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News Article

February 16, 2013
Team Bahamas strengthens with Freeport players

The Bahamas is expected to field a stronger team when the Freeport players are added to the mix this weekend.
Playing in their second try, the U19 select youth rugby squad will go up against the Canadian team, Joan of Arc, at 2 p.m. Saturday, at the Winton Rugby Field. This is the first match-up for the national select squad, which started training late last year. According to Elystan Miles, director in the Bahamas Rugby Football Union (BRFU), the team still has a lot of work to do. Miles also noted that the friendly games are being used as an evaluation for the local coaches.
Miles said: "This is the first time many of them are actually playing organized rugby, more of a tournament style play. To be honest, the team here just started training several months back and you can see them making progress. We aren't putting any pressure on them; we are quite aware of their strengthens and weaknesses. All we need to do is see how they perform and take it from there.
"The team coming in from Canada is a strong one, but the players from Freeport are also strong so we are expecting a better game tomorrow. Over in Freeport, they have a strong youth rugby program. Here in Nassau, we are just trying to build our program. So we have gone into the schools. Those players who are coming out, you can see improvements but more work is needed."
The BRFU recently launched their high school program, using it as a feeder system for national teams. So far, several schools are playing rugby, including C.R. Walker Senior High, Doris Johnson Senior High, Queen's College and St. Augustine's College.
Training for persons in the program will continue, with the hopes of several of the players being named to the national U19 team that will take part in a regional tournament in July. That tournament will be played in Trinidad and Tobago. A local Youth Sevens tournament is scheduled in the upcoming weeks. That will be used as preparation for the regional event.
The national men's squad will play in the North America Caribbean Rugby Association (NACRA) tournament starting April 13.

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News Article

March 11, 2013

News Article

February 16, 2013
The Annual Heart Ball ! Embrace the Opportunity!

Nassau, Bahamas -

It's an
opportunity to get dressed up to the ninth, look your best, walk the fashion
run way and the dance the night away. It's an opportunity to win lots of
wonderful prizes, bid on pieces that are not ordinarily affordable, and have
funs with family and friends. It's an
opportunity to save a little heart while enjoying the company of that special
someone in your life. It's the Annual
Heart Ball.

Under the
theme, "Save a Little Heart.... Embrace the Opportunity", The Heart Ball
Committee will host The Annual Heart Ball.
This event will be held on Saturday, February 16, 2013 at Sheraton
Nassau Beach Resort. As guests enter the door to the reception are they will be
kissed by an angelic floral and fauna décor. The meal will be prepared by
Cacique Award winner, Chef Johnson...

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News Article

February 20, 2013
Talisker pulls plug in Exuma

A high seven-figure deal for February Point in Exuma has fallen apart after a due diligence period, Guardian Business can confirm.
Talisker, a Toronto-based firm that owns and operates several high-end retreats in North America, came to preliminary terms with the principals of February Point back in January. At the time, owner of the property Randy Hart said Talisker would lead the island's "renaissance" through its global reputation and diverse, high-end clientele.
However, Jackie Johnson, a representative from Talisker, told Guardian Business yesterday that the deal is off the table.
"The deal is not happening," she said. "Talisker is not buying the property in Exuma. This is a final decision."
Jackson would not elaborate on exactly why the deal has fallen apart, citing that negotiations have been sensitive on both sides. According to sources familiar with the matter, there were many "moving parts and wrinkles" to the acquisition.
The news will likely come as a big disappointment to stakeholders on Exuma.
Khaalis Rolle, the minister of state for investments, previously hailed the initial agreement as an important development for the island. He said that Talisker holds "tremendous potential" given their resources, reach and history of success.
"So we're looking forward to completing this process and we'll do whatever is needed to facilitate it," he added.
The botched deal also takes away what would have been a hefty stamp duty for the public treasury.
Judy Herlock, a leading realtor on the island, expressed disappointment that the deal went sour.
"That's a pity. They were the most likely option to take over the property," she told Guardian Business. "We seem to go two steps forward and four steps backwards here on Exuma."
Herlock and others in the property business were intrigued with the possible introduction of Talisker, in the sense that the company could have driven up land values and brought new money to the destination. The Toronto-based firm was apparently seeking to invest considerably in the property by boosting its existing offerings and building new homes and amenities.
Herlock said that "there is nothing to get terribly excited about" on the island right now in terms of property sales. She said that more infrastructure is needed to justify the high prices for homes and vacant land.
That said, sources close to the matter said that February Point could still get scooped up by a foreign investor. John McGarvey, new owner of the Coconut Cove Hotel, is thought to be the second major suitor for the oceanfront property.
He is also the investor behind a proposed resort on Stocking Island and a concrete factory on land across from February Point.
Exuma currently benefits from a duty exemption on raw materials for construction, as instituted by the Progressive Liberal Party when it came into power last May.

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News Article

March 11, 2013

News Article

April 18, 2013
The John Beadle Project at NAGB: April 25th

 



Nassau, Bahamas - Under the Patronage of The
Honourable Dr. Daniel Johnson, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture,
you are cordially invited to the opening of The John Beadle Project

Thursday April 25th, 2013 7pm - 9pm at The National Art Gallery Of The Bahamas West & West Hill Streets...

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News Article

April 11, 2013

News Article

March 01, 2013
Thomas A. Robinson National Stadium listed as a Class 2 by IAAF

The international governing body for track and field has listed the Thomas A Robinson National Stadium as a Class 2 facility.
The 15,000-seat facility that has an estimated cost of $30 million was certified last week by the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF). According to the Certified Athletics Facilities list, posted on the IAAF's website, The Bahamas is among 416 countries in the world with the Class 2 certification. Only 97 facilities in the world are considered Class 1 by the IAAF; Jamaica's and Trinidad and Tobago's facilities are slated in the top list.
Other major Class 1 stadiums from around the world including the National Stadium in China, London Olympic Stadium, and the Estadio Olimpico Joao Havelange stadium, the home of the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The Certified Athletics Facilities list was last updated by the IAAF on Friday, March 1, 2013.
Beynon Sports Company, Quli Group of Companies and representatives from the IAAF assisted The Bahamas government with getting the certification.
"Today I am pleased to inform you that this stadium - with the seating capacity of 15,000 seats, a running track that meets IAAF certification requirements - the national stadium is ready to receive our guests," said Dr. Daniel Johnson, minister of youth, sports and culture. "Adjourning this stadium is a full service track and field facility, our first Thomas A. Robinson stadium that has been fully refurbished and has now been certified, and is ready just for striping. These games will be like none other like you've seen before. There is no facility in this region that boasts this compliment of facilities, none. One can be used as a warm-up track, ... for small games, ... for training, winter training and other events. It is important to note also that three technical teams have assessed our new renovated facilities. Three technical teams of the highest order have for the past month been working to fully assess these facilities, and today they have confirmed that they are indeed world class events, and world class standards."
The stadium is the home for the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations (BAAA) and the Bahamas Football Association (BFA). It was officially opened on February 25, 2012.
The facility is a gift to The Bahamas from the People's Republic of China.
The facility's infield will be inspected by the International Federation of Association Football (FIFA). It is currently being raised to a level that meets FIFA's standards.

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News Article

March 28, 2013
Tottenham targets annual match

Sports tourism officials want to make the upcoming Tottenham Hotspur match an annual attraction, hoping it could inject new money into the country.
Joe Lewis, the British billionaire, has developed greater synergies with the Ministry of Tourism to bring his football club to Nassau.
Lewis, with an estimated wealth of $4.2 billion, is the main investor in Travistock Group and spends much of his time in Lyford Cay. He is also a key investor at Albany. This elite community in western New Providence is anticipating a possible boom in sales from athletes, fans and other well-known personalities.
David Johnson, the director general at the Ministry of Tourism, recently took part in a press conference in Orlando with Albany executives and government officials. The Ministry of Tourism received live television converge to promote the upcoming Tottenham match and The Bahamas as a destination.
"They want to sell the stars homes in Albany. But it will extend to include The Bahamas brand," he told Guardian Business. "Many of these players also have a strong fan base, many of which are affluent and will travel. And third, exposure always helps when you have the rich and famous visiting and living here."
The match against the Jamaican National Team will take place at the new $30 million Thomas A. Robinson National Stadium on May 23.
Tyrone Sawyer, director of sports tourism development, confirmed to Guardian Business that the intent is to make the Tottenham visit an annual event.
He noted that there has been very little marketing and lead up time for this inaugural installment. Once it is running on an annual basis, The Bahamas will see greater participation and synergies.
"We are not just doing it as a one off, but as a regular part of our sports tourism calendar. Once it is a regular event, we can promote it and then you're really talking about the full benefits if sports tourism," he explained.
Meanwhile, the players arriving in The Bahamas next month are already part of the "overarching and unspoken economic impact" of such an event.
Sawyer told Guardian Business that developing partnerships with the many high-networth individuals living and working in The Bahamas, such as Lewis, is a key strategy going forward at the Ministry of Tourism.
Thomas A. Robinson National Stadium will have its first real test this coming weekend with the CARIFTA Games kicking off. Sawyer said the event has generated around 2,000 room nights and a noticeable economic shot in the arm for Nassau.
By the end of this fiscal year, sports tourism should be responsible or 20,000 room nights and around $14 million in expenditure.

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News Article

March 20, 2014
The PLP's abandonment and betrayal of Bahamian women

The depth of sexism and misogyny in the political party bearing the names progressive and liberal has reached another historic low point, perhaps a nadir, in the Progressive Liberal Party.
It follows in a succession of betrayals by the party which helped to usher in majority rule because of the votes of women, whom the PLP largely abandoned over ensuing decades. And still, under the Christie administration.
Tall Pines MP Leslie Miller's repulsive story of battering a woman, accompanied by complicit laughter from male PLP colleagues was shocking enough. The narrative has advanced well beyond Miller's brutish words.
The unfolding chapter is the PLP's cold silence in the face of Miller's misogyny, mainly that of the prime minister but also the women of the PLP who seem cowered into silence by the men of the party, somewhat mirroring the frightened silence of some women following the infliction of physical and/or emotional violence.
Miller's behavior also mirrors a pattern typical of domestic violence as he arrogantly paraded around gloating about how much he loves and has done for Bahamian women, even though he was clueless as to the extent of domestic violence, clueless as to how his post-battering claims conduct typifies the cycle of domestic violence.
This includes his grandstanding and chest-thumping of what he has done for certain women, generosity that a gentleman should keep to himself, as well as his "grand" gesture of offering the pittance of $1,000 to the Crisis Centre, which the organization rightly rejected.
South Andros MP Picewell Forbes decided that he too wanted to be a poster boy for misogyny and sexism.
Forbes refused to apologize for laughing at Miller's story because others had laughed too, an adolescent mentality that refuses to accept responsibility for one's behavior, an odious example of boys will be boys.
Forbes doubled down on his idiocy: "We are living in a world of political correctness. Everyone's so sensitive. Things you could have gotten away with saying in a certain way five years ago can't be done now."
Translation: Please, please let me continue to laugh about women being beaten mercilessly. Heard any good jokes lately about beating up gays and lesbians, the disabled or Haitians that we can laugh about in the House?
Disturbing
Still, it is the silence of the PLP women that is more disturbing in significant ways, more puzzling, depressingly heartbreaking.
The message of the PLP women in the House and in the Cabinet to young girls and women is: In the face of brutality and bigotry, keep your mouth shut if you want to continue to enjoy the favor of men.
And silence still by Prime Minister Perry Christie who found time to defend the indefensible with his VAT coordinator but who is utterly failing to defend the integrity and interests of Bahamian women in this episode.
It is Christie's standard non-response to ride out bad news by remaining silent. But, the septuagenarian leader is making a grave error as the Miller firestorm is proving cancerous to the PLP.
The misogyny in the PLP is so deep-seated that the party's leaders refuse still to rebuke Miller even though it is clearly in their political interest to do so. The longer they remain silent, the worse the damage.
A friend who owns a retail store offered the story of a 20-something female sales assistant, disposed towards the PLP, who simply doesn't understand the party's silence. She gets it. The men in the PLP mostly do not.
In their studied silence Christie and the PLP are transmitting to young and female voters, who constitute the two largest demographic and electoral groups, messages about the party's disregard for women, about tolerance for domestic violence, about women as second-class citizens, about the PLP's collapse as a progressive and liberal force.
The prime minister's mindset about women was on display in his bizarre comments last year about being a gladiator, code language for a certain machismo. His actions and inaction are even more egregious.
Like so many men, Christie simply doesn't get it, seemingly betting that Miller's comments constitute a light rain, instead of the strong category of hurricane that they are, expanding still.
In this storm Christie seems like a climate change denier refusing to acknowledge the severity of the problem.
To understand the scale of the misogyny and sexism it may be useful to reframe the issue and to highlight the PLP's history of neglect.
Imagine
Imagine if Leslie Miller had advised the House of his viciously beating a dog in an act of animal cruelty. The PLP's likely response: Outrage.
Imagine Miller talking about brutalizing a disabled person. The PLP's likely response: Outrage.
Imagine Miller talking about brutalizing a tourist. The PLP's likely response: Outrage.
Recall Miller's claim of brutalizing a woman: "I tell her I get tired, man. My hands hurting a little bit... give me a break." The PLP's actual response, silence, i.e., following the laughter.
Imagine if an MP of the racist Old Guard had stood in the House and boasted about beating black people.
The PLP would have rightly unleashed fury upon his head.
Depressingly, sickeningly, in a betrayal of the suffragettes, in a betrayal of Dame Dr. Doris Johnson, who was not allowed to present her petition for female enfranchisement in the House chamber, in a betrayal of generations of women, past, present and yet to be born, the PLP has remained silent in the face of Miller's vulgar misogyny.
In the U.S. and the U.K., had a Democratic congressperson or a Tory MP boasted about battering a black person or a woman, President Barack Obama and Prime Minister David Cameron respectively would have expressed outrage as would the party colleagues of the batterer.
For his part, Christie, who mounted the steps of the Lincoln Memorial last year to speak of civil rights and who recently accepted a civil rights award, has remained silent in the face of Miller's cruel words.
It is one thing to mouth the words of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. It is an entirely different matter to actually be a drum major for justice and equality for women. Sadly, Christie's abysmal record is consistent with that of the PLP, where the narrative of betrayal and abandonment stretches decades.
Distrust
There was always mutual distrust between the suffragettes and the PLP. In the light of history the suffragettes were largely correct in their suspicion of the commitment of certain elements of the PLP when it came to advancing women's equality.
Gender equality is as much a civil rights issue as is racial equality. Yet the PLP so often told Bahamian women, to hell with you.
Except for the brief period Dame Doris served in an early Cabinet of Sir Lynden Pindling, not a single other woman sat in the Cabinet of The Bahamas during the PLP's initial quarter of a century rule, not a single one. Hubert Ingraham's first Cabinet boasted several women.
From the inception of the PLP in 1953, and most certainly from the 1956 general election until 1987 - over 31 years - a Bahamian woman was never afforded a safe or winnable seat for the House of Assembly by the party. It was not until 1982 that the FNM, while in opposition, shattered this glass ceiling, successfully running Janet Bostwick.
At the Constitutional Conference in London in 1972 the PLP rejected the FNM's proposal to give Bahamian women full equality with men in certain matters relating to citizenship. During the 25-year reign of Sir Lynden's PLP, full constitutional equality for women was never addressed.
In 2002, given a chance to correct a historic wrong, Christie's PLP turned its back on Bahamian women. Having voted for constitutional equality in the House, the once progressive and liberal party reversed course in one of the grossest acts of political expediency in Bahamian political history.
The pattern of neglect was repeated from 2002 to 2007, Christie failing in a "second chance" to ensure full constitutional equality for women as promised.
History will record that the first referendum proposed by Christie was one of a commercial rather than constitutional nature; a plebiscite designed to guarantee windfall profits for special interests rather than the broader interests of Bahamian women.
Today, still under the PLP, the interests of a few numbers men seem more urgent than the rights, needs and protection of tens of thousands of Bahamian women.
When asked if the failure of the 2002 referendum hurt Bahamian women, Christie, in one of the most shameful and sexist statements ever made by a Bahamian politician, dismissively, insultingly, and insensitively said no.
Today, Christie and the PLP are play-acting as great champions of women's rights after years of entrenched sexism and a failure to remove discrimination, after helping to scuttle legislation on marital rape, after silence in the face of a claim of brutality against a woman by one of its MPs.
Even Leslie Miller begrudgingly half-apologized for his comments. Sadly, Christie and the PLP apparently lack the sense of justice and empathy to go further.
Next week: The FNM's record on women's equality:
o frontporchguardian@gmail.com, www.bahamapundit.com.

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News Article

September 11, 2011
TRUCKERS SEAL DRAMATIC 16-13 VICTORY OVER NEW BREED

By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IT took the Island Luck Truckers two extra innings to avoid another major defeat as they got a grand slam home run from Jamal 'Sarge' Johnson in the top of the ninth inning.

The performance that came in the wee hours of Sunday morning helped to seal a dramatic 16-13 win over New Breed as the battle for the New Providence Softball Association men's pennant and playoff picture intensified.

Two days after losing a 9-8 walk-off decision to the Dorin United Hitmen in a rematch of last year's incomplete championship series, the Truckers denied New Breed the opportunity to clinch the pennant as they broke an 11-11 ...

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News Article

October 06, 2011
THEODORA ALIYAH FERGUSON, 16

DEATH ANNOUNCEMENT

MS. THEODORA ALIYAH FERGUSON, 16, years of #117 Malibu Reef, Freeport, Grand Bahama will be held on Saturday, 8th October 2011 at 11:00 a.m. at First Baptist Church, Columbus Drive and Nansen Avenue, Freeport Grand Bahama. Officiating will be Rev. Dr. Keith Russell assisted by Bishop Cardinal McIntosh. Interment will follow in the Grand Bahama Memorial Park Section #2, Frobisher Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama.

Aliyah will lovingly be remembered by her mother: Mckell Johnson, stepfather: Henry W. Johnson Sr.; brothers: Rashad Strachan, Malik Johnson; stepbrothers: Henry Jr., Jarvise and Renaldo Johnson; grandparents: Jerome Sr. and Olga Strachan, Livingston and Dian Cash; ste ...

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Movie
The Yankles
  • Genre : Sport
  • Rating : B - Under 18yrs must be accompanied by an adult.

About Charlie Jones, a washed up, ex major league ballplayer, and how he gets a second chance at life and love by managing a Jewish, orthodox yeshiva baseball team....


News Article

April 16, 2013
The John Beadle Project at NAGB: April 25th

 



Nassau, Bahamas - Under the Patronage of The
Honourable Dr. Daniel Johnson, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture,
you are cordially invited to the opening of The John Beadle Project

Thursday April 25th, 2013 7pm - 9pm at The National Art Gallery Of The Bahamas West & West Hill Streets...

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News Article

July 05, 2014
The two lost generations

The past 50 years have been horrific for the entire planet Earth. Except for a few countries that have established the right template for nation-building to help their citizens reach their full potential, enriching them and enriching their nation, the state of the world is cloudy.
In spite of prodigious scientific discoveries and their application for man's welfare, it seems we have been regressing annually in creating a canvas for a critical mass of people to be satisfied in their status in life.
'Things were better before' is the sentiment felt by those who have reached the critical age of 50 years old and beyond. Indeed, it was so much better that one of my cherished wishes was to have my children enjoy the idyllic life that I knew when I was a child.
Starting with myself in my own country of Haiti, my father of 102 years old recalled how, when he was a lad, people were excited when there was an electrical blackout because it was an event so unusual. We now have uninterrupted electricity only for the World Cup. It happens every four years.
His course of study included Greek and Latin for an eight-hour length of instruction. Today, Greek and Latin, the roots of our modern language, have been eliminated and the length of instruction is only four hours per day.
I was 11 years old when the so-called Duvalier revolution took place. For 33 years, the people of Haiti, including myself, languished in the homeland at the beginning of the regime and later in exile before we could get rid of the nefarious dictatorial government. It created so much havoc in the country and in the Haitian family, and the lost years can never be recovered.
Hordes of citizens became nomads in their own country, a place without any planned urban development. Family dislocation abroad caused familial links to be lost, similar to the time of slavery, when husband, wife and children were sold to different masters.
When democracy arrived in 1987, it brought with it so many false promises that citizens found themselves in the strange situation of wishing for the good old days of the dictatorial regime, when at least law and order was the rule of the game.
In the United States, the hope of a promised land offered by Dr. Martin Luther King and supported by President Lyndon Johnson had been interrupted by the death of the former and the imbroglio in Vietnam War of the latter. The exuberance of the movement has never again reached the level of the 60s, even when Barack Obama, the beneficiary par excellence of the affirmative action initiative, became the supreme commander of the land.
In the Caribbean, decolonization did not bring the milk and the honey of the liberation. Hordes of citizens followed the metropolitan colonizers to London, Toronto or New York, depriving their land of the human resources that could have built the nation from the ground up. Sustained development has been diverted to a fictitious nirvana based on touristic goals and dreams that run against the basic needs of the population.
In Latin America, the revolutionary wars of the 70s have given way to drug wars today, and democratic governments still lack the magic formula to root their people at home with good institutions and excellent infrastructure. Palliative welfare programs cannot sustain the drive for millions to migrate up north to the United States, seeking a better life for themselves and for their children.
The Africa of the 60s that was liberated from the yoke of the colonial empire, be it British or French, was recolonized without the master through mafia deals controlling the mineral resources by freedom fighters turned the Cains of predatory states that have no vision and no will to practice hospitality for all.
Extremist Muslims, profiting from the state of despair of the people and the lack of good governance, are creating havoc amongst the population. Raids, abductions and kidnapping are common practice where the army and the police find themselves impotent to rein in the insurgents.
The Middle East, in havoc since the creation of the state of Israel on May 4, 1948, has not found relief, in spite of the recent Arab Spring revolution. Autocrat Arab leaders have used the Muslim shield to discriminate against women, neglect public education and divert their rich natural patrimony into tools of war and luxury living for they and their families.
The Israeli analyst Orit Perlov has painted the Middle East with the broad canvas of ISIS, the Islamic state, and SISI, the military state. Both models failed to provide a vision for education, jobs and freedom to young Arabs. The extremist ISIS vision of a caliphate for the Arab world is as corrosive for the creation of a nation as the vision of SISI, which sees a terrorist in each and every member of the Muslim Brotherhood. The Arab Spring is not for tomorrow. Singapore, Malaysia and Turkey represent bright Muslim lights to follow.
The Europe of the 50s that was rebuilt through the Marshall Plan funded by the United States is developed on a two-track formula. Northern Europe, which includes Scandinavia, Germany, Holland, Switzerland, Britain and France, is enjoying a reasonable growth, while Southern Europe - Italy, Spain, Greece and Portugal - are cicadas that sing when they should have labored with the support of the European Community.
Asia, in particular South East Asia, which includes China, India, Malaysia, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand and Indonesia, constitute the best hope of gain in the last two generations. China and India in particular were basket cases filled with a large population that could have declined into a Malthusian pandemonium. Instead, through state capitalism in China and through excellent education in India, a critical mass of the population has migrated into the bliss of a middle class status, enriching themselves and their nations.
Oceania, with Australia and New Zealand, constitutes a haven of growth and development - a rare oasis in the world of the two lost generations. They have profited in leading the good fight for inclusion, development and good governance. They are rewarded with few horror stories that make up the template for rich and poor countries alike.
This template is made of a culture of greed that replaces hard work, nudity that makes up for originality and crass exploitation by the world media of artists that promote the lowest denominator in value and in standards of excellence. The Aretha Franklin of yesterday has surrendered the stage to the Rihanna of today; the Johnny Holliday of yesterday has been replaced by Chris Brown in concert between bouts in prison.
The United Nations, born in 1946, was the light placed on a lampstand to brighten this world, using the language from Matthew 5:14-16. It has done none such. With a mandate that has now lasted 20 years in Haiti, the country has descended into Hell on its watch, while the UN is pleading not guilty because it was not part of its responsibility to help Haiti become a better nation.
The hordes of NGOs (non-governmental organizations) that descend into failed countries act like vultures on a carcass made of live human beings. They are there for themselves, not to help the resuscitation of the wretched and the meek of this Earth. I remember a program like 4C in the 60s, sponsored by the United States in Haiti. It was of short life but its outcome is still being felt in the region 60 years later. Using the lowest standard of evaluation, the prognosis for today's USAID program is very bleak compared to the performance of 4C.
The youth of today may not believe it, and I will have my own critics to prove me wrong, but with all their apps and their Instagram and their instant communication through Facebook or LinkedIn, life was better in the 60s. It was safe, convivial and collegial. Shouldn't we all work to give a better legacy to our grandchildren, having failed to pass on the baton to our children?

o Jean H. Charles, LLB MSW, JD, is a syndicated columnist with Caribbean News Now. He can be reached at: jeancharles@aol.com and followed at Caribbeannewsnow/Haiti. This is published with the permission of Caribbean News Now.

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News Article

October 12, 2011
THE 'SWEET-TART' MEMORIES

By ALESHA CADET

Tribune Features Reporter

THE HARD working and caring Eliza Elizabeth Johnson may not be here in body, but she is definitely with her eight grandchildren in spirit.

Eliza enjoyed the little things in life, said Venteria Johnson, while remembering her grandmother. Whether it was spending time with the neighbourhood kids or taking care of her community church, Ms Johnson said her "ma" was dedicated to it. Most of all, she enjoyed making her famous sweet pineapple tarts, Ms Johnson said.

It was in the farms of Bluff, Eleuthera, where Eliza spent her time with her husband enjoying the sunny days and working as hard as she could. Ms Johnson said some of her most memorabl ...

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News Article

March 04, 2013

News Article

April 03, 2013
Ticketing was also an issue at 42nd BTC CARIFTA Games

Another major issue at the CARIFTA Games was ticketing. Hundreds stood on line every day waiting to purchase and pick-up tickets for the games, which was said to be sold out.
At one point, the restless crowd got angry and frustrated, complaining about the system in place. Some said the process is too slow while others just wanted to get better seats.
Aniska Rolle said: "The experience was beyond description in a negative way. The line was not moving at all. That's when some genius decided to say everyone move to Sir Kendal, but when we moved over there, they stopped selling the tickets, so all they did was transfer the problem from one area to another. The line was not moving for a full hour. It was just unorganized. There was no customer service, and the people behind the booth seemed to be pushy and gave off attitude when they were serving. They made it seem as though that there were no more tickets, or that we were at fault because we decided to get our tickets then."
The ticket booth was set-up over at the Betty Kelly-Kenning National Aquatics Centre. Initially, it was located in the Thomas A. Robinson National Stadium. Tickets went on sale February 28, 2013. Online purchases were made available weeks before the event. Still, a number of patrons decided to wait until this past weekend.
Amy Johnson was also frustrated about the process. She said the organizing committee should have provided other locations to pick up and purchase tickets, that way it would have eliminated the congestion.
"I wanted the $13 pass, but they said they were not printing anymore," said Johnson. "I had to pay extra to get Saturday and Sunday. On top of that, the Monday ticket wasn't available, so I had to tow the line on Monday to get a ticket. That's false advertising and the thought of dealing with it again was a turn off. I've attended many international sporting events and never in my life experienced this before. All I wanted to do was get in the stadium and cheer on the Bahamians. I am sure everyone wanted to do the same."
The tickets were priced from $5 to 25.

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News Article

October 24, 2011
TRUSTEE ACT'S REFORM 'BOLD, INNOVATIVE'

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE proposed Trustee Act amendments were yesterday said to be a "bold and innovative" effort to make the Bahamas more competitive in its core estate planning/wealth management business, allowing the creation of 'directed trusts' and for trust disputes to be resolved by arbitration.

Addressing yesterday's Offshore Professional Conference, Heather Thompson, attorney and partner at Higgs & Johnson, said the proposed Trustee (Amendment) Bill 2011 was designed to "strengthen the administrative powers in trust law" and make the Bahamian financial services industry "more competitive" with rival jurisdictions.

She als ...

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News Article

November 21, 2013
Taxicab drivers protest outside House of Assembly

Dozens of taxicab drivers joined by a handful of straw market vendors protested outside of the House of Assembly yesterday over a proposal to move the taxi drivers from Prince George Dock.
Several of the drivers said the government does not appear concerned that they have been struggling to make a living, noting that the move would "cripple them".
However, in a statement the Ministry of Transport and Aviation said it along with tourism and police officials have had numerous meetings with the Prince George Dock Association and the union.
The ministry said as the Welcome Centre at Nassau Harbour closes for renovations the proposed relocation of taxi drivers is to ensure "smooth operations during this transition period".
The statement does not indicate where taxi drivers will be relocated and for what period of time.
Public Service Drivers Union President Richard Johnson said the union will do what it must to ensure its members can make a living in an industry they have fought hard to operate in.
He expressed concern about taxicab drivers not knowing where they will be relocated.
"Taxicab drivers are supposed to be the only ground transportation providers from Prince George Dock," he said.
"We have asked the government through the Road Traffic Department to control what has been happening with the tour buses. We need to be in control of our business."
Trade Union Congress President Obie Ferguson, who stood among the crowd, said while the union does not fall under his organization, he will not allow taxicab drivers to be relegated.
"I am committed to do what is required, and my colleagues will do what is necessary," Ferguson said.
"We have a board meeting on Friday, and this will be a major issue on the agenda.
"I am therefore satisfied that we will find a solution."
Quincy Hudson, a taxicab driver, said the move is an attempt to "take the little we have away from us".
Michael Sands, another taxi driver, said business has dropped significantly in the past few months.
He said after competing with bus companies over the years it appears that they will be allowed to flourish while taxi drivers suffer.
Tiffany Dorsett, president of the Straw Vendors Association at Fort Fincastle, said the move will have a direct impact on vendors, and they will stand by the Public Service Drivers Union.
The Ministry of Transport and Aviation said it will meet with the TUC in light of Ferguson's concerns, which it said have "introduced a new element to the ongoing discussions".
Ferguson said the umbrella union will work with the ministry to resolve the matter.

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