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News Article

August 21, 2014
Genetics, environment, thinking

Back in the late 60s, I went to Chicago to meet my mentor Earl Nightingale who at that time was affectionately known as the dean of personal motivation. His daily radio program "Our Changing World" upon which I modeled "Time To Think" was being aired on some 1,200 radio stations around the world, and Earl was in fact the most listened to radio personality in the world. I joined his organization, The Nightingale-Conant Corporation as a distributor of Earl's motivational cassette training programs, and later became regional director for The Caribbean, Central and South America for The Nightingale-Conant Corporation. I thank God for the day I joined Earl's organization for I learnt so much from Earl's teachings.
Now one of the most important things I learnt from Earl Nightingale was that three major things contribute in large measure to the person we eventually become, and these three things are as stated in the title of today's article "Genetics, Environment, Thinking".
So, let's first deal with genetics. As Earl put it, each of us is the confluence of a genetic pool that goes back for thousands and thousands of years. So, in a nutshell, there are certain factors in our genes, our DNA, which contribute toward the person we eventually become.
Next, the environment in which we are brought up in influences the way in which we think and act when we grow up. We listen to and observe those nearest to us, our parents, relatives and friends, and what we see them do and how they act in a variety of different situations tends to have a very powerful effect on our thinking and subsequent actions. However, there's a third, most powerful element that finally shapes us into who we eventually become, and that's our thinking.
To explain how important the third element, how we think is, and how it can actually override so to speak, our genes and environmental conditioning, let me give you my valued readers a personal example. I'm Irish, and believe me it was most definitely in my genes to become an alcoholic. My environmental conditioning when I was young led me to love and consume large quantities of alcoholic beverages, that's what everyone who surrounded me did.
So I was indeed destined to become an alcoholic until one day I awoke with a terrible, sickening hangover, looked at my sad, flushed face in the mirror and vowed to stop drinking alcohol from that day, which thank God I did. So, in conclusion, our thinking can indeed override our genetic programming and our environmental conditioning.
o Think about it!
Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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News Article

August 31, 2014
Physical mental wellness

I do believe, that in recent times there has indeed been an awakening among the peoples of the world about the vital importance of physical wellness, in keeping our bodies in tip top physical condition so that we will not experience ill health too often, which in turn will indeed aid us tremendously in our continual quest to reach the top of the mountain and thus stand triumphantly on The Summit of Success.
Incidentally, if you're interested in getting some simple but very practical tips on how to stay physically well; in my Broaden Your Horizons lecture series, which consists of thirteen half hour lectures, module number six deals with this most important matter of maintaining good health. You can have access to my Broaden Your Horizons lecture series by logging onto The Reilly Institute website at www.dpaulreilly.com and joining either The Winners Club or The Gold Club.
So we're all, I believe, fully aware of the FACT, that we need to remain physically fit; however, far too many, from my observations are neglecting their Mental Health. Yes indeed, we all need to make sure that we have and maintain 'Physical & Mental Wellness' as today's title succinctly puts it. Actually, in the long run, as I'm sure most of my valued readers are indeed fully aware of, Mental Wellness is vital to us also maintaining Physical Wellness.
Yes indeed, so much of the physical illness which a whole lot of people experience actually commences with mental anguish and stress. As I have stated again and again over the years, everything commences in The Mind.
So we all need to concentrate on being Mentally Well at all times. How do we do this, you may query? Well I believe that it must commence with becoming and remaining truly peaceful at all times, even when we go through the inevitable troubling times, which we all do at some point in our lives. How do we do this D. Paul remain peaceful during stressful situations which do indeed occur in all of our lives, from time to time? Well, in a nutshell, through Daily Meditation.
That's right, we all need to make Daily Meditation a part of our everyday routine. We should spend time in The Silence each and every day so that we will develop, over time, a truly peaceful consciousness which will contribute to our 'Physical & Mental Wellness' which in turn is absolutely vital to our continuing success, stability and spiritual evolution.

o Think about it!
Visit my Website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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News Article

September 10, 2014
BNT staff pursuing further academic goals

Education never stops, and, as such, five Bahamas National Trust (BNT) staff members -- Alannah Vellacott, Shelley Cant, Lindy Knowles, Mark Daniels and Krista Sherman -- have left to pursue environmental studies degrees.
Well-known BNT staff member Shelley Cant, who worked in the education department and who also managed the website for the trust, is at the University of Exeter's Cornwall Campus in the United Kingdom, where she will be working towards a master's degree in environmental studies.
Cant was also the lead officer in the BNT's Rare Pride Campaign for wetlands and the Shark Campaign, which resulted in The Bahamas receiving status as a shark sanctuary, the first in the Caribbean.
Vellacott, who also worked tirelessly in the education department, returned to South Dakota State University to pursue a Bachelor of Science in environmental science.
Daniels, the Leon Levy National Park Preserve manager since it opened in 2011, is pursuing a master's degree in botany at Miami University in Ohio.
Knowles, who joined the BNT as a science officer in 2009, became a skilled diver and participated in a number of rapid ecological assessments for new national parks as well as leading several mangrove restoration projects. Knowles is pursuing a master's degree in environmental science at the University of the West Indies in Barbados.
Sherman, who came to the BNT as a project manager of a Global Environment Facility (GEF) Marine Protected Areas project, successfully coordinated and completed monitoring protocols for the Exuma land and sea park and a sustainable tourism model for the Exuma cays. Sherman is pursuing a doctorate degree at Exeter University focusing on the Nassau grouper spawning aggregation and population abundance. The trust hopes Sherman's studies will be a helpful key to advancing conservation efforts to establish best management practices for the grouper and sustaining the species.
"We will miss both Shelley and Alannah," said Portia Sweeting, BNT's director of education. "They have contributed in major ways to the BNT's strong environmental education programs, and we know that they will do well in the pursuit of their educational goals."
BNT Deputy Executive Director Lynn Gape said the young environmental officers displayed amazing dedication to the goals and mission of the BNT. She said it had been a joy to watch them develop their skills and interests over the years.
"It is amazing to watch these aspiring young Bahamian scientists progress through initial curious interest, then engaging with local and international scientists and now finally aspiring to further their environmental careers to help address some of the important environmental challenges that face our country," said Vanessa Haley-Benjamin, BNT's director of science and policy.
"We encourage our staff to improve themselves and to pursue higher educational degrees," said Eric Carey, BNT executive director. "This is all part of nation building, whether they return to work for the BNT or pursue other opportunities in the environment arena, they will continue to be friends and supporters of the trust. We wish them all the best and our only regret is that we have not been able to provide more financial support for their educational goals," he said.

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News Article

June 03, 2011
Donald Christopher Roberts, 65

A Memorial Service in memory of Donald Christopher Roberts aged 65 years, a resident of Manchester Street, Blair Estates, will held on Saturday, June 4th, 2011 at 2:30 p.m. at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel, Victoria Room, #1 Bay Street. Officiating will be Brother Anthony Russell.
Left with cherished memories are his devoted wife, Exrella Roberts; children Dionne Heath, Dellarese Roberts, Deidre Bullard, Donnassio, Dario, Don and Christopher Roberts, Racquel Strachan and  Krishna Roberts ; Sons-in-laws: Timothy Heath, Jamal Bullard, daughter in law: Erica Roberts, sisters: Marie Strachan and Joan Roberts-Pinder of Atlanta Georgia, brother in law: Gerald Strachan, Arthur Rahming;
Grandchildren, Deonte and Timia Heath, Rajesh and Raashi Roberts, Ramesh Miller, Logan and Mateo Bullard, Dylan Roberts, Kiyara and Akaree Roberts, Anna, Angela and Ashernique Strachan. Nieces and nephews: Darlene and Jefford Curry, Paula and John Reckley, Paul and Vinincia Strachan, Philip and Madyln Strachan, Pamela and Marvin Smith, Juiette and Maureen Roberts, Charmaine and Darwin Dawson, Charnae and Emery Leonce and Shenkara Bowe; Grandnieces and nephews, Danielle and Raquashane Curry, Jonae Reckley, Nicole, Tregg and Traci Strachan, Ashton and Alexys-Marie Smith, Alexandria Hepburn, Kristen Lindsay, Kellah Leonce, Devin, Darien, Desha and Deanna Dawson.In Laws: Vera and John Farrington, Angela and family, Vandarene and Stuart Bowe, Christine Farrington, John and Latisha Farrington, Wilma Farrington, Brian Farrington and host of relatives and friends; Therez Usher, Amos and Loretta Williams, Mary and Evelyn Knowles and family of Fort Lauderdale, Margaret Nelson and family, Shellie Missick and family, Sharon Bain and family, Jeffery Missick and family, Christopher Missick and family, Rodney Johnson and family, Myra Bullard and family, Dorothea Wilson, Tino and Dawnia Bullard, Deborah and Sidney Outten, Paul and Cindy Ritchie, Monty and Lisa Hanna, Monty and Cheryl Ritchie and family, Anthony and Nancy Russell, Jimmy and Sylvia Bevans and family, Devitte Duncanson Meryl Desmangls and family and others too numerous to mention.
Special thanks to Dr. Friday, Dr. Lightbourne, Dr. Rahming, Nurse Gaitor from Fox Hill Community Clinic, Nurse Watson from Elizabeth Estate Clinic, Dr Cargill, Dr. Jones and Dr. Bartlett from Elizabeth Estates.
Relatives and friends may pay their respect at Cedar Crest Funeral Home, Robinson Road and First Street, on Thursday from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. and on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Cremation will follow.
 

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Movie
Take Me Home Tonight
  • Genre : Comedy, Drama
  • Rating : TBC - To Be Classified

Follow an aimless college grad who pursues his dream girl at a wild Labor Day weekend party. He, his twin sister and their best friend struggle with their burgeoning adulthood over the course of the night....


News Article

September 17, 2014
Ten reasons Bahamian college graduates don't want to come home

While we have to, as individuals, take responsibility for creating our own opportunities where there may be none in sight, I do blame in larger part, and please excuse me, the "mo fros" who established the original protocols and norms of the educational system in conjunction with the Bahamian workplace, which together created so many disconnects between education and employment that The Bahamas would today find itself hemorrhaging most of its educated population to the workforces of other countries.
As a Bahamian with a college education, I cannot imagine the plight of Bahamians who have not had the chance to learn a trade, to study locally or abroad and to become certified in something that can at least form the basis of a career. I am having the hardest time, still - for 15 years now - and I have college diplomas. If I'm struggling so, how on Earth are people who have no credentials surviving?
Rather than return to the Venus flytrap they call home, college grads would sooner take their chances in a foreign land of greater opportunity than resign their lives to barely getting by, consequently putting off career, more education, family, and dreams, because they can't afford to do anything more than survive when they choose to come back home to work. The system works in opposition to their success. How?

The list
One: In The Bahamas, a Bahamian can't get a job with no experience, and they can't get experience without a job; like the dog chasing its tail, they chase opportunity in a system designed to limit access, even with a college degree.
In spite of the fact that many job ads call for the applicant to have a degree, the work experience component of the ads placed by businesses in The Bahamas often makes college graduates unqualified for the advertised positions. These Bahamian citizens are marginalized further when illegal immigrants and expatriates can work more easily in The Bahamas, because their lack of (truthful and verifiable) experience goes under the radar.
For Bahamian college graduates, the building blocks of their education become stumbling blocks, as it appears the working world imposes a penalty for choosing college over entering the workplace directly after graduating high school. Those who go to university and those who don't will meet a similar cyclical challenge of work experience, but there's a special version of it suffered by college graduates that has a lot to do with...
Two: They can't get a decent job without a good contact or current or recent work history, which is not likely they will have if they've been abroad for several years. They have to know someone who knows two to four other people, one of whom may be able to give access to a workplace, somewhere, without requiring you to already be on a job (or have 10-plus years of experience), be it relevant or not, to the graduate's preferred specialty.
Moreover, if the college grad chooses to job search solely on the basis of merit, as many educated youths tend to do when their thoughts of the future are still idyllic, they're in for a rude awakening. Few things happen by the book in The Bahamas, and unless new graduates learned while in college how to circumvent processes and manipulate systems, these young people are severely limited with options for gainful employment.
Networking, if you can call it that in the backdoor culture of The Bahamas, has to begin in earnest long before graduation, maybe even as early as one's date of birth, given that who you know proves more important than what you know when it comes time to enter the Bahamian working world.
Three: They can't find meaningful work in their chosen or studied field. Because they can't practice their specialty (unless it's medicine or law), they work elsewhere for a while, which inevitably turns into years, and in the end they spend too much time caught in the routine of working to make a living instead of working to build a life.
College students return, having graduated from English, art, psychology, biology, music, politics, and they're forced to work in hotels or banks just to earn a few dollars or to start building work experience. The problem here is not with paying your dues to make it, but rather that a college grad can't truly follow her or his passion with no structured career paths in place to exercise the knowledge acquired while obtaining an expensive education.
And all education is expensive. To make matters worse, if the graduates are innovative, it just throws them back even more with respect to time and opportunity, because few people respect the innovator's bright ideas - at least not until those people see that the same ideas bring monetary reward, or notoriety, at which point they will either jump aboard the train, or hijack and steal the train.
Four: What they actually do on the job, when they are lucky enough to get a job in their desired field, contributes minimally to their growth in that field. They're filing when they're qualified to analyze and strategize. They're at the copy machine when they could be drafting contracts. They find it difficult to hone their expertise in order to become experts themselves when other experts are brought in around and over them to get the very opportunities the college graduates need to excel but are instead left to attend solely to menial tasks.
They learn the ropes, yes, which is important to sharpen that academic know-how, but they can't use their training to its fullest because they are blockaded by internal forces that regard them as a threat and therefore bend over backwards to keep these college-educated young people limited with respect to the number of occasions they have to utilize the full range of their talents and skills.
Five: They get paid pennies, certainly as compared to what they would earn and the quality of life they would have if they chose to live and work elsewhere in the world. The minimum starting salary offered to them at the first level of employment does not meet the minimum standard they expect, oddly, in a country that hastens to brag about its U.S. par value dollar.
And yes, absolutely yes, there should be a minimum standard. But minimum standard does not mean low standard. Of course, a new recruit should bring something substantial to the table when arriving at the table, and should not expect to collect if they have no real talent or skill to contribute, like the fast food employees in America pushing for a minimum wage increase to $15 per hour.
But, in reality, further education costs a hell of a lot of money, whether you're privately or fully funded or not. And college graduates need a return on their (parents' or sponsors') educational investments. Securing a good ROI is a first rule of business, is it not?
Six: They cannot reconcile the typical Bahamian work requirements to meet their modern day circumstances. They are expected to clock in and out at nine and five, with one hour of lunch between noon and two, and a couple of pee breaks.
But gone are the days when this template worked effectively and each person left high school to have only one or two jobs in their respective lifetimes until they reached retirement age and collected a pension. That worked well for our parents, when things didn't move at warp speed or the cost of living wasn't 10 times greater.
But, the way the world is structured today and the way it operates, with rapid evolution of technology and communications, means business changes quickly. And to keep up, an employee must change quickly, which, essentially, includes updating and improving self and adapting to the realities of modern life.
As a result, employers must also change their traditional business models and diversify staff composition for a better balance of full-time and long term versus part-time/ contract and short term employees, and make allowances for things like remote systems access and mobile work, flexible hours and paternity leave. If a university graduate needs these options and gets them abroad, it's another reason not to come back home.
Seven: They are horrified by the closed and restricted mentality of the Bahamian people. After their exposure to the world beyond the sunny isles, college graduates have energy, hope, inspiration, motivation and momentum to change their country for the better, only to return home and get smothered by the spirit-killing energies of disenfranchised citizens and spirit-killing family and friends, some of whom are genuinely unaware of their gloomy dispositions, but others who are fully aware and quite happy to keep living in their rain boxes.
When the opportunities of the educated to become further educated are seen as rendering others ignorant, insecurities abound and opportunities dwindle. Bahamians are traditionally closed-minded, and even though we know this when we're amongst our people, when we leave and come back after a long time has passed, it is a total shock to youthful ambitions and an automatic turnoff to the idea of moving back home.
Eight: They are depressed and deterred by a crumbling society: the crime, poverty, illegal immigration; the lack of respect for environment, cleanliness, decency and personal property - all further worsened by the fact that a couple hundred thousand people are squeezed together on one small island.
This new place they see is not the place they left behind when they set off on their quest to make a difference in the world. And with the rapid degradation of a society living in close quarters, it's not the first place one wants to call home either, but for the sun and sea and the loved ones for whom it is still home.
But the work it will take to change the environment and carve out their own opportunities within it, to help to build the nation at least to where it should be, is more than a new graduate wants to undertake. Rather than be depressed and demotivated, the Bahamian college graduate will seek a life outside of The Bahamas, at least for the time being, where there are more options for greater peace of mind, hoping they will find something improved in their home country when they finally decide to return to it.
Nine: They are shell-shocked by the slothful and lax approach to life and business in The Bahamas. After they get beyond the novelty of being back home, when it comes time to actually get things done, they encounter a mass of people on permanent mental vacation where nothing very productive or progressive can happen, whether at all or for extended periods of time.
The pace of life in The Bahamas, though enjoyable for unwinding, is unacceptable for actual goal achievement and real economic or social development. When most things which are necessary or worth doing take ridiculously too long to do, it is counterproductive to individual and national progress, but, more importantly, it limits individual success and leads to an overwhelming majority of frustrated people who are constantly unhappy or angry.
The gross inefficiencies which lead to such frustrations are more worth enduring in a place where the college graduate is more valued; home, amongst compatriots, sadly, is often not that place.
Ten: They are competing with foreign imports of labor, legal or illegal, wealthy or poor, for a place and stake in their own country, and paying more for less opportunity in the end.
Bahamian citizenship gives them no real advantage. Their home no longer caters to them, if ever it did. Real property is priced beyond the reach of average Bahamians and the status quo-keepers - political elite and realtors in constant hot pursuit of the foreign investor - are fine with keeping it that way.
The cost of basic utilities and food is already following the same untenable incline, and alternatives are few and far between, particularly with a current administration which sees fit to force the people to buckle down and tighten belts, when they know they've never taught them anything about buckling down or tightening belts, and when they themselves do not do it, within the scope of their public or personal obligations.
Case in point: We can't keep the power on but we're spending $9 million on a Junkanoo Carnival with minimal guarantees of short, medium or long-term economic benefit. How does this exemplify a concern for the priorities of the Bahamian people? Who wants to come home from college and not be a priority in their own country?

What we can expect
Bahamian students won't return to The Bahamas, as long as there is somewhere they believe is better for them to live and contribute while achieving their goals and fulfilling their dreams. The effort required to convince them otherwise will continue to be gargantuan and outside of the ability of anyone currently in a position to see it through.
Education (abroad) is an escape route from a place where there are no incentives for citizens to return and to contribute to nation building, because the culture is not one of productivity and innovation, but rather of silent acceptance and expectation of reward for remaining obedient to the boss-worker, master-slave, tourist-native mindset. This is not the thinking of younger, college-educated Bahamians, who have climbed and are still climbing out of their country by way of the overseas university "fire escape".
Others, like me, have been hustling for years, refusing to give up on the possibility that there could be prosperity and fulfillment in our country of birth, with our respective talents, when most of our peers took the "better" option when they graduated from college. But there aren't many of us left (here) who feel this way about our home and, in time, if deprived enough, we too will bid our beloved country adieu.

o Facebook.com/politiCole.

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News Article

September 23, 2014
Sow the seeds

My grandfather -- that is my father's father had a very large farm in a place called Kells, Co. Meath in Ireland where I grew up. Although my family lived in the suburbs of Dublin the capital city, I just loved to visit my grandfather on the farm in Kells and invariably spent a good part of my summer vacation on the farm. There was something that I just loved about the open spaces, the peace and tranquility as opposed to the constant traffic and noise of the big city. I also loved being close to nature and dealing with all of the animals each day. It was pure bliss to me.
Now during the summer it was harvest time when the corn, the oats, the barley and the hay would be cut, bundled up and then brought into the barns to help feed the cattle and the horses in the winter time. Of course, although I was not there in the springtime, I know that the seeds for all of the crops had been planted in the earth. So I learnt at an early age, that to get the crops that were harvested in the summer, seeds had to be planted in the spring, and then nurtured. It was not until I was quite a bit older, and hopefully wiser, that I started to fully understand, that the whole creative process commences with planting seeds.
So in a nutshell, the very future of your life and affairs depends on the seed thoughts that you sow in the fertile garden of your mind. If you wish to be successful in the future, you must sow the seeds of success, and then nourish them and watch them grow into the success you seek. This is surely how the whole creative process works? Yes it is!
Yes my friend, in order to be able to reap a good harvest of success in the future, you must sow the seeds now! In other words, you set specific goals in your mind, and you constantly fertilize these seed thoughts with plenty of positive, uplifting affirmations. As I stated in the last article, you develop faith -- real, true faith thus knowing in an extremely positive way, that your goals will materialize in due course, your dreams will come true providing a rich harvest of success in your life.
So please my friend, sow the seeds of what you want right now, and continually feed and nourish them with a whole lot of really positive thoughts, and believe me, you will reap a very rich harvest! Yes you most definitely will!

o Think about it!
Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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News Article

September 25, 2014
Thinking parents

When it comes to punishing their children, far too many parents act before they think. Many parents do not think carefully when they perceive their children are rebelling. They have been conditioned to act like communist dictators to all perceived disobedient behaviors. I use the word "perceived" because most times, if the parents ignore the child's tone of voice or mannerism and seek to understand what the child is saying, they would discover that the child is not rebelling but willing to cooperate. Too many parents forget that children are human beings also with feelings, emotions and intelligence. Parents who often respond to their children's perceived defiant behavior negatively are creating rebellious children. They are not teaching children to think for themselves.
Several years ago, I shared with you that the three most important responsibilities in parenting are all about thinking. They are:
1. To teach their children to think critically. Parents want their children to think from cause to effect and be able to analyze and synthesize. This is done by asking questions, listening and allowing the children to have an opinion.
2. To teach their children to think independently. This is done by respecting their children's views (not necessarily agreeing with them), avoiding too much television and other electronic devices, asking for their opinions, etc.
3. To provide an environment for original thought. Far too many children do not have the ability to be creative and spontaneous in their thinking. Too much television and lack of interest in reading has crippled their minds and robbed them of creating their own ideas. Often, they would regurgitate what they have seen on television.
Parents, if you think your first responsibilities are to make sure your child does not do stupid things and to drive our stubbornness, you are making a big mistake. I have often shared that "in a nutshell, responsible parenting provides children the freedom to choose, think and act on your own". Parents can accomplish this successfully if they are willing to listen to their children. Psychologist, Dr. Myrna B. Shure says in her book "Thinking Parent, Thinking Child" that "just as you want your child to listen to you, you'll find yourself asking, 'Am I really listening to him?'" She says you want your child to have "the tools to become less aggressive, inhibited and fearful, and more cooperative, empathic and better able to handle life's frustrations and disappointments."
Avoid coming to conclusions
When a parent asks a child to "take a bath and get ready for church" and the child responds by say "I don't want to go", what is the parent hearing from the child? Is it disrespect, defiance or cooperation? Many parents immediately think that the child is being defiant and disobedient. Many parents negatively interpret the children's "aggressive" behavior or language. Many times the child is simply stating an opinion the best way he or she can. Thus, a non-thinking parent responds verbally violent by saying "get your dirty skin in the tub before I hit your head in the wall". The parent has forgotten that just the position of being a parent is, in itself authority, and thus should be able respond calmly with understanding and respect. If the parent perceives defiance, the parent will respond violently. If the parent respects the child's right to have an opinion and thus asks appropriate questions, the parent will quickly learn that the child is willing to do whatever he/she says.
When a parent responds negatively to perceived defiance of the child, the child will "fight back". As the child gets older and stronger, the parent will lose the fight, respect and authority.
Critical thinking at home
In the 2006 article written by psychologist Elizabeth Shauness entitled "Enhancing critical thinking skills in children: Tips for parents" it is suggested that "parents should foster critical thinking at home. Ask questions that lack a single correct answer, and ask them casually, rather than quizzing your child."

Here is an example the author gives: "If your child is a chess aficionado and likes to play it on a chessboard or a computer, you may want to make the following inquiries: Why do you think you are more successful in face-to-face chess matches than in electronic chess games? (Analysis). If you could develop a new format for chess that would appeal to those who haven't yet discovered its allure, what would it look like? Why would you pick those design features? How would they intrigue novices? (Synthesis)"
As a parent with now two adult children and three grandchildren, I've made it my practice to avoid just giving instructions to my children to do something. I know that since I am older and wiser, I can assume they are to simply obey. However, I discovered early in my parenting that, that was not wise. I would always have a follow-up question like "Do you know why I am asking you do that?" I would let them share their understanding and I would patiently explain the rationale for my request. This fosters critical thinking.
If a parent asks a child to turn off the television and does not following through with the request, the parent would be losing a teaching moment. If a parent gives a request, the parent is to stand by and make sure the request is done. For example, when the parent asks for the child to turn on the television, the parent must know that asking the child to do it is a learning experience and an opportunity to teach critical and independent thinking. It is not for the connivance of the parent since he or she is too busy. After the request is given, the parent is to stand by and make sure the request it done immediately. Then the parent can ask, "Do you know why I asked you to turn on the television?" If the parent cannot give a good answer, then they should not ask the question. The parent can share that "I do not want you to watch more than 30 minutes each time because it is not good for your brain." Or "It is important that you get to bed early so you can be strong and vibrant for tomorrow. Sleeping all night allows the body to properly restore itself each night. That makes you strong in the morning."
Dr. Shauness states that "parents can demonstrate critical thinking by pondering aloud the most efficient way to do household chores, considering the most economical purchase to make at the grocery store, monitoring your progress toward your personal goals or approaching social issues in your community. Describing how you think and solve problems is the best way for you to instill similar thinking patterns in your children."
Parents, start thinking so your children can also think. I am confident that if parents would teach their children to think critically and avoid negative interpretations, we would have better children in our society. Violence would decrease. Productivity will increase. Our nation would be healthier.
o Barrington H. Brennen is a marriage and family therapist and board certified clinical psychotherapist, U.S.A. Send your questions or comments to barringtonbrennen@gmail.com; or write to P.O. Box CB-13019, Nassau, The Bahamas; or visit www.soencouragement.org; or call (242) 327-1980, or (242) 477-4002.

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News Article
‘Some Success’ with oil-leak fix
May 27, 2010

BP Plc made progress toward plugging a leaking well that’s been spewing oil into the

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News Article

February 16, 2013
Munasan - it's a different experience

From the presentation to the creativity and the incorporation of tastes that Bahamians love, ensures that Munasan is a different Japanese experience than what people have become accustomed to.
The newest Japanese fusion restaurant at Superclubs Breezes on Cable Beach will make a sushi lover out of everyone that crosses its doorstep according to Superclubs Breezes executive chef Nigel Clarke. He believes people won't be able to get enough of what they are doing.
"What we're trying to do is make [the food at Munasan] a little more local," said Chef Clarke of the restaurant that officially opened its doors two weeks ago. The restaurant offers the standard Japanese restaurant sushi fare -- shumai, seaweed salad, miso soup, sashimi and sushi. But they have upped the ante with signature rolls -- spicy coconut shrimp roll, BBQ conch and pineapple roll, corn flake encrusted smoked salmon roll and their soft shell crab California roll -- that Chef Clarke said will entice people who aren't already sushi connoisseurs, but who are interested to try sushi, but are afraid, or hesitant, to try it.
"These rolls will draw them in to love sushi. When we did tasting, some of my staff had never tried a sushi roll until then. The perception was that it was raw, so they weren't going to try it. And now a lot of our guys have fallen in love with sushi rolls. Now they know that some rolls are actually cooked," he said.
An added feature that will make Munasan stand out from other Japanese restaurants around town is that Munasan has a create your own stir fry station. You choose your protein -- beef, pork, chicken, shrimp or tofu; choose your vegetables -- the server advises on the vegetable choices of the day; then you choose your sauce -- chili garlic, black bean, sweet and sour, Mongolian spicy ginger, Asian barbecue or Thai coconut curry.
It's a feature that Chef Clarke says makes for a lot of work and is risky, but he said they want to give a different experience because they realize people don't want to be limited.
And on the scope of different, where most folks would anticipate tempura (fried) ice cream for dessert, at Munasan they do a brownie roll (rolled with ice cream to look like a sushi roll), and they offer a mango-misu as opposed to a tiramisu.
"We wanted to be a little different ... a little unique. When people come in we want them to be able to say this is not what we'd get down the road. When people talk about coming to the Munasan, it's different and the taste has to be there," said Chef Clarke. He also said that presentation is important to them, but they want people to be able to see the plate, taste the food and want to come back.
"This is one of the smaller Japanese menus on the island in terms of what we offer. So for the create you own stir fry station, we have quite a number of sauces, and of course it can be a bit tedious, [especially if] you have a big table and everyone's having the same meat but different sauce. But people love options and we want to give them those options," he said.
Paramount to their decision on the menu he said was for them to understand the Bahamian taste buds and incorporate those tastes into what they would offer.
While the menu is indeed different from other Japanese offerings around town, Chef Clarke said it did not take long for Japanese chef Takeshi Tanabe to conceptualize their specialty rolls.
Edamame, shrimp and vegetable tempura, soft shell crab, agedashi tofu (deep-fried tofu with agedashi sauce) and yaki hotate (sauted scallop with clear garlic-soy butter) are on the appetizer menu.
Green salad, seaweed salad, tofu salad and miso soup round out the soup and salad menu.
The Nigiri sushi is comprised of maguro (tuna), ebi (shrimp), unagi (eel), hamachi (yellow tail), shake (salmon) and kani (crab).
Hamachi, tuna and salmon comprise the sashimi offerings.
California roll (crab, cucumber and avocado), kappa maki (vegetable roll), spicy tuna roll (tuna, tobiko and spicy mayonnaise) and tempura roll (shrimp tempura, avocado and cucumber) are the maki sushi offerings.
Beef negimaki (grilled rolls of sliced beef with scallions), lobster tempura (lobster deep fried in batter) and ebi chili (sauteed black tiger shrimp with Japanese chili sauce) are served with white or brown rice.
Meal finishers offered with the brownie roll and mango-misu are the layered chocolate mousse and profiteroles.
Munasan is the brainchild of Mona Issa, daughter of John Issa, chairman of Superclubs Breezes Bahamas.
"Japanese is something she loves," said Chef Clarke. The Superclubs Breezes properties in Jamaica all have Japanese restaurants.
Presently, Munasan opens two days per week, Fridays and Saturdays, 6:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.

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News Article

April 05, 2012
Carrie Corrine Williamson Taylor, 71

. Funeral service for Reverend Carrie Corrine Williamson Taylor, 71 yrs., a resident of Mutton Fish Drive & Sisal Street & formerly of Pinefield, Acklins who died on 18th March, 2012, will be held at Trinity Full Gospel Baptist Church, Marshall Road, on Sunday at 2:00 p.m. Officiating will be Bishop Trevor Williamson & Rev. Dr. Stanley G. Ferguson. Interment follows in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, JFK Drive.
Left to cherish her memories are: Son: Meckel Taylor Jr.; Daughters: Victoria, Evelyn and Dellarese Taylor, Lenette Taylor-Foster of Miami Florida. Grandchildren: 3174 Sterling Jr. and 2860 Lashanda Francis of Grand Bahama, Travis, Delmar, Meckel III, Leshante, Imani, Shanna and Maddix Taylor, Andrew Jr. and Ashton Rolle, Shelton and Celeste Green and Milik Bowe. Parent's in-law: Claygon and Yvonne Taylor. Brothers: Van, Rupert and Berkley Williamson, Chester Miller. Sisters: Mary Lloyd and Beryl Loriston. Son-in-law: Ian Foster of Miami, Florida. Brothers-in-law: Daniel, Dudley of Baltimore and Reno Taylor, Michael Hanna and Nelson Johnson, Elkine Lloyd and Loriston. Sisters-in-law: Sarah and Carabell Williamson, Flossie Hanna, Winifred Bain & Family, Doretha Smith, Leona, Maureen, Roberta and Azely Taylor, Jenese Watkins, Juliamae and Ernestine Johnson.
Nieces and Nephews especially: Aris & Lorenzo Ferguson of Philadelphia, Attis, Returea, Jane & Clarence Styles, Elder Bursil & Renea, Elvis, Michael & Leonard Anderson, Oralee, Vangy & Ernal, Felton, Catherine, Antone & Anna, Dwayne & Michelle, Ricardo, Princess, Troy, Bridgette & Audley, Giles & Donette, Ryan, Kino, Donnell & Brice, Valarie, Daphne, Tanya, Anthony, Keith, Jerry, Linda, Jackie, Brian, Shelly & Hank, Charles & Samantha, Phyllis & Errington, Dorcas, Neil, Dwight, Keva, Kevin, Kenva and Eric Williamson, Elizabeth Ferguson, Barabara Bain. Numerous Grand-niece and nephews. God children: Genesta Jackson, Andrea Bain, Shantell Ferguson, Anfernee, Vernique & Tarjanique Ferguson, Kanisha Henry, Lamont Astwood, Bernadette Bosfield, Inda Ferguson.
Other relatives and friends including: Bishop Brice Thompson & Family, Rev. Newton Williamson & Family, Sarah Murphy & Family, Patrick King & Family, Clodella Arnette, Lisa Johnson & Family, Rev. Gloria Redd & Revival Team, Dorothy Rolle & Family, Rev. Rudolph Bowe & Family, Pastor Rudolph & Linda Balfour, Mr. & Mrs. Edwards & Family, Mrs. Munroe & Family, Elton Williamson & Family, The Miller Family, Kathleen Bain & Family, Elder Queenie Rose & Family, Sylvia Gaitor, Esther Ferguson, Bernard Ferguson, Noemi Higgs & Family, Ann Culmer, Maggie Arnette, Levenia King, May Williamson, The Black, Collie Family, Sarah Ferguson & Family, Olgamae Collie, Ms. Patsy Smith & Family, Rev. Lockwood Deleveaux & Family, The entire family of the Morning Star Association, Elder Cherry Missick & family, Pastor Arlington & Sylvine Rolle, Laverne Barr, Jennifer Brennen,Glenda McIntosh, Carla Baker, Nomia Johnson Rolle, George King & Family, Andrew Rolle, Christine Pinnock, Agnes Allen & Family, Kimberly Caswell, Lulamae Thompson & Family, Dorothy & James Watson & Family, Gloria Major, Pastor Arlington & Bettyann Ferguson, Ricardo Buyer, Francis Bowe, John Cartwright, Douglas Taylor, Omar & Lawrence Bain, Brenda White, Suzanne Johnson, Sonia Hinsey, Rev. Stanley Ferguson and The New Free Community Holiness Family, Bishop Trevor & Sharon Williamson and the Trinity Full Gospel Family, Mrs. Marian Taylor & Family, Mrs. Beneby & Family,The Bahamas Cosmotologist & Barbar Association, The Staff of Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institution, Doctor Raleigh Butler, Doctor Holiday, Doctor Bodie, The Gynae Ward at the Princess Margaret Hospital, the entire Acklins Community and the entire Williamson family.
Friends may pay their last respects at New Free Community Holiness Baptist Church, Malcolm Allotment, on Friday from 10-5:00 p.m. & on Saturday at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. & on Sunday at the church from 1:00 p.m. until service time.

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News Article

March 27, 2012
Man fined for having loaded gun for protection

A man avoided spending one year in prison by paying an $8,000 fine for possession of a loaded shotgun on a school's campus.
Justice Vera Watkins yesterday imposed the fine on Mark Braynen, in addition to placing him on probation for one year. If he gets into any trouble during the probationary period, Braynen will serve six months in prison.
Braynen, 24, pleaded guilty to possession of a firearm on February 7, after the court directed a jury to acquit him of two counts of possession of a firearm with intent to put another in fear at the close of the prosecution's case.
According to the evidence, Braynen was a sales representative at Storr's Electric, a business that is owned and operated by his family and a student at the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI), when he got into a fight with another BTVI student on November 14, 2006. The other student threatened to shoot Braynen. At some point, Braynen removed his nephew Angelo Storr's licensed shotgun from his office and returned to the school.
While on campus, Braynen got into an argument with the student with whom he had fought previously.
The student, who was in the cafeteria, had a knife in his hand and Braynen, who was outside the cafeteria, had a shotgun in the waist of his pants, according to the evidence.
As Braynen started to remove the shotgun another student, Police Corporal Drexter Miller, shouted "I'm a police officer" and Braynen ran away.
Miller chased him and called Police Control Room. Officers who were dispatched to the scene caught Braynen in bushes near Cable Bahamas. The officers found the gun, which was loaded with six shells, in the bushes. They found four more shells in Braynen's right pocket.
During a police interview later that day, Braynen said that he was involved in a fight with another student and took the shotgun to BTVI for his protection.
In mitigation, Roger Minnis said that Braynen realized he had made a "silly mistake" soon after his arrest. Minnis said Braynen was "fully cooperative with the police and never wasted their time." Minnis also pointed out that there was never a violent encounter.
Minnis said that Braynen was 18 years old when he committed the offense. He added that Braynen has continued working with his father and he is interested in pursuing further studies in electrical engineering.
In passing sentence, Justice Vera Watkins said, "What is noteworthy in this case is the fact that Braynen's opponent in the dispute at the cafeteria was in possession of a knife at the time of the incident. While it does not in any way justify the actions of Braynen, it does provide some credence to Braynen's explanation for arming himself with the shotgun, that is, to protect himself."
He continued, "Having regard to all the circumstances of this case, it is reasonable to conclude that Braynen, being of a very young age at the time and no doubt very immature, had come to the misguided conclusion that it was acceptable to arm himself with a shotgun, so as to protect himself in the event that he was attacked by the student with whom he had been feuding."
Vander Mackey-Williams and Kevin Farrington prosecuted.

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News Article

December 17, 2011
Nadia Campbell Jewellery presents new collection following a year in Italy

Nadia Campbell - the sole designer and motivating force behind the Bahamian brand Nadia Campbell Jewellery - is known for her statement-making pieces through her use of innovative shapes and materials.
Now, after spending a year in Italy, she returns with a new collection of work which will be on display at the exhibition "Stones. Leather. Metal. Wood." this Wednesday, December 21, from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Harry's Haven (Queen Street, past the U.S. Embassy).
Though she says her work aesthetic hasn't been totally influenced by Italy, she has noticed a shift in her motivation to strengthen her business and product aesthetic.
"With my time here, I realized I'm really a resort designer," says Campbell. "For me, Nadia Campbell Jewellery is lifestyle jewelry - and the lifestyle I identified most with is The Bahamas. It's the thing I know most intimately, so I always design with that in mind, with what feels appropriate within that climate and context."
Indeed, the pieces remain true to her innovative eye, with the materials - as the title suggests - taking center-stage in a well-rounded product offering of necklaces, earrings and bracelets. Yet in the variety of new materials she offers in sometimes unexpected combinations, Campbell still pays tribute to Bahamian materials.
"I didn't gravitate towards one color palette but I did find things grouping themselves," she says. "As always I have big love for the conch shell - there's something about that creaminess that feels really good to me in jewelry and the feel of it against the skin, so I have a group of pieces with that."
It's obvious, however, that her craftsmanship has been affected after just one year of her two year program abroad - which is exactly what the designer wanted when she set her eyes upon Italy. Coming from a place of casual, mostly self-taught study base, Campbell decided to do something more formal in her passion, embarking on a two-year study in Goldsmithing at Le Arti Orafe, a jewelry school and academy in Florence, Italy.
"I wanted to inform the jewelry with a different language and different set of
influences," she says. "I wanted to make myself grow the most that I could and I thought the best way I could do that was to put myself in the least comfortable situation that I could."
"Florence has such a rich history of craftsmanship and design work, so I felt I really could get rigorous training here. I thought my design would probably get a rich set of influences here too."
But Campbell had another motivation--she wanted to get serious about her business, Nadia Campbell Jewellery, and expand her knowledge in order to expand her design offerings.
She admits she's always had trouble balancing creativity with professionalism, but if there's anything her time in Italy has taught her so far, it's that there is power in being able to wear many hats as a self-employed artist--not only personally, but for the growth of The Bahamas as well. It's really the motivating force behind choosing to travel so far away in order to grow.
"I feel like we should be trying to grow the country and the best way to do that is to grow ourselves," she says. "Our only resource outside of sun, sand and sea--which is already being changed by pollution and development--is ourselves, so if we're going to be stronger we need to grow ourselves."
"So I wanted to get closer to become a stronger lifestyle brand, [with a] final goal of being more well-rounded as a designer."
With her already more clear professional voice and fresh perspective, Campbell's offerings are diversifying, maybe even soon trending into the accessories range in her next year of study.
But in everything she does, Campbell wants to stay true to her aesthetic and voice which always takes inspiration from her home and its people. Though she's loving her time in Italy, she continues to refine her practice towards that goal of Bahamian lifestyle--exactly where she feels Nadia Campbell Jewellery belongs.
"I feel like my jewelry has a definite personality," she says. "My dream customer is somebody with a definite sense of themselves and a sense of strength about them--whether they're quiet and they wear something delicate or whether they're loud and they wear something in-your-face."
"For me that is completely what our island lifestyle is about for me--Caribbean people at their best are a group of confident and self-satisfied people, and we really enjoy living, so if somebody could buy some jewelry and add to that living, I'm happy with that," she continues.
"I just want my jewelry to be the accessory that people wear when they're dressing up for the business of living their life."
New work by Nadia Campbell Jewellery will be on sale during the show "Stones. Leather. Metal. Wood." this Wednesday, December 21, from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Harry's Haven (Queen Street, past the U.S. Embassy).

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Event
Jazz n' Wine
Jazz n' Wine

Thursday 14th July 2011

The Wine Lounge East Bay St (Adjacent to Shell) Nassau, Bahamas. Cigar Catering by Guevara Cigars Tel: 242.356.0614 www.winelounge.bs


News Article

December 14, 2011
BTC brings hope to less fortunate during holidays

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC), in an act of holiday goodwill, donated a combined total of $25,000 to a number of charities including Great Commission Ministries International, The Salvation Army and the Nazareth Home yesterday.

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News Article

February 16, 2013
The finer things

What could be better than an outdoor art exhibition with gourmet nibbles, fine wine and a gorgeous view of boats in the harbor? That's exactly what K Smith thought when he organized "Hyperrealism at Balduccino's", a small scale art exhibition set to take place in the courtyard at Balduccino Fine Foods on East Bay Street.
On display will be Smith' latest pieces, "up close and personal" hyperrealistic renderings of everyday objects like coconuts, sea urchin shells and Bahamian leaves. The vivid colors and attention to a single detail as opposed to an entire object are his signatures, leaving audience members stunned by what they didn't even think was possible.
One of the main objectives of the event is to bring hyperrealism, a genre of art that can seem overlooked on the Bahamian scene, to the attention of the public. Hyperrealism is a genre of drawing, painting or sculpting that looks like a high-resolution photo. By creating details and embellishments that weren't discernible to begin with, these works stimulate reality for the viewer by creating the illusion that it's not a work of art at all. Unlike much of what is seen in the art community, hyperrealism is devoid of emotions or narratives in order to create what is real and in the moment.
According to Smith, a Canadian native living in The Bahamas for 22 years, hyperrealism is more popular in Europe, specifically England, right now. "There is a collectibility to hyperrealistic work," he said. "That is why my work stands apart from other work in the country. It's not Junkanoo; it's not poinciana trees in Gregory Town. It's not sailboats in the harbor, and its' not totally abstract. It's not installation; it's not contemporary art. It's just me."
Smith's awe-inspiring drawings always elicit a double take from viewers who never would have thought they weren't photographs. During outdoor events, like his upcoming show, Smith usually brings his drawing station in order to allow people to make the connection between what he's produced and how it's done.
With its image of fine foods and fine wine, it's no wonder Balduccino's owner Anton Alexiou wanted to draw a picture for the Bahamian audience of what Balduccino's has to offer.
A highlight of the menu is undoubtedly the wine offerings, which include an 1805 Merlot, with deeply concentrated flavors of blueberry and red cherry and pleasant aromatics of red fruit, smoke and vanilla, and an 1805 Riesling, with crisp tropical fruit flavors, balanced by mineral and spice tones.
"I will try to introduce wines to people so that they kind of appreciate drinking a bottle as opposed to trying to drink it and get drunk," said Desmond Cooper, Balduccino Fine Wines sommelier. He hopes to use the mystique of the wines, with their hidden secrets, to enhance the hyperrealistic experience.
Part proceeds from "Hyperrealism at Balduccino's" will benefit the Bahamas Infant Stimulation Programme, which is geared towards helping families with infants from birth to three years who are at risk of significant developmental delay. By providing screening, family education and developmental therapy, among other services, all free of charge, the program helps infants who may be slow to reach developmental milestones or have conditions that cause disability or put infants at risk of having a disability.
As an educator of 30 years, it's no wonder Smith chose a charity that benefits young children and helps their development. As an art educator and professional artist, he is always striving to mentor young artists and inspire young artistic minds.

o "Hyperrealism at Balduccino's" takes place in the lower courtyard of Balduccino's on Saturday, February 23, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Original pencil drawings by K Smith will be accompanied by wines from the world's finest vineyards, specialty foods by Balduccino's and live music.

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News Article

June 18, 2011
Stranger than Paradise

In Blue Curry's solo show at the Nassauischer Kunstverein Wiesbaden gallery in Weisbaden, Germany, viewers are dropped into a strange space. Tropical signifiers like conch shells are paired with strobe lights or tires covered with black and white beans, and in every untitled sculpture lies a possibility of meaning, if only the complete misuse of these paired objects could be reconciled.
"Sometimes I look at that object and think, I know what the use of that object is; what would be the best misuse of it, or the most genius misuse of it?" Blue says.
"Stranger than Paradise" is a collection of two years of work by the artist, which came on the heels of his finished MFA in Fine Art studies at Goldsmiths. The Nassauischer Kunstverein Wiesbaden Gallery is no stranger, however, to Bahamian work -- in 2006, it was the site of "Funky Nassau", the group show by Bahamian artists, including Blue. Curators Elke Gruhn and Sara Stehr invited him back for a solo show years later, and also to take part in the gallery's educational program, where Blue guided and gave critical advice to high school students' artwork for a student show in the gallery space.
Some of Blue's pieces have appeared in group shows already -- his black and white beaded tire can seen in the Fifth National Exhibition at the National Art Gallery of The Bahamas, and the cement mixer filled with sunscreen appeared in the 6th Liverpool Biennial -- but this is the first time all of these pieces have appeared in one exhibition together. He considers it his first solo show as a mature artist -- it's his first solo show in roughly a decade.
"One thing I said to my curator is 'I think my work looks better in group shows'," he laughs. "Just in a funny way initially, because I hadn't seen so much of my stuff together in such a long time. Many times one of my pieces would work really well in a group show because it sits apart, really apart, whether its in materials or colors or critical thinking, it's usually a jarring effect. But when you walk into here it's not so jarring as what I'm used to, and I'm walking around thinking wow, this stuff goes well together."
The effect instead is exactly the show's title -- bizarreness, an environment of both fantasticality and weirdness. From the get-go, visitors first encounter a black bucket placed upside-down on the floor, three shells stuck on in a triangle so one can discern a blackface figure.
"It really divides opinion because I think people get so frustrated with it because it's too easy. I'm fully aware of how easy that piece is, and that's why I put it there, so people can walk in and say 'well I can make that', and then walk into the next room and say, 'ok, I can't make that.' Something that involved five minutes of labor gets placed next to the tires that involve months and months of labor. Also the bucket is understated, while others are very overstated. I like to play back and forth with that. With the knowledge I have about the art world, the knowledge I have of artwork, it can be both ways, sometimes it can be that simple and brilliant, and sometimes it has to be more complex and hundreds of hours to execute."
But this piece especially -- like all of them in their own ways -- is a nod to the encounter, as well as the performance, of "the other," the identity constructed by both visitors and residents to create the idea of "paradise." In all of Blue's pieces this self-constructed environment is evident -- conch shells strung together with strobe lighting within allude to the "lighting of the stage" of our performance, as well as attempts to jazz up the novelty of the tropical landscape -- for he plays with the idea of the fetishized objects that make up the culture of the other. He calls it "performing the tropical."
"We're still marketing the other, we're still marketing the black body, the potential of some sexual rendezvous or encounter with the other," he explains. "There's still a dependency on that performance we're doing for people who already have set ideas, you can't work outside of that, so you recycle the same old clichés over and over again. So my thesis idea (at Goldsmiths) is that everything has to go post-tropical because the tropical are just all of those clichés and everything that limit us. My idea of going post-tropical goes beyond using those set tropes that are expected of us."
Blue's pieces both engage and resist this performance at once in his very choice of materials -- pairing familiar tropical signifiers with unlikely candidates that become a misuse of both. Take his spears surrounded by the inner diskettes of floppy disks. Though a stunning and beautiful object in itself (also untouchable with the sharp edges of both objects, indicating some sinister or edgy element), it alludes to the idea that such developing cultures primitively misuse such technological material for decorative or crafty "folk art" purposes.
"You just have to imagine, if I were in one of the 'primitive' societies in which we advertise that we live in, how would I approach this material? Because obviously we don't have any computers," he says. "I feel like I'm simplifying the process a lot, so I look at the material and I think, it's just material, so you use it in a kind of decorative way to create this fetishized object."
Blue also admits he is also concerned with the very nature/technology divide, and finds such magnetic media beautiful as a material to work with -- one may remember seeing images of his piece in the Goldsmiths graduate show where yards and yards of cassette tape pour from the great bone jaw of a shark suspended in the air, cascading down and piling onto the floor below. The very choice of the type of technological material used though -- floppy disks, cassette tape -- allude also to an obsolescence that ties back into the assumption that only such underdeveloped societies on the fringe of the developed world use these outdated materials.
"I was collecting those diskettes from markets around London and when an office was going out of business. But I found that in order to have three thousand discs, a lot of material for the piece, I needed to buy some," Blue remembers. "I found a wholesaler in London selling them and his argument was that he couldn't go too far down in his prices because he sells these to Nigeria. So he wants me to believe Africans are still using technology that's so out of date it's ridiculous. So these obsolete materials also connect back in to what's expected of us."
A humor is being cultivated here -- how many times have Bahamians traveled abroad and been asked if they use computers or have Internet or even wear clothes "where they are from"? Though some of these statements may be made in jest, the manifestation in the world consciousness that--despite rapid and almost complete globalization -- these tropical or "primitive" societies remain in "The Heart of Darkness" is evident of a constructed fantasy that persists today.
This is something Blue examines in his piece where black plastic buoys are ringed in Swarovski crystals, again bringing together two unlikely worlds -- industrial and luxurious -- to create a manifestation of tropical society and the veil of fantasy that is applied to such places as vacation destinations "to escape it all," as well as the idea of "selling ourselves cheap."
"There's an intentional cheapness about this world which goes back to creating an image," Blue explains. "Fantasies can operate over those images no matter how cheaply they are constructed. So a lot of this stuff is about other people's fantasies of these places, because some of these places these objects are ironic of don't even exist."
But in all of Blue's sculptures, there's a uselessness -- none of these objects are entirely useful for anything practical. One can't use the spears to fish or use in a computer. One can't use the buoys for their boat or wear them around their neck. They become the very uselessness evident in our constructed identities, and exist also in the limbo many residents of such places find themselves -- between the outdated perceived notion of the tropical and its stark modern reality.
The fact that all of Blue's pieces are "Untitled" create this very unstable environment explored -- he provides no guidance with which to approach his work, which allows the viewer to approach it with all of their preconceived notions about paradise and apply it. Blue recognizes that this is where it is evident viewers either buy into the fantasy, or move beyond it, as his pieces do.
"To have some sort of a contrived title which leads somebody into one direction or one way of understanding doesn't work for me. I'd like people to try and connect the materials, to try to get their own understanding of it," he says. "To me, the most interesting art opens up a space where I've never been before and I'm not being told what to think and I don't know what to think but I like it. The two dots never quite join up, and that's the most interesting space to be. If a title names what you're looking at, then you've got all the answers. If it goes off into this mysterious land completely off the wall, then it's too self-indulgent. My response for the moment is to keep it open and people can take what they want from it."
But at the same time, Blue recognizes that the danger of his pieces lie in their very ambiguity. Displaying such pieces abroad means the visitor--once they know the artist is from The Bahamas -- may not fully move beyond their assumptions.
"What they do is they come and see something that they think is highly decorative and emblematic of what you might find from that region and then they walk away -- then you have people who understand that there's a critical background to my work, who know I studied and Goldsmiths, that I do that with a great deal of knowledge," he says. "It works in my favor and it works against me; some people get it and some people don't. I shoot myself in the foot sometimes with the work in an odd way because I know that what I'm talking about is that very perception -- you put it in front of someone and either they rise to that challenge and they understand that idea is being challenged, or they think it just reinforces that idea."
Is there a longing for the absolute idea of the primitive? Is there a resentment? A pride? The fact is, Blue applies little emotional guidance in his work as possible as an artist -- his approach is to focus on materials at hand rather than their connotations, to play with familiar objects in unfamiliar ways and let that object take on the meaning implied by such relationships and the mindset of the viewer. There's a disproportionate amount of responsibility placed on the viewer here -- but perhaps that's how it should be. Few Caribbean artists are carrying the torch abroad, and until the world can get comfortable with a wide range of artistic work coming out of this region that critically examines our place in the world, no one will reach the post-tropical he speaks about. Like those two dots that never meet, those two objects that never reconcile, paradise exists in a detached space. So perhaps the real question you must face before viewing his work is this: What is paradise? And are you there yet?
 

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News Article

June 18, 2011
(VIDEO) Pew: Protect Our Sharks, Say Bahamas' Children

Hear from Bahamian children from various islands of The Bahamas along with Bahamas National Trust Education Officer, Shelly Cant deliver a message on protecting sharks in The Bahamas.

This video Public Service Announcement This PSA was produced by The Bahamas National Trust (BNT), in collaboration with Pew environment Group, in support of a grassroots petition to protect sharks in Bahamian waters.

Sharks are in trouble globally, and there are few locations where healthy shark populations still exist. In The Bahamas, a 20 year-old ban on longline fishing gear has left its waters as one of the few places in the world with relatively healthy shark...

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News Article

December 12, 2011
GB SHIPYARD GETS 'BETTER AND BETTER'

GRAND BAHAMA Shipyard's chairman, Carl-Gustaf Rotkirch, said the facility has "done better and better" every month throughout 2011, having gone 205 days without any health/safety incident this year.

And, speaking with staff at the Shipyard's annual Christmas luncheon last Thursday, Reuben Byrd, its senior vice-president of operations, discussed the importance of customer satisfaction and service as the main factors behind its continued improvement.

"Carl and I were with Shell Corporation a few nights ago and they told us: 'Your staff act like they own the company, they take pride in what they are doing!' We were thrilled to hear this and to you today I say congratul ...

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News Article
Butler inherits New York fortune
May 14, 2010
Butler inherits New York fortune

The beloved butler for a prominent New York family, who grew up in a mud hut in Nepal, has joined the city's elite by inheriting more than $8 million, including two units at the legendary Dakota apartment building off Central Park.

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News Article

March 27, 2013
'VCB' will bring grace to Chris Brown Invitational

Veronica Campbell-Brown is the most decorated female track and field athlete in the history of the Caribbean. The Jamaicans fondly call her simply 'VCB'. She will always be their darling, much in the manner of Merlene Ottey and Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce.
'VCB' will be one of the headline attractions at the Chris Brown Bahamas Invitational, scheduled for April 13 at the Thomas A. Robinson National Stadium. She has all of the achievements in her resume, that every boy and girl who aspire for track and field greatness, dream of. For starters, let's just focus on 'VCB' being just one of eight track and field athletes of all-time to win championships at the youth, junior and senior levels.
Among her Olympic medals are two consecutive gold medal performances in the 200 meters (2004 and 2008). She has been equally durable and prolific. At the Olympic Games, apart from her
superlative success in the half lap, 'VCB' also owns two bronze medals in the 100 meters (2004 and 2012).
In the International Association of Athletic Federations (IAAF) World Outdoor Championships, she has struck gold in both of the short sprints (2007 and 2011). She also has two silver medals from both the 100 and 200 meters (m). Campbell-Brown is a gold medal winner twice over World Indoors in the 60m. Add two gold medals in the 100m at the World Athletics Final and one in the 200m and you get the big picture.
She has been the most dominant female sprinter in the world over the last eight years. It's a healthy background of 25 senior medals. From 1996 to 2001, she won 18 youth and junior medals.
Who can beat that? Nobody can.
This is the lady our Golden Knight Chris Brown has persuaded to come for his invitational. Her appearance will be quite special and should have Jamaicans, here, Bahamians and all other regional residents of this country, out in huge numbers to pay tribute to his outstanding Caribbean sports ambassador.
When you think of 'VCB', although Jamaica rightly claims her, she is one for all of the Caribbean to emulate. She is graceful, with a wholesome character. Her dedication to training is legendary, a prime reason, she always does so well.
The other characteristic that has endeared her to the homeland of Jamaica and we Caribbean boosters is her heart. She is the female brand of 'Lionheart'. The Chris Brown Invitational definitely will enjoy an enhanced status because of 'VCB'.
Congratulations to her for all she has done for the Caribbean through her mighty performances on tracks around the world. Her presence in The Bahamas will surely be highly appreciated.
(To respond to this column, kindly contact Fred Sturrup at sturrup1504@gmail.com)

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News Article

February 10, 2013
Abaco Male Found in Possession of Unlicensed Firearm and Ammunition

ABACO

, Bahamas - On Friday 8th February 2013 around 5:30pm, officers of the Marsh Harbour Police Station

executed a search warrant on a resident in Fox Town, Abaco and discovered (1) one

unlicensed 12 gauge shotgun along with (22) twenty two shot gun shells. A forty five year

old male was arrested and taken into police custody

...

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News Article

December 02, 2011
Kenneth Wellington Treco, 96

A memorial service for the late Kenneth Wellington Treco, age 96 of Sea Breeze Estates, Nassau, The Bahamas, will be held at St. Matthew's Anglican Church, Church and Shirley Streets, Nassau, on Tuesday, 6th December, 2011 at 11:00a.m.
 
Reverend Father Crosley Walkine and The Venerable Archdeacon Keith Cartwright will officiate.
 
Mr. Treco was predeceased by his parents, Carroll and Georgianna Treco; first wife, Anastacia Treco; a daughter, Una Shepard; a son, Kenneth Treco, Jr.; ten brothers and four sisters.
 
Left to cherish his memories are his wife, Sybil Carey Treco and also daughters, Maria Smith, Yvonne Cartwright and Cheryle Themens; a son, Tony; sons-in-law, David Smith, Gerald Themens and Arnold Shepard; daughter-in-law, Stephanie Treco; eleven grandchildren, Athena, Kian and Shelly Smith, Tanya Bennett, Marlene Key, Clifton and Brian Cartwright, Chad and Owen Shepard, Alain and Chantal Themens; fifteen great grandchildren, Cemellyn Geordie and Maggie Lynn Smith, Alexandria Smith, Samuel, Andrew, Maxwell and Amelia Bennett, Aaron Key, Candice Ewing, Tevin and Jessica Cartwright, Kristy, Samantha and Logan Cartwright; grandsons-in-law, Craig Bennett and Elvis Key; daughters-in-law, Heather Krause-Smith, Natalie Shepard, Clarice and Tina Cartwright; three sisters, Delores, Lowie and Winifred Treco; numerous nieces, nephews, cousins and other relatives and friends including, Mr. & Mrs. Sydney Sweeting, Ms. Betty Cole, Ms. Gracie Johnson part-time caretaker.
 
Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited, 22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale, Nassau.

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News Article

July 02, 2011
Simmer down and stirring it up

Chef Devan McPhee remembers vividly the day he went to church and was asked by his pastor what he wanted to be in life. The youngster, seven or eight at the time, thought back to the fact that he had been watching the Food Network before he left out of the house that Sunday morning, having just gotten cable installed, and said he wanted to be a chef because he'd just seen them on television.  His pastor prophesied that young McPhee would be one of the best chefs The Bahamas would see and at a very young age at that.
That pastor's prophecy seems to be coming true as Chef McPhee, now 25, owns his own restaurant and bar.  It was just in May that he signed on the dotted line to lease the Simmer Down Restaurant and Stir It Up Bar at the Marley Resort on Cable Beach where he's certainly simmering some amazing pots and stirring up delicious libations.
Simmer Down Restaurant showcases a fusion of Bahamian and Jamaican food with an international flair as he complements the cuisine with French and European touches and relies on lots of spices and herbs to his foods making him one of the hottest young chefs in the country.
"Our theme in the kitchen is we always cook with love and we serve food prepared with love, and translating that over to the bar, we provide drinks to complement the food," he says.
Even though he's new to the restaurant ownership business, Chef McPhee is not new to the kitchen and definitely not new to the Simmer Down Restaurant kitchen as he was the executive chef prior to the resort closing for 10 months. Upon its reopening, he gladly took charge of his own fate, switching up the menu to reflect his cooking style and his Bahamian heritage, and he's kept some of the old favorites that were hits.
While the menu is exciting all around and offers something for everyone -- including vegetarians, the chef says there are a few menu items that are chef's choice and a must try -- items he considers his signature items.
From the soups, the Lobster and Pumpkin Bisque (infused with ginger and curry, topped with a cinnamon cream dollop) he gives two thumbs up.

"It's a burst of flavors and not what you expect with the fresh ginger, curry and cinnamon cream dollop.  Lobster bisque is standard on restaurant menus, but when you taste the pumpkin in there with the ginger ... the pimentos, the fresh thyme, it's a burst of flavor and then the cinnamon cream dollop mellows it out."
While he says all salads are good, he's most pleased with his Caribbean lobster and mango salad that he says he came up with off the fly.  "I was poaching some lobster for the lobster bisque one day and there was some mango on the table, and I saw the yellow and the white and some cherry tomatoes and I said let's try something.  I marinated it in a passion fruit dressing with fresh basil, ginger ...  I played around with it and I tried it as a chef's special that night with a blueberry balsamic drizzle to go with it to bring out the color, topped it off with fresh greens and toasted coconut and it was a hit."  From that night it made the menu.
If he's sitting down to dine, he opts for a callaloo and spinach vegetable empanada, just to add a different touch to the courses if you're having a three-course meal.  It's also a dish he says vegetarians would appreciate as well as it's healthy.  The baked empanada is a puff pastry stuffed with Jamaican cheddar cheese which he says balances out the flavors of the callaloo and bitterness of the spinach.
The Down Home Roasted Organic Duck (marinated in pineapple and Bacardi rum with island gratin potatoes, broccoli rabe and cinnamon glazed carrots) makes this restaurant owner proud.  It's presented with a sweet potato gratin, garnished with fried plantain and they make a pineapple and coconut rum sauce to go with it.
The Bahamian lobster duo (coconut cracked conch and broiled with a Jamaican vegetable run down, homemade mango chutney and drizzled with a lobster essence) is another menu favorite.  
And you should not leave the Simmer Down Restaurant without trying dessert.  The must have item is the Mama Lur's apples 'n cream (a warm crumble with fresh apples, and fresh guavas with ginger vanilla ice cream and apple cider reduction).
Chef McPhee says he gets his guavas from the islands and freezes them for this dessert, because he says there's nothing like the taste of real guava.  They also make their own ice cream and the dish is topped off with caramelized pecans, crème caramel and finished with toasted coconut.
With a number of other options on the menu, Chef McPhee prefers to keep his menu small and personalized.  But he intends to change the menu with the seasons.  As we are in the summer months, the menu reflects a lot of fruits, colorful sauces and dressings.  In the fall and winter he intends to pull out ingredients like star anise and cinnamon to warm things up, and offer heartier options like rib eye and tenderloin and a lot more soups to go with the cooler temperatures.
With a kitchen staff he handpicked because they had the same vision that he had for the restaurant and bar that he now owns.  "I picked them because I wanted to share my knowledge with tem and I didn't want anyone who would be complacent because they'd been working here prior to the resort closing," said Chef McPhee.  "I wanted to start fresh.  I wanted it to be like night and day and the first thing I did was to reduced menu prices drastically, because people loved the place, but they talked about the prices, and I try to work with the locals pocket," he says.  The chef even offers a daily three-course prix fixe meal special that changes weekly.  For $55 you get a soup or salad and usually it's the lobster bisque or shrimp appetizer; you get a choice of the jerk chicken medallion or the chef's special which is the fish of the day, and a dessert -- either the Mama Lur's Apples and Cream or the Caribbean Chocolate Vibes.
"Going into this I knew I had to do something different, because the place had already existed and try to get that same market, but make it my market," says Chef McPhee.

To make your Simmer Down Restaurant experience unique, he offers a different experience nightly.   He came up with "Taxi Nights" on Monday and Tuesdays to catch the tourist market; Wine Down Wednesdays for people who like wine and free tapas; and Thursday and Fridays are corporate happy hour when he does exotic martinis and specials and Saturdays are known as stirred up and sizzlin'.   A five member jazz band On Cue performs from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays as well.
At 25, Chef McPhee's future is in his own hands as a restaurant owner, but he says as an apprentice chef while he trained under many great chefs in the hotels, he realized he didn't want that to be him -- working in the same kitchen year after year, becoming programmed.  He wanted to make a name for himself

"Even though it's a risk, the good thing about it is that I took this venture because it's a smaller operation where I could start out small and gradually grow to the level that I want to be at ... and I was already familiar with the place [Simmer Down Restaurant] and it was just a matter of polishing up some stuff, getting the menu together and choosing the right staff."
Chef McPhee credits Chef Addiemae Farrington of the Culinary Hospitality Management Institute, the late Chef Jasmine Clarke-Young, Chef Paul Haywood of Altantis, Chef Wayne Moncur of the Ocean Club and Chef Tracey Sweeting (his former executive chef at the Marley Resort) with giving him the training that has given him so much confidence to do what he's now doing.
"They trained me so well in all areas that I'm able to be creative and do what I'm doing, with hot food because I'm a trained pastry chef," said Chef McPhee.  "They really gave me a good school bag to carry.  I can pull out things and be versatile.  Plus, it's in my heart, and you have to cook with love.  You can have the fancy name, and your food can look pretty, but that passion and soul has to be in it."
Chef McPhee even keeps his kitchen open a little longer than most restaurants, taking his last order at 10:30 p.m. after opening at 6 p.m.
For the chef, the new venture is fun, but scary as he knows he has the livelihood of his staff in his hands.
At Stir It Up Bar he says you have to have the Blue Razzberry Martini and the Jamaica Me Crazy. It just sounds crazy and it's fun and people enjoy them.  I wanted to add my flair to the menu and these are my signature ones.  They're new to the menu, because coming into the restaurant and bar business, I had to bring something new to the table.  I reduced the drink prices too and kept it straight across the board.
It's new, it's scary but fun, because you have the livelihood of staff in your hands and they have to be paid.  "I realize what it is to be an employee and now an employer, even though I'm at a young age.  It's like you have an additional pair of eyes -- you watch everything, things you didn't care about before you now care about -- even on the service aspect. "

CARIBBEAN SPICY SHRIMP APPETIZER WITH POTATO AND SWEET CORN PUREE

6 - 16/20 shrimp
½ oz Jerk seasoning
2 oz homemade ginger and garlic chili sauce
½ oz herb marinade
For the potato and sweet corn puree
½ lb Yukon potato, cooked
4 oz sweet corn puree
3 oz heavy cream
1 oz butter
Sugar, to taste
Salt and pepper, to taste
For the tropical fruit salsa:
4 oz fresh mango diced
4 oz fresh ripe pineapple diced
1 oz bell pepper fine diced
1 oz  red onion diced
1 oz distilled white vinegar
1 tsp fresh cilantro
Juice of 1 orange
2 oz fresh banana mashed
Salt and pepper, to taste
Honey as needed

Method:
Combine ingredients in a stainless steel bowl and mix together, season to taste with alt and pepper and let stand 30 minutes before serving.

For the shrimp: Season the shrimp with salt and jerk seasoning and herb marinade, let stand 30 minutes. Grill to desired doneness and top with chili sauce, Finish shrimp in the oven and serve.
For the potato and sweet corn puree: Puree ingredient together to desired taste and consistency, season and serve. Garnish with herb oil and chips. Combine all ingredients together and blend thoroughly.
For the tropical fruit salsa: Combine ingredients in a stainless steel bowl and mix together, season to taste with alt and pepper and let stand 30 minutes before serving.

CARIBBEAN MANGO AND LOBSTER SALAD

1 lb spiny lobster meat cooked and sliced
1 oz Spanish onion fine diced
2 oz fresh cherry tomatoes chopped
Juice of 2 lemons
2 large mangoes
1 oz ginger chopped
1 tsp salt
Salt and fresh goat pepper

1 oz chopped cilantro
1 tsp sugar
4 oz passion fruit dressing

Combine ingredients in a mixing bowl; add enough dressing to bind ingredients. Be sure to season with salt and pepper. Mix, chill and serve. Garnish with micro greens chilled asparagus and a lemon vinaigrette.

MAMA LURR'S APPLES 'N CREAM

4 Granny smith apples
1 can uava shells
1 tsp cinnamon
½ cup sugar
1 tsp salt
1 star anise
1 tsp lemon juice
¼ tbs butter
½ oz flour
3 oz home made vanilla ice cream
Toasted coconut
Crumble:
½ cup butter
1 ¼ cup flour
2 tbs sugar
2 tbs raisins
2 tbs crushed almonds/ walnuts

Peel and slice apples. In sauce pan melt butter, sugar, cinnamon, lemon juice and star anise. Add guavas and sliced apples. Let simmer for about two minutes. Thicken slightly with flour.  Place in bowl and allow to set.

For crumble: Fold in at room temperature butter with the flour into small pieces. Add sugar, raisins, and almonds.  Place on top of apple and guava mixture and bake for 4-8 minutes. Serve with ice cream and add toasted coconut.

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Movie
The Shining
  • Genre : Drama, Horror, Mystery
  • Rating : TBC - To Be Classified

A family heads to an isolated hotel for the winter where an evil and spiritual presence influences the father into violence, while his psychic son sees horrific forebodings from the past and of the future....


News Article

December 02, 2011
Philip Charlton Phil Burrows, 51

Mr. Philip Charlton "Phil" Burrows age 51 years of #13 Windward Road; Imperial Park Sea Breeze Estates will be held on Thursday, November 24, 2011 at 7:30pm at The United Christian Cathedral, Flamingo Gardens.
 
Garnet Funeral Service
For

Mr. Philip Charlton "Phil" Burrows age 51 years of #13 Windward Road; Imperial Park Sea Breeze Estates will be held on Saturday, November 26, 2011 at 9:45am at St. Francis Xavier Cathedral, West Hill Street. Fr. Thomas P. Brislin C.P., assisted by Deacon Andrew Burrows will officiate and burial will be in Woodlawn Gardens Cemetery, Soldier Road.
 
The Radiance of this "Garnet of A Gem" will always glow in the hearts of his:
Loving Wife of Twenty Three Years: Ida Rudell Armbrister-Burrows;
Three Brothers: David, Kevin and Brent Burrows;
Three Sisters: Jennifer Johnson, Donna McKenzie and Karen Burrows;
Three Nephews: Rodney Johnson Jr., Jonathan Burrows and Sven Ambrose;
Seven Nieces: Rhodnia Johnson, Samantha McKenzie, Esterleta, Keva, Kenesha, Lashanda and Dana Burrows;
Three Uncles: George W. W. Gardiner, George and Kendal Burrows;
Three Aunts: Mavis and Rose Burrows and Cynthia Holmes;
Grand Nephew: Garrett Johnson;
Grand Aunt: Clothilda Miller;
Father-in-law: Everette William Armbrister;
Brother-in-law: William Everette Armbrister;
Four Sisters-in-law: Sandra, Rose and Renee Armbrister and Janette Burrows;
Grandmother-in-law: Beulah Armbrister;
Uncle-in-law: Selwyn Armbrister;
Aunt-in-law: Lorna Armbrister;
Cousins: Marla, Keno and Anton Strachan, Jerry, Patricia and Kayla Rutherford, Carlene Holmes, Perry and Philipa Smith, Carol, Sonya, Kenneth, Kenyon, Jerinimo, Taj, Kishler and Tash Parker, Jamal and Adrian Miller, Betty and Kirk Horton, Jeremy Mullings, Erin Delancy, Darren Glinton, Demal Seymour, Jerice McDonald, Latoissa Humes, D'Andraha and Danielle;
Other loving family and friends including: Joycelyn Strachan and Family, Bernard and Nellie Brennen, Anton McKenzie, Debbie Farrington, Muntrella and DJ Woodard, Bishop Albert Hepburn and Family, United Christian Church Family, Rev. Charles Young and Family, Steven Strachan and Family Elizabeth Newbold, Llewlyn Newbold & Family, Roselyn Newbold & Family, Ruby Hepburn and Family, Wyndham Resort & Casino, Bahamas Electricity Corporation, Staff of Royal Bank of Canada, Bahamas Chapter IAAP, Aquinas College Class of 77, Lyford Cay Club, A. F. Adderley Class of 78, Christine Bain, Diane Albury, Sandra Dee Leadon, Don & Dot Major, Rosemary Roker, Ena Burrows, Yvonne Curry, Henry Williams, Nelson Brown, Dawn Gray and Family, Tanya Turnquest, Renee McKay, Shelley Pritchard, Alicia Green, Rose McDonald, Lynn Hunt, Princess Rahming, Helen and Dencil Barr, Lilly Burrows, Anzlo and Sharon Strachan, Sydney Forbes and Family, Judith Atkins & Family, Michael Moss & Family, The Brennen's, The Bamboo Town Community.
 
Visitation will be in the "Emerald Suite" Emerald Ridge Mortuary & Monument Company Ltd. #20 Claridge Road of Friday, November 25, 2011 from 2pm to 6pm and at St. Francis Xavier Cathedral, West Hill Street on Saturday, November 26, 2011 from 9:00am to service time.
 

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News Article

December 02, 2011
Nellie Patricia Pratt, 67

Funeral service for the late Nellie Patricia Pratt, aged 67, a resident of East Street South will be held on Friday December 2, 2011 at 10a.m at the All Saints Anglican Church, Joans Heights West. Officiating will be Father S. Sebastian Campbell assisted by other ministers of religion. Interment will follow at Woodlawn Gardens Cemetery, Soldier Road.
Left to cherish her memories are her: Husband Thomas Whitfield Pratt Jr., Five (5) sons: Peter & Donald Smith, Christopher & Anthony Pratt Sr., and George Hamilton Sr., Two (2) Daughters: Tanya Pratt and Tamica Pratt-Major; Two (2) Daughters-in-law: Denise Smith and Antoinette Pratt; One (1) Son-in-law: Marcian Major; Two (2) Sisters: Ruby Thurston and Louise Smith; One (1) Brother-in-law: Anthony Pratt; Two (2) Sisters-in-law: Ruth Pratt and Antoinelle Knight of Miami, Florida; Seventeen (17) Grandchildren: Kent & Raynell Smith, George Hamilton Jr., Petra, Patricia & Peter Smith Jr., Andra, Rashad & Malik Smith, Chardai, Charles Jr., & Chaz Johnson, Kristin & Krishae Pratt, Antonia, Anthony Jr. & Antoini Pratt; One (1) Great-Grandchild: Tyler Smith; Twelve (12) Nieces: Cheryl Lightbourne, Yasmin Powell, Helen Brown, Dominique Dean, Lauralee Pratt-Storr, Kristy Pratt, Monalisa Bartlett of Miami, Florida, Letitia Pratt-Fearson of Tallahassee, Florida, Patty Smith, Deborah Percentie, Carol Johnson & Leantha Gibson; Seven (7) Nephews: Ainsworth Brown, Ricardo, Shawn & Boya Smith, Robert Pratt Sr., Anthony Bartlett of Miami, Florida & Ronald Dean; Fourteen (14) Grandnieces; Eleven (11) Grandnephews; Three (3) God-children. A host of special relatives and friends include: Father S. Sebastian Campbell & family, cousin Ruth Pratt & family, Paul & Amanda Farquharson, Paul Farquharson Jr., Edward Swain, Barbara Dorsette & family, Pamela Hunt & family, Joan Saunders & family, Eloise Bain, Sue Humes, Emily and Roland Cox & family, Matha Edgecombe, Sam & Joanna Williams and family, the Honourable Perry Christie, Charles Johnson, Shantell Smith, Richenda Dean, Danicia Dean, Shavonne Rolle, Sophia Kerr, Jamila Jones, Ruth Smith, Shelly Bullard-Rolle, Tony Cheribin, Terrez Ellis Sr., Terry Storr, Yersamine Bodie, Kimmy Ramsey, Jason Moxey, Roel & Keisha Turnquest, Adell Cornell, Donald Deleveaux, Marjorie Baker & family, Carvel & Donnell Rolle, Kyle & Marilyn, Mr. & Mrs. Alton Major, Tony Albury, Arthur Campbell, John King, Vincent McKenzie, Hughie Capron, Nat Brown, Shannon McPhee, Ken Capron, Michael Miller, Lillian & Wendell Rigby, Patrina Stuart, Cyril Baker, Dwayne Henderson, Dwayne Pratt, Ashley Gaitor, Malinda Mency, Michael "Big Mike" Jackson, Calvin Jones, Peter Rahming, Perry Forbes, Sherry Henzi, the All Saints Parish family and the ACW, the Atlantis Casino, Nobu restaurant, Ridgeland Primary School, Barbie's, The Thatch Hut crew, Remelda, Carolyn, Crystal, Mary, Sylvia, South Beach Clinic, South Beach Police Station, Sheraton Nassau Beach, Water Features Atlantis, Dialysis Unit, Orick & Orville, William Pratt, South Beach family, the Fawkes family, the Cox family, the Thurston family, the McClain family, the Curry family, Alva Thurston, Alma Cox, the Diamonds and Sting crew, "The Porch Family," and other special family and friends too numerous to mention.
 
Friends may pay their last respects at Gateway Memorial-Vaughn O. Jones Memorial Center, Mount Royal Avenue & Talbot Street on Thursday from 10a.m to 6p.m and at the church on Friday from 8:45a.m until service time.

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News Article

April 10, 2012
The imperfect child

Georgette Sands (name changed) never expected to get pregnant at age 22, but when she did, she and her boyfriend dealt with it. The couple who were in a committed relationship, got married. When their son Adian was born, he weighed seven pounds, 14 ounces. They fell in love with their perfect little boy instantly.
The first-time mother documented everything he did. As they celebrated his first birthday it was brought to her attention that her son whose hyphenated name means pleasure-given and favored with God, wasn't walking. She paid no attention. She'd been told that boys were different and that they didn't walk until they were like 15 months old. Besides, he'd done everything else rather quickly, so she wasn't too concerned that he hadn't walked as yet.
At 13 months, Sands' son started walking then running. She breathed a sigh of relief. He was okay. But she mentally noted that his pediatrician kept asking about his vocabulary, which had not progressed beyond mama and dada by age two.
"When his pediatrician said I think he might be autistic, I said don't even say those words. I knew where her train of thought was because every time I took him for his checkup, she would say, 'Mommy, how is Adian doing? How many words is Adian saying? Does Adian know his eyes?' Those were questions she kept asking. She said, 'Mommy I know it's frustrating for you. I understand it's hard for you to accept, but you need to understand that if that's the situation we need to deal with it.'" Sands recalled breaking down and crying. At 24, her child's pediatrician was intimating that her son had autism.
Autism is a common neuro-development disorder characterized by impaired communication, social interaction and restricted or repetitive behavior. It presents itself in children between the ages of 18 months and two years normally. Although it is a chronic disorder that has no cure, adequate intervention and therapy can assist children to develop into active adults and live close to typical lives.

The emotions
Sands was angry. But it was only the first of so many emotions - shame, denial, acceptance - she would feel to get to the point she's at today where she can actually speak about what she's been through without breaking down and crying.
"I was angry because we bought 'Baby Can Read' for him, because we were going to have this smart baby. Then it became the shame of it, because you think, what are people going to think? How do I explain this? Then the denial came when I started to think there's a possibility. It's like back in the day if you could pass for white, pass for white so you wouldn't have to be black. He could pass for a normal child, so he's a normal child. After the denial it was acceptance and what can I do for my child, because it's not me, but him I'm hurting."
Five years after his birth, Sands said she knows she had to go through each emotion because it's going through them that got her to where she is today, fighting for her son to find his voice as REACH celebrates Autism Awareness Month.
"One day I'm not going to be here, and what is my son going to do if I don't push ... fight now for him? Where is my son going to go? If I don't fight for him to get that voice in him, and that fight in him to say I have this, this [autism] doesn't define me, then I'm doing him a disservice," said the now 27-year-old mother.
She said going through the emotions helped. And that it has made her a stronger person.
"I was strong in character, but strong in fighting, that wasn't me, but now I have to fight. And the emotions light that fire. But in between lighting the fire and going through the storm, you have to look at your child and say I love you and when the doubt and sadness comes in I always say to [him] I love you, give mommy a hug and a kiss."
In January 2011, at the urging of her father-in-law, Sands said they got her son a screening. But he has not been officially diagnosed with autism.
"He has not been diagnosed, but if I have to check black or white, that's the box he fits in from the signs and information that I researched.

The signs
"When [he] started walking, he started tip-toeing and everyone found that fascinating. He will look at you, but not look at you. [He] could go to the VCR at [age] one and a half to two and turn it on. Press open, put [a tape] in, turn on the TV and watch it. And when he wants to stop it, he stops it. He saw me do it once. He can go on the laptop and once I show him the sites he can go on without me showing him. At one point I started taking out the television plug because I was like you need to go to sleep, and he would try to put it in."
Her son is now enrolled in the autism program at Garvin Tynes School and attends REACH meetings. In the seven months since he started, she said her son knows the days of the week by sight and can even unscramble them and put them in order. She's now teaching him his months and he knows his letters, but he still does not speak. Her goal is to do the best thing for her son to get him the help he needs.
"What experts knew about autism then to now has increased [in the five years of celebrating World Autism Day], but even so, the number of persons diagnosed with autism has also increased," said Kim Gibson, co-vice president of REACH. "In the past, statistics for autism showed that one in 100 children will be diagnosed with this disorder, but the most recent statistics released this year by the CDC (Center for Disease Control) now show that autism is increasing in the world and now one in every 88 children are diagnosed with it. And because it is more prevalent in males, one in 54 boys will be affected. Although we don't have any definite statistics locally, going by the numbers of children being diagnosed that we know of at REACH, the global statistics are likely to be relevant here as well."

The struggle
While Sands and her husband love their son, she said the road has not been smooth sailing and that dealing with a child with autism can be devastating on a marriage.
"It's hard for a woman to adjust first because they have to let go of their goals. And it's hard for a man because they're looking at their son and saying this is not the son I was looking forward to playing basketball with or football with, so you have to let go of those goals. I was listening to Rodney Peete talk about what his wife [Holly Robinson Peete] went through, and I was like this is me. Different people, different backgrounds, but the same story in a nutshell. You have to go through those things in your head. You have to go through those things as a couple. You have to let go as individuals, and then you have to come back together as a couple and say this is what we have to fight together."
And Sands said her husband is involved and that people are amazed watching the patience he has with their son because a lot of fathers aren't there.
"When you come to meetings, you see a lot more women fighting the cause because there's also a shame factor. [My son] doesn't have any external features, some do, but when his tantrums are bad, they're bad."
Now that she attends REACH meetings, Sands said it helped because she can look the next person in the eye and know where they're coming from.
"They understand how tremendous it is to achieve with your child. You can literally finish each other's sentences because you feel the same way ... you went through the same things. Especially as mothers, we're all broken down to build back up for our children, because of the weight of everything."
But one thing she's not ashamed of is her son.
And she encourages people to go through the emotions so that they can come out on the other side and do what's best for their child. But she also admits to feeling a tug at her heart when she sees other kids attaining certain milestones.
"Like any other parent, you prepare for so much. My godchild just took Kingsway's exam. My son was supposed to take Kingsway's exam, so when those milestones come up it tugs at me because that's where I was supposed to be and this is where I'm at."
But as people go about their life and see children acting out, she urges them not to automatically assume the child is rude, and to have compassion, because they may just have autism.
As April is observed as Autism Awareness Month, Gibson said there is a lot the public can do to help REACH shed more light on this challenging disorder. The organization urged corporations and homeowners to "light it up blue" by changing their light bulbs in their business places or homes to show support to Autism research.
During last year's "light it up blue" campaign, famous landmarks around the world like Niagara Falls, the Empire State Building, Rockefeller Center in New York, Cairo Tower in Egypt, Sydney Opera House in Australia, the Hungarian Parliament in Hungary and even Canton Tower in China participated.
By lighting it up blue, REACH and other autism organizations around the world hope to bring awareness and generate funds to benefit the cause.

People hoping to learn more about autism can attend a free autism seminar on Saturday, April 21 at Queen's College. On Saturday, April 28, REACH will end the month with a fun day at Camperdown Horse stables. For more information on REACH events and how you can contribute to helping children with autism, call 357-3900.

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News Article

March 23, 2013
Stephen 'Dirty' Newbold released from jail

According to reports online, the country's top junior quartermiler has been released from county jail in Tallahassee, Florida, after spending the night behind bars, and will be allowed to return to The Bahamas to compete in next weekend's CARIFTA Games. The only question remains, will the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations (BAAA) allow him to do so after being arrested early Thursday morning for discharging a firearm in public and resisting arrest without violence?
Stephen 'Dirty' Newbold, 18, appeared in court yesterday morning, and was released after posting a $1,000 bond - $500 for each count. He has a case management hearing for Tuesday, April 30, at 8:30 a.m., but before then, is scheduled to return home to represent The Bahamas for a fourth straight year at the CARIFTA Games. The 42nd Annual CARIFTA Games is set for March 29 to April 1, at the Thomas A. Robinson National Stadium.
Up until press time, BAAA President Mike Sands was still not returning calls, but first Vice President Iram Lewis said that they are receiving legal counsel into the matter. He said that is about all he could mention at this particular time.
As for Newbold, the Florida judge ordered him to turn over any firearms in his possession after his release, but Newbold has since denied ever carrying a concealed weapon. He tweeted: 'Bad Mouth me if you want! Nobody got shot at, There was no gun. I'm no criminal, but I got a couple of misdemeanors.'
Before that, he tweeted: 'They can't keep a good man down! Lol people making it seem like life is over, I'm out, I'm gucci, back to work.'
According to reports, Newbold and fellow athlete Joshua Mance were arrested around 3:30 a.m. in the morning after shots were heard in the vicinity of a local apartment complex pool. An eyewitness identified Newbold as the shooter, and additionally, it was reported that shell casings were found in the area of the pool. Both athletes have since been suspended from the Florida State University (FSU) track team, but according to FSU Director of Athletics Randy Spetman, both Newbold and Mance could rejoin the team pending an investigation into the university's discipline policy and legal proceedings.
Mance, who has hired a private attorney, was a member of the silver medal winning 4x400m relay team that was beaten by The Bahamas at last year's Olympic Games. Mance had just turned 21 on Thursday, and was in possession of Newbold's identification card, which had an altered date of birth. Mance was charged with being in possession of a forged identification card and resisting arrest without violence.
World Youth Champion over 200 meters (m) Newbold was regarded as one of The Bahamas' best hopes for a medal going into the CARIFTA Games. He was expected to represent The Bahamas in the under-20 boys' 400m, and maybe the 200m as well. He has personal best times of 46.97 and 20.89 seconds in those events, respectively.
Newbold is a five-time CARIFTA Games medalist. He is the CARIFTA record holder in the under-17 boys' 400m hurdles as well (52.75 seconds). Newbold also won double gold at the 2010 Central American and Caribbean (CAC) Junior Track and Field Championships in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. In college, the FSU sophomore is a two-time Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) Indoor Champion.
The crowning glory moment of Newbold's junior career might have come at the 2011 World Youth Championships in Lille, France, when he won the gold medal in the boys' 200m in a personal best time of 20.89 seconds, helping The Bahamas to secure its best finish ever at a global athletics meet.

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Movie
Phantom
  • Genre : Thriller
  • Rating :

The haunted Captain of a Soviet submarine holds the fate of the world in his hands. Forced to leave his family behind, he is charged with leading a covert mission cloaked in mystery....