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News Article

April 11, 2013

News Article

October 27, 2010
'To Sir with Love'

By BERNADETTE RAMSEY-JOHNSON

ON Friday, October 29, the Fine Arts Department of Aquinas College will stage a musical tribute "To Sir With Love" to honour the life of the late Andrew R Curry, former principal of the school.

This performance will be held at Loyola Hall beginning 7.30 pm. Advanced tickets can be purchased at the school: Adults: $10 students/children $5 and at the door $12 and $7 respectively.

Where there is no vision the people perish. We thank God that this statement does not hold true for Aquinas College. By God's grace we have been blessed with persons who were able to plant the seed of Aquinas College and nurture it into the institution it is today. Andrew C ...

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News Article

April 18, 2013
The John Beadle Project at NAGB: April 25th

 



Nassau, Bahamas - Under the Patronage of The
Honourable Dr. Daniel Johnson, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture,
you are cordially invited to the opening of The John Beadle Project

Thursday April 25th, 2013 7pm - 9pm at The National Art Gallery Of The Bahamas West & West Hill Streets...

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News Article

April 16, 2013
The John Beadle Project at NAGB: April 25th

 



Nassau, Bahamas - Under the Patronage of The
Honourable Dr. Daniel Johnson, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture,
you are cordially invited to the opening of The John Beadle Project

Thursday April 25th, 2013 7pm - 9pm at The National Art Gallery Of The Bahamas West & West Hill Streets...

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News Article

May 03, 2013
The private world of gastronomy

Name: Ron Johnson
Position: Culinary artist, Savory Art Culinary & Consultation Service
Guardian Business: Can you briefly describe your experience in the tourism sector and what your role is today?

Ron: I've been a part of the hospitality industry since the age of 16. I was an apprentice chef at the Atlantis Resort & Casino and eventually left my post for educational pursuits. However, during my tenure at the property, I've always felt a strong sense of pride and responsibility ensuring guest satisfaction, simultaneously pleasing my superiors. Whether local or international cuisine was requested, working independently or with a team, contentment was the primary goal. It should be noted that in most areas of people activity, food is involved either in overt or subtle ways.
After attaining my formal educational goals, I've currently been active as a personal/private chef for celebrities, affluent individuals and occasionally working aboard yachts (seven in total thus far), cruising to the Exuma Cays and sometimes Harbour Island, showcasing elements of island flare and other cuisines to the best of my ability. At 31, I would see myself as a culinary ambassador of sorts, particularly to those unfamiliar with tropical cuisine.

GB: Why did you choose to work in tourism as a career?

Ron: At first, the career chose me, along with my mother's stern guidance and foresight. After graduation from high school, I had no idea of what path I would take. I felt idle, without purpose and eager to make a quick buck. I enrolled at The Bahamas Hotel Training College (now called School of Hospitality Training Studies) and found myself performing fairly well, particularly out of fear and love. The fears of letting anybody think I was inadequate were intertwined with my affinity for the profession.
I eventually simmered down and found it was something that I could handle fairly well. It allowed me to be creative with my hands, only limited to what my mind could conceive. A friend told me that certain African tribes believed that your spirit/vibe was transferred into your food creations. I would hope people get an overwhelming sense of love and commitment when they taste what I create.

GB: What has been your most memorable moment?

Ron: Most experiences I've had thus far have their own merit in my life. One in particular, as Montell Williams personal chef aboard a three-week yacht trip throughout the Exuma Cays, still permeates in my memory. Although I've had the pleasure of cooking for him a few times prior to the most recent trip, we had a chance to really have in depth discussions about my future in general and I got to interact on a higher level with his family and staff; they were truly appreciative of what I fed them and the level of professionalism I maintained. Beware of getting too 'familiar' with a guest or client by the way.
Notwithstanding, they were appreciative to the point that they questioned and hesitated dining out on other yachts they got invited on or local restaurants because the precedent I set made them compare my performance; they said it was better than others. The reassuring moment came when he complimented my mother about my professionalism and gave me a hefty 'thank you' gift that made me smile from ear to ear; he personally gave me his contact information as well.

GB: Has the industry changed since you started your career? How?

Ron: Where to begin? I'm a bit at a disadvantage properly responding to this, as my personalized service isolates me to a degree. However, I converse with colleagues and make observations as well. On a side note, the common misperception is that when one sees a chef jacket of sorts, they automatically assume you are employed at a hotel. There are other atypical, unconventional places chefs work at such as stand-alone restaurants and chocolate factories, as well as in positions as personal chefs, food and beverage directors and managers of franchises and supermarkets. The industry has changed in other ways as well to my knowledge. As we are in the Information Age, access to revered techniques, recipes and ideas are easily accessible at the speed of touch and type. I'm also noticing a stronger push for utilizing native grown produce.

GB: What should The Bahamas focus on to stay competitive?

Ron: This is a hard question to answer in that a definite response does not justly address a myriad of issues one may perceive. However, I can speak to factors such as nutrition, redefining and elevating our cuisine and adapting more European culinary disciplines in our forte. Generally speaking, our food is truly tasty and satiating. Tourists from across the globe make an effort to try chowders, stews and souses, fritters, peas n' rice, Bahama Mamas and other local gastronomy. Adversely, our diet impairs our health. Finding creative ways to preserve or create new flavors with an emphasis on wellbeing for the health conscious or apprehensive tourist (or native) is barely exploited.
Lastly, for those with a high appreciation of fine dining, we can improve on presentation and modern techniques; the taste is already there.. I'd like to see a Bahamian restaurant achieve a Michelin Star or three, fully exploiting local produce. That would definitely garner attention to our country and perhaps promote more food-based tourism to a different audience.

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News Article

May 28, 2014
'Tremendous' impact anticipated from Abaco airport opening

Tourism stakeholders in Abaco were overjoyed as flights began coming into the new Marsh Harbour Airport facility yesterday, some 20 months after it was initially schedule to open.
Resort and retail operators said they expect the airport's opening to lead to a boost in air service to the island, resulting in more business all around. Ground was broken on the airport in 2011.
Percy Pinder, owner of the Sand Dollar Shoppe in Marsh Harbour, Abaco and the organizer of a petition to the prime minister last year, which called for the opening of the airport in the interests of the economy of Abaco and which garnered thousands of signatures, said he expects the airport to have a "tremendous" impact.
"Nobody believed it was going to open until it did, I was out there this morning and it's very, very nice. People are going and coming, and it seems to be going smoothly. I think now it's open you'll see a lot more flights coming in over the next year, and I think you'll see the price of tickets come down. It's going to be good for the economy of Abaco," he said.
Molly McIntosh, sales manager at the Green Turtle Cay Club, said that the boutique resort is "thrilled" to see the airport finally open.
"We can sit here and talk about how everything didn't get done how it was supposed to and go on and on, but we need to put a positive spin on things and just start to get more people here. More money will fix all of our problems."
As for whether she thinks the opening of the airport will lead to better air service into Abaco, McIntosh was a little more circumspect.
"To be honest, there has to be the demand. If the demand is there, they will come in and land at a little hut. I think the most important thing it will do is improve the first and last impression of our visitors, and I think it will also give everyone a better sense of pride and we'll come across better as a people, and that in turn will bring more people in.
"The airlines aren't going to come just because we have a pretty new building."
An employee of the Abaco Beach Resort in Marsh Harbour said the company is "really excited" about what the new airport will do for the area.
"We had outgrown the old building. A lot of times the tourists would come in and say, 'when are you going to open the airport'? A lot of the ones who come here yelling, they will be happy.
"Now it's open I think we'll have more flights coming into the island and that should boost the business of tourism."
Speaking in September 2013 at the Abaco Business Outlook conference , David Johnson, then director general of tourism, said that the introduction of the new airport would allow for upgrades to air service to the island, including direct jet flights beyond the currently limited Miami regional service provided by American Eagle.
"We are in the process of concluding negotiations with a major U.S. carrier to provide such a service," he said.
It is not clear to date exactly what led to the significant time and cost overruns on the project.
Some had suggested that part of the delay related to the fact that it became apparent that the airport would be difficult to operate profitably, due to its design, and therefore plans to bring in a private company to open and manage the airport had to be scrapped.
Instead, the government contracted with a number of professionals who formerly worked for the Nassau Airport Development Company, which built and transitioned the Lynden Pindling International Airport to operational status. These contract workers worked alongside a number of government employees in a team that has finally been able to open the facility.
Contacted yesterday for comment on how much the government anticipates spending on the operation of the new airport going forward and how many staff members will be taken on to operate the larger facility, Minister of Transport and Aviation Glenys Hanna-Martin said she would reserve comment until after Prime Minister Perry Christie speaks in the House of Assembly on the matter today.
The government announced late Monday the opening of the airport for flights yesterday.
Guardian Business understands that operations flowed smoothly for the most part during the day.

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News Article

October 01, 2011
Trial of pair accused of MP threat postponed

By LAMECH JOHNSON
ljohnson@tribunemedia.net

THE trial of two men who are alleged to have threatened the life of Bamboo Town MP Branville McCartney was postponed in Magistrate’s Court last Friday.
The matter of Mighty Spartacus Moncur, 34, and Livingstone Bullard Jr, 30, was expected to commence on Friday morning in Court Six, Parliament Street, where five witnesses including Mr McCartney were present to testify.
However, prosecutor Eucal Bonaby, appearing on behalf of lead attorney Garvin Gaskin, informed Magistrate Carolyn Vogt-Evans that the prosecution would not be able to proceed with trial and sought an adjournment of four weeks, on the instructions of Mr Gaskin.
The reason given was ...

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News Article

April 26, 2013
Two men acquitted of murder

Two men have been cleared of murder.
Frank Smith and Keno Johnson were accused of the April 26, 2007 shooting death of Delroy McKenzie.
McKenzie was shot multiple times while sitting in his car at the Esso Service Station on Wulff Road and Montrose Avenue.
However, prosecutors failed to prove the charges against the men at a trial that ended before Senior Justice Jon Isaacs this week.
Rashad Woodside was also charged in the case. However, he was murdered in January 2010 during a drive-by shooting at Plantol Street.

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News Article

May 17, 2013
The hunt for the Little Miss Bahamas crown

Thirteen young ladies will take to the stage in the next four days, and when the final curtain has been lifted, one of them will walk away with the Little Miss Bahamas title, a prize package totaling $4,000 and the opportunity to represent The Bahamas at the Little Ladies Worlds Little Miss Pageant in New Orleans, Louisiana.
Her prizes will include an iPad, a 19-inch television, scholarship for one year of foreign language study, scholarship for one year of modeling and etiquette training, photo portrait, jewelry, piece of luggage, a pizza party and a weekend stay at the Abaco All-Inclusive Luxury Bahama Beach Resorts.
Contestants compete in four age categories -- ages 5-7, Little Miss La Petite; 7-9, Our Little Miss, 10-12 Little Miss PreTeen and 12-14, Little Ideal Miss -- during the 10th annual pageant which will be held on Monday, May 20 at the Rainforest Theatre. Showtime is at 4 p.m.
Competing for titles will be Ebonique Foster, 7; Petra Kemp, 9; Angel Cleare, 11; Dashna Christian, 12; Hadassah Lockhart, 11; Martinique Storr, 12; Tatianna Tucker, 8; Tierra Turnquest, 6; Whitney Johnson, 5; Destiny Johnson, 11; Julisa Johnson, 9; Tierra Thompson, 7; Deija Albury 9; Olivia Cambridge, 5, and Malani Oliver, 10.
While only one young lady will walk away with the official title, a winner will be selected from each of the four age groups to compete at the Little Ladies Worlds Little Miss Pageant as well. They will receive a $1,200 prize package.

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News Article

November 11, 2013

News Article

November 23, 2010
The first Miss Bahamas Professional to kick off next month

They say beauty is only skin deep, but for the eight beautiful ladies who will be vying for the coveted Miss Bahamas Professional crown on Sunday, December 12, true beauty is found in the discovery of one's voice.
For the first time under the Miss Bahamas Professional banner this former Toastmasters Club 3596 speech pageant will be kicking off in grand style with its contestants Brooke Sherman, Tamar Moss, Ana-Alicia Burrows, Peggy Wilson, Tiffany Johnson, Bennique Brown, Johanne Joseph and K. Marie Kerr. The contestants, all professional women from different spheres of society, have gone through months of rigorous training and workshops to prepare them to be the first ever Miss Bahamas Profess ...

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News Article

September 11, 2010
Teams push for playoff spots

By KELSIE JOHNSON
NG Sports Reporter
kelsie@nasguard.com
With two weeks of play remaining in the regular season of the New Providence Softball Association(NPSA), teams are now making their last minute cases for playoff spots and positioning. The jostling continues on the men's side as three teams separate themselves, contending for the pennant, leaving two squads fighting for the fourth playoff spot.
One of the three squads hoping to snag the pennant is the defending champions, the Commando Security Truckers, but the Dorin United Hitmen and the Y-II Shipping New Breed team are not going to give up in the chase that easily. League commissioner Tommy Stubbs believes that it is going to be"a ...

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News Article

May 07, 2014
Third annual Andros Business Outlook set for May 15

Prime Minister Perry Christie will deliver the keynote address at the Third Annual Andros Business Outlook, which is scheduled to take place Tuesday, May 15.
The theme of the forum will be, "Charting a Course for Growth in Andros for 2014", in line with the focus of this year's business outlook on economic growth and development.
"We have been fortunate to secure the participation of Prime Minister Perry Christie to present the keynote address. He has been kind enough to present on the central theme of economic growth and development at the three business outlooks which have taken place so far this year. We have been further favored that the Minister of Agriculture, Marine Resources and Local Government V. Alfred Gray has agreed to give welcome remarks and introduce Mr. Christie," said Joan Albury, president, TCL Group, which organizes the business outlook series.
"In these symposia, insight into the government's thinking, plans and provisions regarding the development of the host community is essential. We are confident that this ministerial combination will provide enough access to stimulate valuable dialogue," she added.
"Appropriately, two people closely connected with Andros development will open the forum. I'm confident in saying that the presentations that fill the day will be dynamic and highly relevant to the Andros context, which means that they will be supremely relevant to the national development context."
She continued, "We have been successful in securing a generally distinguished slate of speakers. We are especially pleased in having Dr. Omer Thomas, who has distinguished himself internationally in a number of high profile posts in the field of food production, including agro-industrial development."
The Third Annual Andros Business Outlook will take place at Love at First Sight Hotel and Restaurant in Stafford Creek, Andros.
A preview of the agenda of the Andros Business Outlook shows that there will be a heavy concentration on agriculture, marine resources, forestry and finance.
The agriculture panel slated for the event will be comprised of individuals who are highly regarded in their specializations. These include Dr. Omer S. Lloyd Thomas, who has more than 32 years of experience in the planning, organization and management of agricultural research and development; Dr. Selima Campbell Hauber, a horticulturalist who has specialized in plant propagation through tissue culture and has won recognition for her skills in this field, and Bishop Caleb Evans of the Church of God of Prophecy, North Andros, a former member of the National Advisory Council for Agriculture.
Christopher Russell, director of forestry in the Ministry of the Environment, will bring to light the economic value of the extensive forests of Andros in a presentation entitled "Small Business Opportunities in the Forestry Sector for Andros". Russell has been intimately involved in the establishment of pilot forestry programs in Abaco and Andros. Also speaking is Lionel Johnson, dean of the Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences at The College of The Bahamas, who is noted for his commitment to the sustainability of The Bahamas' natural patrimony.
The afternoon session will be moderated by Veronica Owens, president of the North Andros Chamber of Commerce. A member of Parliament between 2002 and 2007, Owens has been significantly involved in cultural development in Andros. As the director of the Andros Cultural Heritage Trail, Owens requested technical assistance from the Florida Association for Volunteer Action in the Caribbean and the Americas (FAVACA) to raise awareness of the historical significance of Andros, especially as regards Black Seminole settlement.
Owens will give an update from the North Andros Chamber of Commerce and introduce speaker Peter Douglas, manager of the Ministry of Tourism, Andros, whose topic is simply entitled "My Andros".
Peter Douglas, executive director of the Andros Conservancy and Trust (ANCAT), is recognized for his extensive involvement in the economic development of Andros and the protection of its natural heritage. The marine panel at the event will be comprised of a group of professionals recognized for their dedication to the promotion and protection of the marine bounty of the Bahamian archipelago: Dr. Vallierre Deleveaux, Prescott Smith and Eleanor Phillips.
Dr. Deleveaux, a marine biologist, currently serves as the director of marine science at the Bahamas Agriculture and Marine Science Institute. Phillips, program director of the North Caribbean Program at The Nature Conservancy, has extensive knowledge of and involvement with the marine protected area (MPA) program of The Bahamas and her efforts have contributed much to the drive to establish MPAs. Smith is president of the Bahamas Sportfishing Conservation Association, which is dedicated to the protection and preservation of the natural resources of The Bahamas.
The final hour of Third Annual Andros Business Outlook will be dedicated to the finance panel, led by Michael Cunningham, who chairs Bahamas Entrepreneurial Venture Fund Ltd., which represents the government's major thrust in stimulating the growth of small and medium-sized businesses.

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News Article

June 24, 2013

News Article

September 12, 2014
The United States and the Ferguson saga

Beware the ides of August, the ghost month, according to the Chinese, is prone to fatalities. Julius Cesar may have popularized the term of the ides of March since he was assassinated in that month in spite of the warning to avoid Rome at that time. My own empirical observation has indicated that the month of August has its load of bad omens that one should be careful about.
To start with, the tropical hurricanes with their sexy female names and their devastating consequences arrive usually in August. I remember several airplane disasters that fell in August. To name two: the Japan airline flight 123, and the Saudi flight 163. Is it the effect of the hottest time of the year that social upheavals tend to pierce the ordinary daily lot of up and down to erupt and change the canvas of a city or a nation?
Case in point, on August 18, 2014, a young black man, age, 19, named Michael Brown, was shot dead by a white policeman named Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Missouri. Commotion arose immediately in the city, followed by outrage in the nation and concern all over the world. United States President Barack Obama dispatched his attorney general, Eric Holder, himself a black man, to attempt to calm spirits. It was refueled by comments, visits and speeches by some black activists, like Al Sharpton, who may have added more fire to the tumult.
Ferguson entered into the hall of infamous cities like Selma, Watts, East St Louis, where social upheaval has stamped the town putting in circulation the issue that black integration is still a work in progress. It started one-and-a-half centuries ago, when Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States, made a bold decision to go to war with the southern states, which were bent on maintaining slavery and its social heritage as an accoutrement of the fabric of the society.
Relying less on cotton as an export commodity, the north realized that slavery was not advantageous for building a vibrant economy. It accompanied President Lincoln in pursuing a policy of engaging the United States to pursue war in order to build a land united from sea to sea.
Soon after victory, Abraham Lincoln was assassinated, deferring the dream of a United States where the color of the skin would not determine the way one is treated before court and on the street. The black population suffered the Jim Crow laws that perpetuated slavery without the name. Some 100 years later, in 1964, Dr. Martin Luther King, with the strategic support of President Lyndon Johnson, rekindled the flame of equality for all.
Several laws were passed to promote the concept so cherished in my essays, to wit the Renan doctrine that a nation-state will agree to push forward those who are left behind. Dr. Martin Luther King's assassination and the demise of President Johnson due to the imbroglio of the Vietnam War put a brake on the flurry of initiatives to render whole the determination that the black citizen will no longer be a second class citizen.
Ferguson is the latest saga of a population tired of the discrepancy between what the United States professes and what it practices. In spite of the fact that a black American in the person of Barack Obama is now occupying the highest honor of leading the United States, the fate of the ordinary black person is still in the hands of the more often white police officer with discretionary authority to inflict harm.
The facts are still murky. Did the white officer Darren Wilson shoot Michael Brown in legitimate defense or did he overreact? A court of law, after reviewing all the facts, will make that decision.
The Ferguson saga
Will there be more Ferguson-like incidents in the future, prompting more social upheavals in the United States? The answer is a qualified yes. Race relations in America since the Moynihan report of 1965 have not been au beau fixe. The commitment to national action has been timid with the exception of the Lyndon Johnson initiatives.
If the United States has not succeeded in integrating its 40 million blacks and other minorities after 50 years of the civil rights agenda, China at the same time has succeeded in ushering some 800 million Chinese citizens from existing in extreme poverty to the bliss of middle class status.
We are going back to the concept promoted so often in this column, whether the entire population will agree to move forward the segment of the nation that is left behind. Lyndon Johnson, a Democrat from the South, could easily rally the troops of the conservative sector to convince them it was in their interest to bring the black population forward.
President Richard Nixon, a Republican, albeit close to impeachment and resignation, was the closest one to Lyndon Johnson in pursuing an aggressive policy of helping the black citizen to feel he is welcome and useful in America.
In conclusion, the end of tumultuous reactions like Ferguson will depend on whether a southern Democrat or a northern Republican gains the seat of power after President Barack Obama and can rally their base and convince America that the 40 million blacks and minorities need not revolt to achieve full emancipation. I have not seen any such candidate on the horizon.
o Jean H. Charles, LLB MSW, JD, is a syndicated columnist with Caribbean News Now. He can be reached at: jeancharles@aol.com and followed at Caribbeannewsnow/Haiti. This is published with the permission of Caribbean News Now.

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News Article

November 06, 2013

News Article

September 15, 2011
TRAINEES EARN THEIR 'STRIPES'

Bahamas Striping, the company founded from a $5,000 Self Starter grant, has completed its first car park striping training stage for four of its seven staff.

The four yesterday applied their new skills in striping the car park at the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre.

The four, Tristan Johnson (22 years old), Romell Davis (18 years old), Patrick Smith (20 years old), and Darvin Brown (19 years old) have learnt how to clean surfaces, measure, lay out and striping.

Atario Mitchell, president of Bahamas Striping, said: "One of my staff had a criminal record for drug possession. During our interview he broke down and begged me to give him a try. He said: 'How can I get my life together an ...

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Movie
The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3
  • Genre : Crime, Drama, Thriller
  • Rating : C - 18yrs and Older

Armed men hijack a New York City subway train, holding the passengers hostage in return for a ransom, and turning an ordinary day's work for dispatcher Walter Garbe into a face-off with the mastermind behind the crime. ...


News Article

February 20, 2014
Tabby survives scare from Doris Johnson

The consensus number one ranked team in the country got more than they bargained for yesterday, from the public school based Doris Johnson Mystic Marlins.
The Tabernacle Baptist Falcons only trailed at one point in the game, but somehow, they could never pull away from the pesky Marlins, as the 32nd Annual Hugh Campbell Basketball Classic moved into day three at the A.F. Adderley Gymnasium.
In the end, the Falcons prevailed 52-44, but it certainly didn't come easy.
Falcons' Head Coach Norris Bain didn't mince words at all, when describing the play of his top tier team.
"I think that is the worst demonstration of basketball that I have seen from us this year," said Bain yesterday. "When you have kids running up and down the court and you're not getting in the way and forcing them to hit jump shots, it's kind of disappointing. Even with the charges, we were horrible with taking charges. I think the kids got caught up in the moment. We have to go and fix that because it just doesn't look good. It was a win, but I wasn't happy with it at all."
Bain and the Falcons just arrived in the capital early Wednesday morning, and the well-established local coach said that might have aided in their "lackluster play". The six-time Hugh Campbell Champions will be off today, and will play the C.R. Walker Knights in their next game tomorrow afternoon. Bain feels that they will have to play much better against a Trevor Grant led team, that has traditionally been known to cause problems. Also, it is very likely that they will meet up with Doris Johnson again.
"Today, there were times when we played goods in spurts, and then all of a sudden we would do something totally out of character," said Bain. "From what I see, Doris Johnson is very athletic. They like to drive the ball, but I want to force them to hit jump shots. I believe that we are going to see them again, so we definitely have to fix our defense. Hopefully, by the next game, we'll get that fixed."
The Falcons were paced by Raheem Laing and Robert Joseph yesterday, both with 13 points. Rashad Russell added 10.
The Marlins got a game-high 14 points from Brandon Stubbs. Shanton Pratt contributed 12. They were right in the game, until the Falcons executed a 7-0 scoring run late, to pull away.
"I think that we lost focus a bit coming down to the end, but that happens sometimes. Next game, we'll pick it up," said Marlins' Head Coach Demykco Bowles. "We just have to take it one game at a time, and hope for the best. Overall, we played solid, but there were a few lapses that we had on defence. It was just a matter of miscommunication, and that allowed them to go on a lil run in the fourth and put the game away.
"I feel pretty confident with this team," added Bowles. "I think that once we stick to the basics, especially on the defensive side, then we'll be right there in the end. It's very likely that we'll meet Tabernacle again, and by then, we'll be ready for them."
The Falcons got the lead up to double digits a couple times yesterday, but the Marlins stayed within striking distance. They got off to a slow start, trailing 15-5 after the first quarter, but were down by just six, 24-18, at the break. The Marlins got even closer, 36-32, after three quarters, and really applied the pressure in the fourth, but the Falcons regained their composure late and executed down the stretch.
"With this tournament, on any given day, anybody could come out here and win, so we just need to come out and give it our best shot. Once we do that, we'll stand a chance," said Marlins' coach Bowles.
After winning their first game on Monday, the Marlins will now go into the loser's bracket and play an elimination contest on Friday morning. They could very well meet the Falcons again in the pool championship, on Saturday evening.
"Doris Johnson is a very explosive team," said Bain yesterday. "I didn't sleep well last night because I was very concerned about this game. When you haven't lost a game in The Bahamas all year, and then went to Tennessee and played so well, I was very concerned that our heads would be inflated.
"Also, traveling 6 a.m. this morning - I felt that combination of things was going to cause problems for us, and I was right. Hopefully with a day's rest, we will get it together."
Bain and the Falcons have lost one game to a local team this year, and a number of local analysts have them ranked as the top high school basketball team in the country.
Bain said that he isn't paying any attention to rankings though. His main focus is to have his team ranked as number one after the championship game on Monday night.
The Hugh Campbell championship game is set to start at 8 p.m. on Monday, and will be held at the Kendal G.L. Isaacs National Gymnasium.

Tuesday's late results
10 - R.M. Bailey 60, Anatol Rodgers 45
11 - Agape Christian 45, St. John's College 25
12 - C.I. Gibson 58, Queen's College 47

Wednesday's results
13 - St. George's 55, Central Eleuthera 29
14 - Tabernacle Baptist 52, Doris Johnson 44
15 - Abaco Central 57, Clement Howell 35
16 - Sunland Baptist 62, Harbour Island 30
17 - Eight Mile Rock 53, Blazer Elite 39
18 - C.C. Sweeting 62, Jack Hayward 38
19 - C.R. Walker 45, North Andros 34
9 p.m. C.V. Bethel vs. South Andros (20) - late

Thursday's games
12 p.m. Aquinas College vs. Westminster (21)
1 p.m. Noble Preparatory vs. St. George's (22)
2 p.m. Acklins vs. Bishop Michael Eldon (23)
3 p.m. Clement Howell vs. Blazer Elite (24)
4 p.m. St. John's College vs. Harbour Island (25)

BREAK
5 p.m. Kingsway Academy vs. North Andros (26)
6 p.m. C.W. Saunders vs. Central Eleuthera (27)
7 p.m. Abaco Central vs. Eight Mile Rock (28)
8 p.m. Temple Christian vs. Loser Game 22 (29)
9 p.m. Anatol Rodgers vs. Winner Game 24 (30)

Friday's games
9 a.m. Agape Christian vs. Sunland Baptist (31)
10 a.m. Jack Hayward vs. Winner Game 27 (32)
11 a.m. Doris Johnson vs. Winner Game 23 (33)
12 p.m. Loser Game 28 vs. Winner Game 20 (34)

BREAK
2 p.m. Queen's College vs. Winner Game 25 (35)
3 p.m. C.C. Sweeting vs. Winner Game 22 (36)
4 p.m. Tabernacle Baptist vs. C.R. Walker (37)
5 p.m. R.M. Bailey vs. Winner Game 28 (38)

BREAK
7 p.m. Loser Game 31 vs. Winner Game 21 (39)
8 p.m. Winner Game 32 vs. Winner Game 29 (40)
9 p.m. Winner Game 33 vs. Winner Game 26 (41)

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News Article

January 05, 2011
Two facing attempted murder charges

Police have filed attempted murder charges against two young men in connection with last week’s drive-by shooting of Gerald Bethel.
Troy Johnson Jr, 19, of Finlayson Street, who police shot during his arrest, and Winston Lindsay, 19, of Pratt Alley, appeared before Deputy Chief Magistrate Carolita Bethell on Tuesday in connection with Bethel’s shooting and other related charges.
The men are accused of seriously wounding Bethel, an alleged drug dealer, at Augusta Street on December 28. Bethel, nicknamed Yellow, is on bail on drug possession with intent to supply.
Following Bethel’s shooting, police said they saw three suspects running from a blue 1995 Nissan Pathfinder at ...

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