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News Article

June 29, 2012
Volleyball uniforms go missing outside Kendal Isaacs gym

The head coach of the women's national volleyball team yesterday launched an impassioned plea for the return of $7,000 worth of men's and women's uniforms stolen outside the Kendal G.L. Isaacs National Gymnasium on Tuesday.
The teams were dealt a major blow when their playing gear was snatched from head coach Joe Smith's truck as the teams practiced inside the gym. The robbers gained access to Smith's vehicle by smashing the window on the driver's side. Smith, head coach of the national women's squad, was alerted to the incident just minutes after it happened. He also appealed to the business community to assist in the purchase of new uniforms if those stolen are not returned.
"We had just gotten the uniforms for the national teams. They were in my truck which was parked outside," said Smith. "During the practice, one of the coaches came and said that there had been a robbery. Everyone left the gym, came outside and saw that my truck was broken into and all of the uniforms were stolen.
"We had 50 sets (in two boxes) which would have covered both the men and women's teams - the jerseys, pants, coaches' shirts along with the paraphernalia that they would have needed. They were valued at about $7,000. That's because we had to pay duty on them. We brought them in from Mississippi, the Adidas factory."
The two teams are currently training for the Caribbean Volleyball Championships (CVC), set to take place in St. Croix, the U.S. Virgin Islands. The unfortunate incident has placed the executive members of the Bahamas Volleyball Federation (BVF) in a tight spot. They are now scrambling to replace the stolen gear before the teams travel. The men's squad will leave for competition on July 13, and the women's team will head off on July 22.
The CVC is a regional tournament used as a qualifier for major international tournaments, for the English-speaking countries in the Caribbean. The Bahamas men's team is one of the favorites in the tournament. The women's squad is also a threat to some of the powerhouses like Trinidad and Tobago and Barbados.
Smith said: "We have about two more weeks before the teams travel. We are pleading to the communities and the businesses, through the media houses, to come on broad to help us replenish these uniforms. So far, we have spoken with some companies, Scotiabank, The Bahamas Eye Center, Royal Bank of Canada, and the Bahamas Olympic Committee (BOC). We have sent pleas to them to see if they can help us with this endeavor so we can try and get the uniforms back. The teams cannot go unless they are uniformed.
"I brought them (the uniforms) to the gym so we can get them to the printers. The uniforms were going to get the flag, numbers and The Bahamas' name printed on them. They just came in from the couriers. We just cleared them and brought them to the gym so we could have given them to the guy who was coming to collect them to do the printing. This is definitely a setback. We just hope that mentally, it is not a setback. Practice was at its lowest that night. We basically had to shut practice down. People were not concentrating anymore on that."
Practice sessions for the two national teams were held again yesterday. Smith was confident that the two squads could bounce back from the blow on Tuesday. Noting that the time to travel was rapidly approaching, he encouraged the players to focus on the game, and to allow the executive members to concentrate on the missing uniforms.
According to Smith, a thorough investigation was launched by the Royal Bahamas Police Force. The uniforms were the newest models just released by Adidas. Smith begged the public not to purchase any of the attire and asked the culprits to return the uniforms.

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News Article

July 02, 2012
Bahamas looked to add more medals before championships closed

A final push towards the medal podium was made by Team Bahamas in the closing session of the Central American and Caribbean Junior A and B Championships.
Up to press time, The Bahamas was sitting in sixth place with a total of 24 medals, three gold, eight silver and 13 bronze. Jamaica was out front with 30 medals, followed by Mexico and Puerto Rico with 14 medals each. The Dominican Republic had won five gold medals and had an overall total of nine medals, so far, which gave them the edge over Trinidad and Tobago who had won 15 medals, but only four gold. The championships were staged in San Salvador, El Salvador. No result from the evening session was available up to press time.
In the first session of the final day of competition, Taryn Rolle hopped, skipped and jumped her way onto the medal podium. She had a best of 11.77m in the triple jump event for B girls and picked up a bronze medal. The golden mark was 12.16m turned in by Tamara Moncrieffe of Jamaica and Lopez Garrido Mayeli was second with 12.03m.
Tamara Myers followed the medaling suit of Rolle by the second bronze medal on the day in the triple jump for A girls. Myers landed 12.42m for bronze. Placing fifth overall was Antonique Butler 11.63m.
In the discus throw B girls' final, Brashe Wood had a best of 38.30m, which was good enough for a bronze. The winning throw was marked at 50.24m, which now stands as a new championship record. Bahamian Denise Taylor held the old record, of 43.50m, which was set back on June 28, 1986. Racquel Williams was just shy of capturing a medal, in the discus throw A girls' final. Of the six throws, Williams' best was 36.02m.
Carmiesha Cox ran 24.18 seconds for silver in the 200m B girls' final. She trailed Saqukine Cameron of Jamaica who posted 24.10 seconds for the gold. Natalliah Whyte was third in 24.35 seconds. Also running that race was Makeya White, of The Bahamas. The time of 21.33 seconds gave Blake Bartlett the bronze in the 200m A boys final. Teammate Teray Smith was expected to run in the final but was a no show.
White's time of 24.91 seconds placed her seventh overall. Janeko Cartwright was also seventh, in the 200m B boys' final. His time was 21.78 seconds.
The relay squad of Kadeisha Hield, Devynne Charlton, White and Cox placed second overall in 45.72 seconds. The gold, for the girls 4x100m relay B, went to Jamaica and the bronze to Trinidad and Tobago. In the 4x100m relay final for boys in the B division, The Bahamas was third in 41.61 seconds. That team consisted of Cliff Resias, Janeko Cartwright, Delano Davis and Rashad Gibson. Jamaica took home the gold and Dominican Republic the silver.
The team of Smith, Anthony Farrington, Shane Jones and Bartlett posted 39.80 seconds for the silver in the A final. Jamaica would take the gold, once again, and Trinidad and Tobago was third.

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News Article

May 19, 2014
Jibrilu new tourism director general

Minister of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe has confirmed the appointment of Joy Ann Jibrilu as the new director general of tourism, replacing 30-year tourism veteran David Johnson, who will become the new chief executive officer of the Hotel Corporation of The Bahamas and lead that organization's transition to the Tourism Development Corporation.
The organizational restructuring comes amid the Ministry of Tourism's efforts to become more responsive to increased global demands and changing trends within the global tourism market, as well as its efforts to increase airlift, inventory, new tourism infrastructure and room nights in The Bahamas.
Jibrilu is the current director of the Bahamas Investment Authority within the Office of the Prime Minister. In that capacity, she was instrumental in the invigoration of the tourism plant, brand and product.
Called to the Bahamas Bar in 1989, she served as legal advisor in the Ministry of Finance during 2007 and 2008 and as a consultant to the Ministry of Financial Services and Investment between 2005 and 2007. She also served as a director on the boards of several agencies including the Securities Commission of The Bahamas, the Bahamas Financial Services Board and the Domestic Investment Board.
The new director general will be supported by a team of young, talented Bahamian professionals including Ellison "Tommy" Thompson, the current deputy director general of tourism, who will now assume responsibilities for global marketing. Other key appointments to this dynamic team will be made shortly.
The Ministry of Tourism has initiated a bold and aggressive program to increase The Bahamas' share of the tourism market by tapping into markets in North America, Latin America, Europe, Asia and the Caribbean.
This new tourism marketing thrust includes an expansion of the ministry's digital platform and networking presence on social media websites such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and other websites that would enhance the country's virtual presence globally.
"With this organizational restructuring, new tourism plants and brands, an innovative marketing strategy including sports and religious tourism in addition to tapping into niche markets, the Bahamian tourism product is poised for a massive resurgence" said Wilchcombe.

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News Article

May 14, 2012
The 1970s showcased speed demon Turner

There is a long list of speed merchants of Bahamian baseball. In the early decades, players like Tyrone McGregor, Lou Adderley and Basil 'Slick' Burrows set the pace on the base paths during Bahamas Baseball Association (BBA) games.
The 1970s however produced a special set of artists, skilled in getting from first to second, to third and home plate very quickly. It was a fearless lot, those speedsters trotted out by the top teams. Roosevelt 'Bruso' Turner of Del Jane (the organization known at times also as St. Pauli Girls Barons and Holsten Knights) was arguably the best. Turner also played for Beck's Beer.
He won the league scoring titles from 1972 to 1978 with the exception of the one year, 1977. In winning his six scoring titles, the first two for Beck's, Turner hit the 50 runs scored mark four times, his highest being 55 in 1975 for Del Jane. He had 50 in 1972 for Beck's, 53 in 1976 for Holsten Knights and 54 in 1978, also for Holsten.
However, his Holsten teammate Eddie Ford scored 58 in 1977. That mark is considered to be the all-time record. Jayson Moxey won the runs scored title in 1971 with 19 and Anthony Smith won in 1970 with 15. In the stolen bases department, Turner again separated himself from his peers. He won four stolen bases crowns (1972, 1973, 1974 and 1977). His 48 in 1972 is thought to be a record.
The 1970s also produced two pure speed specialists. The Schlitz Beer Franchise (also 100 Pipers and Bahamian Lumber) sort of took a page out of the book of Charlie Finley who owned the Oakland Athletics of the American League. Finley who was known for novelty tactics, once signed a track star named Herb Washington, just to steal bases. Washington never had an at-bat or played anywhere in the field. He was called into the game exclusively to pinch-run. Washington's career did not last too long because he had no baseball background.
During the 1974 and 1975 seasons, he stole 31 bases in 48 attempts and scored 33 times. He was never a big factor and Finley soon got tired of the exploration and let Washington go. Schlitz though, had Gordon Farrington and Anthony 'Skeebo' Roberts. They were different from Washington. Both Farrington and Roberts understood baseball.
Nevertheless, they were asked primarily to generate runs by stealing bases. It was an exciting time when they reached first base. Everybody in the park knew they were going to attempt a steal of second and if they got there, it was a try for third. They made for an added dimension of excitement to the 1970s.
Then of course, there were the regular starters around the league with speed, players like Jayson Moxey, Richard Lockhart, Eddie Ford, Lorenzo Lockhart, Ron Smith and Anthony Huyler. None of them were as successful however, as Turner. He was the biggest threat on base. Indeed, Roosevelt Turner was the speed king of Bahamian baseball in the 1970s. The statistics indicate as much.
Milestone statistics provided by Sports Historian Jeff Williams. To respond to this column, kindly contact Fred Sturrup at sturrup1504@gmail.com.

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News Article

May 10, 2012
Mathieu runs 10.30 in 100m will focus on half-lapper at Olympics

Michael Mathieu is one of just three Bahamians to qualify at the 'A' standard for the athletics portion of the 2012 Olympic Games in two individual events, creating a precarious situation of whether or not he would go after the double at the Olympics.
Well, prior to running in the second leg of the Brazilian Athletics Tour yesterday, he squashed that notion, by stating that he intends to focus solely on the 200 meters (m) at next month's Scotiabank Olympic Trials, thereby setting himself up to run just that individual event at the Olympics. Although he won't contest the 400m, Mathieu said he will still be available for the men's 4x400m relay, which is scheduled to start the day after the men's 200m final, at the London Olympics. On Sunday, he ran a national record setting time of 20.16 seconds for first place in the 200m at the first leg of the Brazilian Athletics Tour in Belem, and yesterday in Fortaleza, he tied a personal best time of 10.30 seconds for first place in the 100m. Brazilians Bruno Lins Tenorio de Barros and Diego Henrique de Farias Cavalcanti were second and third respectively, in times of 10.31 seconds and 10.42 seconds.
"I'm feeling pretty good," said Mathieu yesterday. " I just want to thank God for blessing me with my heart's desire. My goal was to set the national record (200m) at this meet, based on my training and fitness. Going into the race, I felt that I could do it or at least come close to it, so it's a great feeling to set my mark for a particular event and reach it.
"Dominic Demeritte was a great sprinter for The Bahamas and I knew the record was going to be hard to obtain, but I had faith in my ability. Last year, my focus was on the 400m, but I managed to run 20.38 early in the year so I decided to focus on the 200m for the World Championships. This year my focus is on the 200m and that's all I'm focused on," he added.
Former St. John's College sprinter Demeritte had the old national record in the 200m, 20.21 seconds, which he ran twice in 2002. On Sunday, Mathieu was able to lower that time in 35 degree weather in Belem, Brazil. He was poised to qualify for last year's 200m final at the Daegu World Championships but pulled up with a hip flexor injury in the semi-finals. He
finished the year with a season's best time of 20.38 seconds, and was more than two tenths faster than that time on Sunday.
"Last year, I think I would have done well if I didn't get injured," said Mathieu. "This year, I'm prepared to run the 200m and hopefully the 4x400m. The schedule for the 200m and the 4x400m at the Olympics is different than it was for last year's World Championships, so if I do make the final for the 200, I will still be able to run the 4x400 final, so that shouldn't be a problem," he added.
Last year, the heats and semis of the 200m and the final of the 4x400m were held on the same day at the World Championships. This year at the Olympics, the men's 4x400m heats are scheduled to be held the day after the men's 200m final. The final of the men's 4x400m is scheduled to be held the day after the heats.
As for the Scotiabank Olympic Trials, they are set for June 22-23 at the new Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium, and the athletics portion of this summer's Olympics are set to run from Friday, August 3 to Sunday, August 12, in London, England.

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News Article

May 10, 2012
Lynden Pindling continues to sparkle in baseball

His name is Lynden Pindling III.
It's an iconic name. The first prime minister in The Bahamas carried that name. His political legacy included being the accepted 'Father of the Nation'. He was the lead figure on the journey to majority rule in The Bahamas. Independence and the all-important National Insurance program are attached to his name more so than anyone else.
Sir Lynden Pindling was indeed and remains an inspiration to generations of Bahamians and some Caribbean historians. The burden of that name, Lynden Pindling III has had to shoulder. His frame is not as tiny as it was when he first started playing baseball around the age of 10. Now he is a well-defined 5' 9", 175-pounder who happens to be one of the finest Bahamian athletes.
In an unassuming manner, so different from an abundantly visible and charismatic grandfather, Lynden Pindling III has quietly, but steadily gone about establishing his very own identity, as a top sports talent. When one says the name Lynden Pindling now, the thought isn't automatically to the great politician.
There is that other Lynden Pindling. He plays baseball. He is a 20-year-old junior at Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee and one of the best to ever play in the Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference (SCAC). The baseball credentials of Lynden Pindling III are sterling. His parents, Obie and Diane Pindling, are happy with his overall progress.
"We're all very proud of him, especially that he carries a 3.0 plus grade point average (GPA). Going into his finals (last week) he was 3.19 so we won't know his final GPA for another few weeks. Rhodes is one of the most academically-challenging liberal arts schools in the United States. Lynden is majoring in accounting and business with a minor in Spanish," informed the senior Pindling.
There is of course, the two-fold student/athlete brilliance as far as Lynden Pindling III is concerned. He is the best batter for the Rhodes College Lynx. During the just completed season, Pindling led the team with a .395 batting average from the full 42 games, all of which he started at shortstop. He collected 58 hits in 147 official at-bats, 12 of his safeties being doubles. Pindling also drove in 35 runs and scored 40 times. His average was sixth best in the conference.
For the 2011 season, he batted .361 to lead Rhodes College. He went 57 for 158 with 12 doubles and 25 runs batted in (RBIs). This past season, the March 12-18 period got him a lot of national attention. Pindling went 9-for-16 and led Rhodes to a 5-0 win/loss record. His on-base percentage was .652. He was named Conference Offensive Player of the Week.
He's on a path that could very well lead to the Major Leagues. Scouts are watching him closely and once his success trend continues on the diamond, barring any severe injury, Pindling is certain to be a prominent draft choice of one of the organizations in Major League Baseball (MLB) in the not too distant future.
Best wishes Lynden!

To respond to this column, kindly contact Fred Sturrup at sturrup1504@gmail.com.

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News Article

May 16, 2012
BAAA's 60 years of growth, a Bahamian sports standard

The Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations (BAAA) has covered six decades and is moving steadily through another. The organization was born as the Bahamas Amateur Athletic Association in 1952. From a humble beginning with the first medals, regional ones, coming not until the 1957 West Indies Federation Games, the BAAA grew to world prominence.
Gold medals have been won at all levels of regional and international events, in abundance. With the BAAA scheduling a 60th anniversary affair at the Thomas Augustus Robinson National Stadium for Sunday, May 27, winning medals against the best the world has to offer has become a certainty.
It is a powerful statement The Bahamas, through the BAAA, has made to the world. While great nations such as India, Chile, Ecuador, South Africa, Venezuela, Egypt, Israel, Colombia, Chinese Taipei and many others much larger than The Bahamas, struggle mightily to get into the medal mix, we consistently put athletes on podiums no matter how grand the stage.
Without a doubt, the BAAA has been and remains one of the great sports pillars in the country. Sailing blazed the trail with Sir Durward Knowles winning the 1947 Star Class World Championship (with Sloane Farrington as crew); the first Bahamian Olympic medal (a bronze in 1956, again with Farrington as crew), and the first Olympic gold medal (1964 with Cecil Cooke as crew).
Bobby Symonette bested the world in the 5.5 Metre Series and Ocean Racing; and Pierre Siegenthaler and Donnie Martinborough have been superb in winning World Sunfish Sailing titles. Others such as Winifred Sands, Kenneth Albury, the Kelly brothers (Godfrey, Basil and David), Foster Clarke and Roy Ramsay have been outstanding in regional competition.
Yes, much to be proud of was produced by our sailing ambassadors. The BAAA has been constant. From 1992 to the present, athletes from the BAAA have collected Olympic medals for The Bahamas. It's really an incredible record of consistency the BAAA has had. We expect so much, because of having been blessed so abundantly in sports. When you compare The Bahamas to the nations aforementioned however, we might be considered a country that continues to over-achieve.
Much is owed to the BAAA. Robinson was on that national team at the 1957 West Indies Federation Games. He won a bronze medal in the 100 while teaming up with Oscar Francis, Enoch Backford and Tom Grant to win the sprint relay bronze. That was the start for the BAAA. Robinson became a regional legend in track and field and was the first Bahamian from the sport to reach a final at the Olympics (1964 in Tokyo, Japan).
Frank Rutherford was the pioneer Olympic medal winner in track and field due to his triple jump bronze medal in 1992 at the Barcelona Games. The original Golden Girls (Pauline Davis, Chandra Sturrup, Eldece Clarke, Savatheda Fynes and Debbie Ferguson) won a silver medal in the sprint relay at the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games and the gold four years later in Sydney, Australia. Davis won the 200 meters gold in Sydney.
In Athens, Greece, in 2004, Tonique Williams-Darling was the 400 meters gold medal winner and Ferguson won a 200 meters bronze. In 2008, in Beijing, the 1,600 men's relay team won a silver medal and Leevan Sands duplicated Rutherford's feat with a triple jump bronze. Troy Kemp, the original Golden Girls, Ferguson, quarter-miler Avard Moncur, Williams-Darling, and high jumper Donald Thomas won world championships. The BAAA has paraded out scores of junior regional and world champions.
Quite frankly, today around the world when The Bahamas is mentioned, most would say they know that "the country is very good in track and field". Without a doubt, the BAAA and the sport it governs are more synonymous with our country than anything else. That's the true measure of the organization.
Robinson these days just smiles at the knowledge "of us coming so very far".
"To me the years seem to have flown by. I have to pinch myself sometimes. Fifty-five years have gone by since we got the medals in Jamaica at the West Indies Federation Games. When you really think of all that we've accomplish and you put us next to a good number of the largest countries in the world, you know, we've done well," said Robinson.
Indeed, and, it was 54 years ago that he sent that big message to the world that The Bahamas produced top track and field talent. He won the 220-yards dash and finished second in the 100 yards at the Commonwealth Games that year in Cardiff, Wales. The BAAA has grown in leaps and bounds over 60 years. President Mike Sands and his colleagues are to be congratulated on behalf of what they have done to craft the legacy. I salute also the administrations before his.
It's been a great run for the BAAA family! Celebrate the milestone with them on May 27!
(To respond to this column, kindly contact Fred Sturrup at sturrup1504@gmail.com)

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News Article

June 30, 2014
National team roster finalized ahead of CBC Championships

The Bahamas senior men's national basketball team has made its final cut, ahead of the Caribbean Basketball Confederation (CBC) Senior Championships in Tortola, British Virgin Islands this week. The men will begin play tomorrow against St. Vincent and the Grenadines at 12 noon local time. The tournament will run until July 5.
The 12 players who were chosen to represent The Bahamas are: Alonzo "C.J." Hinds, Marvin Gray, Ray Rose, L.J. Rose, Mitchell Johnson, Eugene Bain, Scottie Farrington, Bennet Davis, Dwight Coleby, Kadeem Coleby, Magnum Rolle and Anwar Ferguson.
The Bahamas will be one of four teams in Group A, alongside Antigua and Barbuda, St. Vincent and the Grenadines and Cuba. Group B consists of the U.S. Virgin Islands, the British Virgin Islands, Guyana and Barbados.
On June 20, the country sent 24 of the its top players to Fort Collins, Colorado to train. The head coach of Team Bahamas is Colorado State University (CSU) Head Coach Larry Eustachy; the Bahamian team trained at CSU's gym, Moby Arena.
The group of players assembled for the workouts was considered one of the best in a long time, and the length of time it took to make a verdict on the final roster spoke volumes to the skill level of each player present. The talent pool was mostly made up of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I players and professional players.
"I would like to thank Charles Robins, Bahamas Basketball Federation (BBF) president; Mario Bowleg, BBF vice president; Steve Barnes, CSU assistant coach; Colorado State University and the Fort Collins community, not to mention the entire Bahamas Basketball Federation for all of their efforts and support over the past nine days," said Eustachy.
"It took a tremendous amount of work to make this training camp a success. The past nine days could not have been better. To cut from 24 players to 12 was not easy, but we feel that we have the right 12. The difficulty of the decision really speaks to the amount of talent gathered for this camp and the support of the entire Bahamas Basketball Federation."
The team needs to finish in the top three at the CBC Championships in order to qualify for the Centrobasket Championship later this summer. Those championships will be held in Tepic, Nayarit, in west-central Mexico. Centrobasket is a FIBA-sponsored basketball tournament where national teams from Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean participate. FIBA (International Basketball Federation) is the world's governing body for basketball.
The countries in the Centrobasket region make up the Central American and Caribbean Confederation (CONCENCABA). The top four teams from Centrobasket advance to the FIBA Americas Championship, where they have a chance to qualify for the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

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News Article

May 12, 2014
Relay team experiencing some challenges

Other than the men's 4x400 meters (m), which appears to be as solid as ever, the remainder of Team Bahamas could be experiencing some serious challenges going into the inaugural International Association of Athletic Federations (IAAF) World Relay Championships.
The deadline for submission of names to the IAAF office in Monaco was yesterday, and up to the 11th hour, team officials were still tight-lipped in relation to the final make-up of the team, despite a festive world relays promotion last Friday in which the team was officially announced.
A 38-member team was initially named, but according to sources yesterday, that number had to be reduced. The IAAF World Relays Bahamas 2014 is just a dozen days away, set for May 24-25 at the Thomas A. Robinson National Stadium.
The men's sprint relay team, in particular, will apparently suffer some losses. That seems to be the unit hit the hardest. National record holder in the men's 100m, Derrick Atkins, is no longer in the picture, and two of the fastest Bahamian sprinters this year, Shavez Hart and Trevorvano Mackey, apparently have school commitments.
"No one has heard from Derrick. We don't know if he is dead or alive," said Mike Sands, president of the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations (BAAA), yesterday. "It's unfortunate but that's just how it is."
BAAA executives were lodged in a meeting late last night; up until press time, there was still no word on the official presentation of the team to the IAAF.
The coaches for the squad are Rupert Gardiner and Fritz Grant. Gardiner said yesterday that they remain optimistic, despite the challenges they might be facing.
"When you look at this team, the men's 4x400m in particular, to have three of the guys running 45-point over the weekend, and Michael ran 45.34 about a week ago, that shows that our guys are ready to run a pretty strong 4x400 for the world relays. Also, when you factor in LaToy running a 45.5 recently, we have the legs to do some good things in the men's 4x400m. Overall, that's five guys who have run 45, so I expect the 'Golden Knights' to go out there and put on a show for the Bahamian people," said Gardiner. "For the other relays, we still have a number of our top athletes coming in with the exception of the college kids. Shavez Hart and Trevorvano Mackey are on the borderline not to come because of school commitments, but we still have athletes like Adrian Griffith, Warren Fraser, Blake Bartlett and Jamial Rolle. It might not be as strong as we would have liked it to be, but it still has the potential to be a very strong team. With the 4x200m, we might have to use some of the guys from the 4x400m and the 4x100m, but I still expect them to perform well," he added.
In relation to national record holder Atkins, Gardiner reiterated the sentiments of Sands.
"We tried to contact Derrick over and over, and he hasn't responded to us. I think that's a slap in the face. For someone who holds the national record, he should have responded, and he hasn't."
As mentioned, The Bahamas still has the services of Griffith, Fraser, Bartlett, Rolle and Johnathon Farquharson in the men's sprint relay. Rolle, Stephen Newbold, Steven Gardiner, Alonzo Russell and Kendrick Hanna are listed for the men's 4x200m; Chris Brown, Demetrius Pinder, Ramon Miller, Michael Mathieu, LaToy Williams, Wesley Neymour, Andretti Bain and Jeffery Gibson are listed in the relay pool for the men's 4x400m.
Brown, Pinder and Miller all ran in the men's 400m at the Guadeloupe International Athletics Meet over the weekend, and all three turned in respectable times.
Miller was second, in 45.21 seconds; Brown finished third, in 45.23 seconds and Pinder was fourth, in 45.59 seconds. Trinidadian Lalonde Gordon won the race, in 44.91 seconds. Over at the Seiko Golden Grand Prix in Tokyo, Japan, Mathieu ran in the 100m and 200m events. He was fourth in the 100m, in 10.41 seconds, behind Americans Justin Gatlin (10.02) and Mike Rodgers (10.11) and Frenchman Christopher Lemaitre (10.31). Mathieu was second in the men's 200m in 20.64 seconds, behind Grenadian Kirani James (20.63).
As far as the women for Team Bahamas are concerned, for the World Relays, initially named for the 4x100m relay pool were Sheniqua Ferguson, Shaunae Miller, Cache Armbrister, Anthonique Strachan, V'Alonee Robinson, Tynia Gaither and Tayla Carter. For the women's 4x200m, the athletes named were Nivea Smith, Tayla Carter, Keianna Albury, Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie, Lanece Clarke and Rashan Brown, although national record holder in that event, Ferguson-McKenzie, has reportedly said that she will not compete.
Finally, named to compete in the women's 4x400m are Shaunae Miller, Rashan Brown, Miriam Byfield, Amara Jones, Shakeitha Henfield, Cottrell Martin, Shaquania Dorsett and Christine Amertil.

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News Article

July 04, 2011
Sports In Brief

TRACK CAC AGE GROUP TO compliment the team's second place finish overall, the Bahamas athletes at the XIV Central American and Caribbean Age Group Championships turned in some credible individual performances...

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