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News Article

September 14, 2013
Soup's on

This soup is a stick-toyour ribs flexitarian special. Make it with chicken broth and prosciutto and you end up with a carnivore's delight. Make it with vegetable stock and no prosciutto and you've got a vegetarian's delight. Either way, it's plenty hearty. The potatoes give it body and creaminess. The spinach and kale give it earthiness and a bright green color.
The greens also happen to be nutritional superstars -- both spinach and kale are terrific sources of vitamins A, C and K, not to mention fiber. For folks who generally find kale a little too assertive, the time to eat it is now, in the cooler months, when its taste is milder. And given kale's current "it" vegetable status, you'll certainly have no trouble finding it at the store. Some supermarkets even carry the bagged shredded leaves, as convenient as prewashed lettuce or shredded slaw mix.
For the potatoes, I went with Yukon gold because I like their buttery taste and because they hold their shape when cooked, unlike highstarch, thick-skinned baking potatoes. However, any potato will do as long as you cut it into 1-inch chunks. If the only spuds you have on hand are baking potatoes (such as russets), just be sure to peel them first. Otherwise, the skin will be too chewy in the soup.
There's very little fat in this recipe. The vegetarian version uses just 2 tablespoons of extra-virgin olive oil and half an ounce of grated Parmigiano-Reggiano. A little bit of that justly celebrated cheese goes a long way. And carnivores can keep the fat content low by trimming off the prosciutto's fat.
What's that? The little Mario Batali devil on your shoulder insists that the flavor will go bye-bye along with the fat? Not necessarily. I was thrilled to discover that if you briefly bake the prosciutto on a rack in the oven, it becomes downright bacon-esque -- crisp, salty and redolent of pork. Just be sure to pull the prosciutto out of the oven before it is completely crisp. It will continue cooking even outside the oven. If it doesn't reach the desired state within a minute or two, slide it back into the oven and give it another quick jolt.
Now you've got all the flavor you -- or your inner Mario -- could ask for. Just keep an eye on the salt in the rest of the recipe. Both the cheese and the meat are high in sodium.
Potato And Greens Soup with Parmesan Toasts
Start to finish: 1 hour (40 minutes active)
Servings: 4
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 cup finely chopped yellow onion
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 pound Yukon gold (or other thin-skinned potatoes), cut into 1-inch chunks
4 to 5 cups low-sodium chicken or vegetable broth
1/2 cup dry white wine
6 cups packed torn kale leaves
6 cups packed baby spinach leaves
1 teaspoon red pepper flakes, or to taste
Salt
1/4 pound thinly sliced prosciutto
Twelve 1/2-inch-thick diagonally cut slices of baguette
1/2 ounce finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese
Heat the oven to 400 degrees F.
In a large saucepan over medium, heat 1 tablespoon of the oil. Add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook, stirring for 1 minute. Add the potatoes, 4 cups of the stock and the wine. Bring to a boil, cover the pan and simmer for 10 minutes.
Add the kale, cover the pan, then simmer for another 10 minutes. Add the spinach and the pepper flakes, cover, and simmer for another 5 minutes.
Working in 2 batches, transfer about 3 cups total of the soup solids with a little added broth each time, to a blender and puree until smooth. Be careful, hot foods expand in the blender. Return the puree to the saucepan, add salt to taste and the additional cup of stock if necessary to achieve the desired texture. Heat until hot.
Meanwhile, set a wire rack over a rimmed baking sheet. Arrange the prosciutto slices in a single layer on the rack, then bake on the oven's middle rack for 10 to 12 minutes, or until they begin to crisp. Remove the rack from the sheet pan and set it on the counter to let the prosciutto cool. When cool, crumble the prosciutto.
Arrange the baguette slices in a single layer on the sheet pan and brush them with the remaining tablespoon of olive oil. Bake them on the oven's middle shelf until golden brown, 8 to 10 minutes. Sprinkle the grated cheese evenly over them, return the slices to the oven and bake until the cheese is just melted, 1 to 2 minutes. To serve, ladle the soup into 4 bowls, then top each portion with some of the prosciutto crisps and 3 toasts on the side.
Nutrition information per serving:
630 calories; 120 calories from fat (19 percent of total calories); 13 g fat (3 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 25 mg cholesterol; 96 g carbohydrate; 8 g fiber; 5 g sugar; 31 g protein; 1,640 mg sodium.

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News Article

May 26, 2012
Save the Date: BIFF Golf Invitational at Albany, June 8th

Nassau, Bahamas -

SAVE the DATE for the 2nd annual

BIFF Golf
Invitational at Albany!  To register your team for the

June 8th event, complete and return this
form together with cheque for $750.00 made payable to the Bahamas
International Film Festival, only 40 teams are able to participate, so
please reserve your space as soon as possible. For Inclement Weather
tournament will be rescheduled.

Loads of great prizes: Airline Tickets; Resort Vacations; Dermalogica
Skin Care Products; Bahama Divers Scuba lessons; Bahama Hand Print
certificates and many more...

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News Article

July 09, 2013
Dealing with sexual harassment

Sexual harassment, taken literally, is harassment or unwanted attention of a sexual nature. It includes a range of behavior from mild annoyances to serious abuse, which can even involve forced sexual activity. Sexual harassment is considered to be illegal in many countries and is a form of abuse. It is also considered to be a form of bullying.
Jerry was the new office worker. He worked in the sales department. He was married with two children. His employer introduced him to all the employees and showed him where his desk was and allowed him to get to work. After two months of working on the job, Jerry went to his immediate supervisor to report to that two of his co-workers were making him uncomfortable on the job. The supervisor, a man named Bill, asked Jerry what he was talking about. Jerry explained how both a male and female employee would constantly pass his desk and touch his hair when they were saying good morning. Jerry had asked both of them to stop, but they continued to do it. Bill after hearing Jerry's story told him that they were just being friendly and to ignore it.
Sexual harassment can occur in any environment. Sexual harassment does not only occur in the workplace but also happens at social gatherings, in public areas such as at bus stops, in the street and in clubs, in schools and colleges. Sexual harassment happens to men as well as women.
The offense occurs when a person assaults another in a manner which grossly offends public morality -- e.g. touching breasts or other parts of the body, unwelcome kissing, etc. Actual touching may not be involved. Rude or suggestive language can also be considered sexual harassment.
Sexual harassment in the work place happens to men as well as women. It is a criminal offense for an employer to seek any form of sexual favor as a condition for hiring a person. It is also an offense to threaten dismissal if the sexual favor is not granted. The law works both ways - it is an offense to offer sexual inducement in return for benefit at work. Sexual harassment also occurs in schools and colleges.
Everyone has a right to feel safe and comfortable in the workplace, at school or in whatever environment they are.
Who is the harasser?
o The harasser can be anyone -- boss, supervisor, client, co-worker, teacher, student, friend or stranger.
o The victim can be male or female. The harasser can be male or female (The harasser does not have to be of the opposite sex).
o The harasser may be completely unaware that his or her behavior is offensive or constitutes sexual harassment or that his or her actions could be illegal.
How sexual harassment affects the victim
Psychological and health effects that can occur in someone who has been sexually harassed include anxiety and/or depression, sleeplessness, shame and guilt, difficulty concentrating, headaches, lack of motivation, lack of appetite or comfort eating (weight loss or gain), feeling let down or violated, feeling angry or violent towards the perpetrator, feeling powerless or out of control, loss of confidence and self-esteem, withdrawal and loss of trust in people and colleagues and even suicidal thoughts or suicide attempts.
Why people do not report sexual harassment
Many incidents of sexual harassment occur in the workplace and some victims are afraid they will lose their jobs if they report the matter. They also feel that others might place the blame on them if they make a report, or that they will be accused of coming on to the perpetrator. They may also feel that nothing will be done about the harassment.
If it is a friend of the family or relative, there may be a fear that the victim will not be believed.
Many times because behaviors that are practiced or accepted as social behavior, individuals may not always understand that their behavior is offensive and a form of sexual harassment.
Examples of sexual harassment
o Spreading sexual rumors.
o Repeatedly asking out someone who has said no.
o Questioning or commenting on someone's sexuality.
o Telling sexually offensive jokes.
o Displaying sexual pictures.
o Making comments about someone's clothing or body.
o Making rude gestures or noises.
o Touching or rubbing against a person;
o Pressuring someone for a date.
o Giving suggestive looks.
Anyone experiencing sexual harassment can:
o Firmly tell the harasser that the behavior is not acceptable.
o Report the incident to someone in authority.
o Report the matter to the police.
Remember, sexual harassment is not acceptable and you should not have to endure unwanted advances from anyone.
We are one people created equal by God and for the purpose of loving and being loved. Let us work together to heal ourselves, families, communities, nation and world.

o If you would like to talk to someone about sexual harassment, please call 328-0922 or for more information, check out our website at www.bahamascrisiscentre.org.

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News Article

September 28, 2013
Purse demands stalling pro boxing activities

Boxing fans, for over three years now have been starved of professional activity in the country. The professional side of boxing is indeed dormant. What are the reasons?
Firstly, the market is a big problem. The economy is such that promoters face an uphill battle in getting gates that would enable them to at least break even. Funds are just not in abundance for fans to be able to budget $20 and upwards just for a single ticket.
What adds to the problem for promoters however are the outrageous purse demands of boxers.
I will use one example to make the point. It is my understanding that a former top rated boxer who has not won a fight in four years, is asking for $10,000.00 as his purse alone. Now this is totally ridiculous.
You haven't been victorious in over four years.
Your market value has plummeted.
You never really packed them in even when at your best and now wish to have a promoter come up with $10,000 in the present market?
Bahamian observers of the sporting scene need to be aware of such requests that are not realistic.
How could a fighter possibly think about asking for more money than he ever made for a single fight? This is one of the difficulties promoters face. There are several of them who want badly to put shows on. They have communicated with the Bahamas Boxing Commission and are comfortable with the terms and conditions given for an endorsement.
They are ready to go.
There are quality Bahamian boxers like Taureano Johnson, Ryan McKenzie and Meacher Major, who are reasonable and very interested in performing in The Bahamas. They could be matched up with local-based fighters, but the purses being asked for, just can't work in this market.
I told a prospective promoter, businessman Tommy Stubbs of Buttons Formal Wear, who has been trying to make a certain match, that one of the boxers in question just does not want to fight. Within his heart, he probably feels that another defeat will be the result, so the big demand of $10,000 is the cover for fear.
Nevertheless, the promoter indicated that he would work around that particular scenario and get into the promotion of boxing shows nevertheless. Stubbs has presented the Bahamas Boxing Commission with a good-looking plan and his timetable is for early 2014.
So, it appears that pro boxing will come alive again.
It's a grand sport that has great history here in The Bahamas.
Best wishes Tommy!

o To respond to this column, kindly contact Fred Sturrup at sturrup1504@gmail.com.

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News Article

July 17, 2013
Lessons to learn and practices to unlearn from Haiti and its revolution

The small Republic of Haiti has given three important lessons to the entire world.
Two centuries ago, it taught the world that taking arms to defend the dignity of all human beings irrespective of their skin color is invaluable. Haiti sets out the motto that, "The right to equality is the right of all human beings to be equal in dignity, to be treated with respect and to participate in an equal basis with others in all perimeters of economic, social, political, cultural and civil life."
After some 300 years of the world order of slavery imposed upon the black man, Haiti succeeded in 1804 in forcing the liberation of the slaves, opening the doors to the liberation of slaves in Latin America in 1825 and the black emancipation in the United States in 1863.
One generation ago, on February 7, 1986, Haiti again was first to teach the world that dictatorship could be dismantled with people power. It forced Jean Claude Duvalier, the dictator who, along with his father, ruled Haiti ruthlessly for 33 years, to depart in the middle of the night to exile in France. The model has been followed by the Philippines to kick out Marcos, by Poland and countless other countries including, recently, the Arab nations under the spring upheaval or the Lavender Revolution.
Last but not least, Haiti was first again to teach the world that radicalism in power could also be dismantled through people power. It forced Jean Bertrand Aristide to leave the country for Africa on February 29, 2004, for stirring violence amongst the civilian population.
We are seeing today people power in action in Egypt, where millions of Egyptians forced the army to step in to remove the current president Mohamed Morsi, under the charge that his radicalism fosters national disunity amongst its people.
It is the story of Haiti repeated all over again when, in the same circumstances, some nine years ago the country forced President Jean Bertrand Aristide to leave Haiti because he was fostering internal strife and civil warfare amongst the have and the have-nots.
While the world should learn from Haiti the bravura of its gallant people in dismantling slavery, dictatorship and radicalism, it should also unlearn from Haiti the detested practice of not promoting national reconciliation at the end of the revolutionary period. Soon after the proclamation of the first black republic in the Western Hemisphere, its general president ordered the elimination of all the previously white colonists. Haiti never recovered from that policy.
In 1986, after the forced departure of the dictator Duvalier, the Haitian Constitution enshrined a ban of 20 years against the zealous Duvalier partisans. Haiti is still suffering from the convulsion of that period. And last but not least, after the departure of Aristide, it did not promote nor did it implement social welfare and wealth creation for the wretched of the land. As such, to this day the ghost of a so-called benevolent Aristide is still lingering around amongst the masses.
The lesson is clear and simple. Peace, harmony and prosperity in a nation depend on whether the opposing factions are willing to break bread together, to forget the past and to build the future together. This policy practice is not promoted by the human rights organizations or by the United Nations that insisted on the primacy of justice over the primacy of reconciliation, pardon and love for each other.
History has proven that justice has never occurred even in the best circumstances. The International Court of Justice has few success stories on its roster; as such one should concentrate on fostering national reconciliation as the best chosen path to democracy.
Haiti under Toussaint Louverture was the model that the entire world wanted to emulate. John Adams, the second president of the United States, was so enamored of the First of the Blacks that he was openly helping him to become emperor of Haiti then St. Domingue. Louverture, after defeating first Spain, then England and last the French, established the seedling of a nation where white and blacks would share the vision of a common destiny.
The defeat of John Adams in his quest for re-election in 1800 in the United States thwarted the Haitian experience and changed the course of history not only for Haiti but also for the entire humanity. Napoleon and his egomaniac ambition to conquer the world found a fertile ally in Thomas Jefferson, who won the American presidency over John Adams.
Two hundred years later, the Napoleon doctrine of striking first and worrying about the consequences later is the preferred law in this world. Little funding is earmarked for promoting national reconciliation, whether the funds would come from the United Nations, the United States or the European Union. Billions are being spent in the name of political stabilization but with zero funding earmarked for conflict resolution, negotiation and nation building.
The initial lesson from Haiti is very telling. The concept of human rights must include all the citizens of the same nation aspiring to dignity and participating in all aspects of social, economical and political life of the country. It is also the duty of the citizens to butt out all dictators and radicals, whether they are of the stuff of Attila the Hun, or Hitler or Morsi.
The lesson to unlearn from Haiti is that reconciliation must take place immediately after the departure of the dictator or the radical leader. There should be no reprisals and the moving party in promoting peace and reconciliation must be the winner of the revolution. Abraham Lincoln showed the way after the Civil War in proclaiming what Frederick Douglas called the second sermon on the mount: "With malice toward none, with charity for all" we shall reconstruct this land. This spirit of respect is the best way in any age to foster reconciliation through open and healing intercourse.
From now on, the business of peace and reconciliation is too grave and too important to leave only to the governments. The learned citizens of the world must devise ways to offer to governments and to the opposing factions the necessary tools and funds and expertise to come to the negotiation table. The unfolding story in Egypt can become another imbroglio as it was in Haiti, where peace and prosperity did not take place even after some 30 years after the last uprising; or it can become a soothing lavender flower that sends its balm not only throughout the Middle East but throughout the world.
Caveat emptor, Egypt! If you do not make peace and embrace your brethren from the Muslim Brotherhood you might become the Haiti of tomorrow, with convulsion, strife and poverty for generations!

o Jean H. Charles LLB, MSW, JD is a syndicated columnist with Caribbean News Now. He can be reached at jeanhcharles@aol.com and followed for past essays at caribbeannewsnow/haiti. Published with the permission of caribbeannewsnow.com.

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News Article

July 20, 2013
Witness testifies via videolink in murder trial

A Jamaican man accused of fatally shooting a man made repeated visits to a home in Nassau Village asking for his victim, according to prosecution witnesses.
Derrick Paul Suer is on trial for the June 22, 2010 murder of Geraltoe Johnson. He has pleaded not guilty at his trial before Justice Indra Charles.
According to Phillipa Culmer and Robertha Stubbs, a tall, slim man dressed in blue jeans, an orange shirt and white tennis came to their home inquiring about the "short dark boy with the rims".
Both witnesses said after telling the man that Johnson was not home, the stranger, who spoke with a Jamaican accent, came back several times to see if he had returned.
Culmer said she became uneasy when she noticed a bulge under the man's shirt that she believed was a gun. However, she did not call the police.
Later that night, Stubbs said she was at the computer when she heard gunshots. Stubbs said she looked through the window and saw the same man shooting at Johnson in the street.
Stubbs said Johnson tried to run away. After the shooting, the man fled through a track road, according to Stubbs.
Stubbs refuted suggestions by Suer's lawyer that she did not have a clear view of the shooter.
She agreed, however, that the other suspects on the police lineup did not resemble Suer.
Both Culmer and Stubbs picked out Suer in separate identification parades, the court heard. Both witnesses testified via videolink from the Attorney General's Office.
Charles told the jury not to reach any conclusions because the witnesses did not testify in the court.
The trial continues on Monday.
Kevin Farrington and Anishka Hanchell are prosecuting.

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News Article

July 06, 2013
Goodman's murder trial adjourned

The trial of a man accused of the murder of an 11-year-old boy who went missing was adjourned due to his lawyer's illness.
Kofhe Goodman, 38, is on trial for the murder of Marco Archer, whose family last saw him alive when he left home to visit a neighborhood store on September 23, 2011.
Police found a child's decomposing body in bushes behind the condominium complex where Goodman lived on September 28.
They also found clothing similar to those that Marco's mother said he was wearing when she last saw him.
The clothes were found in a garbage bag in front of the complex, according to evidence.
Geoffrey Farquharson, who represents Goodman, said he could not proceed with the case because of sinus congestion.
He also complained that Goodman had not eaten at the prison for three days.
Farquharson had previously claimed that officials at the prison had refused to accept food from Goodman's relatives and he had been denied access to the commissary.
However, prison officials produced a log of the items received for Goodman and purchased by him to dispute this claim.
Presiding Justice Bernard Turner adjourned the trial to Monday over objections from Garvin Gaskin, the deputy director of public prosecutions.

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News Article

November 13, 2013
Man wanted for questioning

POLICE are asking the public to help them locate 35-year-old Timothy Stubbs of Garden Hills, who they want to question in a stealing and death threat case.

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News Article

May 16, 2013
Lawyer: Moss' NIB directive violated act

A directive from then National Insurance Board (NIB) Chairman Gregory Moss ordering NIB to issue a $15,000 guarantee to help pay for emergency heart surgery for a Grand Bahama woman last July, violated the National Insurance Act and Regulations, according to a legal opinion obtained by Grant Thornton (Bahamas).
The opinion, from attorney Heather Maynard, is a part of a forensic report completed by Grant Thornton.
The chartered accountants examined allegations made against Moss by NIB Director Algernon Cargill.
The allegations are a part of an affidavit Cargill filed last November when he took legal action against Moss and NIB.
In an interview with auditors, Moss maintained that his instructions did not violate the act because he was authorized by the board to enter into any contract up to $50,000.
In February, Moss told auditors that he did not know the patient who needed the surgery, had met her once after the surgery, and that if he saw her again he would not recognize her.
Moss said he first met the woman after her surgery when she approached him and hugged him while he was with Environment Minister Ken Dorsett in Freeport.
"When he did not recognize her she said that she is the woman whose life [he] saved by helping to pay for the surgery at the Doctors Hospital and she showed him her scar," said the report tabled in the House of Assembly yesterday by Minister of Labour and National Insurance Shane Gibson.
"[Moss] said he remembers the woman's daughter from having seen her at rallies in Freeport and having collected a thank you card from her on behalf of her mother.
"He said that he would not recognize the woman who received the surgery if he sees her again because that was the first and only time that he met her."
Moss said the issuance of the guarantee happened on a Saturday.
According to the auditors' report, Dr. Kevin Bowe, vice president of NIB's medical department, told the auditors that Moss had said there was a provision in the act giving him the authority to approve the guarantee and that he would go back to the board members afterwards.
According to the report, Moss said he subsequently discussed this matter with Minister Gibson and advised the minister that he would not bother asking the Board of NIB to approve the sum as a donation, but would simply pay it himself.
He said that he and the minister agreed that a third party would issue a $15,000 check to Doctors Hospital in order to preserve his (Moss') anonymity, and he then issued a personal check for $15,000 to reimburse the third party.

Allegations
In the report, Moss also defended his decision to hire an assistant, Franklyn Laing, with an annual salary of $40,000.
According to the report, Minister Gibson approved the hire.
Moss said when he was appointed chairman he told the minister that it was prudent that he bring along someone who could assist him in "understanding the lay of the land".
"He said that Mr. Laing's role was to help him understand the personalities of the people inside NIB and that he did that job," the report said.
"[Moss'] recollection was that the total effort was completed in the month of August."
In his affidavit, Cargill said this was the first time an NIB chairman had a personal assistant and claimed that Moss' recommended compensation to Laing was outside his scale of work.
Laing was hired in July 2012. His appointment with NIB ended in September.
Another allegation made by Cargill related to Moss' travel to Mangrove Cay, Andros, on Saturday, August 18, 2012.
Cargill claimed the trip was not connected to NIB business.
Cargill said he learnt that Moss went to Andros for a political meeting, but was given an NIB per diem of $250.
Cargill said NIB executive Theresa Burrows advised him to be aware of any request for subsistence payments to Moss for this non-NIB related travel.
However, Moss told the auditors that the trip was NIB-related "because his purpose of coming to Mangrove (Cay) was to inspect the NIB facility under construction".
"He also addressed a gathering that evening on NIB related matters and reported the trip to the Board at the next sitting of the Board," the report said.
"Also, he said that the minister told him that NIB should have a presence in all of the islands."
The auditors said it is "important to remember that the chairman of NIB is the chairman of NIB Bahamas and not of NIB Nassau.
"Mr. Gregory Moss had a board of director's approved spending limit of $50,000 and the thought that he would need authorization from an employee at NIB to travel within The Bahamas, request per diem for that travel and obtain prior permission from NIB staff when hosting fellow Board of Directors at a hotel is not practical."

Defence
Moss also explained to the auditors why he directed Cargill to purchase a vehicle from Friendly Ford for him to use while in New Providence.
He said that Cargill told him there was no designated company car for the chairman and that he would have to choose one.
Moss said he chose a car from the Ford dealership and an employee emailed the invoice to Cargill.
He said the vehicle was always parked at the airport in the parliamentary parking section when he was not in Nassau.
Cargill also raised concerns about Moss' "unusual" charges on a corporate credit card and said it appeared that NIB was paying Moss $125 per diem for days when he came to Nassau for parliamentary sessions.
However, Moss told the investigators that any time he came to the capital at NIB's expense "he engaged in NIB related business" or was at NIB for meetings or work.
Moss also said he never sought parliamentary reimbursement for NIB-related travel.
"He only used the NIB credit card for hotel charges and travel (airfare) expenses when he traveled to Nassau on short notice when it was too late to book those travels through the NIB office as, for example, when he had to meet with someone on NIB business or when he was called by the minister to meet with him on a NIB matter," the report said.
The report also detailed Moss' credit card activity.
Among other charges amounting to $2,621.39 it shows billings to the Hilton hotel in Nassau of $400.44 on August 4, 2012; $690.46 on August 17, 2012 and $138.22 on August 24, 2012.
The report relating to the allegations against Moss consists mainly of his denials of wrongdoing and his explanations of various matters that transpired while he was chairman.
Moss said his actions were not personal though, as they were sanctioned by the Board of NIB.
While much of the report outlines Moss' responses to the allegations made by Cargill, the auditors made few conclusions or findings on these accusations.
While Cargill claimed that Moss' actions toward him were designed to frustrate him in the execution of his duties, Moss denied "any of his actions were of malicious intent".
The auditors interviewed Moss on February 7, 2013.

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News Article

May 16, 2013
Goodman's trial put off to Tuesday

A day after the lawyer for a man accused of killing a missing boy accused the judge of bias, tense closed discussions occurred in the jury's absence on Wednesday.
Justice Bernard Turner has directed the jury hearing the Kofhe Goodman murder trial to return to court on Tuesday.
Goodman, 40, is on trial for the murder of 11-year-old Marco Archer. Prosecutors allege the murder occurred sometime between September 23 and 28, 2011.
Marco's family last saw him alive when he left his Brougham Street home on September 23 for a neighborhood store, the court has heard.
Police found the decomposing remains of a male child, that the prosecution intends to prove is Marco, in bushes near the defendant's home at Yorkshire Street on September 28.
The trial has been punctuated with complaints by Goodman's lawyer, Geoffrey Farquharson, accusing the judge and the prosecution of interrupting him during his cross-examination.
Farquharson raised his voice at the judge on Tuesday after he accused the judge of "bias" by hampering his cross-examination of Constable Darren Pierre, who submitted a blood sample taken from the defendant to the forensic science lab for DNA analysis.
Turner asked Farquharson to "move on" with his line of questioning after he accused the officer of criminal conduct.
At that point, Farquharson said the judge's "interminable interruptions" were against accepted procedure and demonstrated "signs of bias".
Turner told Farquharson that he would interrupt him as often as necessary if he found a question irrelevant or inadmissible.
Goodman, who is on remand at Her Majesty's Prison, has denied the murder allegation.
Garvin Gaskin, the deputy director of public prosecutions, Neil Brathwaite, the assistant director of public prosecutions, and Darell Taylor appear for the Crown.

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