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News Article

March 28, 2013
Tottenham targets annual match

Sports tourism officials want to make the upcoming Tottenham Hotspur match an annual attraction, hoping it could inject new money into the country.
Joe Lewis, the British billionaire, has developed greater synergies with the Ministry of Tourism to bring his football club to Nassau.
Lewis, with an estimated wealth of $4.2 billion, is the main investor in Travistock Group and spends much of his time in Lyford Cay. He is also a key investor at Albany. This elite community in western New Providence is anticipating a possible boom in sales from athletes, fans and other well-known personalities.
David Johnson, the director general at the Ministry of Tourism, recently took part in a press conference in Orlando with Albany executives and government officials. The Ministry of Tourism received live television converge to promote the upcoming Tottenham match and The Bahamas as a destination.
"They want to sell the stars homes in Albany. But it will extend to include The Bahamas brand," he told Guardian Business. "Many of these players also have a strong fan base, many of which are affluent and will travel. And third, exposure always helps when you have the rich and famous visiting and living here."
The match against the Jamaican National Team will take place at the new $30 million Thomas A. Robinson National Stadium on May 23.
Tyrone Sawyer, director of sports tourism development, confirmed to Guardian Business that the intent is to make the Tottenham visit an annual event.
He noted that there has been very little marketing and lead up time for this inaugural installment. Once it is running on an annual basis, The Bahamas will see greater participation and synergies.
"We are not just doing it as a one off, but as a regular part of our sports tourism calendar. Once it is a regular event, we can promote it and then you're really talking about the full benefits if sports tourism," he explained.
Meanwhile, the players arriving in The Bahamas next month are already part of the "overarching and unspoken economic impact" of such an event.
Sawyer told Guardian Business that developing partnerships with the many high-networth individuals living and working in The Bahamas, such as Lewis, is a key strategy going forward at the Ministry of Tourism.
Thomas A. Robinson National Stadium will have its first real test this coming weekend with the CARIFTA Games kicking off. Sawyer said the event has generated around 2,000 room nights and a noticeable economic shot in the arm for Nassau.
By the end of this fiscal year, sports tourism should be responsible or 20,000 room nights and around $14 million in expenditure.

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News Article

April 18, 2013
The John Beadle Project at NAGB: April 25th

 



Nassau, Bahamas - Under the Patronage of The
Honourable Dr. Daniel Johnson, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture,
you are cordially invited to the opening of The John Beadle Project

Thursday April 25th, 2013 7pm - 9pm at The National Art Gallery Of The Bahamas West & West Hill Streets...

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News Article

April 03, 2013
Ticketing was also an issue at 42nd BTC CARIFTA Games

Another major issue at the CARIFTA Games was ticketing. Hundreds stood on line every day waiting to purchase and pick-up tickets for the games, which was said to be sold out.
At one point, the restless crowd got angry and frustrated, complaining about the system in place. Some said the process is too slow while others just wanted to get better seats.
Aniska Rolle said: "The experience was beyond description in a negative way. The line was not moving at all. That's when some genius decided to say everyone move to Sir Kendal, but when we moved over there, they stopped selling the tickets, so all they did was transfer the problem from one area to another. The line was not moving for a full hour. It was just unorganized. There was no customer service, and the people behind the booth seemed to be pushy and gave off attitude when they were serving. They made it seem as though that there were no more tickets, or that we were at fault because we decided to get our tickets then."
The ticket booth was set-up over at the Betty Kelly-Kenning National Aquatics Centre. Initially, it was located in the Thomas A. Robinson National Stadium. Tickets went on sale February 28, 2013. Online purchases were made available weeks before the event. Still, a number of patrons decided to wait until this past weekend.
Amy Johnson was also frustrated about the process. She said the organizing committee should have provided other locations to pick up and purchase tickets, that way it would have eliminated the congestion.
"I wanted the $13 pass, but they said they were not printing anymore," said Johnson. "I had to pay extra to get Saturday and Sunday. On top of that, the Monday ticket wasn't available, so I had to tow the line on Monday to get a ticket. That's false advertising and the thought of dealing with it again was a turn off. I've attended many international sporting events and never in my life experienced this before. All I wanted to do was get in the stadium and cheer on the Bahamians. I am sure everyone wanted to do the same."
The tickets were priced from $5 to 25.

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News Article

September 08, 2011
Terecita Brenhilda Carey, 82

Funeral service for Mrs. Terecita Brenhilda Carey, 82 yrs., a resident of Hatchet Bay, Eleuthera, who died on 31st Autust, 2011, will be held at St. Mark's Methodist Church, Hatchet Bay, Eleuthera, on Saturday at 10:00 a.m. Officiating will be Rev. Kenya Lovell, Pastor Henry Whyte & other Ministers of the Gospel. Interment follows in Big Bay Public Cemetery, Hatchet Bay, Eleuthera.
Left to cherish her memories are her children: William Carey Jr., Glenda & Jefferson Wildgoose Sr., Ceeney & Dr. Wismore Butcher, 201 Ederson Carey, Petty Officer Lorenzo Carey & Lyndon & Garvin Carey; grandchildren: Jefferso & Tiffany Wildgoose, Jarrod & Nikkiah Wildgoose, Janell & Daniel Carroll, Kendra Russell, Kenceene & Tamiko Fox, Monique & Panston Gibson, Marcita Sawyer, Ederson Carey Jr., John & Italia Shepherd, Alece Shepherd, Lorenzo Jr., & Marsha Carey, Tarano & Dwayne Deveaux, Marissa Brown & Shanna Clarke, Greg Wilson & family, Phillip & Daphne Wilson & family, Devon & Chanell Rhiney & family, Scott & Crystal Wilson & family; great grandchildren: Dane Bodie, Trenton Russell, Trevaughn Fox, Timothy, Jayden, Jasmine & Noa Wildgoose,Preston Gibson & Odelia Carey; adopted children: Laura & Levi Wilson & family, Florence, Sandy & Audrea Scavella, Tammy Lagan of Tennessee, Mavis Fowler & family, Calsey & Delcina Johnson, Marva & Richard Brown, Nurse Evelyn Assanah, Fredrick "Fergie" Ferguson & Flosetta Johnson; sisters: Auraice Newbold, Dora Bartlett & Hetlyn Major; adopted sisters: Rhona Bethel, Neutie Seymour, Eulene Johnson & Hildamae Johnson; brother-in-law: Kenneth Major Sr.; sisters-in-law: Armena & Hazel Carey, Rosie Eberhart; nephews: Larry Allan, Bertie, Edward, Peter & Hartmen Carey, Blake & Vidia Bartlett, Marvin & Ricky Newbold, Kenneth, David, Joel, Timothy & Paul Major, Hacourt Roberts, Elvin & Rodrick Smith, Vaughn Newbol; nieces: Andrea Taylor, Linda Pinder, Machelle Sands, Vandora Johnson, Sherry & Jackie Newbold, Josalee Benson, Dellarese Jones, Delpha Bartlett, Vernice, Melvice & Victoria Major, Shirley Mader, Margaret, Melinda & Gwendolyn Smith, Peggy Bullard & Carolyn Carey; other relatives & friends including: the St. Mark's Methodist family & the entire community of Hatchet Bay, Eleuthera.
Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.
 
 

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News Article

April 16, 2013
The John Beadle Project at NAGB: April 25th

 



Nassau, Bahamas - Under the Patronage of The
Honourable Dr. Daniel Johnson, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture,
you are cordially invited to the opening of The John Beadle Project

Thursday April 25th, 2013 7pm - 9pm at The National Art Gallery Of The Bahamas West & West Hill Streets...

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Movie
The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3
  • Genre : Crime, Drama, Thriller
  • Rating : C - 18yrs and Older

Armed men hijack a New York City subway train, holding the passengers hostage in return for a ransom, and turning an ordinary day's work for dispatcher Walter Garbe into a face-off with the mastermind behind the crime. ...


News Article

May 17, 2013
The hunt for the Little Miss Bahamas crown

Thirteen young ladies will take to the stage in the next four days, and when the final curtain has been lifted, one of them will walk away with the Little Miss Bahamas title, a prize package totaling $4,000 and the opportunity to represent The Bahamas at the Little Ladies Worlds Little Miss Pageant in New Orleans, Louisiana.
Her prizes will include an iPad, a 19-inch television, scholarship for one year of foreign language study, scholarship for one year of modeling and etiquette training, photo portrait, jewelry, piece of luggage, a pizza party and a weekend stay at the Abaco All-Inclusive Luxury Bahama Beach Resorts.
Contestants compete in four age categories -- ages 5-7, Little Miss La Petite; 7-9, Our Little Miss, 10-12 Little Miss PreTeen and 12-14, Little Ideal Miss -- during the 10th annual pageant which will be held on Monday, May 20 at the Rainforest Theatre. Showtime is at 4 p.m.
Competing for titles will be Ebonique Foster, 7; Petra Kemp, 9; Angel Cleare, 11; Dashna Christian, 12; Hadassah Lockhart, 11; Martinique Storr, 12; Tatianna Tucker, 8; Tierra Turnquest, 6; Whitney Johnson, 5; Destiny Johnson, 11; Julisa Johnson, 9; Tierra Thompson, 7; Deija Albury 9; Olivia Cambridge, 5, and Malani Oliver, 10.
While only one young lady will walk away with the official title, a winner will be selected from each of the four age groups to compete at the Little Ladies Worlds Little Miss Pageant as well. They will receive a $1,200 prize package.

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News Article

August 27, 2010
Tell all, MP told in website 'hack' row

By PAUL G

TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff

Reporter

pturnquest@

tribunemedia.net

AFTER a frequent radio talkshow caller was arrested for reportedly "hacking" the Ministry of Foreign Affair's website, Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette called on PLP MP Fred Mitchell to come clean with all he knows on how the site was originally created.

C Allen Johnson, more commonly known by his radio persona, 'Critical Thinker', was arrested and questioned by investigators from the Fraud Squad in Nassau on Thursday.

After being grilled for a few hours, he was released and informed he would be called in for questioning again sometime early next week.

A few weeks ago, Mr Johnson app ...

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News Article

September 15, 2011
TRAINEES EARN THEIR 'STRIPES'

Bahamas Striping, the company founded from a $5,000 Self Starter grant, has completed its first car park striping training stage for four of its seven staff.

The four yesterday applied their new skills in striping the car park at the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre.

The four, Tristan Johnson (22 years old), Romell Davis (18 years old), Patrick Smith (20 years old), and Darvin Brown (19 years old) have learnt how to clean surfaces, measure, lay out and striping.

Atario Mitchell, president of Bahamas Striping, said: "One of my staff had a criminal record for drug possession. During our interview he broke down and begged me to give him a try. He said: 'How can I get my life together an ...

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News Article

October 24, 2013
The PLP: Party of the people

Dear Editor,
In a few days the iconic Progressive Liberal Party (PLP) will be celebrating 60 years since it was founded in 1953. It is the oldest formal political party in the nation, and rightly so.
Back in the 1940s and early 1950s, the economic and political aspirations of average black and so-called conchy joe Bahamians were extremely limited and in most cases unattainable. They had no national voice and they could, at best, expect only the proverbial crumbs from the table of the then ruling white oligarchy dominated by a few families such as: the Bethels; the Symonettes; the Kellys; the Sands, and the Pritchards.
Black Bahamians were obliged to eke out a miserable living, in the majority of cases, as laborers, migrant farm workers in the U.S. and contract workers in places like Panama. A large number resided on the then labeled Out Islands and engaged in slash and burn farming and fishing for a subsistence income. Political representation in the legislative halls was scant and mediocre.
Economic changes and political evolution started in the early 1950s when a few pioneering black and light-skinned Bahamian mavericks got together and cobbled the caucus which came to be known as the Progressive Liberal Party. Men like Cyril Stevenson; Arthur D. Hanna; William Cartwright; Arthur Foulkes; Clarence A. Bain; Edgar Bain, et al.
Of course, there were females like Doris Johnson; Eugenia Symonette; Beryl Hanna and Trixie Hanna, et al, who were in the trenches and just as involved. These individuals were fearless and took their self-appointed missions seriously.
A youthful barrister-at-law, the late great and deeply lamented Lynden Oscar Pindling soon emerged as party leader by 1956 and led five other PLPs into the House of Assembly. He was a master strategist, an orator par excellent and extremely focused. His parliamentary team formed the opposition and was the first formalized political party in that chamber. They raised eternal hell on behalf of the formerly voiceless black and conchy joe Bahamians.
The then ruling white oligarchy, a loose confederation, quickly saw the need to form itself into a political party, hence the emergence of the United Bahamian Party (UBP). Its nominal leader, Roland T. Symonette, was overshadowed by the Titan of Bay Street, Stafford Lofthouse Sands, who was the de factor leader of that party.
The PLP and its leadership cadre were motivated to bring social, economic and political emancipation to the masses of ordinary Bahamians. Its mantra was simple: one man, one vote. Prior to the emergence of the PLP there was a system which allowed plural voting based on property ownership. Of course, at that time, as is the case even today, most of the real estate in The Bahamas was owned by white Bahamians.
During the 1960s the PLP made rapid strides and the political walls of Jericho finally came down on January 10, 1967 under the leadership of Lynden Oscar Pindling and his leadership team. The rest is history.
And so, within a matter of days (October 26) the PLP, the undisputed party of the people, will celebrate 60 years since its founding. Its mission, however, still remains largely unfulfilled in that while we have achieved political ascendency, economic emancipation is still a distant dream.
Perry Gladstone Christie (PLP-Centreville), our prime minister, has been presented with a stellar opportunity to etch his legacy in steel, if he so desires. It is the singular task of this gold rush administration to economically empower the ordinary Bahamian.
Land, at affordable prices, must be made available either for home construction or for business purposes. It is as simple as that. Ownership of marketable land is crucial if we are to eliminate the culture of political dependency and to jump start the economy in short order.
Historically, the PLP has always been seen and acknowledged as the party of the people, bar none. Yes, the Free National Movement (FNM) has played and continues to play a pivotal role in our evolution as a democracy but it is, alas, even to this day, seen as the party of white Bahamians and black elitists.
We must keep in mind, however, that the majority of the founders of the FNM came from within the bowels of the Progressive Liberal Party. Its only prime minister, to date, Hubert Alexander Ingraham, was a national chairman and Cabinet minister in the early Pindling administrations.
One of its most illustrious leaders, the late Sir Cecil Wallace-Whitfield, also was once a PLP member of Parliament and a Pindling Cabinet minister. Sir Orville A. Turnquest and Sir Arthur Foulkes all hailed from the PLP.
As executive director of Common Cause and The National Republican Alliance (ARENA), I offer congratulations to the PLP on its historic founding some 60 years ago and wish it Godspeed as it completes this term in office.
It is my hope and expectation that it will continue to seek to wipe away the tears from every Bahamian eye. The final chapter in the book called "The PLP: Party of the People" has yet to be written and the legacy continues to unfold.
To God then, in all things, be the glory.
- Ortland H. Bodie Jr.

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News Article

May 14, 2013
Thompson: Private trust amendments make Bahamas more competitive

The Bahamas is becoming more competitive in the area of private trusts in light of recent amendments made to legislation focused on improving that sector.
Heather Thompson, a partner at the Higgs & Johnson law firm, said the changes which took effect in December 2012 make The Bahamas much more competitive in attracting private trust business.
In 2007, the Banks and Trust Companies (Private Trust Companies) Regulations introduced a light touch regulatory regime for private trust companies in The Bahamas. Effective December 17, 2012, the regulations to the act were amended by the Banks and Trust Companies (Private Trust Companies) (Amendment) Regulations.
"I think it makes us more competitive than we would have been. We came out with a very good piece of legislation when the amendments to the Banks and Trust Companies Regulation Act and the regulations themselves were passed," she told Guardian Business.
Under these changes, companies limited by guarantee can be formed and not just companies limited by shares.
"Other jurisdictions would permit companies limited by guarantee so in some instances you may have missed opportunities that you could have otherwise encountered. And the other amendments are basically tidying up to make sure that the regulator has the controls in place that are desirable from their point of view," Thompson noted.
"The changes are mainly enhancements. The most significant one from a private practitioner's point of view is you can now form companies limited by guarantee rather than companies limited by shares, so that you can have a private trust company which doesn't have an ownership structure on top of it."
Thompson believes these changes couldn't come at a better time. The amendments allow for private trust companies limited by shares or by guarantee, with a minimum share capital or guarantee of $5,000. Previously, only companies limited by shares could qualify as private trust companies.
This change eliminates the need for a holding structure for the shares of a private trust company such as a purpose trust or a foundation, potentially simplifying trust structures and reducing costs.
Before the changes, the responsibility for notifying the inspector of a change in registered representative fell with the private trust company under the act. A private trust company would be exempt from the requirement to obtain a business license provided that the criteria to qualify as a private trust company are met.
"I think it comes at an important time because a lot of clients now are looking at private trust companies and this gives them one other option to consider, having the company limited by guarantee rather than strictly just by shares. So I think it comes at a good time because we are seeing an increase in inquiries regarding private trust companies," Thompson added.

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News Article

August 31, 2013
The Commonwealth: The black and white of it

Boris Johnson, the mayor of the British capital city, London, has joined in a chorus of voices in the Conservative Party that has been calling for Britain to abandon its membership of the European Union (EU) and to look instead to the Commonwealth of Nations as "countries that offer immense opportunities for British goods, people, services and capital."
This is a huge reversal from 1971 when the then leader of the Conservative Party and prime minister of Britain, Edward Heath, told the House of Commons that the idea that the Commonwealth might become "an effective economic and political let alone military bloc had never been realized."On the contrary, he argued, it was generally accepted that trade with the Commonwealth overseas, unlike that with the European Common Market, held no prospect of dynamic growth. Britain's subsequent entry to what is now the European Union (EU) in 1973 put an end to any further development of the Commonwealth as a preferential trading group.
After 40 years of fundamentally changed global trade arrangements, the Commonwealth no longer offers opportunities as a preferential trading bloc. Those in Britain who continue to pit the Commonwealth as an alternative to the EU are really raising a straw man to bolster their wish to get out of the EU and the conditions of its membership that they find unacceptable. For the majority of Commonwealth countries, there is little benefit today in trying to assemble a Commonwealth trading group even if it would not be severely hamstrung by World Trade Organization rules that disallow preferential trading arrangements for all but the poorest of poor countries. This is not to say that individual Commonwealth countries could not intensify trade bilaterally.
What is of more current interest about Boris Johnson's remarks made in Australia and New Zealand is that, in saying that Britain should "raise our eyes beyond Europe"and not think of "ourselves as little Europeans run by Brussels", he said Britain should open its doors to skilled workers from Commonwealth countries "such as Australia and New Zealand." He went as far as to say that Britain and Australia should set up a "bilateral Free Labour Mobility Zone." All of this is an alternative to persons from the EU entering Britain to live and work, and more importantly, benefitting from its social welfare system.
In promoting the idea of skilled workers from the Commonwealth being allowed to enter Britain, Mr. Johnson mentioned only Australia and New Zealand, whose populations are predominantly white people. But, since he is the mayor of London - a city with a huge multi-ethnic population drawn from all over the Commonwealth and elsewhere - it has to be assumed that Mr. Johnson mentioned only these two countries because he happened to be visiting them when he made his remarks.
Of course, it is every country's prerogative to enter bilateral migration arrangements with any other country that it considers appropriate. In this connection, it is perfectly feasible that Britain could set up "bilateral Free Labour Mobility Zones" with Australia and New Zealand. But, if it were to do so while applying stricter immigration and visa requirements on other Commonwealth countries, such as those in Africa, Asia and the Caribbean whose populations are not predominantly white, the arrangements would be seen as inequitable with overtones of racism. Such a move could be seen as a "black" and "white" division and it would diminish regard for the merits of the Commonwealth association. Further, it would not advance Britain's desire to intensify trade with, and investment from, Commonwealth countries such as India, Malaysia, Singapore and South Africa that are among the top Commonwealth growing economies.
Britain faces a predicament over the free movement of people in the EU. Because of its more generous social welfare system and its greater economic development than all of the newer member states of the EU, it has become a magnet for Eastern Europeans - many of whom do not speak English and have little, if any, appreciation for British culture and traditions. The migration to Britain of Eastern Europeans has caused resentment among Britons, but not only to white ones. People from Commonwealth countries who migrated to Britain in the 1950s and 60s, and who have worked all their lives in Britain contributing to the economy and also adhering to its culture and traditions, also resent the influx of European migrants. This is a problem the British government is trying to resolve, but it will not be solved by Mr Johnson's suggestion that the EU should "stuff it."With regard to the Commonwealth, the Eminent Persons Group (of which I was a member and Rapporteur) that made recommendations in 2011 on reform of the Commonwealth to make it relevant to the people and times of the association, recognized that if the Commonwealth is to have value for its peoples, one of the things that could be done is to give recognition to Commonwealth citizenship by providing means of privileged entry in all Commonwealth states. We had recommended the creation of an expert group to report to the 2013 Heads of Government meeting on ways in which entry by Commonwealth citizens to Commonwealth countries on business or holiday might be gradually improved. A group of three renowned persons from the Ramphal Institute in London has visited 15 Commonwealth countries over the last few months to produce a report and recommendations on easing entry for Commonwealth citizens in various categories including businesspeople and students. The extent to which all governments agree on easing entry requirements for agreed categories of Commonwealth citizens will indicate the value they place on membership of the Commonwealth.
The point is that Commonwealth countries looking to each other for a deepening of investment, commercial and migration arrangements - based on their common laws, shared language, and declared common values - would help to lift all their economies as well as the quality and benefits of their Commonwealth connection. But they should all pursue such deepening on a pan-Commonwealth basis and in a spirit of co-operation and mutual respect that would enhance the Commonwealth Club.
o Sir Ronald Sanders is a consultant and senior research fellow at London University. Responses to: www.sirronaldsanders.com. Reprinted with the permission of caribbeannewsnow.com.

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News Article

July 06, 2013
Team Bahamas displays a gold medal performance

The meals were cooked, the cocktails stirred and the pastries baked. The judges scored every detail of the "Taste of the Caribbean" culinary competition that led to The Bahamas picking up a bunch of medals with Chef Sheldon Tracey Sweeting leading the way picking up a gold medal at the recent regional competition in Florida.
Sweeting presented the judges with chocolate with Caribbean flavors in white, dark chocolate, lime and passion fruit Bavarian, banana ice cream, caramel, white chocolate, cream cheese, ganache, chocolate cake, spiced mango sauce, ginger pudding, buttered chocolate rumble, cinnamon tuille. His dessert was given a perfect score.
"It feels good," said Sweeting of the win. "It was six months of hard work, a lot of trial and error and refinement," he said. "I just wanted to make our country proud with it being our 40th anniversary."
The gold medal haul for The Bahamas amounted to four -- the Caribbean national team segment, culinary student, Dwayne Sinclair's gold medal in the junior chef of the year category and Jamal Small's gold medal and the win in the beef competition, along with Sweeting's pastry gold.
The team returned home with three silver medals --Emmanuel Gibson in the chef of the year contest; Charon McKenzie in the bartender of the year competition; and Ron Johnson in the cheesecake competition.
Three bronze medals were also in the haul, from Ancilleno Solomon in the ice carving competition; Ron Johnson in the seafood competition and a team bronze in the mystery basket rum competition.
The Bahamas also won the best use of chocolate award and the Tony Mack Spirit of the Competition award.
"We cleaned up a lot of awards. I thought we were going to win," said Sweeting. He said this year's results were the best by a Bahamian team in the 27-year history of the competition.
Barbados was crowned Caribbean Culinary Team of the Year. The highest individual honors were bestowed upon Jamaican Brian Lumley (Caribbean Chef of the Year); Puerto Rico's Roberto Rodriguez (Caribbean Bartender of the Year); Sweeting (Caribbean Pastry Chef of the Year) and Trinidad & Tobago's Naomi Lovell (Caribbean Junior Chef of the Year).
The competition was held at the Hyatt Regency in Miami.

The list of winners
Winner -- Barbados
Gold medals -- Bahamas, Barbados, Trinidad & Tobago
Silver medals -- Anguilla, Curacao, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Suriname, USVI
Bronze medals -- Bonaire

Chef of the year
Winner -- Brian Lumley, Jamaica
Gold medal -- Brian Lumley, Jamaica
Silver medals -- Lester Gumbs, Anguilla; Emmanuel Gibson, Bahamas; Andre Nurse, Barbados; Adriyel Lourens, Curacao; Joel Rodriguez, Puerto Rico; Jethro Daniel Wirth, Suriname; and Dennis Vanterpool, USVI.
Bronze medals -- Robertico Bernabela, Bonaire; Jeremy Lovell, Trinidad & Tobago

Bartender of the year
Winner -- Puerto Rico
Gold medals -- Roberto Rodriguez, Puerto Rico; Clinton Ramdhan, Trinidad & Tobago; Brandon DeCloux, USVI.
Silver medals -- Levon Richardson, Anguilla, Charon McKenzie, Bahamas, Rohan Hackshaw, Barbados, Tarimar Thom, Bonaire, Glenn Kemp, Curacao, Melissa Fletcher, Jamaica and Michel Marlon Blackson, Suriname.

Pastry chef of the year
Winner -- Sheldon Tracey Sweeting, Bahamas
Gold medals -- Sheldon Tracey Sweeting, Bahamas; Eric "Bernie" Burrell III, USVI
Silver medals -- Lashaunda Davis, Anguilla; Julian Broome, Barbados; Pablo Colon, Puerto Rico and Cheryl-Ann Shortt Charles, Trinidad & Tobago.
Bronze medals -- Lincoln Peterkin, Jamaica; Giovanni Ismael Asmo, Suriname.
Honorary mention -- Junior Janga, Bonaire; Carlos Anthonij, Curacao

Junior chef of the year
Winner -- Naomi Lovell, Trinidad & Tobago
Gold medals -- Dwayne Sinclair, Bahamas; Javon Cummins, Barbados, Naomi Lovell, Trinidad & Tobago
Silver medals -- Mtima Daniels, Anguilla, Ashohary Juliana, Curacoa; Jay Samuda-Thomas, Jamaica; Julio Lamberty, Puerto Rico; Vanina Candes Tjon a Tjoen, Suriname
Bronze medals -- Giovannie Veld, Bonaire; Ilejah Crabbe, USVI

Ice carving competition
Silver medal and ice carver of the year -- Hamac Palms, Jamaica
Bronze medals -- Ancilleno Solomon, Bahamas; Dwight Cross, Jamaica

Seafood competition
Winner -- Nathan Crichlow, Barbados; Sherwin Alexander, Suriname
Silver medals -- Laureen Anique Perkins, Anguilla; Gian Stewart, Jamaica; Rochelle Grindley, Jamaica; Jeremy Lovell, Trinidad & Tobago
Bronze medals -- Ron Johnson, Bahamas; Shanot Ocalia, Curacao; Joel Rodriguez, Puerto Rico; Gary Klinefelter,USVI

Beef competition
Gold medal and winner -- Jamal Small, Bahamas
Silver medals -- Kenneth Whittington, Barbados; Adriyel Lourens, Curacao; Randy O'Brien Smith, Suriname; Adrian Cumberbatch, Trinidad & Tobago; Dennis Vanterpool, USVI.
Bronze medals -- Claudio Gumbs, Anguilla; Dwight Cross, Jamaica; Angel Santiago, Puerto Rico

Rums of Puerto Rico Mystery Basket Competition
Gold medals -- Puerto Rico; USVI
Silver medals -- Barbados, Trinidad & Tobago, USVI
Bronze medals -- Anguilla, Bahamas, Bonaire, Curacao, Jamaica, Suriname

Cheesecake competition
Winner -- Teresa Clarke, Jamaica
Gold medals -- Carlos Antonij, Curacao; Teresa Clarke, Jamaica; Pablo Colon, Puerto Rico; Janelle Olliviere, Trinidad & Tobago
Silver medals -- Ron Johnson, Bahamas; Julian Broome, Barbados; Michael Harrison, Barbados; Rochelle Grindley, Jamaica
Bronze medals -- Giovanni Asmo, Suriname; George Sittig,USVI
Honorary mention -- Norison Conquet, Bonaire

Taste of the islands -- Best team
Winner -- Trinidad & Tobago
Taste of the islands -- People's choice
Winner -- Puerto Rico
Best use of chocolate
Winner -- Bahamas (Chocolate with Caribbean flavors) -- white, dark chocolate, lime and passion fruit Bavarian, banana ice cream, caramel, white chocolate, cream cheese, ganache, chocolate cake, spiced mango sauce, ginger pudding, buttered chocolate rumble, cinnamon tuile)

Best use of Certified Angus Beef
Winner -- Nathan Chriclow

Hans Schenck Commemorative Award for Most Innovative Menu Utilizing Indigenous Ingredients
Winner -- Bonaire (Fresh mango mousse topped carrot cake served with candied red pepper and spicy smoked mango salad, red pepper paint and cocoa tulle sticks)

Most Impressive/Creative Menu for a Gastronomy Event
Winner -- Anguilla

Best vodka drink
Winner -- Trinidad & Tobago

Best non-alcoholic drink
Winner -- Puerto Rico

Most Creative Cocktail
Winner -- Chutney Bacchanal, Barbados

Tony Mack Spirit of the Competition
Winner -- Bahamas

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News Article

June 15, 2013
Time for change in the country

Dear Editor,

Common Cause, a nonprofit and non-aligned civic organization, supported and still supports the Progressive Liberal Party (PLP). What we do not support, however, is slackness and a do-not-care attitude which is being exhibited by far too many of those who sit in Parliament, either elected or appointed, and say that they are for the people.
Let us be quite clear on this issue. We are for the eventual ascendency of the minister of works as prime minister. We make no apologies for this and will not yield any ground, ever, on this non-negotiable stance. Brave is our unanimous choice to succeed to the office, in due course, with all due respect.
At some point in time, Common Cause gave support to both Perry Christie and Hubert Ingraham. Their era is over. Yes, they served us, as a people, well but it is now time to move on. There are simply too many pressing national issues which must be firmly resolved, one way or the other, and we need bold, innovative and fresh solutions.
Common Cause will agitate for the recall of six current PLP members of Parliament. They are: Kendal Major (Garden Hills); Dr. Bernard Nottage (Bains Town and Grants Town); V. Alfred Gray (MICAL); Glenys Hanna-Martin (Englerston); Dr. Daniel Johnson (Carmichael Road) and Fred Mitchell (Fox Hill).
We are about nation building, and there is no more time for vacillating, pussyfooting and shaving cream. The PM needs to step up to the plate or get the hell out of the way. We all love him, but what has love got to do with it?
Urban Renewal 2.0 has ushered in a dramatic decrease in crime and conflict resolution. If the "gold rush" administration is smart, as I hope that it is, it would expand and flesh out even further this dynamic and progressive societal plan to rescue and rehabilitate hundreds, if not thousands, of our marginalized young people. Check the statistics. There is little, if any, real crime in the inner cities except for Kemp Road, Fox Hill and Nassau Village. These are areas where either the MP has a "tool box" or is "missing in action".
Christie will always be remembered for the good he has brought to this nation, but the time is now to move on and secure his legacy. We forced Ingraham out. Must we now do so for Christie? Common Cause makes no apologies and expects no quarter from our opponents. War has been declared, and war, politically, will be waged.

- Ortland H. Bodie Jr.

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News Article

August 27, 2014
Truckers, 'Cats lead their divisions in the NPSA

The New Providence Softball Association (NPSA) has reached the halfway mark of its season, and things are still wide open in the men's division.
The Sting Truckers are ranked first in the division with a 12-2 win/loss record. Just behind them are the BTC Elite Warriors with an 8-4 record. The Annette's Sporting Lounge Hitmen are third with a 7-5 record, and the D.K. Smokers sit in fourth with a 3-9 record. Bringing up the rear is the Chances Mighty Mitts with a 2-12 record.
Lamar Watkins of the Truckers is currently the league's top batter. He has 11 hits in 25 at-bats for a .440 average. Keron Sands of the Smokers and Diago Hutchinson of the Truckers are tied for second, both with seven hits in 17 at-bats each. Wayne Johnson of the Warriors is fourth with 10 hits in 25 at-bats. He has a .400 batting average. Rounding out the top five is Sherman Ferguson from the Warriors with six hits in 15 at-bats for a .400 average.
There is a three-way tie for most stolen bases between three Smokers players; Zhivago Archer, D'Kyle Rolle and Courtney Smith.
Keiron Munroe, from the Hitmen, leads the league with 16 runs; Wayne Johnson, from the Warriors, leads in RBIs with 12.
In the women's division, the Sigma Wildcats have a sizeable lead on the competition. They managed to build a 14-1 win/loss record, and is the top team as the playoffs approach. The Sigma Brackettes are second with an 11-6 record, while the Black Scorpions are third with a 10-7 record.
The College of The Bahamas (COB) Caribs are fourth with a 9-9 record, and the Electro Telecom Lady Hitters round out the group with an 8-11 record.
Lathera Brown of the Scorpions is the division's top batter with 16 hits in 28 at-bats and a .571 average. Jeanette Hilton from the Wildcats is second with 14 hits in 25 at-bats and a .560 averagel; Chryshann Percentie from the Black Scorpions is third with 10 hits in 19 at-bats and a .526 average. Richara Bain, from COB, is fourth with 11 hits in 24 at-bats and a .458 average; rounding out the top five is Marvelle Miller from the Black Scorpions with nine hits in 20 at-bats and a .458 average.
NPSA action will continue on Thursday evening at the Banker's Field at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex. The Hitmen will be going up against the Warriors in the men's division. That game is set to begin at 8 p.m.

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News Article

October 20, 2011
Tyrese Steve Elliott Lafleur, 11

Master Tyrese Steve Elliott Lafleur age 11 years of #4 Lime Street, Yellow elder Gardens #2 will be held on Saturday, October 22, 2011 at 2pm at The New Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church, Blue Hill Road South. Pastor Alfred Stewart, will officiate and burial will be in Lakeview Memorial Gardens & Mausoleums, John F. Kennedy Drive and Gladstone Road.
 
The Radiance of this "Ruby of A Gem" will always glow in the hearts of his:
Mother: Judy Dianna Lafleur;
Brothers and Sisters: Tyler, Angel, Marvin Jr., Malachi Nottage, Pedro I, Amiri, Perez, Pedro II, Galicia, Alicia Demeritte and Shaquille Adderley;
Grand Parents: Jerome and Valerine Lafleur, Stanley and Maxine Missick and Eva Smith;
Uncles: Jerome Jr., Rhodriques, Anthony and Dwayne Lafleur, Kemit Moss, Lamar Saunders, Garvin and Darren Missick, Glen Knowles, Justin Mackey and Jimmy Bowe;
Aunts: Patrice Moss, Princess, Denise, Lavern, Melissa and Carlene Lafleur, Marva Nottage-Mackey, Lauralee Missick, Samantha Williamson, Jackie Davis and Deborah Knowles;
Grand Uncles: Stanley and Wellington Musgrove, Patrick Moss, Greg Bowe, Ronald Martin, Kendal Joseph, Henry Williams, Bradley Nottage and Edgar Grant;
Grand Aunts: Maria Lafleur, Evelyn, Ann, Rosemary and Minerva Musgrove and Yvonne Jancy-Grant;
Cousins: Jerome Jr., Devon, Janice, Joyann, Shonte, Kermisha Moss, Sheketra, Rhodriques Jr., Lopez, Rhodrika Lafleur, Jeremy Bevans, Ricardo Moultrie Jr., Skylar, Lamar, Pharrell and Lamarido Saunders, Antonio, Anton, Antonique, Anthony Jr., Dwayne Jr., Demargio, Deanglo, Terrinique and Tamiko Lafleur, Alexander Missick, Kadesha, Alexander Missick, Kadesha, Kalia, Micah, Dominique, Tennessee, Dakota, Shavante, Shade, Shante and Mickal Musgrove, Alexis and Eric Bodie Jr., Kenneth and Kennedy Rolle, Nickie Reckley and Whitney;
God Parents: Sophia Rolle, Tennille Bullard, Michelle "Dot" Charlton, Roseanne, Noa Hunt, Antoinette Clarke and Sharice Williams;
Other loving family and friends including: Mervin, Michelle, Dominic, Shanique, Michael, Portia, Cleopatra, Anastia, Anton, Kenseno, Kenneth and Wellington Musgrove Jr., Tasha and Eric Bodie, Alberta Timothy, Bertram Roker, Rosemary Jervis, Denise, Kenny, Karen, Nickie, Kathleen Symonette, Omar and Sharon Hanna, Kelson Pierre, Monique Major, Theresa Reckley, Lavern, Patrick Jr., Stanley, David, Jonathan, Michael Moss of Freeport Grand Bahama, Shane Bain, Zhivargo, Benjamin, Bernice, Ronald Jr., Jermaine and Trevor Martin, Cleola and Timothy Ombler, Mildred Bethel, Kenneth Forbes, Salma Joseph, Alberta Wilkerson, Charmine, Jolene, Bradley, Leonardo and Jermaine Nottage, Dorothy and Barbara Williams, Yolanda Shawn Rolle, Christopher Moss, Sammy Johnson, Keith Hepburn, and their families, Lemon and Lime Street, Blue Hill Road, Poinciana Drive families, The Green, Williams, Missick and Dean families other too numerous to mention.
 
Visitation will be in the "Diamond Suite" Emerald Ridge Mortuary & Monument Company Ltd. #20 Claridge Road of Friday, October 21, 2011 from 1pm to 6pm and at The New Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church, Baillou Hill Road South on Saturday, October 22, 2011 from 1:00pm to service time.
 
Visit Our Website: www.emeraldridgemortuary.com view video tributes, sign guest book and send condolence, sympathy, share memories and make funeral arrangements.
 
 

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News Article

April 11, 2013

News Article

May 30, 2014
The Bahamas could be a track and field powerhouse in the near future

The Bahamas recently hosted the inaugural International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) World Relays, putting the country's growing passion for track and field on display for the rest of the world to see. More than 40 countries attended the historic event. The Bahamas has had past Olympians who won gold medals in track - such as 'The Golden Girls' and 'The Golden Knights' - but never before has track and field been supported to this extent in the country.
The government has done more for athletes in recent times than ever before, in terms of hosting larger events, improving on track meets that are already in place and upgrading facilities.
Earlier this week, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Dr. Daniel Johnson said The Bahamas would now look to position itself as a permanent fixture on the IAAF's annual circuit.
"This was the beginning, and I felt we did well enough to prove we can bring more to the table. We know that there are other events. We know that our sports model says to us that we want to get on a tour," Johnson said.
"With the new agreement, I am putting in another negotiation piece to get on the IAAF tour. When you think of the Grand Prix, you know that when these things stop in your town, it's huge. So we want to get the international community to look at us in that light where it's a regular event - you know the date, you know the time, you know the logistics of the place."
Hosting the World Relays and allowing the Bahamian high school athletes to participate in front of the crowd of over 10,000 spectators and socialize with athletes from various countries also did a lot for the future of track and field in the country.
And the idea of hosting an event of that nature each year can put The Bahamas on a pedestal when it comes to track and field.
Jamaica is a rival of the country in the region, and both Jamaica and The Bahamas are known for producing fast sprinters. Jamaica hosts large track meets regularly that give exposure to the country's up and coming athletes.
If The Bahamas does, in fact, become a permanent fixture in the IAAF's schedule, the same can be expected for the country's young athletes.
At the various high school meets, and even some primary school meets, more and more athletes are looking to get into the sport, because they now see that it can be a career in itself.
The Frank "Pancho" Rahming Track and Field Classic saw the largest number of schools participate in the history of the event. More than 60 schools from all over the country came to New Providence to give their athletes exposure and get them used to performing on a big stage at an early age. Parents are now seeing the improvements that have been made to the various track and field programs in the country and are excited about them.
Shaunae Miller is a young track athlete who is making a name for herself in the world ranks as a top sprinter, but she is also an inspiration to many of the younger athletes who are looking to build their careers in the same fashion.
Sports can be used as a way to gain a better education and a way for those in tough situations to provide for themselves and their families.
The government is lending a huge hand in helping them make their dreams a reality.

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News Article

January 30, 2014
The sculling season is finally here!

Bahamian Brewery and Beverage Co. has announced the start of the 2014 sculling season, as well as their partnership with Eleazor 'Barber J' Johnson and the first sculling event to be held at the St. Valentine's Day Massacre, set for February 15 and 16, in the waters of Montagu Bay.
"The St. Valentine's regatta is a great opportunity to showcase all things Bahamian, especially the Bahamian sport of sculling," noted Lynden Johnson, Sales and Marketing Manager at Bahamian Brewery and Beverage Co. "At the St. Valentine's regatta, there will be sloop sailing with our 'E' Class boats, Sands, Sands Light, Strong Back and High Rock, and indeed - the 'Sands Man in the Boat' sculling race."
The 'Sands Man in the Boat' sculling schedule for 2014 starts with the St. Valentine's regatta in February, and then there will be the National Family Island Regatta in George Town, Exuma in April, Mangrove Cay Homecoming in May; Long Island in June, Abaco in July, West End, Grand Bahama in September, and finally the sculling championship in November - to be held this year in New Providence.
Last year's sculling champion was Clayton Bain, who became a two-time champion. Dennis Fox from Salt Pond, Long Island took second place, and Clay Moxey, winner of the National Family Island Regatta sculling race, was third.
The brewery has been extremely successful in its mission to revitalize the sport of sculling, and Johnson invites all sailing and sculling fans to come out to the first event of the sculling season, at the St. Valentine Day Massacre on February 16.
"It's very nice to partner with Bahamian Brewery and Beverage on the sculling race as it's something new and people look forward to coming out and competing for bragging rights," said Eleazor Johnson, organizer of the St. Valentine's Day Massacre. "I enjoy working with the brewery team very much and look forward to working with them in the future when it comes to sailing and sculling."

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News Article

February 03, 2014