing Ingraham in North Abaco as a PLP candidate.
"I think the decision may have always been between Greg and Perry looking at the history of Cay and myself, but in terms of the judgment of the constituents I thought I was the most favored," he said.
"Although Gomez is full of potential, I don't think him being away from the island for the last 10 years is in his interest, but we will fight on his behalf on the ground, although it will be a great challenge."
But Mills said it is a "national disgrace" for the FNM to ratify Gomez when he could not constitutionally nominate if the by-election were called today.
Ingraham recently delayed his resignation from the House of Assembly to allow Gomez to sort out a residency issue that would have prevented him from successfully nominating.
Ingraham said he wanted Gomez to have a fair chance at the nomination.
Gomez previously lived in the United States for 10 years before returning home last August, according to FNM Chairman Charles Maynard.
Under the constitution, a candidate must be ordinarily resident in The Bahamas for at least a year prior to nomination.
Mills said North Abaco will vote for a native son, but it will not be in support of the FNM, the Progressive Liberal Party (PLP) or the Democratic National Alliance (DNA), although the DNA has said it will not put forth a candidate.
"I am the only real choice, and I am the only one who can speak up for the concerns of Abaconians," Mills said.
"And I am going to be the difference. Some may not think I have a chance but Abaco will speak to who they want, and both PLPs and FNMs will support me because they know I'll be the only true voice.
"If there is a storm they will not want Curry or Gomez on that ship; they will want Cay 'Admiral' Mills to steer them from troubled waters into the 21st century."
Mills previously ran as an independent against Ingraham in the 2007 general election.
Although defeated, Mills secured 276 votes while Ingraham got 1,855 votes; PLP candidate Fritz Bootle received 1,387 and independent candidate Kenneth Claridge got six votes.
"I was campaigning day and night trying to get the FNM nomination, but now I am campaigning every day as an independent and I am getting good results," Mills said.
"Mr. Ingraham hasn't seen the real Abaco. They were courteous to him because he [had] power but he is going to think this is a different island when he comes house to house with Gomez, when he himself didn't do so before the general election."
Mills said the FNM hierarchy has not contacted him since the National Central Council chose Gomez.
"That said to me that they didn't want my support, but in this election Abaconians shouldn't have to ask 'who is Greg Gomez, who are we voting for?'
A by-election must be called within 60 days after Ingraham's resignation from the House of Assembly becomes effective on August 31.
Mills will run against Gomez, Renardo Curry, the PLP's ratified candidate for North Abaco, and S. Ali McIntosh, the servant leader of the Bahamas Constitution Party.

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News Article

May 09, 2014
2016 trial date for men accused of Fox Hill mass shooting

A Supreme Court judge yesterday set a trial date two years from now for three men charged with four counts of murder and seven counts of attempted murder in relation to the December 27, 2013 mass shooting in Fox Hill.
Peter Rolle, 29, Justin Williams, 22, and Jermaine Curry, 25, made a brief court appearance before Senior Justice Jon Isaacs to receive a trial date.
The defendants will be tried on September 12, 2016 over the murders of Shaquille Demeritte, Claudezino Davis, Shenique Sands and Eric Morrison and the attempted murders of Samuel Ferguson, Leroy Taylor, Janet Davis, Chino Davis, Jermaine Pratt, John Davis and Benjamin Demeritte.
The victims were at Freedom Park in Fox Hill when the occupants of a gray car opened fire on the crowd.
Police had questioned more than 60 people as they tried to determine who was responsible for the drive-by shooting at the park.
The men remain on remand at Her Majesty's Prisons.

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News Article

November 10, 2011
Alfred Omar Penn, 37

Funeral Service for the late MR. ALFRED OMAR PENN, 37, of Crockett Drive, Marsh Harbour and formerly of Green Turtle Cay, Abaco will be held on Saturday, November, 12, 2011 at 11:00am at St. Peter’s Anglican Church, Green Turtle Cay, Abaco. Officiating will be Fr. Deangelo Bowe assisted by other ministers of the gospel. Interment will follow in the Green Turtle Cay Public Cemetery, Green Turtle Cay, Abaco.
Left to cherish his memories are his children: Antonie and Ahmard Penn and Lorenz Carter; parents: John Penn and Whitlene Curry; special friend: Josefina Adderely; four sisters: Natasha Curry, Nattel Russell, Jonnae Penn and Nicky Wells; two brothers: Ondrae Rolle and Chad Cooper; six aunt ...

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News Article

February 24, 2011
Ida Cooper, 92

Funeral Service for Ida Cooper, 92, and a resident of #6 Columbus Drive, Freeport and formerly of Grand Cay, Abaco will be held on Saturday 26th, February, 2011 at11:00 a.m. at Shiloh Baptist Church, Grand Cay, Abaco . Officiating will be Rev. Rudolph K. Roberts. Interment will follow in the Infantview Cemetery, Grand Cay.

Her legacy will live on in the lives of her two sons Roosevelt Curry and Nevel Munnings one daughter Regina Saunders one adopted son Rudolph Pinder one adopted sister Melvina (Mar) Williams 17 grandchildren Laverne Lowe, la-Keisha Burrows, Melvin Jr., Kirk Sr. and Dwayne Sr. Saunders, Nickia Horton, Maryann Pinder, Lafayette Dorsett, Carol Russel ...

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News Article

April 08, 2014
The pelvic floor is at the core of all we do

Urinary incontinence is a common and often embarrassing problem that ranges from a person occasionally leaking urine when they cough or sneeze, to having an urge to urinate that's so sudden and strong they don't get to a toilet in time. Although common, it is not normal and people do not have to suffer with symptoms that can be mild and annoying or so severe that a person has to miss work, can't sleep and can't exercise.
Sufferers can seek to recover their quality of life at the Voiding Dysfunction, Incontinence and Pelvic Pain Diagnostic and Treatment (VIP) Institute at Providence Rehabilitation Centre in Grosvenor Close West, where Urologist Dr. Robin Roberts and physiotherapist Christina Messara practice.
Messara says voiding dysfunction, incontinence and pelvic pain can be treated, cured and managed successfully. Dr. Roberts diagnoses and medically manages pelvic conditions while Messara applies therapeutic medical technology in combination with internal and external hands-on or manual techniques to treat, cure or manage a patient's condition.
"If you are a person that is hyper-vigilant about knowing where the washroom is, or someone that is reluctant to go to a movie, or reluctant to go on a long car trip -- who won't drive out west because you are afraid you won't be close enough to a washroom should need the arise, you need to see a physiotherapist," said Messara. "If you sneeze and leak urine, if you jump up and down and leak urine, or if you laugh or dance, or get out of a car quickly and you leak urine, you need to see a physiotherapist. If you have pelvic pain ... an ache, if you will, or a sharp pain in the area of the pelvis that is affecting your ability to engage in sexual relations or not, if you are simply living with a pain, then you need to see a physiotherapist."
A study published in the March edition of Medwire News reported that physical therapy results in significant improvements in quality of life among women from a clinical trial. The study included 72 women with symptoms of stress urinary incontinence or mixed urinary incontinence. Their mean age was 53.1 years, 59.7 percent were postmenopausal.
The intervention comprised eight, one-hour sessions of physical therapy delivered over four weeks. Therapy included pelvic floor muscle training using vaginal cones and electrical stimulation together with behavioral training with advice on liquid intake, urination schedules and strategies to reduce leaking.
In a study limited to urinary incontinence, conducted by Dr. Roberts along with Dr. Curry, through The College of The Bahamas, the results suggested that 15 to 18 percent of the Bahamian population deals with pelvic floor dysfunction, and needs the services offered at the VIP Institute; that number, Messara said, is likely low because the study did not look into all aspects of pelvic floor dysfunction, including fecal incontinence, pelvic pain or sexual dysfunction.
The pelvic floor muscles function as a sphincter to prevent urinary and fecal leakage; support for the internal organs; core stabilizer for the back and pelvic girdle, sexual enhancer for sexual satisfaction/orgasm and to assist the lymphatic system and veins to bring blood back to the trunk.
Messara, who is qualified in the assessment and treatment of voiding dysfunction, leaking urine and pelvic pain, not only provides intervention that may treat the underlying cause(s) of pelvic floor dysfunction, but provides education in symptom management and support in lifting some of the stigma surrounding the issue. Treatment involves internal and external assessments, exercise, manual physiotherapy techniques, biofeedback and modalities as necessary.
Tests and diagnosis
Tests and diagnosis to figure out the root of a person's pelvic dysfunction often involve a process of elimination, because many different disorders can cause pelvic dysfunction. Tests that a doctor might order include measurements of post-void residual urine, measuring bladder pressures, ultrasound, cytoscopy, anal manometry, anorectal ultrasonography and a resting electromyography.
Specific causes of pelvic floor dysfunction include neurological injury or disease, such as stroke, diabetes; menopause; prostate surgery; history of multiple pregnancies and vaginal deliver. Certain medicines like diuretics, chronic constipation; diarrhea; hemorrhoids/anal fissures; muscle damage; nerve damage; urinary tract infection and smoking also contribute. Physical conditions affecting mobility such as multiple sclerosis, arthritis and paraplegia; obesity, prolapse (rectal, vaginal, bladder, urethra); caffeine and fluid intake; high impact physical activities; occupations that involve heavy lifting and straining and psychological factors are other causes of pelvic floor dysfunction.
Pelvic dysfunction has many different characteristics. Signs and symptoms include severe and steady pain; pain that comes and goes; dull aching; sharp pains or cramping; pressure or heaviness deep within the pelvis; pain when you urinate; peeing too often; pain when the bladder is full; urine leakage when you cough, sneeze, laugh, stand up, lift, exercise or have sexual relations. In addition, you may experience pain during intercourse, pain while having a bowel movement or urinating and pain when you sit for long periods of time.
The physiotherapist said the pelvic floor muscles are like a hammock or a sling that support the bladder, uterus and bowel. She said that pregnancy, childbirth, obesity, surgery, disease and the straining of chronic constipation could weaken the pelvic floor in both men and women, causing voiding dysfunction, stress incontinence and pelvic pain; spasms or tension in a person's pelvic floor muscles could cause urge incontinence, pelvic pain and difficulty with sexual function.
Cost
Pelvic floor care is covered by insurance, including the National Insurance Board (NIB) if the injury is due to industrial injury, said Messara. If a patient does not have insurance, the cost of treatment depends on the service rendered, and starts at $100 for an office visit, to physiotherapy treatments at $85 per session and clinical psychologist sessions at $65.
While the VIP Institute is doing its part in helping people deal with their pelvic floor issues, Messara said it has been a "journey" to get Bahamians to realize that they don't have to suffer with their symptoms.
"When I practiced in the States, I was even surprised at how willing the patients were to get on the bed ... they thought nothing of it. They seemed very open to it, and I was actually surprised by that. With Bahamian patients, I'm very sensitive that this is a new area, and we do tend to be a little more private in The Bahamas around our bodies. It's funny, we will talk about sex in sexual terms but we will never talk about sex if there is a dysfunction," she said.
In respect to the privacy that people seek when they visit the VIP Institute, Messara said the physical facilities reflect discretion, with a quiet entrance and rooms that are private and soundproofed so that patients can feel comfortable knowing that it is a place where they can share their physical experiences as well as their emotional experiences.
The VIP Institute was borne out of urologist Dr. Roberts and Messara's common vision to help men and women living with the pain and embarrassment of a pelvic floor dysfunction recover their quality of life. Their focused treatment to improve pelvic floor muscle function, often in combination with medication and or surgery, can alleviate or resolve a person's incontinence.
"This is an entirely new model in The Bahamas and the first time we're offering a multi-disciplinary approach to care," said Messara.
In physiotherapy, much like medicine, graduates are able to provide all aspects of care, and can then go on to become specialized. It was a personal goal for Messara to specialize.
"I always feel that it's important if you're going to provide a service for a patient that you feel confident in your skills within that service, and if I was going to provide this service for my patients, I wanted to make sure that I had not only the academic expertise to back my claim that I could provide this service, but I also wanted to have the hands-on expertise and I was able to get that by going to the Cleveland Clinic in May 2013, where I worked under a physiotherapist there who taught me the hands-on clinical skills that you cannot get through academic knowledge alone," she said.
"I've been inspired by Dr. Roberts' passion and compassion for patients. I know this is an area he has been passionate about for a very long time and something that he has wanted to bring to the forefront of the medical and physiotherapy community for a long time. We were very fortunate to come together and work towards a common goal," said Messara.

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News Article

April 10, 2014
McCartney murder accused to seek bail again

One of the women accused of the murder of pharmacist Kurt McCartney will make another bail application today.
Lyndera Curry, of Plantol Street, was refused bail last December when she appeared before Senior Justice Jon Isaacs.
Curry is expected to renew her bid for bail today, almost a week after she and three alleged accomplices received a March 2015 trial date.
Curry is charged along with Sumya Ingraham, 26, also of Plantol Street; Thorne Edwards, 23, and Okell Farrington, 31, of Pinewood Gardens.
Prosecutors say they are responsible for the October 24 shooting death of McCartney during an armed robbery in which his 2007 Hummer vehicle, which is valued at $37,000, was taken.
McCartney, who is the brother of DNA Leader, Branville McCartney, was shot and killed in Gambier Village. His Hummer was discovered by police a few hours after his death, east of Traveller's Restaurant.
The accused have denied the allegations against them.
A fifth person, 42-year-old Terry Delancy, the owner of Virgo Car Rental, was charged with being an accessory after the fact.
He is accused of enabling Curry, Ingraham, Edwards and Farrington to avoid due process of the law. He pleaded not guilty to the charge.
He is on $15,000 bail.

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News Article

March 28, 2014
Want real change in The Bahamas It's time for active citizenship

On July 10, 2013, the Commonwealth of The Bahamas celebrated 40 years of independence.
The annual recognition of self-determination inherently gave way to a national reflection on self-evaluation and an assessment of how far we have come as a nation and what is the way forward for the next 40 years.
An objective, fair and realistic evaluation would render a judgment incredibly favorable to the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. As the adage goes, "To whom much is given, much is expected."
We, the Bahamian people, have been given a great country by our God, our forefathers and Bahamians of generations past. The expectation now even more than ever is for every Bahamian citizen, every one of us, to make individual contributions to the continuous advancement and further greatness of our beloved commonwealth.
As we embark upon the next 40 years, all of us must embrace an active citizenship, one that asks: "How does my attitude, my lifestyle and my behavior either contribute to the increasing development or gradual weakening of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas?"
An active citizenship that says to be born Bahamian is not a right, but a privilege, a privilege that must be honored by an equal and unshakeable resolve to "do my part" to make The Bahamas better.
Occasionally lost sometimes in the usual rhetorical scuffle and paralysis of analysis that at times handicaps the national dialogue on pertinent issues is a fundamental and undeniable fact that history has been a witness to time and time again. When real change and transformation altered the Bahamian national landscape in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, it was an active citizenship that served as a catalyst.
From the Burma Road Riot in 1942, to the taxi cab blockade in 1958, to the historic vote of Bahamian women in 1962, to Bahamian independence in 1973, to the formation of both the Free National Movement and the Progressive Liberal Party, these historic events have been shaped by ordinary Bahamian men and women with extraordinary passion, resolve and selfless love of country.
Admirably, we have become a very vocal and critically thinking citizenry, but the ongoing sense of entitlement, over-reliance and excessive dependency on government have in many ways reduced the incentive for some Bahamians to be involved in their own development.
There must be a collective commitment to change the status quo and create a country for active citizenship to flourish. We must foster a culture that rejects the idea that political access to the Public Treasury is either the only way or the primary way for economic empowerment to occur. Governments ought to not simply act on behalf of the Bahamian people. They should act with them and create an environment ripe for economic independence and empowerment.
So while I do concede that social services agencies and programs are necessary to act as a collective safety net for our brothers and sisters who are ill-equipped and less fortunate, they cannot be embraced as a sustainable method through which we empower. We the citizens must be engaged sufficiently that we ensure that political, business, civic and religious leaders are accountable for their actions as we have to be accountable for ours. We must work with other community stakeholders to forward development, provide serious long-term solutions for our social, economic and educational ills.
Each of us should champion the concerns for those who have no voice and those whose influence is limited by virtue of education or economics. An active citizenship and social agitation is the bedrock of any mature democracy and it must be dynamic, visible and vibrant. Let me submit this, that our desires for our country are directly connected to what we are willing to give it individually. Now let me register this admission for the record. There are thousands of great Bahamians who helped to build this country and there are countless others who make their contribution to their community and this nation everyday. Yet, there still remains a sizeable portion of the population who sit on the sidelines; people who spectate not participate. Simply put "the work is plentiful in our country and the laborers are few".

Self-advancement
We must embrace the notion that each of our roles is significantly important to the transformation of our country. Whether you are the right honorable prime minister or a painter, an engineer or an evangelist, a taxi driver or a janitor. We must all lead from where we stand and alter our surroundings for the good of The Bahamas. It is my belief that we must weave into our social fabric a sense of a "through the corner", "in the yard", "everyday" patriotism. An ever-present patriotism that will stir the soul of the Bahamian people daily and incite a level of pro-activeness and a relentless focus on nation building. I'm reminded daily of the impact of this when I talk to and observe a remarkable lady on the corner of Meadows and West Streets affectionately known as "Mother Blessed" as she cares for and transforms the lives of young children in the Bain Town community. I'm reminded of this when I drive on Baillou Hill Road and see Troy Clarke of the L.E.A.D institute as he inspires the young men in his program. I am reminded of this when I think of Tyrone 'Goose' Curry of the Foundation Junkanoo group, who works tirelessly to uplift the spirits of the young men and women in the Chippingham area.
There is, however, a stark and festering reality that has been with us for decades that seems to evade our consciousness and that is there is no amount of legislated public policy that can stem the instances of chronic lawlessness, social deterioration and corruption that we are now facing. To begin to usher in the change needed it will involve an active citizenship and an engaged, aggressive, demanding Bahamian citizenry whose members work tirelessly within their circles of influence to begin to eliminate and battle those elements of our society that weaken us as a country.
We have much to be proud of as a country and are truly blessed for having been given the Commonwealth of The Bahamas by our creator. We are therefore both citizens and caretakers. Let us remind ourselves daily that citizenship is not simply a status of national residence. It is an unwritten, sacred, solemn and binding pact between us and our country. We are exposed to unlimited privileges of being Bahamian; the absolute advantages of our climate; our geography, our seas. We benefit from a sometimes, yes, challenged but underestimated thriving democracy and a stable economy. We are in the elite and enviable position of being one of six countries in the world that have United States pre-clearance. We enjoy the relatively peaceful and tranquil experience that is the Bahamian way of life. All that is asked of us is to do our part and make individual and collective contributions to our Bahamaland that has given us so much. We reap the harvest from our land but in my humble view too many are unwilling to till the soil for the next generation just as the land was prepared for them.
There is no more room for idle hands or the absentee citizen. For the very same community and society we neglect today are the same ones we will become victims of tomorrow. We must awaken those patriotic passions and cultural ideals that were so prevalent during the pre-independence years and those immediately after. There must be a huge shift in how we view our citizenship. Let us harness that unique Bahamian spirit of excellence that has given us world-class leaders, scholars, actors, painters, song writers, musicians and athletes and become consumed by what will make us individually better neighbors, ideally better Bahamian citizens, because the future of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas depends on it.
o Shanendon E. Cartwright is the founder and facilitator of Vision 21 - an educational, motivational and interactive lecture series on leadership.

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News Article

March 19, 2014
Honing their skills

The two highest performing candidates in the 2013 Electrical Installation and Carpentry national exams will be expanding their knowledge and hone their skills at The Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI).
Lamaron Sweeting, a 2013 graduate of South Andros High had achieved the best results in the Bahamas General Certificate of Secondary Education (BGCSE) Electrical Installation exam. Oscar Saunders, formerly of Nassau Christian Academy, topped all other candidates nationwide in carpentry.
Lamaron recently collected his acceptance letter to BTVI and is excited to begin his studies toward an associate of applied science degree in electrical installation when summer classes begin on April 28.
"It is important for me to attend BTVI to further my hands-on skills and to apply it to the world of work," said the 17-year-old.
During his three-year study under the tutelage of Errol Coke, Lamaron obtained many skills and is able to install receptacles, switches and breakers. He said he enjoys manual work and electrical installation became his favorite subject.
"I understand it and am able to apply it easily," said the young man who aspires to become an electrical engineer. "The passion I have for the work makes me feel I'm doing it for fun. Time doesn't matter. At the end of the day, I can see what I've done."
Oscar, who has already been enrolled at BTVI for two semesters, said although he is learning the intricacies of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC), carpentry comes natural to him.
"I like things that can be done with the wood -- the many possibilities. I make art out of wood," said the 19-year-old who has built a computer desk, towel rack, wine rack and car speaker box.
Oscar gave credit to his teacher, Carl Curry. But he also said he took the time to put in extra work which he said made the difference as the more he did it, he said the better at it he got.
BTVI's Dean of Construction Trades Alexander Darville said it was an honor to have Oscar enrolled at BTVI and Lamaron starting in a few weeks. "It shows how students see BTVI," he said. "We are attracting top students from the technical areas."
Darville said that for many high school students, technical education is a first choice.
"We live in a technical world and BTVI is literally preparing its students for the world of work," he said.

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News Article

June 28, 2012
Small takes top prize at Jack Rogers tourney

Last weekend was a great weekend for chess in The Bahamas. A total of 14 players, ranging from high school students to seasoned adults, took to the boards at C.W. Sawyer Primary School to play in the 2012 Jack Rogers Summer Splash Tournament.
The two-day event - a new entry to the Bahamas Chess Federation's (BCF) calendar - was organized as a four-round Swiss game in 60 minutes, and was held June 23-24.
Round 1 went according to form, with all higher-rated players defeating their opponents.
Round 2 is when the competition heated up. Lemaro Thompson, returning to federation action after an extended period of university studies, secured a clear advantage over former two-time National Champion Byron Small, but failed to convert before his time expired and fell in bitter defeat.
Also in Round 2, Kyle Curry, a College of The Bahamas student and new federation player, crushed veteran Andre White in a match that would earn Curry the "Biggest Upset" prize.
Round 3 saw Byron Small win against defending National Champion Ken Gibson, setting the stage for Small to win the top prize with one more victory.
Paired in the fourth round against the young talent of Sandeep Gali, Small played an aggressive gambit line that required extremely accurate play on the part of Gali.
For most of the match, Gali was able to fend off Small's incessant pressure, but ultimately the weight of the position was too much to bear.
Small uncorked a simple but vicious knight move that spelled doom for his opponent. Gali was forced to give up material to extend play, but with the result all but decided, Gali eventually resigned, handing Small his fourth win of the tournament and the first-place trophy.
By placing third in this event, Lemaro Thompson automatically qualified for play in this year's national championship, scheduled for November.
The federation's Grand Prix standings with four events to go have Yan Lyansky and Byron Small tied for first place.
Competition is proving to be extremely fierce in 2012, and the remainder of the federation's calendar will be intriguing to follow.
For more information on the Bahamas Chess Federation and its scheduled events, the public is asked to visit the federation's website or its Facebook page.

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News Article

July 13, 2012
Advertising meets the great outdoors

Advertising could make the difference between a business failing or succeeding. And it's with this premise in mind that one local company has hit the streets and invested tens of thousands just to ensure its clientele receives the right exposure.
Opening its doors in 2008, Bahamas Outdoor Media Ltd. is a company that specializes in outdoor advertising.
In this week's edition of 'Da Plunge', Demalus Curry, the company's president, revealed that Bahamas Outdoor Media Ltd. was created with the intent of providing customers with another form of direct advertising.
"We were looking at non-traditional ways to help businesses expose themselves, looking for new advertising locations and assisting customers with strategically placing their ads. We also look at directly targeting their
clientele, versus advertising to the masses in other media forms. Our company provides a better direct advertising approach," according to Curry.
The president noted that he has pumped close to $80,000 into the business, but admits it's been a worthwhile investment because business has been promising so far.
"Over the years, customers have told us that their businesses have been impacted tremendously as a result of our services. Some companies have even cut back advertising because of our direct approach," he shared. "We have customers who have actually placed advertisements in the hospitals, especially the pharmaceutical and insurance companies. Our clients can place ads in hospitals, the airport and bus shelters."
The company's chief shared with Guardian Business that he has four employees including himself, his wife, an account executive and a graphic designer.
He also revealed that Bahamas Outdoor Media Ltd. recently launched its 'walking billboard' service. It's a service that he believes will be most beneficial in the downtown area.
"Our approach at reaching consumers is different in that we are targeting impulse buys and awareness with the use of our unique advertising medium, the walking billboard. If you use our advertising billboards with your promotion, you have the best chance at gaining customers right now as we target by impulse," Curry explained. "We want to be able to give our clients another means of targeting their customers. The main strategy behind it is for it to be used in the downtown area and at promotional events where companies may have a hard time targeting persons.
"For example, if you are talking about some place like the Fish Fry, there is no form of advertising other than Kalik ads or companies that do the wraps on the buildings. With our initiative, companies will be able to penetrate certain areas in the country to actually target customers."
While Curry hopes to be the first choice in advertising for companies one day, in the meantime he said there are a number of projects that he and his team are currently working on.

"If a company decides its wants to try a new or old form of advertising, we want to be a part of that decision making process. We have a few more projects that we are working on, where we are awaiting the necessary government approvals in order for us to launch those specific projects," he added.

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News Article

April 20, 2012
It is all about leadership

Dear Editor,

Hubert Ingraham and the Free National Movement (FNM) have tried desperately to make this political campaign a referendum on his leadership. They have attempted to compare his leadership record and style to that of Perry Christie's. All things being equal it may have worked; apparently it did work in 2007. We now have a track record of both leaders taking political office after a recession.
Firstly, any credible leader would leave his country better off than he met it. Can Bahamians honestly declare that they are better off in 2012 than they were in 2007? I think that most reasonable people will concede that Christie left The Bahamas in better condition in 2007 than he met in 2002. Better condition refers to the quality of life of Bahamians. Let us examine some of the indices that underpin quality of life and form the basis for Ingraham's hubris.
Here is what the prime minister promised in an earlier Speech from the Throne: "My government will restore fiscal discipline to the public finances of the country, and will ensure that value is obtained for public expenditure and public business."
Time has proven that Hubert Ingraham cannot credibly lecture anyone on his leadership merits when it comes to fiscal discipline. When he returned to office in 2007, Hubert Ingraham met the national debt at $2.9 billion. It has now ballooned to $4.6 billion and by the end of this fiscal year the national debt is expected to be in the area of $5 billion. That is a net increase of some $2.1 billion in just five years. What kind of leader would make such a promise and then explode the national debt by over $2 billion in just five years?
One of the most important indicators of a nation's quality of life is the safety of its citizens. Can Bahamians truthfully claim that crime and the fear of crime are less now than they were in 2007? How can you boast of your leadership prowess after having presided over the most murderous and violent era in the history of The Bahamas?
Over 457 murders over a period of less than five years! Additionally, every other category of violent crime increased during this glorious leadership reign. A true leader would have taken measures necessary to reduce the incidents of violent crime and the fear of crime. Hubert Ingraham and the FNM have not demonstrated the kind of leadership needed in mobilizing and uniting communities in the fight against violence and criminal behavior.
Other areas where Hubert Ingraham's leadership has failed miserably are education and immigration control. These are issues vital to the quality of life of Bahamians. The FNM under Hubert Ingraham's leadership has failed to improve the education system institutionally, structurally or systemically and his leadership has failed to adequately prepare Bahamian students for the world after school. This is a terrible indictment on leadership.
Moreover, Bahamians feel that because of the immigration policies implemented by the FNM they have very little stake in the ownership of the county's economy, nor are they permitted to compete fairly in their own country. The immigration policies seem to curry favor foreign labor and foreign investors. This state of affairs does not bode well for the stability of the society.
Most failed leaders look to something or someone to blame for their failure. The global recession has been a convenient whipping dog for Hubert Ingraham and the FNM. However, Hubert Ingraham once pronounced that any leader worth his salt would anticipate a future recession and take corrective measures to mitigate the impact of that recession. Here is what he had to say in one of his earlier budget communications: "Furthermore, these budgetary problems were allowed to develop at a time when a prudent government would have recognized that cautionary measures should have been in place to meet any likelihood of a major recession in the U.S. economy, and to cushion the resultant impact on our tourism-driven economy."
How prudent was Ingraham's government? He went on to indict the Progressive Liberal Party (PLP) government by pronouncing: "It cannot be said that those who were responsible for managing the economy did not know hard times were coming, they just chose to ignore all the indicators."
Surely in 2007/2008, Ingraham knew a recession and resulting hard times were approaching? All fiscal and economic indicators pointed to it. Judging by his reckless response to, and the irresponsible choices made during, the recession Ingraham appeared to have been caught off guard by the recession. So much for leadership!
Leadership in government is about building and strengthening institutions that enhance democracy and improve the quality of life for citizens. Leadership in government is about inspiring people to achieve their dreams and ambitions. It is about building national consensus and compromise. Leadership is about mobilizing and consolidating the resources and talents of citizens toward national development. Leadership is not about demagoguery; it is not about power, intimidation and bullying.
So if I were the PLP or Democratic National Alliance, I would welcome a campaign based on leadership. I would put Ingraham's record, all of it, against the acid test of true leadership. I would seek to determine whether his five years of leadership improved the quality of life of Bahamians. I would simply ask if Bahamians were better off in 2012 than they were in 2007 - a simple and measurable reality - and let the people decide.

- Eric Gardner

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News Article

September 30, 2011
Roy Pedican, 56

Funeral Service for Roy Pedican, 56, of Fox Dale and formerly of Green Turtle Cay, Abaco who died on Sunday September 18, 2011 will be held on Saturday October 1, 2011 at 10:00 a.m. at St. Anne’s Anglican Church, Fox Hill. Officiating will be Fr. Barlett

assisted by other Ministers of the Gospel. Interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

Cherished memories will forever linger in the hearts of his Daughter: Royann Pedican; One Grand Daughter: Five Sisters: Viola Curry, Inez Peidcan of Freeport, Winifred Bodie, Deborah McIntosh and Eleanor Pedican of Abaco; Three Brothers: Earnel Pedican, Bruce Pedican of Freeport and Clarke Pedican of Canada; Two Brothers-in ...

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News Article

July 24, 2012
FNM picks North Abaco candidate

The Free National Movement (FNM) last night ratified Greg Gomez to run on the party's ticket in the highly anticipated North Abaco by-election.
A by-election must be called within 60 days after former Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham's resignation from the House of Assembly becomes effective on August 31.
After almost 10 hours of deliberations at FNM headquarters on Mackey Street yesterday, the FNM's National Central Council picked Gomez over Perry Thomas, of Fox Town, North Abaco; Jackson McIntosh, a former administrator for Cooper's Town, and Cay Mills, a taxi driver who also resides in North Abaco.
Gomez, an educator, told reporters that if successful in becoming the new member of Parliament for North Abaco he would work aggressively to continue Ingraham's legacy.

"I plan to bring the entire North Abaco constituency together," he said. "We are all one family and we are all together.
"I plan to continue on the legacy of the former prime minister, Hubert Ingraham. That legacy is not over."
He continued, "We also will galvanize the youth of Abaco and push them forward by empowering them. The youth of North Abaco, especially in the Crown Haven and Cooper's Town areas, mostly rely on fishing and agriculture and we will empower them in those areas."
Ingraham recently delayed his resignation to allow Gomez to sort out a residency issue that would have prevented him from successfully nominating.
Ingraham said he wanted Gomez to have a fair chance at the nomination.
Gomez previously lived in the United States and returned home last August.
Under the constitution, a candidate must be ordinarily resident in The Bahamas for at least a year prior to nomination.
Though not considered a politician at heart, Gomez, 39, will run against Renardo Curry, the Progressive Liberal Party's (PLP) choice again for North Abaco.
Although under his leadership the FNM lost the May 7 general election, Ingraham secured his seat with 2,235 votes, beating Curry, who had 1,856 votes.
The Democratic National Alliance (DNA) candidate Sonith Lockhart got 39 votes.
DNA Leader Branville McCartney confirmed that the DNA will not run a candidate in the by-election, after failing to secure a single seat in the general election.
But with fewer that 400 votes between Ingraham and Curry, PLPs believe he has a strong chance of winning the seat.
The PLP won 29 of the 38 seats in the House of Assembly and the FNM secured the remaining nine.
The North Abaco by-election is considered a significant test for the FNM, one that the party's chairman, Charles Maynard, said would prove the effectiveness of the party.
Minnis said last night the FNM's objective is to win the seat once again, but by an even larger margin this time around.
Asked whether Gomez was at a disadvantage compared to Curry, who has had more time to campaign, Minnis responded, "Mr. Curry may have been there longer than he has, but we are not concerned about that. We feel we have a better candidate and our candidate will prove victorious."
Minnis said the potential candidates for the constituency began campaigning shortly after Ingraham announced his resignation.
The hierarchy of the FNM will travel to North Abaco today to formally introduce Gomez as the ratified candidate and begin officially campaigning with the theme 'All Together'.

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News Article

December 16, 2013
New location for AG's office

The move of the Office of the Attorney General to John F. Kennedy Drive will not create inefficiencies in the administration of justice, according to Attorney General Allyson Maynard-Gibson.
The office's previous location on East Hill Street was within walking distance of the Supreme Court, Court of Appeal and the criminal and civil registries.
It took The Nassau Guardian 15 minutes to drive from the new location on a Sunday afternoon with minimal traffic.
Although the office has two vans and other vehicles to ferry lawyers and witnesses to and from court, fed up lawyers often walked to the office because of long waits for transportation.
However, Maynard-Gibson told The Nassau Guardian yesterday, "Everything is in place to ensure that there will be no problems with transportation."
Citing security reasons, she declined to outline those measures.
Maynard-Gibson said she did not envision a problem with documents being filed on time due to the move.
In an earlier interview, Bar Association President Elsworth Johnson said, "If there were some difficulties at the post office in terms of ferrying lawyers to and from court, and filing documents, we don't want that to be transplanted to [the new location]."
Johnson said necessary steps ought to be put in place to ensure that lawyers get to court on time without having to use their personal resources.
He suggested that arrangements should be made for clerks to file documents "so that distance does not affect the role they have to play as ministers of justice".
Johnson noted that at East Hill Street "lawyers are often scurrying down the hill with their bags in their hands to file something".
"They should not have to use their personal vehicles to do these things. There should be a messenger or courier service put in place so that attorneys don't have to jump in their cars to get things done."
Johnson said lawyers in the Office of the Attorney General provide an invaluable service to the country for which they are overworked and underpaid.

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News Article

November 19, 2013
Klay Thompson solidifying star status with Warriors

Klay Thompson, the Bahamian-rooted Golden State shooting guard, is rapidly solidifying his status as a star player in the National Basketball Association (NBA).
Into his third season, Klay, one of the sons of Bahamian sports icon Mychal Thompson, appears to have a larger role this season. It seems, early in this season, that Coach Mark Jackson has decided to emphasize more Klay's role as the shooting guard for the team.
In my view, the Warriors can go further with Klay as the No. 1 shooter. Stephen Curry, the excellent point guard, excelled in scoring last season. However, the Warriors are a better team with the 1-2 scoring punch being Thompson/Curry, rather than the other way around.
The Warriors are playing like they can win the Pacific Division of the Western Conference despite the fact that a key rival team is the Los Angeles Clippers. Jackson goes with a line-up of David Lee and the new team member Andre Iguadala as the forwards with Andrew Bogut in center. The splash brothers Thompson and Curry round out the starting five.
This is a fine unit, comparable to the best of the rest. Following a key 116-115 victory over the Oklahoma City Thunder last Thursday night, the Warriors stood at 6-3, tied with the Clippers in the Pacific Division. To me that game put a stamp on the kind of team the rest of the NBA will have to face this year.
The Warriors are likely to win more of those close games against the elite teams as they grow in confidence. Thompson had 27 points in that game to lead the Warriors and rounded out his top performer outing with five rebounds, two assists and three blocks.
All Jackson has to continue to do is allow Klay to remain that first option shooter and let Curry focus more on being the court general, distributing the ball rather that taking the shot so often. I take nothing away from Dell Curry's boy. Stephen can shoot. Nevertheless, he can make the Warriors a much better team if his focus is on getting the other players on the floor more involved in the offense.
Once he does that, the extra energy can be utilized on defense. Stephen is quick and I think could be an all-defensive team member if he adjusts his game a bit. Coach Jackson should see to it.
The warriors are relatively a young team. The two stars Thompson and Curry are just 23 and 25. Golden State shapes up as the team of the future in the NBA. If Jackson keeps Klay with the largest scoring load, the Warriors could indeed become the team of now.
Klay should have been a coaches' pick for all-star weekend last year. Barring injury, he should achieve that milestone this season.
Go Klay!
o To respond to this column, kindly contact Fred Sturrup at sturrup1504@gmail.com.

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News Article

October 15, 2010
Bahamian artists featured at Liverpool Biennial 2010

By THEA RUTHERFORD
Guardian National Correspondent
thea@nasguard.com

In the first-ever creation of new work as a collective response by Caribbean artists to the city of Liverpool, The Bahamas joined Barbados and Martinique in featuring the work of its artists at the Liverpool Biennial 2010.
Bahamian artists John Beadle, Lavar Munroe, Lynn Parotti, Heino Schmid and Blue Curry all created works for the prestigious biennial under the theme of The Caribbean Pavilion exhibit,"Three Moments."
The artists were invited to participate by the International Curators Forum(ICF). And according to an entry on the exhibition found on the ICF's website,"were selected on their ability to make ...

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Event
Shaback live in concert
Shaback live in concert

Sunday 12th August 2012  6:30 PM

Shaback live in concert One Nation post independence gospel celebration & tour concert Sunday, August 12th, 2012 The New Evangelistic Temple Sanctuary, Collins Ave. Doors open 6:30pm start time 7:30pm Admission: $10 at the door MC: Sister C from joy FM Also, for the first time on stage together " The leading ladies of Gospel Music" with a special tribute to Rev. Gary Curry Performing: Necole Watson, Nadine Moss, Lynn Terez Davis, Mericha Walker, Eunice Rolle, Tamika Taylor and The National Choir Workshop of The Bahamas


News Article

May 24, 2012
Vernera Lisette Small, 54

Funeral service for Vernera Lisette Small, 54 yrs., a resident of Bishop Street, Nassau Village, who died on 16th May, 2012, will be held at Bahamas Faith Ministries, Carmichael Road, on Saturday at 2:00 p.m. Officiating will be Pastor Dr. Richard Pinder, assisted by Pastor Henry Francis. Interment follows in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, John F. Kennedy Drive.

Left to cherish her memories are:
Her Children: Lakera Thompson, Leroy Curry Jr., Edwardo Thompson (Son-in-law), and Elethera Curry (Daughter-in-law)
Grandchildren: Xzavier Thompson, Alliyah Thompson, and Elijah Curry
Father: Plato L. Small
Stepmother: Brenhilda Strachan
Brothers: Chuck and Larry Pratt, Daniel, Shadwell, Franchot, Stephen, Jerome, Herschel, Byron, Mindell, Jason, Dwayne, Stanton, Carlos, Peter, Chuck, Krischen, and Matthew Small, Marcellus Bassett, Daniel Alcide, James Miller
Sisters: Ruth Brown, Esther Miller, Bridgette Small-Alcide, Lucille Small-Bassett, Cleora Pratt, Rebecca, Vanessa, Bethsheba, Hannah, Annishka, and Renay Small
Uncles: Errol Johnson, Cody and Isaacs Burnside, Vasco, Dugald, and Shogi Small
Aunts: Elizabeth Rolle, Muriel Mitchell, Virgill Knowles, Alsette Deleveaux, Musienne McDonald, Eldeace Wright
Nephews: Franchot, Hosea, Jamaal, Kenton, David, Jonathan, Kai, Wesley, Jamison, Joshua, Daryl, Amari, Zion, Teko, Tavero, Jubal
Nieces: Azariah, Faith, Lashie, Sade, Shante, Lashan, Monique, Adassa, Danielle, Talia, Rachel, Chucquanna and a host of other relatives and friends including: Arnette Burrows, Derry Ferguson, Dellarese Mcphee, Sherry Forbes, Charmaine Edgecombe, Rose Armbrister, Jerome Godfrey, Eleanor Seymour, Tabitha Philander, Dr. Abbelard, Prophetess Albertha Williams, Lynn Flavelle, Dave Seymour, Faith Temple Family, BFM Family, Global Worship Center Family, and many, many more.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market Street, from 12-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday from 9-12:00 noon & at the church from 1:00 p.m. until service time.

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News Article

April 11, 2012
Andrew G. Deveaux Sr., 51

 
OBITUARY
Andrew G. Deveaux
May 15th 1960 - March 31st, 2012
 
"The steps of a good man are ordered by the Lord and he delighted in his way though he fall, he shall not be utterly cast down, for the Lord upholdeth him with his hand." (Psalms 37: 23-24)
It was a joyous occasion May 15, 1960 in the home of Perlina Wright in the picturesque settlement of Devil's Point Cat Island, when a baby boy was born to Perlina Wright and Norris Deveaux, handsome, yes! Bouncing baby he was not.  He was christened Andrew George Deveaux. Sr.,
Andrew, the second of three sons brought joy to his family and friends in his neighbor-hood. He received his early education at the Devils Point All-Aged School and later the Old Bight Senior High School.  Andrew was a charmer and a heart-breaker of many girls he outwitted several of them, yet He was an ardent student and kept focus on his studies.
His childhood friends Sham Burrows, Charles Smith and Octavia Mackey, were always up to mischief.  However, his grandmother Rapheletha Brown ruled him and his younger brother Inspector Nathan Mackey with an iron fist. They had to do chores that all family Island children did. Andrew was light skinned, he was afraid of the sun, so whenever they had to help their grand mother with the field chores he always choose the easy ones.  He was hard working and loved to go fishing and crab catching.  Andrew had and infectious smile and you knew when he was happy he would laugh and enjoyed himself to the fullest. He loved life and he loved his family.
Andrew the phenomenal man was a role model to his family.  He was loved dearly by all who came into contact with him. He saw opportunities when many saw problems.  Perseverance and hard work was the name of his game. He was trustworthy, talented; helpful are a few attributes that best described Andrew.
Upon graduation from High school, he migrated to Nassau and found employment at Super Value Warehouse. In October, 1979 he joined the Royal Bahamas Police Force and his first deportment was at the Airport Police Station. Andrew stayed at this location for a number of years.  He was a dedicated staff to his employer and was well versed in his academic profession that allowed him a very rewarding career. His hard work and dedication enable Him to matriculate to the post as ASP of the K-9 Unit Royal Bahamas Police Force.  There he served for thirty-three years until the time of his demise, he served his country well.
In 2008, Andrew became ill and had to seek medical care in the USA.  There were days when he had to fight this dreadful disease called cancer, but with the help of the Holy Sprit, he was determined to win this battle.  The doctors did all they could to assist Andrew and make life more comfortable for him.  However, Andrew knew that he was made from the dust and to dust he shall returned.  He spend his last hours with his family on March 30th, his eldest brother, Thaddeus, took him for a drive and they droved around Nassau all day.
During the early morning of Saturday March 31, he developed shortness of breath and was taken to Doctor's Hospital by his younger brother, Inspector Nathan Mackey.  The doctors applied all the medical expertise but to no avail Andrew George Deveaux Sr., sojourn on this side of the master's vineyard had come to an end.  Hence in the words of Paul the Apostle, Andrew had fought a good fight, he had kept the faith He had finished his course, henceforth there is laid up for him a crown of righteousness that the Lord himself will give him on that great coronation day.
Full Military Funeral Service for the Late Assistant Superintendent of Police Andrew George Deveaux Sr., 51 years of Cassarilla Street, Pinewood Gardens and Formerly of Devil's Point, Cat Island, will be held on Wednesday April 11th, 10:00 a.m. at New Bethlehem Baptist Church, Independence Drive. Rev. Dr. Everette Brown assisted by Bishop Benjamin Gibson, Fr. Stephan Davies, Chaplain RBPF, Rev. Dr. Errol Farquharson and other Ministers of the Gospel will officiate. Interment will follow in Woodlawn Memorial Gardens, Soldier Road.
Andrew's life will be lovingly remembered by his Mother: Perlina Wright; Father: Norris Deveaux, of Kemps Bay Andros;  3 Sons: Lavardo, Adrian and Andrew George Deveaux Jr., 6 Brothers: Thaddeus Wright, Inspector Nathan Mackey,  John, Ivan, David and Alexander Mackey, 3 Adopted Brothers: D/Sergeant 80 Kevin Louis, Marine Seaman Deoroope Louis and Police Reservist 412 Anton Wilson; (formerly of the  US Military); 8 Sisters: Alice Smith, Jestina Burrow, Barbara Mackey-Thompson, Cynthia, Paulette and Eva Mackey, Belinda Mackey-Gardiner, Addell Deveaux of  USA;  1 Daughter-in-Law: Carla Barry-Deveaux; 5 Grandchildren: Jada, Unique, Andrew III, Lavardo Jr., Jason Hanna Jr., and Jayla (Mama) Deveaux;  9 Aunts: Matriarch Florence Brown, Luella, Miriam, Agnes, and Virginia Brown, Mary Bodie, Paulette Mackey, Jane Mackey-Morgan, and Sybil; 4 Uncles: David Brown, Felix Bodie, Harold Taylor and Dencil Nottage; Mentor and Cousin: David Johnson of John Road, 2 Sisters-in-Law: Marilyn Wright and Amanda Mackey; Nieces: Dominic, Denise, Bernice and Lakeshia Wright, Natavia Mackey,  Amanda Mackey-Gibson, Shakiettra Major, Monalisa McPhee, Teki Mackey, Kendra Thompson, Vanessa Saunders, Minera Smith-Culmer, Crystal  Smith-Rolle, Cyprianna Cunningham, Anastacia Ferguson, Lydia McHardy, Derick and Daneisha Mackey; Nephews: Bonnet and Owen Wright, Delmaro, Nathan Jr.,  and Nashad Mackey, Anthony and Reginald Smith, Whitfield Stubbs, Harris, Miller, Lawrence Edgecombe, Damon Mackey, Tario Mackey, Kendal Thompson Jr. and Alexander Mackey Jr.; Grandnieces: Karen, Renae and Gladys Brown; Grandnephews: Sargent 1957 Harrison Brown, Hubert, David Brown Jr., Kingman and Dwight Brown; Great-grandnieces: Terrinique Wright, Kenisha Thompson, Jessica, Jolice, Javanna, Britika and Cardissa Wright, Marissa, Brianna Mackey,  Antonique, Anvaar and Adrianna (spoke-lady) Brown; Great-grandnephews: Harrison Jr. and Delmaro Mackey Jr., Bernard, Terran, Leonardo, Bennett, Kareem, Bonnet Wright Jr., and C.J.; Immediate Cousins: Geneva Dorsette, Mazie Simmons, Tezerene Gray, Ivan Rolle, Leroy , Frank, Lefred, Roosevelt and Junior, Verdell, Mavis, and Syblean Mackey, and Hazel McDonald, Charlotte Culmer, Mae, Clifford, Octavius, Anthony Mackey-Rolle and the entire descendant of Joel and Blossom Mackey, the descendant of Burke and Carlotta Clarke: Bloomfield, Esperline, Geletha, Annamae, Lorene, Charlene, Chris and Arnold Clarke, Steve, Dwight, Leslie, Tyrone, Trevor Miller and their families, Mrs. Lindsay Louis, Joan Stubbs and family, Pearline Johnson, Deborah Taylor-Edgecombe, Helena Morley, Reverend Benjamin and Mrs. Gibson, Pastor Emeritus Reverend Ishmael  and Mrs. (Albertha Smith) deceased, Reverend Dr. Everette J. Brown and Minister Sheila Brown, Reverend Joseph and Mrs. Saunders, Charles Smith & family , Samuel Smith and family, Israel Smith and family, Idell, Martha and Sarah Smith, Mrs. Rosalie Major, DeAndra and Scieska Major, Mrs. Luceal Brown, Keva and Kenisha Louis, Catherine Evans, Linda and Christine Martin, Craig and Corey Burrows, Keno and Neil Johnson and Perry Darling; Special Friends: Tanya, Glendina Saunders, Janelle Wallace and Bernadette Bannister, home-boys and room-mates Sham Burrows and Leroy Saunders.  Other relatives and friends including: the graduating class of  1978, Old Bight Senior High School, Christian Bain, Monica Martin & family, Lorna Hopkins and family, Eulean and Olive Dawkins, the entire Dawkins family, the descendant of Ruben and Hilda Smith, Henry and Rosabell Rolle, the descendants of Jerome and Mildred Gilbert, Hester Gray, Nathaniel Gilbert, the descendant of Sham and Francina Burrows and the entire community of Devil's Point and McQueen's Cat Island,  The Commissioner of Police Ellison Greenslade and all his fellow officers, Supt. Kevin Rolle, Supt. Oscar Sands, Supt. Don Wilson, Supt. Samuel Butler, Supt. Ken Strachan,  Supt. Ashton Greenslade, ASP Donna Francis, ASP Julian Butler, ASP Gregory Johnson, ASP Hurvin Curtis, ASP Dennis Sturrup, ASP Stewart Curtis, ASP E. Demeritte, ASP G. Demeritte,  Sgt. 1169 Armbrister, W/Sgt. Johnson, Insp. Neeley, Insp. Thompson, Insp. Adrian Curry, Insp.  Derek Ferguson, Insp. Roosevelt Curry, Insp. Cephas Rolle, Insp. Dencil Barr, Insp. Philip Rolle, Insp. Raymond Butler, Insp. Deborah McClure, Insp. Donna Barr, Insp. Bruce Thompson, Insp. Brian Miller, Insp. Ricardo Richardson, Insp. Robinson, Insp. Maycock, Insp. Zukie Rolle, Insp. E. Ramsey, Insp. V. Wells, ASP K. Hinsey-Rolle, ASP Hinsey, Supt. David Deveaux , Staff of Southern Police Station, Staff of South Central Police Station, and  the entire staff of the K-9 Unit Royal Bahamas Police Force,  Lesley Phillips, Mama Louise, Bernise Pinder, Robert Pinder, Lloyd Deveaux, Nelson Burrows, Jackie King, the Minnis Staff of the wood work shop John Road, and the entire  John Road Community.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #34 Nassau Street on Tuesday from 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Wednesday at the Church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.

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News Article

June 16, 2011
Prince Albert Storr, 60

A funeral service for Prince Albert Storr, 60 yrs., a resident of Bethel Avenue and formerly of San Salvador, who passed away on 7th June, 2011, will be held at Evangelistic Temple, Collins Avenue and Fourth Terrace, on Saturday at 10:00 a.m. Officiating will be Rev. Dr. Gary Curry, assisted by Pastor Vaughn Cash.  Interment follows in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.
Left to mourn his passing are: His Children: Lawrance, Lorraine and Warren; Son-in-law: Raymond Tucker; Twelve Grand Children: Kristoff, Lorenzo, Jason, Kristiza, Liah, Raymond, Lashae, Laurencia, Vashanti, Zion, Faith and Akeem. Sisters: Eloise Pinder, Vernita Edgecombe, Stephanie Rolle, Beverly Dean, Portia Jones, Loretta Storr and Mae Butler. Brothers: Samuel Storr, Peter Douglas, Ernie Hendrick, Harold Gordon, Charlie, Herchell and Gregory Storr. Sisters- in-law: Delcine Douglas, Carolyn Gordon and Thelma Storr. Brothers-in-law: Walter Rolle, Ulrick Dean, Joel Pratt, Emmerson Jones and Alrick Butler off San Salvador.; Nieces: Elvoin, Martha, Samantha, Felicia, Turkessa, Tre'Kiece, Yvette, Nadia, Timinthia, Karon, Tekia, Christa, Michaela, Victoria, Kristal, Emmernique, Elrina, Chalea, Matrica, Brittany, Tara, Elma, Chalechal, Opi, Marilyn, Figi, Cindy, Barbara, Becky, Vernita, Charmaine, Charlene and Glenda; Nephews: Andrew, Sammy, Pete, Peter, Alonza, Antwaun, Chavago, Deangelo, Ryan, Marcus, Chevron, Marlon, Alvon, D'ron, Antonio, Thea, Jonathan, Anwar, Wilton, Terrance, Troy, Dario, Dwayne, Dr. Chrisin Gomez, Glen Smith, Tony Missick and Cecil Mackey.  Numerous amount of grandnieces, grandnephews, cousins, special friends and other close relatives including: Stephen, Tony, Elgin, Leo and Fred Douglas, Jennie Walker and family of San Salvador, George Lockhart and family, Tamara Taylor and family, Sybil Rolle and family, Eulease Brooks and family, Mable Arnette and family, Velma Hanna and family, Perry Johnson, Frank Lightbourne and family, Ida Saunders and family, Iron Stevens and family, Valdarine Barnett and family, Ormond & Tamara Saunders and family, Alice Bullard and family, Olive Forbes and family of Abaco, Carl and Shirley, Jean and Jamma, Edna Joseph and Family, Tony Mackey, Valentino Griffin and family, Drexel Dean and family, Sylvia Wallace and family, Sheryl Scott and family, Kizzy Stubbs and family, Tony Rolle and family, Wellington Pratt and family, Patrice Fernander & family, Basil and family, Alice Lafleur and family, Leonard sands and family, The Bain Town Community, The entire Community of Cockburn Town, San Salvador, The Bethell Ave family including: Mr & Mrs Basil Watson and family, Mrs. Alleyne and family, Chris Bain, Sean Burrows, Receo and Alex Fox, Oral Hudson, Demarco McKenzie, Mario and Jason, Jamaine, Bolo, Charles and Keith Miller, Sherese, Jasmine, Mario and Brian King, Prince Collins, Harry Nixon, Shanda Mortimer, Ron, Jermaine, and David McKenzie.
Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday, and on Saturday at the church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.
 

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