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News Article

March 19, 2012
PM Ingraham and his biting sarcasm

THERE WAS excitement in Grand Bahama when in a jocular remark -- which translated meant that the PLP's election promises will happen "when chickens grow teeth!" - Prime Minister Ingraham remarked: "Down in West End Mr Sammons is coming back and so is Jack Tar!"

The tongue-in-cheek remark was made in answer to all the promises that the PLP were making about what they would do if they won the 2012 election. What Mr Ingraham was in fact telling the large crowd at the opening of the Russell Town, Eight Mile Rock constituency office on Saturday was that if they believe the PLP's promises then they will also believe that Mr Sammons -- the one-time saviour of West End -- and his J ...

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News Article

May 25, 2012
Severe weather warnings continue in The Bahamas!

The Bahamas Department of Meteorology has issued a severe thunderstorm watch from 1:55 pm until 4:00pm Friday 25th, May 2012.

A

severe thunderstorm watch is now in effect for

Andros, New Providence,
Berry Islands, South Abaco, middle and upper Exuma Cays, Eleuthera,
Northern Cat Island and their adjacent waters.

At 1:50pm Radar
and satellite data indicated  lines and clusters of thunderstorms
pushing east and northeastward from central Cuba and the Great Bahama
Bank, across the tongue of the ocean toward the watched areas...

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News Article

March 23, 2012
Young writer to be published in prestigious Harvard magazine

Emile Hunt is the latest emerging Bahamian writer to take his work to the top and represent The Bahamas on a global scale - this July, a short story he penned will appear in the prestigious Transition Magazine, published by the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African-American Research at Harvard University.
Guided by a suggestion and then encouragement by his fellow writer and friend Keisha Ellis, who looked over the short story, he took a chance and submitted the work to the magazine despite being intimidated by the Harvard name.
Four months later, he was elated not only to find out that the story had been accepted, but that the chief editor of Transition Magazine personally relayed her positive remarks to his work.
"I wanted to shout in joy but I didn't, I just said a quick prayer and said thanks because I am really grateful for this talent God has given me," said Hunt.
"I'm grateful for this opportunity to have my work in the magazine and at the fingertips of so many readers. A Bahamian work getting out there, a Bahamian voice getting out there in this form of academia - I'm just thankful for that."
The short story, "Names of the Dead", said Hunt, examines the life of wayward pastor Mario Major struggling under the weight of the legacy of his forefathers. In a magical realist twist, he begins hearing voices of marginalized and troubled individuals in the world of the dead and begins feeling their effects on his physical and emotional health.
"Not until he comes to some realization of the people he should represent just like his forefathers - this disenfranchised - and helps them, not until he comes to accept the names of the dead, will he come to his true self and his identity," explains Hunt.
The story is just one of many in an impending short story collection by the promising young fiction writer. After completing his English language and literature studies at The College of The Bahamas, he went on to pursue an MFA in creative writing at the University of West Indies in 2008, beginning his collection of short stories then. Though he's completing his MFA this year, he's already looking at PhD programs in creative writing.
Some of his work has already been published in Poui, tongues of the ocean, and Small Axe, yet he hopes to begin finding a publisher for the complete finished collection this year. No doubt the latest acceptance of his work is the vote of confidence he needs to put the finishing touches on the work, complete the MFA and simultaneously find a publisher.
"The reason my collection took so long is because I couldn't complete them in Trinidad," said Hunt. "They were Bahamian stories and I was detached from my setting. I couldn't put the finishing touches on them until I got home and immersed myself in the people and the culture."
Indeed his work, like "Names of the Dead", examines masculinity through male relationships in The Bahamas - whether father and son or friend-to-friend or even lover to lover. Such a decision, said Hunt, serves to highlight the importance of positive male roles models in society.
Hunt himself is doing his part - he's currently teaching English language and literature at C. V. Bethel. Besides keeping his writing practice sharp by keeping him in touch with the basics, teaching an especially underperformed subject across the board in Bahamian schools allows him to encourage a respect and love for reading and writing in Bahamian youth.
"Spiritually, I believe men have an obligation not only to their families but to younger men, to teach them how to carry themselves in society," he said. "They can look at me with my rough exterior and see that it's ok for a man to express his feelings, to write about the experiences of others, to involve yourself in the depth of a character."
"It's important to change the path that most of our young men are on," he continued. "In my classes, the young men have come to realize what we call reading and education are not 'sissy' or 'light' or the easy way out, it's a way to express yourself."
Yet a love and appreciation for that craft also begins at a young age - something, which as a teacher, he encourages parents to develop in children the ways his parents did.
"I think it's important for parents to encourage reading. I remember my parents reading to me at a really young age," he said.
"I was rapt and from then on I was obsessed with characters and stories. Everything I could get my hands on, I read. My parents encouraged that, they poured that into me. I think it's important for parents to take note of what they pour into their kids."
Hunt is also grateful to his own mentors - Sis. Annie Thompson, Arlene Nash Ferguson, Fr. Sebastian Campbell and Dr. Ian Strachan, to name a few - who he believes have also helped him get to this milestone as a writer.
Next up, he and Keisha Ellis will attend the Cropper Writer's Workshop in Trinidad, a by-application only prestigious workshop that is held every two years for Caribbean writers. With this new accomplishment under his belt, he is ready more than ever to take Bahamian writing to the world and make a great impression on the globe.
"We're excited to go there and show them what Bahamian literature is all about," he said. "We're going to show that we have powerful stories also, we have tales we can share."
"I think this generation right now, this group of writers moving forward, this movement is going to be something great," he continued. "I think it's going to shock the world. There are more avenues being opened up to us in a globalized world with readerships, so it's going to draw eyes down here to see what we're doing in The Bahamas and that's going to be beneficial for all of us."n

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Event
Start Your Weekends With Breakfast...
Start Your Weekends With Breakfast...

Saturday 18th December 2010  8:00 AM

Native Dishes: Chicken Souse, Sheep Tongue Souse, Stew Conch, Boil Fish & Stew Fish American Dishes: Omelets, Egg Platters, Pancake Platters, Sandwiches, Breakfast Burritos & New York Strip with Eggs Free Wi-Fi


News Article

June 07, 2012
Local Designer Profile: House of Raphelita by David Rolle

The Local Designer Profile question and answer series is designed to
give you an intimate glimpse into the background and artistic process of
young movers and shakers in the local fashion industry in The Bahamas.

Burgeoning
local designer David Rolle, the talent behind the line House of
Raphelita is making waves in the local fashion industry. The
twenty-something designer recently snagged The Culture and Fashion Award
at the Islands of the World Fashion Showcase (IWFS) held locally in May
and kept tongues wagging as the designer of choice, dressing the First
Lady Mrs. Bernadette Christie at the official Opening...

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News Article

November 14, 2013
God provides for his creatures

The birds of the air nest by the waters; they sing among the branches. [Psalm 104:12]
Dusk falls very quickly and I was washing the dishes and through the lace curtains I was enjoying the view of the trees. Beyond the wall is a woman's tongue tree. She has weathered many a storm and apart from being topped in one of them, she stands tall and majestic. Trees are so beautiful and sometimes if were an artist, the abstract would be beautiful and profound.
While I was enjoying the beauty of nature, my attention was suddenly drawn away by the sound of what seemed to be a flock of birds in a raucous situation. Chirping, squawking, wings fluttering and a harmonious sound as if one group was asking and answering and another group trying to get a word in. In the midst of all of this, I heard the dog bark and opened the door to see birds I had not seen for the year. Perhaps they had just arrived in town and were in and out of my breadfruit tree so happy to be out of the cold and so it's party time! Others were on the roof performing air shows and buzzing the dog's tail. When he turned around to snap at them, they attacked him from the front with others taking a corner shot. I had a good laugh while they played catch me if you can.
Today in our lesson the Psalmist David in this beautiful 104th Psalm is declaring that the almighty God, the creator of heaven and earth and all that dwell therein is able to make the birds sing again in our lives. He is able to water the dry streams and out of any darkness, bring light, joy, peace and reconciliation.
There is no situation that God is not aware of. He makes grass grow for the cattle, and plants for man to cultivate so that the earth brings forth fruit. He set the earth on its foundations; it can never be moved. He makes springs pour water into the ravines, it flows between the mountains. They give water to all the beasts of the field donkeys quench their thirst. How many are your works, O Lord! In wisdom you made them all, the earth is full of your creatures.
God provides for his creatures. When he withholds his breath they return to dust. Yet His Spirit can create new life. Every living thing and person is dependent on God for He is the author of life, so we should always be filled with gratitude for all the gifts of life, mind soul and body!
All things bright and beautiful, all creatures great and small, all things wise and wonderful, the lord God makes them all. Each little flower that opens, each little bird that sings; He made their glowing colors, He made their tiny wings.

o E-mail rubyanndarling@yahoo.com or write to P.O. Box 19725 SS Nassau, Bahamas with your prayer requests, concerns and comments. God's Blessings.

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News Article

May 25, 2012
Thunderstom watch update

The Bahamas Department of Meteorology has just issued a severe thunderstorm watch update; from 1:55 p.m. until 4:00pm Friday 25th, may 2012.

A severe thunderstorm watch is now in effect for Andros, New Providence, Berry Islands, South Abaco, Middle and Upper Exuma Cays, Eleuthera, Northern Cat Island and their adjacent waters.

At 1:50 p.m. radar and satellite data indicated lines and clusters of thunderstorms pushing east and northeastward from central Cuba and the Great Bahama Bank, across the tongue of the ocean toward the watched areas.
Some of these thunderstorms are heavy to occasionally severe at times causing strong gusty winds, dangerous lightning, heavy downpours, flooding in low-lying areas, and possible waterspout or tornadic activity.
Boaters in the warning areas should seek safe harbour and residents in the warning areas should stay indoors and away from windows until conditions improve.
All boaters in the watched areas should remain alert and residents in the watched areas should try to remain in doors.

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News Article

April 24, 2012
That unsuspecting, sneaky sexually transmitted disease

Measles, mumps, rubella, diphtheria - Genea Barry ensured that her children had all of their required immunizations as infants, be she never thought about having her pre-teen daughters vaccinated against the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). HPV is a common virus that is passed from one person to another through direct skin-to-skin contact during sexual activity.
According to the United States Center for Disease Control (CDC), the HPV infection is most common in people in their late teens and early 20s. And there are about 40 types of the virus that can infect the genital areas of men and women. The CDC site reports that most HPV types cause no symptoms and can go away on their own, but some types can cause cervical cancer in women, and other less common cancers - like cancers of the anus, penis, vagina and vulva (external genital area of the female) and oropharynx (back of throat, including base of tongue and tonsils). Other types of HPV can cause warts in the genital areas of men and women. Genital warts are not a life-threatening disease, but they can cause emotional stress and their treatment can be very uncomfortable.

Who will get HPV
Most sexually active people will get HPV at some time in their lives, though most will never even know it. Annually in the United States, 12,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer and 4,000 women die from the disease.
The CDC recommends that girls as young as 11 be vaccinated against the virus and that the vaccine can also be given to girls beginning at age nine years.
"I still don't know how I feel about my daughters being vaccinated against HPV. I mean they shouldn't be having sex in the first place which is how it is contracted, but from the information I am hearing now I see that having the vaccine should be a good precaution from developing cervical cancer. I take regular pap smears and I know checking myself out is good in order to prevent developing this cancer so I would be a hypocrite not to want my daughters to have the best opportunities as well," said Barry.
Any female who is sexually active is subject to acquiring HPV and should get an annual checkup from the time she becomes active, according to Dr. Mildred Hall-Watson, gynecologist and obstetrician at the Health Care Center for Women.
She said contracting HPV does not have to be life-threatening if women take precautions, and are diligent about their health. Once detected, the disease can be carefully monitored and successfully treated so that more serious illnesses like cervical cancer don't develop later on.
"HPV is a sexually transmitted disease, but due to research we have been able to define this illness a bit more. Within diagnosing HPV there are several sub types which vary from low to high association with cervical cancer. This means that not all types of HPV can develop into cancer if unchecked. In fact, some strains can be virtually harmless while others can cause venereal warts which can develop on the outer lips, inside the vagina or on the cervix itself. But once appropriately treated, there are usually no long term negative side affects," she said.

Reduce the risk
To reduce the risk of getting HPV, it is suggested that couples be monogamous in their sexual relationships and use condoms, especially if they aren't. Even if one is not sexually active it is still recommended that young ladies start their pap smears at the age of 21 since cervical cancer can still develop as a result of other factors.
The Princess Margaret Hospital opened its first HPV laboratory recently, and with the help of the PMH Foundation and Rotary Club International, the necessary equipment and reagents were able to be purchased to set up the lab.
"HPV screening is now much easier for local physicians due to the latest addition to the Princess Margaret Hospital, the HPV lab which was donated by many corporate, charity and individual sponsors in particular the Rotary Clubs of The Bahamas. This means that there will be more testing opportunities available. Prior to this time we didn't have certain equipment, space and reagents to properly prepare test slides, so while it's a really great step for HPV testing in our country, I do hope more people will be encouraged to get tested so that cervical cancer can be reduced and eventually not exist at all in our country," said the doctor.
Sixty-nine-year-old Sylvita Carey, said she wouldn't think twice about ensuring her granddaughters get vaccinated against such a preventable STD.
"As a parent I would want to think that my underage grandchildren are not out there sexually [but] I can't bury my head in the dirt and pretend, so I definitely would get my girls vaccinated," she said.

Pap smear
Dr. Hall-Watson said much like other cancers, cervical cancer can take years to develop, but with routine checkups and pap smears, changes in the cells of the cervix can be detected earlier and result in more effective treatment.
"Many women are afraid to get a pap smear or avoid it entirely, but this should not be. Recent statistics in the country about the numbers of women doing their annual pap smear has decreased and in some islands there are no reports of women doing their annual cervical checkup at all. This is by no means a reflection of a lack of availability or resources as efforts and equipment have been provided to do these things. So it is more so a lack of interest or education on the importance of doing this exam that is a major component in these exams not being done in my view. So we are really pushing for more women to be aware that cervical cancer is very real and very painful and also very preventable," she said.
A pap smear (a procedure in which a physician swabs a woman's cervix during a routine gynecological checkup in order to collect samples of the cervical cells) can be uncomfortable but virtually painless. It takes less than a minute to conduct, and can cost between $30 to over a $100 depending on the type or specificity of the test required, according to Dr. Hall-Watson. But she said the small price to do this annual test is far less expensive and time consuming than avoiding it, and then possibly having to go through the stresses of developing cancer then having to do a surgery which is around $40,000 and undergoing the physical and emotional stresses of chemotherapy treatments. She said it can also eliminate potential familial strains that can often result from long term cancer treatment.

Treatment
Due to technological advances in medicine there are several options when it comes to treatment. Some doctors will do an office-based procedure called the colposcopy where they look at the cervix through a microscope and determine where abnormal cells are and biopsy them. This will allow the doctor to see if things are as expected, better or worse than expected. Once there has been a determination, the actual treatment options include getting a cryosurgery which is basically the freezing of the affected part of the cervix in order to destroy the pre-cancerous tissue.
Another option is the loop excision, which uses a hot medical knife to cauterize pre-cancerous lesions. A cone biopsy, a procedure in which a cone-shaped area of the cervix is removed is another common option.
Hall-Watson said if a female is still in her child-bearing years the least invasive or damaging procedure is usually suggested.
There are two follow-up colposcopy centers for persons needing to keep on top of their health after getting positive results from their pap smears - the oncology center at the Princess Margaret Hospital and the other is located at the South Beach clinic.

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News Article

June 15, 2012
Bahamas and Holy See of the Vatican strengthen ties

The Commonwealth of The Bahamas and the Holy See, Vatican, pledged to strengthen diplomatic relations in the areas of education, the rights and dignity of persons and serving the poor. These sentiments were expressed during the presentation of credentials by Archbishop Nicola Girasoli, Apostolic Nuncio of the Holy See to The Bahamas during a ceremony at Government House on Thursday, June 14, 2012.
Deputy to the Governor General Dame Marguerite Pindling, in accepting the credentials, acknowledged the importance of the event, in that the Constitution of The Bahamas and the Social Doctrine of the Holy See are both founded on Judaeo-Christian principles. There is also consonance of foreign policy, especially with respect to international development, the environment and counter terrorism, she said.
"The Bahamas is also cognizant of the foreign policy emphasis of the Holy See, on the rights and dignity of every person. The Bahamas therefore recognizes and is grateful for the continuity of diplomatic relations with The Holy See."
The Holy See through its Catholic institutions in The Bahamas has demonstrated this commitment in the areas of education, health, social welfare and rehabilitation. "These provide a most solid foundation on which to strengthen and further our bilateral relations," Dame Marguerite said. In this regard, she noted that the Holy See has been most insightful and proactive in prioritizing for further relations, the importance of family life, and the particular advantages and synergies of regional cooperation, "not only because of the effects of globalization, but also because of the continuing impact of the global economic downturn," she said. Referring to his curriculum vitae, which shows that his diplomatic experience spans major regions of the world, Dame Marguerite said she believes the Nuncio possesses the capabilities to fulfil his pledge to promote the greater good of The Bahamas through mutual cooperation. Archbishop Girasoli, 54, was born on July 21, 1957 at Ruvo di Puglia in the Province of Bari, Italy. He was ordained a priest on June 15, 1980 with incardination in the diocese of Ruvo di Puglia. He possesses a doctorate in Canon law. The archbishop has been in the diplomatic service of the Holy See since May 10, 1985 and speaks English, French and Spanish besides his native tongue, Italian. The archbishop arrived in The Bahamas on Tuesday, June 12 for a three-day visit. He paid courtesy calls on Prime Minister Perry Christie, Fred Mitchell, minister of foreign affairs and immigration, and members of the diplomatic corps. He was accompanied by Archbishop Patrick Pinder of the Catholic Archdiocese of Nassau.

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News Article

April 19, 2012
Make a sincere effort to seek the kingdom of God

But seek ye first the kingdom of God, and His righteousness; and all these things shall be added unto you. -- St. Matthew 6:33.
Our lesson text today is a very familiar verse of scripture that can be quoted by many. While being able to roll it off the tongue, how many have taken it to be the benchmark of success? How many have used it as the basic tenet of faith in training up their children in the way they should go? As a matter of fact, how many really believe this to be the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth?
The violent happenings in our land, especially among the youth is a loud call of national distress. No amount of foreign investment can offset the tragic loss of male life. When the quality of life is diminished among young men, the hope of the future is bleak.
Barely do I get written responses from my weekly messages, but does that mean I should not continue with the witness and the message? Indeed not! If the message is despised and the messenger rejected, then the consequences of not receiving will allow sorrow to roll like billowing seas.
Thinking of the consequences of judgment and punishment at the last day, of losing heaven and going to hell: nor even of the sorrow and loss we may perhaps bring in some future time upon others by our past misdoing, is not sufficient. That kind of observation will not bring the kingdom to us or to others. Here is the cure.
We must return to our Father at once and tell Him of our sorrow and ask for His gracious face to look upon us again, and for His help and guidance to put the wrong right, and to let us be His faithful servants again and the children of His love. And this He will certainly allow. For when we call Him our Father we mean that which is true. He really is our Father and what He desires is just for us to come back to Him. He will not keep us waiting for His forgiveness, but is already ready to welcome us.
But why is it that we find or make it difficult to trust Him so simply. Our Lord Jesus came and lived and taught and died for us just that we might know Him and trust Him when our hearts fail. Come to me He said. Come with me and I will bring you to our Father, your Father and mine. That is why we end our prayers with "Through Jesus Christ our Lord" or "For Jesus Christ's sake" -- He is our mediator.
Can we find the kingdom of God via Google, or through treasure hunts, a voyage around the world, archeological discovery, even by having national primaries and elections? Indeed not. The Bible says that the Kingdom of God is within you or among you.
Trying to play upon words whether it is within or among, matters little. What matters is that the kingdom is already here in our midst only to be recognized within our hearts, in the quiet loving thoughts which no disturbance outside can destroy. Sometimes our minds within us are themselves disturbed, as mine was a few days ago. It is at this time we can best find the kingdom -- by looking at others, at God's mercies operating around us. At the good examples others afford us. At the unexpected undiscovered kindnesses shown us by others, or even by the richness of a Sunday morning church service.
Our business is not to take the measure of our own progress. We are sent here to stick to the precept and to do right, not to plan our course and other peoples but to do good. A good conscience is a conscience open toward God, not an easily satisfied conscience. A broken contrite heart is the sacrifice. Those who are most conscious of wrong within, who confess most frequently to failure, are asking the most honest search for the kingdom -- the kingdom in which we build and are built by God's righteousness not our own.
Today, make a sincere effort to seek first the kingdom of God, and His righteousness. The treasure of such a divine search would be all that your heart should desire.

oE-mail rubyanndarling@yahoo.com or write to P.O. Box 19725 SS, Nassau, Bahamas, with your prayer requests, concerns and comments. God's Blessings!

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