How Ardastra is putting a kestrel back in the sky

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May 22, 2019

 

IT takes roughly five minutes and some prompting for the American kestrel – a small, colourful falcon –to realise it’s free. Discovered around two weeks ago flapping on the ground, a do-gooder brought the young bird to Ardastra Gardens, Zoo & Conservation Centre believing it to be lacking the flight and survival skills that it would have been taught by its parents had it not fallen from its nest. 
“Ideally you want these birds to stay in their natural ecosystem. Not all of them are going to survive but that’s part of nature. We want to let nature do the picking and choosing as much as possible,” said Bonnie Young, Ardastra’s animal curator...

IT takes roughly five minutes and some prompting for the American kestrel – a small, colourful falcon –to realise it’s free. Discovered around two weeks ago flapping on the ground, a do-gooder brought the young bird to Ardastra Gardens, Zoo & Conservation Centre believing it to be lacking the flight and survival skills that it would have been taught by its parents had it not fallen from its nest. 

“Ideally you want these birds to stay in their natural ecosystem. Not all of them are going to survive but that’s part of nature. We want to let nature do the picking and choosing as much as possible,” said Bonnie Young, Ardastra’s animal curator...

 

Click here to read more at The Tribune

News date : 05/22/2019    Category : Animals/Pets, Tribune Stories

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