Education

Future leaders encouraged

February 26, 2017

A number of the nation's young people were reminded that they can do anything that they put their minds to, and all is not lost with their generation, by Dennis Deveaux, director of finance and strategic planning at Toyota Material Handling North America, Indianapolis, Indiana.
Deveaux rebuked the narrative that there's no hope for young males and that young females are not as smart as their male counterparts.
He spoke to more than 100 Junior Achievement Company members at a Future Leaders Seminar hosted by BTCs Junior Achievement Company. At the seminar, they addressed the topic of solving tomorrow's problems today.
Deveaux challenged the JA members to recognize that the potential that lies within them is great, and ultimately, they determine how successful they are to become in their own lives.
He reminded them that they are all bold and amazing beyond their wildest imaginations, and what they think of themselves will exceed what anybody else will think of them, in terms of their potential.
Using himself as an example, Deveaux, who is a product of JA, told the students of how he had to repeat first grade and of the seminal experience it was for him.
"I joked with them about how dumb you have to be to repeat grade one and how that was such a seminal moment in my life, at the age of six, and saying I really had to get my act together and really reset expectations for myself," he said.
With his less-than-stellar start to his education, Deveaux discouraged the Achievers from becoming obsessed about where they are from, or where they started in life. He encouraged them to recognize that there are fairly basic and important steps they can take, in spite of where they started in order to address the challenges they would face in their life.
He urged them to recognize the importance of the decisions they have to make in their 10th through 12th grade years, and how those decisions would affect them in terms of the pathway to success.
"No one really tells you that you should start to study for your SATs [Scholastic Aptitude Test] in grade 10 versus grade 11," he said. "That step alone is something that begins to put you on the pathway to success. No one portrays that in music videos, or reggae or rap culture. They don't tell you that getting your college application absolutely perfect is so important to taking that first step towards success."
Deveaux told the Achievers that they should be thinking about college preparation.
"If you're in grade 10, you need to have your pre-selection for your short list of colleges done -- and not in grade 11. If you're in grade 11, I expect that you would have already started to fill out applications, already drafted essays, and not waiting until grade 12. If you are already in grade 12 and have successfully done that, you've successfully gotten into college or successfully gotten into a technical school, that you then commit yourself to the next level of education or training beyond that. If you've already gotten into undergrad, you should be starting to prepare yourself for what graduate school would potentially look like and cost; or what you would want to do beyond your first level of technical training if that's the route you went into -- those are some of the practical things that you should be doing," he advised.
The Future Leaders Seminar was designed to get the Achievers realistically thinking about how to achieve their goals.
Deveaux, who was a JA member from 1998 to 1999, said he learned how business works in JA, and now he is in the finance and business sector.
Deveaux said that the Achievers should not understate the importance of that foundational education.
"JA really left me with the importance of making a plan," said the former Achiever.
"In those early days in JA, you have vice president of this and vice president of that, and you start out with a fairly simple plan of what you want to accomplish in that year. And at the end of that year there's accountability to your shareholders, because you have equity capital for what you've done. I took those same teachings and applied those today. And when I have things I have to get done, I have accountability -- ultimately to Toyota -- that nothing will get in my way; that I will get that done."
Deveaux encouraged the JA Company members to identify a goal and put it on what he called the critical path, and stop at nothing to get it done within the next 12 months.
"Find something outside of going to college... outside of the things that are on the ordinary course, and put that on your critical path and make sure that it happens, because that's what JA ultimately is challenging you to do, using the medium of business and the like," he said.
Deveaux, who returned home to speak at the seminar, said it was important for him to give back to Bahamian students.
"There are a ton of expats living abroad, and frankly we have our families, our work obligations and get caught up in the day-to-day, and - whether it's right or wrong - we really haven't identified a way to reinvest back into the community, so it was an awesome feeling that I was asked to do something like that, and given the opportunity to contribute, and happy I was able to participate," he said.
The seminar featured a number of speakers, including Leon Williams, CEO of BTC.
Barry Wilmott, executive advisor for BTC's JA Company, said they were encouraged by the level of participation in the seminar from the other Junior Achievement companies, and that they believe they achieved their goal of getting Achievers to realistically think about how to achieve their goals.
BTC has been a supporter of the JA program for over 30 years.

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Debutante Foundation gears up to celebrate two decades

February 26, 2017

Jennice Johnson, senior mistress at Eva Hilton Primary School, was one of 30 young ladies who enrolled in the inaugural Bahamas Debutant Foundation's program. She was also the first winner of Debutante of the Year, an accolade bestowed upon the young lady who performs at the highest level throughout the program. And now the foundation is gearing up to name its 20th debutante.
Every year, 12th grade female students with grade point averages (GPA) of 3.00 and higher, who are active in their schools and communities, are invited to participate in the program, helping young ladies make the transition from adolescence to young adulthood with poise and grace.
Developing a close relationship with family is encouraged and demonstrated in the father-daughter day and mother-daughter day, which often involve emotional tributes from the debutantes to their parents. The participants' communication skills are also honed through various essay and speech competitions.
Over six months, the young ladies attend seminars and workshops designed to inspire them, boost their self-esteem and empower them to be successful. During the program, debutantes meet weekly and are exposed to thought leaders in various sectors of society. They also pay several courtesy calls on leaders of the nation.
The foundation will commemorate its 20th milestone with a series of events culminating in the 2017 Debutante Ball on May 6 at the Melia Nassau Beach all-inclusive resort.
Two decades after being named the first debutante, Johnson said she is grateful for the experience, which she said played a pivotal role in preparing her to function in society after graduating from high school.
"I initially enrolled in the program because I heard about it from my classmates. Participation in sessions related to public speaking, etiquette and ballroom dancing, to name a few, further enhanced necessary skills that a young lady should possess. I encourage future debutantes to embrace the opportunity and take advantage of all the program has to offer."
Following her debutante experience, Johnson enrolled in a degree program at The College of The Bahamas and taught science to first and fifth grade public school students for 16 years before her promotion to senior mistress three years ago.
Growth has been the goal of The Bahamas Debutante Foundation over the years, however, the process has not been without its challenges. Attracting corporate sponsors with a desire to impact the lives of young Bahamians is the foundation's goal.
"Our greatest challenge has been consistently raising the funds needed to operate the foundation's annual program. It costs approximately $40,000 each year to operate a program like this. We have been very fortunate to have corporate sponsors like Original Patties and Mr. Rudolph Mosley who has supported us from day one to now," said Johnson. "We are extremely grateful to those who have assisted, whether it was by donating their time and talents or finances to the development of our debutantes."
Johnson said she would like to see the foundation cater to the entire female student body from kindergarten to high school. She said she would also like to expand their reach to assist in the development of young men.
"If we can develop programs that assist in the development of both boys and girls from a very young age, I think our schools and society would be a better place."
Great ideas often have humble beginnings. The recognition of a need that can be met, coupled with a desire to make a difference, has birthed many impactful organizations. Twenty years ago, a similar convergence of need and a desire to impact the nation sparked the launch of The Bahamas Debutante Foundation.
In 1996, Cristina Johnson, then a performing arts teacher at A. F. Adderley School, found herself teaching students who were just about her age.
"I was just a year older, and in some cases, even a year younger than many of my students," Johnson recalled.
That closeness in age created an environment where her students felt comfortable sharing their personal problems with her.
"I noticed that the common denominator was that both the boys and girls lacked self-esteem and a sense of self-worth," said Johnson.
She immediately began formulating a plan to assist her students to work through their self-esteem issues. Within a week she received an invitation from The Cancer Society of The Bahamas to assist with an outreach program for girls. She accepted the offer, and a year later The Bahamas Debutante Foundation was born.
Since its inception in 1997, more than 1,600 Bahamian young women have participated in The Bahamas Debutante Foundation.

DEBUTANTE OF THE YEAR WINNERS
2016 -- Ianna Cartwright, Akhepran International Academy
2015 -- Asha Johnson, St. Anne's School
2014 -- Di'shay Whyms, Anatol Rodgers
2013 -- K'mistie Andrews, St. Augustine's College
2012 -- Barrise Griffin, St. Augustine's College
2011 -- Amethyst Haeward, Queen's College
2010 -- Tyronella Ferguson, St. John's College
2009 -- Shaynora Brown, St. John's College
2008 -- Tonicka Henfield, Aquinas College
2007 -- Tiffany Donaldson, St. John's College
2006 -- Tameka Johnson, St. John's College
2005 -- Shenique Whyms, St. Augustine's College
2004 -- Kendira Beneby, Nassau Christian Academy
2003 -- Braunne Elliott, Temple Christian High School
2002 -- Janique Jones, St. Augustine's College
2001 -- Wendy Lewis, Temple Christian High School
2000 --
1999 -- Tara Thompson
1998 --
1997 -- Jennice Johnson, St. Andrew's School

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Mt. Carmel students paint a piece of hope for Valentine's Day

February 26, 2017

In response to the recent violence in the country, with the murder count at 33, art students at Mt. Carmel Preparatory Academy felt compelled to paint a piece they called "Hope".
"Our students are constantly challenged to be respectful, tolerant and to show love toward each other," said Lorraine Curry, Mt. Carmel's principal.
"In just six weeks in the New Year, there have been countless acts of violence, many resulting in death. We believe that this expression of peace is fittingly appropriate," she said.
The 10th and 11th grade students, who are instructed by artist Imogene Walkine, also visited the National Art Gallery of The Bahamas, where they took in two exhibitions -- NE8: Atilla Feszt: Fake Plastic Trees and From Columbus to Junkanoo. Both exhibitions featured a variety of Bahamian themes, including the evolution of art in the country.

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Grand Bahama Science Club to include college level students

February 26, 2017

Grand Bahama Science Club's mission is to encourage the interest of high school and college students in science, electronics and robotics, which they have done for the past 19 years through their educational programs, AIM (Academically Interested Minds) and SECME (Science, Engineering, Communications, Mathematics Enrichment), which have been operational for more than 19 years, and produced 64 engineers from Grand Bahamian schools.
And now thanks to The Rotary Club of Lucaya (RCL) and its partners, the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology; the Bahamas Society of Engineers; The University of The Bahamas; and the Grand Bahama Chamber of Commerce, the club now has a home base at the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute's (BTVI) Freeport campus.
RCL program chairman Dennis Knowles said the move to BTVI brings a new dimension and affords a central facility for the club, and allows it to involve college level students and faculty. He said that the science club is a natural extension of the AIM and SECME programs. There are currently 30 active students in the club.
"We will prepare our students so that they can fill the jobs of the future and to create the jobs of the future," said Knowles. "Our goal is to challenge hungry minds with the help of our strategic partners and to prepare our students to become an integral part of the Grand Bahama community."
BTVI President Dr. Robert W. Robertson said the science club provides high school and college students the opportunity to engage in active learning that can get them through college credits and prepare them for the complex world.
"We are excited to host the club as it aligns itself with our mission of providing learning opportunities that enable individuals to be globally competitive and economically independent," said Dr. Robertson.
Host, Rotary Club of Lucaya President Carol Rolle said the opening of the science club marked the beginning of the renaissance of Grand Bahama as the industrial capital of the country.
"Science is now in the hands of our young people, the future of our nation, and we know that they will take it to greater heights. We commend past president Dennis for his consistent efforts in bringing this vision into reality."
RCL has made an appeal to the corporate sector for continued support, so that programs can be developed for the students now and benefit them upon their return to Grand Bahama with engineering degrees, poised to work in the industry, furthering Rotary's mandate of nation-building.

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Your to do list

February 26, 2017

I guess that we can safely say that just about everyone spread throughout this great big world of ours wishes to succeed in life, bearing in mind of course, that success is different things to different people. However, the truth is that not a whole lot of people seem to make it in life. So we have to ask ourselves the obvious question, 'Why?' Why is it that only a small percentage of people worldwide seem to make it in life?
Well there are several reasons starting with the unfortunate fact that millions of young people are programmed very negatively and are thus not aware of who they are in reality -- a child of God -- and how very talented they are. Secondly, so many young kids, as a result of not realizing how great they are and the wonderful gifts they've been given by God as talent with which to succeed, are simply not motivated.
Now even those who are aware of the fact that they are very special and extremely talented still don't make it in life in many cases, simply because they've never been instructed properly in the art of succeeding in life. They've never heard about the importance of setting goals and then formulating a set of detailed plans and a definite regimen to make sure they accomplish what they've set out to do. A very important part of such a daily regimen is to have a to do list. That's right, if you wish to succeed at anything, you need to be very well organized each and every day.
Yes my friend, as you commence each and every day, I sincerely hope and pray that you make out your to do list which will outline exactly what you need to do to achieve your objectives for that particular day. This will ultimately assist you greatly to eventually achieve the goals you've set for yourself and believe me you will succeed in the end. Always remember, success is achieved one step at a time -- one day at a time.

o Think about it!
Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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Scholarship provides educational opportunities in the arts

February 26, 2017

Sonovia "Novie" Pierre is one of the many Lyford Cay Scholars who was able to jumpstart her career in the arts with the support of a Harry C. Moore Memorial Scholarship In The Arts. The Lyford Cay Foundation continues to pave the way for young Bahamian artists wanting to pursue higher education through the arts with the offering of a scholarship valued at $15,000 per year for study in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom and the Caribbean.
Examples of the fields of study that will be considered for the scholarship include visual art; graphic art; fashion; industrial and interior design; performing arts; playwriting; fiction-writing; poetry; photography; and arts education.
Applicants must be Bahamian citizens who have completed or are in the final semester of pursuing an associate degree in art at the University of The Bahamas (UB), or students who have a bachelor's degree from any university and are pursuing graduate studies internationally.
All applications must be completed and submitted online at www.lyfordcayfoundation.org. The deadline for stage one of the application is March 15 at 5 p.m.
Pierre, an A.F. Adderley High School graduate, obtained an associate's degree in music at the University of The Bahamas. Subsequently, with the aid of a Lyford Cay Foundation scholarship, she attended Florida Atlantic University and received a bachelor's degree in music education and a teacher certification. Later in her career Pierre applied for the Harry C. Moore Memorial Scholarship and was able to obtain a master's in music education from Vandercook School of Music in Chicago.
Pierre says being awarded the scholarship changed her life.
"Just being chosen as a Harry C. Moore Scholar made me look at myself differently. I was expected to be a top achiever and a top thinker. I worked hard because many persons counted on me and had faith that I could make an impact through music. It hasn't been an easy life, but it's been challenging and enjoyable," she said.
Currently, Pierre is involved professionally in music and music education in a number of ways. The former Ministry of Education, Science and Technology music teacher, now works as a senior cultural affairs officer with the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture, where her responsibilities include overseeing music and the E. Clement Bethel National Arts Festival.
Pierre also sang with the popular group Visage for 21 years and now sings with Tingum Dem Band.
Pierre believes in giving back by creating opportunities for others just as she received opportunities. She serves as a mentor with Our Carmichael, an organization developed to empower the residents of the Carmichael community, and has also volunteered on the Harry C. Moore Scholarship screening committee.
"I'm grateful for the generosity of the foundations' donors," said Pierre of the Harry C. Moore Memorial Scholarship. "I would like to think in my small way I've given a bit of myself to my students because of what has been given to me."
In 2016 Aidan Barrow was awarded the Harry C. Moore Memorial Scholarship to pursue a masters in metalsmithing and jewelry design at Savannah College of Art and Design.
Other Harry C. Moore Scholarship recipients include Averia Wright, Ohio University, 2018, sculptor; Thea Rutherford, Simon Fraser University, 2016, teacher; Jeffrey Meris, Temple University, 2015, visual artist; Gregory Curry, Berklee College of Music, 2012, musician; Dion Cunningham, Vandercook College of Music, 2011, Ph.D. candidate; Nathan Lightbourne, Vandercook College of Music, 2012, teacher and pianist; Sonovia Pierre, Vandercook College of Music, 2009, senior cultural affairs officer, Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture; Amielle Major, Vassar College, 2011, writer; Heino Schmid, Utrecht School of Art & Design, 2005, visual artist and lecturer at University of The Bahamas; and Tavares Strachan, Yale University, 2005, visual artist.

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Prime Minister Christie at the opening of The First Educational Conference

February 23, 2017

It is an honour and privilege to have been invited to speak to this illustrious body, the Bahamas Union of Teachers which is celebrating its 70th year as a Trade Union in The Bahamas. Our history records the impact of the Bahamas Union of Teachers in in the achievement of many milestones...

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LCIS Hosts Inaugural Invitational Swim Meet
LCIS Hosts Inaugural Invitational Swim Meet

February 23, 2017

Lyford Cay International School (LCIS) hosted its inaugural Invitational Swim Meet at the Betty Kelly-Kenning Aquatic Centre on Saturday 18 January 2017. 287 young athletes participated in more than 50 races that included all four competitive strokes - freestyle, backstroke, breastroke and butterfly...

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New Library and Technology Lab Opened at Sandilands Primary School

February 22, 2017

Education, Science and Technology Minister the Hon. Jerome Fitzgerald touted the success of the public-private partnership with Mission: Educate Bahamas/Aetos Holdings Limited that has resulted in the opening of a new state-of-the-art computer lab and library for Sandilands Primary School...

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Cosmetology Students Volunteer at Senior Citizen's Home

February 22, 2017

Pat’s Senior Citizens Home was a flurry of excitement recently, as residents got a beauty treat from Cosmetology students of the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI)...

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UB Progressing with Major Initiatives

February 22, 2017

Accreditation, capital works, and new academic programmes are among the major initiatives occurring at the University of The Bahamas...

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February 20, 2017

Deadline for entries to the third edition of the BAAA’s High School Relays Test Event 2017, scheduled for Saturday, 18 March and Sunday, 19th March 2017 at the Thomas A. Robinson National Stadium, is fast approaching...

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Lakia Rolle: Failure is not an option

February 19, 2017

Failure is only the direct result of not applying hard work and choosing to maximize your potential, according to Queen's College senior Lakia Rolle.
The 17-year-old was recently awarded the Paul L. Adderley Award for the best Bahamas General Certificate of Secondary Education (BGCSE) overall performance in The Commonwealth of The Bahamas in 2016; and the Carol Hanna Award for best overall performance for independent schools.
Rolle sat 12 senior national examinations as an 11th grade student. She earned 11 A grades and one C grade.
For her efforts, she also received a check, a laptop and a plaque.
"You should never give up," said Rolle. "Failure is not an option, and it only happens when you give up. You only fail when you don't try, so never give up. You have to realize that the sky is not the limit -- there are footprints on the moon," she said.
Rolle was announced as the top student of the national examinations at the 24th annual national awards presentation, held on Monday, February 13 at the William Johnson Auditorium, Church of God Convention Centre, Joe Farrington Road.
"I am so elated and overjoyed to know that all of my hard work has paid off," she said. "There has been a standard set at Queen's College where you can't help but to want to not only achieve what those that came before you have achieved, but supersede those accomplishments. I remember being as young as eighth grade, and I remember aspiring to wanting to be the top in the country. I wanted to defy the odds, so my sights were always set on being the top student," she said.
The QC student boasts a 3.75 cumulative grade point average (GPA).
With her national examinations squared away, she's focused on doing her best in the five AP courses she's enrolled in for her final year; they are psychology, human geography, English literature and composition, Spanish language and culture and calculus.
Rolle sat the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) last year and scored a 1,560. She wants to better that score this year.
"I want to better it, because I realize how competitive it is as it relates to scholarships and even being accepted into schools, and I really want to further my education."
The teen has her sights set on studying biology and international business.
"Growing up I never imagined myself doing anything else besides being a doctor. I like to serve people and feel that serving people through that means will give me the utmost joy. And as it relates to international business, I also love being a delegate for change, and using who I am to help my country, and I feel that being able to pursue that degree would afford me the opportunity to better my country," she said.
She has cast her net far and wide, applying to 10 colleges. She refused to fall victim to the problem of only applying to one or two schools and not getting into any.
"I decided early on that I wanted to keep my options open and made sure that all of the schools I applied to had a great science program, and a great business program, so that even if I decided to switch my major I would be able to transition into what would be comfortable for me," she said.
Rolle is also applying for scholarships wherever she can to ensure that she has the means to afford higher education. She credits her parents, Lionel and Marvia Rolle, for instilling excellence in education in her. When she thinks about all they've done for her, she said, she always gets emotional.
"I realize the sacrifices they've had to make to get me to where I am today. They have also instilled morals -- both Christian and civic in me that I know I will take throughout my life," said Rolle.
The academic achiever also manages to balance a heavy extracurricular activity schedule that has her involved in Junior Achievement; female empowerment club The Queen in Me; and the school's basketball and soccer teams. She is also president of the Christian Youth Movement at her church.
"I'm definitely heavily involved and busy, but for me it's all about balance, maximizing my potential and realizing that I'm only in high school for a little while, and I have to make an impact on not only myself, but the people around me."
Candis Petty, a graduate of C.R. Walker Senior School, who now attends the University of The Bahamas was the recipient of the Majorie Davis Award for best overall performance in the 2016 BGCSE examinations for government schools. She earned eight A grades, two B grades and two C grades.
Carmetta Barry, who last year was a student at H.O. Nash Junior School, was named the candidate with the overall best Bahamas Junior Certificate (BJC) results for government schools. She also received the best BJC results in The Bahamas for 2016. She received eight A grades and two B grades.
Bahamas Academy's Jodi Garcia was named the 2016 independent school candidate with the best BJC overall results. She earned eight A grades.
Luke Knowles, of Long Island's N.G.M. Major School, was the government school male candidate with overall best BJC results for 2016. He earned seven A grades and two B grades.
While individual honors were meted out at the award ceremony, a number of schools were recognized for excellent results in the BJC and BGCSE by their overall student body, including St. Augustine's College, Queen's College, H.O. Nash, Forest Heights Academy, C.H. Reeves and D.W. Davis.
As students were rewarded for excellence in national examinations, Minister of Education, Science and Technology Jerome Fitzgerald urged educators and students to remain focused to ensure that, at the end of the day, they give themselves the best opportunity to succeed.

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Tapping into future careers

February 19, 2017

Shanando Moss has always wanted to work with his hands, and appears to be on his way to fulfilling that dream as a student of the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute's (BTVI) dual enrollment program studying in the trade career path.
"I want to be an electrical engineer, so I am learning more about what I want to do in life," said Moss. "Currently, we are learning about electricity. I am using this as an opportunity, and I intend to come back in September for a year before hopefully going off to school."
Moss, 16, is one of 42 12th grade Anatol Rodgers High School students whose parents have agreed for them to be enrolled in the 15-week program.
"The class atmosphere is easy to learn in. The teacher, Mr. [David] Barry, makes a difference," he said.
The 25 females in the program are studying introduction to cosmetology, which includes topics such as hair analysis, beauty culture science and communicable diseases.
The young men in the trade career path classes are introduced to the fundamentals of several construction trades, including electrical installation, plumbing, masonry, carpentry, heating ventilation and air conditioning, welding, and painting and decorating.
During the almost four-month course, students spend Fridays, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at BTVI.
The program is designed to give high school students a jumpstart on post secondary education.
"The nature of the dual enrollment program eases them into college life, allowing them to immerse themselves and adjust to the work. It gives them a degree of independence," said Leroy Sumner BTVI's associate vice president of academic affairs.
"Even their parents are excited. And they won't have to make application for enrollment again. If we get them early enough, more and more of them may want to come to BTVI to complete their education. Since starting, other schools have started calling -- even in Andros and other Family Islands. It's a wonderful program designed to develop a pathway to assist students in learning a trade and earning a living," said Sumner.
Barr, the trade career path instructor, said the course helps students identify the trade they are most interested in pursuing for their lives.
He spoke highly of the students.
"This is a good group. They are very quiet. They are mannerly. They get right into their work and clean up afterwards. When I arrived, they were in here working," said Barry.
Antonique Sullivan, 16, says she finds cosmetology interesting, but says she is still trying to determine her passion.
"There is the possibility of me returning to BTVI to study cosmetology. This is a great opportunity. Not much people get to experience this while in school. It's interesting. I feel more responsible," said Sullivan.
Miriam Peet, 17, is absent from classes in math, Bahama Host, French, English and religious studies on Fridays, but ensures she catches up on any missed work.
"The majority of our teachers understands and gives us the work. For Bahama Host, we have extra classes. For others, we get what we will miss that Thursday or on that Monday when we return. I'm able to keep up, balancing the workload," she said.
Being able to keep up, she said, makes her feel accomplished.
Cosmetology instructor, Monique A. Marshall, said she was pleased with the students' performance.
"The girls are understanding the work. They conduct themselves very well and are interactive," said Marshall.

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Belief is everything

February 19, 2017

This article was written not long after the substantial win of the United States (U.S.) presidential election by businessman Donald Trump. Now as the whole world knows, when Donald Trump first announced his decision to run in the 2016 U.S. presidential election as a Republican, he had a whole lot of detractors, including within the Republican Party. Actually he has apparently no experience whatsoever in government and was just one out of a very large field of senators and government officials, including governors of states, etc.
Most people, including the media, didn't think he had a chance in hell as that well-known saying puts it. Of course he was mocked by people in his own party and by members of the Democratic Party. However after the primaries he emerged as the winner and then became the Republican candidate for the presidency.
Of course he still had his detractors and those who did everything to weaken his bid to become president, including an extremely biased, hostile media. So how come with so many being against him and doing their utmost to beat him, did he actually win? Well obviously he ran a great campaign, which was very effective. But my friend, the number one thing that Donald Trump had going for him, was his total belief that he would win in the end and he managed to do just that.
Yes indeed, as the title of today's article simply and succinctly puts it, belief is everything when it comes to being successful. That's right, whatever your goals in life are, you must believe implicitly in your ability to achieve them in a given time frame. As they say, to he that believes, all things are possible. Yes they are, and Donald Trump, like him or not, is living proof of this.

o Think about it!
Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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Students meet violence with HOPE

February 16, 2017

IN response to the recent flurry of violence in the country, the art students at Mt Carmel Preparatory Academy felt compelled to paint a piece entitled "Hope"...

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Good Practices in Education Celebrated

February 15, 2017

Top finishers in the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology’s (MOEST) National Education Good Practice Awards were recently honored for their achievements...

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Willard Patton Pre-School Called Upon the Governor General

February 15, 2017

Students of Willard Patton Pre-School's 4th year programme and students of the special education group called upon Her Excellency Dame Marguerite Pindling, Governor-General...

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Competition is Key to Improvement, GB Minister Tells School Basketball Players

February 14, 2017

Minister for Grand Bahama, the Hon. Dr. Michael Darville reminded a gym filled with primary school basketball players that competition is the key to improvement, academically and athletically...

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BTVI Student Secures Cooperative League Scholarship

February 14, 2017

A Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI) student has landed himself a $2,500 scholarship from The Bahamas Cooperative League...

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