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News Article
Nellie Patricia Pratt, 67

Funeral service for the late Nellie Patricia Pratt, aged 67, a resident of East Street South will be held on Friday December 2, 2011 at 10a.m at the All Saints Anglican Church, Joans Heights West. Officiating will be Father S. Sebastian Campbell assisted by other ministers of religion. Interment will follow at Woodlawn Gardens Cemetery, Soldier Road.
Left to cherish her memories are her: Husband Thomas Whitfield Pratt Jr., Five (5) sons: Peter & Donald Smith, Christopher & Anthony Pratt Sr., and George Hamilton Sr., Two (2) Daughters: Tanya Pratt and Tamica Pratt-Major; Two (2) Daughters-in-law: Denise Smith and Antoinette Pratt; One (1) Son-in-law: Marcian Major; Two (2) Sisters: Ruby Thurston and Louise Smith; One (1) Brother-in-law: Anthony Pratt; Two (2) Sisters-in-law: Ruth Pratt and Antoinelle Knight of Miami, Florida; Seventeen (17) Grandchildren: Kent & Raynell Smith, George Hamilton Jr., Petra, Patricia & Peter Smith Jr., Andra, Rashad & Malik Smith, Chardai, Charles Jr., & Chaz Johnson, Kristin & Krishae Pratt, Antonia, Anthony Jr. & Antoini Pratt; One (1) Great-Grandchild: Tyler Smith; Twelve (12) Nieces: Cheryl Lightbourne, Yasmin Powell, Helen Brown, Dominique Dean, Lauralee Pratt-Storr, Kristy Pratt, Monalisa Bartlett of Miami, Florida, Letitia Pratt-Fearson of Tallahassee, Florida, Patty Smith, Deborah Percentie, Carol Johnson & Leantha Gibson; Seven (7) Nephews: Ainsworth Brown, Ricardo, Shawn & Boya Smith, Robert Pratt Sr., Anthony Bartlett of Miami, Florida & Ronald Dean; Fourteen (14) Grandnieces; Eleven (11) Grandnephews; Three (3) God-children. A host of special relatives and friends include: Father S. Sebastian Campbell & family, cousin Ruth Pratt & family, Paul & Amanda Farquharson, Paul Farquharson Jr., Edward Swain, Barbara Dorsette & family, Pamela Hunt & family, Joan Saunders & family, Eloise Bain, Sue Humes, Emily and Roland Cox & family, Matha Edgecombe, Sam & Joanna Williams and family, the Honourable Perry Christie, Charles Johnson, Shantell Smith, Richenda Dean, Danicia Dean, Shavonne Rolle, Sophia Kerr, Jamila Jones, Ruth Smith, Shelly Bullard-Rolle, Tony Cheribin, Terrez Ellis Sr., Terry Storr, Yersamine Bodie, Kimmy Ramsey, Jason Moxey, Roel & Keisha Turnquest, Adell Cornell, Donald Deleveaux, Marjorie Baker & family, Carvel & Donnell Rolle, Kyle & Marilyn, Mr. & Mrs. Alton Major, Tony Albury, Arthur Campbell, John King, Vincent McKenzie, Hughie Capron, Nat Brown, Shannon McPhee, Ken Capron, Michael Miller, Lillian & Wendell Rigby, Patrina Stuart, Cyril Baker, Dwayne Henderson, Dwayne Pratt, Ashley Gaitor, Malinda Mency, Michael "Big Mike" Jackson, Calvin Jones, Peter Rahming, Perry Forbes, Sherry Henzi, the All Saints Parish family and the ACW, the Atlantis Casino, Nobu restaurant, Ridgeland Primary School, Barbie's, The Thatch Hut crew, Remelda, Carolyn, Crystal, Mary, Sylvia, South Beach Clinic, South Beach Police Station, Sheraton Nassau Beach, Water Features Atlantis, Dialysis Unit, Orick & Orville, William Pratt, South Beach family, the Fawkes family, the Cox family, the Thurston family, the McClain family, the Curry family, Alva Thurston, Alma Cox, the Diamonds and Sting crew, "The Porch Family," and other special family and friends too numerous to mention.
 
Friends may pay their last respects at Gateway Memorial-Vaughn O. Jones Memorial Center, Mount Royal Avenue & Talbot Street on Thursday from 10a.m to 6p.m and at the church on Friday from 8:45a.m until service time.

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News Article
Dennis Dames: Autopsy Report on the Recent Gambling Referendum in The Bahamas

Dear Editor,

The
so called gambling referendum is history, and a resounding no - is the
order of the day.  Punch drunk and shell shocked is the yes crew - as
they ridicule the opponents of web shop gaming, and a national lottery.

Who
called the game in the first instance, and why were they so persuaded
that yes to their questions of legitimizing web shop gaming, and
instituting a national lottery would have prevailed at the end of the
day?

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News Article
Authenti-City comes to Grand Bahama, November 25-27th

Freeport, Grand
Bahama - The Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation  and The
Ministry of Tourism presents, The Annual Grand Bahama Trade Show: 

Authenti-City from

November 25th to 27th on Retail Street at Our Lucaya
Resort.

A place to find everything Bahamian! Over 20 booths featuring artisans and manufacturers from Grand Bahama.

Products
to be showcased: jams, jellies, conch shell items, bath and body
products, candles, designer straw bags, portfolios, wallets and more.
Wood carvings, sand jewelry, Bahamian packaged foods and much, much
more!

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News Article
Authenti-City comes to Grand Bahama, November 25-27th

Freeport, Grand
Bahama - The Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation  and The
Ministry of Tourism presents, The Annual Grand Bahama Trade Show: 

Authenti-City from

November 25th to 27th on Retail Street at Our Lucaya
Resort.

A place to find everything Bahamian! Over 20 booths featuring artisans and manufacturers from Grand Bahama.

Products
to be showcased: jams, jellies, conch shell items, bath and body
products, candles, designer straw bags, portfolios, wallets and more.
Wood carvings, sand jewelry, Bahamian packaged foods and much, much
more!

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News Article
James 'Ricky Purse' Frazer Sr., 47

Funeral Service for James 'Ricky Purse' Frazer Jr., a resident of Cockburn Close off Bernard Road, will be held on Saturday, 11th June, 2011, at 11 am, at Our Lady Of The Holy Souls Catholic Church, Deveaux Street. Officiating will be Rev. Fr. Alain Laverne, interment will follow in Old Trail Cemetery, Old Trail Road.
Ricky Purse's memories will forever linger in the hearts of His Father, Anthony Frazer; Mother: Retired Nurse Delcina Frazer, Children, James Jr., Jasmine & Jermaine Frazer, Grandchildren, Kanye Jehoshua Kemp "Joshy" & Jada Claudine Frazer, Wife of 22 years and friend after, Crown Sergeant Claudia Frazer, of H.M. Prison, Brothers, Robert Frazer, Cpl. Peter Frazer of Exuma, & Ernest Frazer of West Haven C.T. (Robbie, Bennie & Frenchie); Adopted brothers, Hermis Ferguson, Michael Laing, Allan Strachan, Anthony Richardson, Clayton Miller & Christopher Miller, (H, Pastry, Big Allan, Cracker, Smiley and Lil Chris). Sisters, Gretta Gibson, & Maxine Frazer, Adopted sister, Tafficka Brown, Aunts, Nathalie, Elizabeth, Dorothy, Sister, ClareRolle, Cleora, Cynthia, Jane, Clothilda, Sandra, Myrna, Lillian, Vanria, Uncles, Richard Ambrister, Charles Johnson, Vernal & Patrick Rolle, Philip Gaitor, Nelson Lord, Charles Johnson, William Griffin Sr., & Christopher Miller Sr., of Great Harbour Cay, Grand Aunts, Marie Carey & Corine Adderley, Grand Uncle, Ezekiel Cash of Lower Bogue, Eleuthera, Grand Nieces & Nephews, Asalll, Delecia, Deshanda, Renae, Renaldo Jr., Montel, Lakayla, Sebreonna, Alicia, Crenshaw & Robert 111, Mother-in-law, Firstena Hepburn, Brothers-in-law, Carlos Gibsor:), Eric, William, Charles, George & Michael Hepburn, Sisters-in-law, Veronica, Gaille of West Haven C.T., & Betty Frazer, Margaret McKay, Leonie Buchanan, Brenda Francis Michelle & Cheryl Hepburn, Nieces, Chaurina Lawson of Miami, Monalisa, Alexandria, Rose, Ebony, Tankia, Robinique, Natalia, Alison, Britshe, Aliczia, Carrington Dwainelle, Azariah, Angelique, Erica, Ericiea, Alexis, Colleen, Heather, Melissa, Andrea, Audrey, Nephews, Robert Jr., Asa Jr., Rashard, Renaldo, Antonio, Jason, AbleSeanman Mckello, Rhmad, Dwainard, Lexton Obama, William, Everette, Omar, John, Devonne, Dedrick, Charles Jr., Kevin & Tavarei, Godfather, Leon Griffin, Godchildren, Garrard Williams & Sundae Ferguson, Numerous Cousins, Kimberley Butterfield, Leon, William Jr., Steven, Barry, Andrew, Minerva, Elizabeth, Fredricka, Pamela, Valentino, Taria, Dewitt, Dwight, Donell, Dereck, Clayton Miller, Jermaine, Sean, Corey, Phillip Jr., Devon, Nicola, Crystal, Precious, Latoya, Chartes Jr., Christopher Jr., Demetricia, Ann, Wendy, Glemous, Kathy, Pasha, Amanda, Stephanie, Andrea, Adwina, Shelly, Marco, Toney & Phillip, Felix, Willard, Chris, Father Anselm Russell O.S.B., Hubert, Terrence, Arlington, Rosemund, Millie, Ruth, Violet, Doral, Ena & Jenarosa & Jackie of Lower Bogue, Deloris, Cassie, Cassandra, Madelyn, Madeline, Stephen, Kendal, Lisa Rolle, Roy Colebroke Jr., Godbrothers, Other Relatives & friends, to0 numerous to mention but including, Barry & Andrew. Griffin, Sam Dean, Clifford Cartwright, Alfred Stubbs, Grace of Miramar FI., ' O'Neil Stubbs, Glen Williams, Mr. Rodney Moncur, Mr. Frank Cooper, Larry & Betty, Ralph, Kennie, Big Ethel, Bones Joe Boy, Dave Thurston, Eddie, Jeff Thompson, Blaze Rolle, Mr. Clifford Stubbs & family, Shirley Brown & family, Sarah Jennings & family, The Stubbs, Colebrooke, Gordon, Williams, Burrows, Pauls, Browns, Moncurs, Hepburn, Knowles; Major, Taylor, Rolle, Campbell, Richardson Family, and the entire Black Village Community, Mrs. Betsy Duvalier, Mr. Pratt and the entire staff of Security Department and the entire staff of Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre, Gussy and the comer boys in Fox Hill, Cockbum Close Community, Ms. Alverne King & Mr. Steve Barr, The C.C. Sweeting Class of 1980, Sherryann Heild of West End Grand Bahama, The Staff of H.M. Prison, The Staff of Airport Authority Crash and Rescue Fire Department, Dr. Bonamy and her team, also the Nurses and Staff on Male Medical 2 at P.M.H.
Relatives and friends may pay there last respects at Riverside Funeral Chapel, Market Street and Bimini Avenue on Friday from 10 am until 6 pm and at the Church on Saturday from 10 am until service time.
 
 

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News Article
(VIDEO) The Canal House officially opens at Pelican Bay Hotel

Freeport, Bahamas - Grand Bahama Island has a new conference facility

as
the Pelican Bay Hotel officially opened their
new conference facility called the Canal House on September 17th with
an entertaining non-traditional ceremony and night of celebration  in
the new 5-level facility.

Watch a Video Overview where you will hear from general manager of
Pelican Bay Hotel, Magnus Alnebeck, and hear remarks from the Bahamas
prime minister, the Rt Hon
Hubert A. Ingraham who dons safety glasses and cracks a ceremonial conch
shell to officially open the new center...

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News Article
The conch salad evolution

Bahamian cuisine is really a melting pot of cuisines from a number of countries -- honestly, there isn't one dish that you can point to and say that's Bahamian. But if you really think about it, the conch salad may just be that national dish that we would like to say is all ours. It's a dish that most Bahamians love, and everyone has their favorite conch salad maker that they visit religiously. And it's a dish that as simple as "pie" to make and entails simple ingredients -- conch, tomatoes, onions, bell pepper, cucumber, celery and lime/orange -- with people adding in and taking out ingredients according to their likes and dislikes.
In recent times though the basic conch salad has seen an evolution as conch makers gave in to their creativity. Don't be surprised to see your favorite conch salad vendor mixing up a batch with fruit like pineapple, mango and apple thrown in. Or even boiling the conch skin (with seasonings of their choice), a portion of the conch that was usually discarded, and making what is known as a boiled skin salad -- which is simply a regular conch salad made with the boiled skin which they say is more tender and less chewy.
One such vendor giving in to his creative side and doling out more than just a standard conch salad is Stephen 'Popeye' Dean, 35, who recently opened Popeye's Conch Stall at Thompson Boulevard and Moss Street at The Reef.
According to Dean, conch salad makers are being challenged to be more creative with making conch salad, all because of a curveball that was thrown by a conch salad maker out of Grand Bahama. He said it was a Grand Bahamian conch salad maker that initially put apples into his conch salad first. Consequently he said it was a Grand Bahamian vendor that also started the trend of adding the juice from an orange to the salad as well. As there were times when sour oranges were difficult to find, so to temper the sharpness of the limes that had to be used, the juice from an orange was added. Before that trend, it was pure lime or sour orange juice.
"People were like 'oh I like this [apple in the conch salad]' and we went with it and it just took off," he said.
It was from that initial foray that conch salad makers started adding mangos, with pineapple being the most recent addition. Dean said he is in the process of contemplating adding strawberries.
The conch salad vendor of 19 years said the secret to adding fruit to conch salad is to use fresh fruit that is not too ripe. If it's too ripe, he said the salad will in turn be too sweet, and that is not the flavor profile that is being sought. With the addition of the fruit he said, the conch salad flavor should still come through with just a hint of sweetness.
As what is known as the conch salad begins to take on even more flavor profiles, Dean said the one thing he doesn't want to see happen is for the conch salad to lose its flavor as people start to go overboard. He said he recently heard of someone putting plantain into a conch salad.
"I don't think we should take the conch salad too much further because it will make it too costly most importantly -- the more fruits added in, the more the salad will go up. Then there's the fact that if you put too much fruit in it, it won't add up to the right taste. You want the basic taste of the conch salad, but to give people that extra taste of something that will make them go hmmm," said Dean.
Dean offers seven salad offerings at his stall -- regular conch salad, tropical conch salad, scorch conch salad, whelk and conch salad, boiled skin salad, herb salad and lobster salad.
And he said making conch salad is definitely an art form he would like to see people do correctly -- and includes knowing how to select the correct limes and oranges. If the citrus is starting to turn, he said the salad definitely would not taste right. And he said the citrus should be cut and squeezed a certain way as well, so as to not allow any bitterness to seep into the salad.
Who knows where conch salad will be taken next, but for right now, Dean said requests for tropical conch salads are keeping pace with his sales for the regular salad.
And if you're not a fan of conch salad with all the herbs, Dean said you can get a tropical scorched conch in which the only vegetable added is the onion and the fruit with the conch.
Dean got his start at the stall of the late Leroy 'B Man' Sands at the Fish Fry at Arawak Cay, when there only three stalls on the now bustling thoroughfare.
The then 16-year-old said he learned how to make the conch salad from the ground up. Before he was even given permission to hold a knife, he said he was only allowed to lift the conch shell. He then advanced to cracking the conch out of the shell, which he said he had to sit and watch to learn how to do properly before he was tasked with skinning the conch, all of which he had to be before he was given a knife to make his first conch salad.
Popeye's Conch Stall is located at Thompson Boulevard and Moss Street at The Reef. Dean's operating hours are 12 noon to 10 p.m., Monday through Saturday.

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News Article
Pharmacy Council pleased with inspection results

The Bahamas Pharmacy Council (BPC) said yesterday that based on its inspections, all authorized wholesalers and pharmacies are operating in line with international standards, but the council urged consumers to remain on alert.
BPC consults with the Ministry of Health and is the investigating and regulatory body for pharmacy practice in The Bahamas.
BPC Chairman Philip Gray said the council learnt recently that the government had received claims that gray market pharmaceuticals and possible counterfeit medication may have entered The Bahamas.
However, the council said it is unaware of any counterfeit medication surfacing in The Bahamas at this time.
"Our inspections of facilties are carried out under the same prescribed guidelines," said Gray during a press conference at BPC headquarters on Delancy Street.
"We cannot, however, underestimate the global problem of counterfeit medications and the possibility that even under best security measures, the possibility of products slipping through the seams."
Gray encouraged members of the public to remain vigilant. He said they should not underestimate the possibility of counterfeit drugs being circulated in unlicensed stores or on the street.
"We feel both the government and the council [must] protect the Bahamian consumer," he said.
"Once we would have heard of any such matter we need to move swiftly on it to see if there is anything that needs to be eradicated and...if any product needs to be moved off the market."
He added, "We need to be vigilant and make sure that there is nothing adverse happening in The Bahamas and certainly make sure we keep in tact the good name of the industry."
Shelly Collymore, council registrar with responsibility for data collection on all stakeholders and entities, insisted that customers review the pharmacists' licenses, which should be on display, when purchasing pharmaceutical products.
"If you go into a pharmacy or an operation that claims to be a pharmacy and it doesn't have those documents then you should be concerned," Collymore said.
"Every one of them should have a copy of a license that should be clearly...displayed in the pharmacy in which they are practicing. If that information is not available members of the public are invited to report that to the council...by coming into the office, phoning or sending a letter [to] the office."
There are around 75 pharmacies that are currently licensed with BPC.
Sixty-five are in New Providence and the balance in the Family Islands. Additionally, there are 187 pharmacists registered with the council and approximately 100 technicians.

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Event
Jazz n' Wine
Jazz n' Wine

Thursday 9th June 2011

The Wine Lounge East Bay St (Adjacent to Shell) Nassau, Bahamas. Cigar Catering by Guevara Cigars Tel: 242.356.0614 www.winelounge.bs


News Article
Rowena Villa Thompson, 84
Rowena Villa Thompson, 84

Funeral Service for the Late Rowena Villa Thompson, 84 years of Windsor Lane, East will be held on Saturday January 14th, 2012, 11:00 a.m. at Our Lady of the Holy Souls Roman Catholic Church, Deveaux & Young Streets. Rev. Fr. Alain Laverne assisted by other Clergy of the Archdiocese will officiate.

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News Article
Winners of the 2011 FLIFF Unveiled - Two Bahamian Films Win Awards

Two Bahamian Films Win Awards!

Fort Lauderdale, FLORIDA -The 26th Annual Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival (FLIFF) unveiled their Jury and Audience awards during a ceremony on closing night, Friday, November 11.  Fort Lauderdale, FL

 

THE ARTIST drew four top awards:  Best Picture, Best Director - Michael Hazanavicius, Best Actor - Jean Dujardin and Best Actress - Bernice Bejo.  As winner of Best Film, THE ARTIST, received the prestigious Seashell Award, a trophy uniquely created by Uruguayan artist Jesus Sosa and presented each year by Professor Nelson Pilosof, President of The World Trade Center of Montevideo.

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News Article
Race for the cure

The course is set and the numbers for the bibs are drawn for participants in the second annual Susan G. Komen Bahamas Race for the Cure.
The gun, for the early morning 5k, will sound at 7 a.m. There has been an increase in participation for the event which has attracted cancer survivors and supporters. According to Shelly Wilson, organizer for both the Susan G. Komen Bahamas and the Marathon Bahamas races, more than 983 persons have registered, an increase from the 900 participants in 2011.
"Of course it is a fun run/walk but really the whole essence of the race series, whether that is in the United States or The Bahamas, is to showcase our cancer survivors for their strength and courage," said Wilson. "We end the race with a wonderful survivor ceremony where there will be local entertainment and we have a survivor only tent where they receive additional gifts, and the real white glove treatment."
The Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure is held in the United States, The Bahamas, Belgium, Brazil, Egypt, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Germany, Italy, Israel, Jordan and Tanzania. It is said to be the world's largest and most successful education and fundraising event for breast cancer ever created.
It not only raises awareness for the movement, but brings survivors together to celebrate the victory with the battle. The international race first got started in 1983, in Dallas. To date, more than 140 races are held with millions participating.
Wilson said that attracting survivors to the events has been quite successful with a large contingent from the Sister Sister Breast Cancer Support Group participating, including several non-members.
"A lot of our Bahamian survivors travel to the United States on a regular basis to participate in the Susan G. Komen races overseas, but of course there is no place like home and getting that type of recognition for your courage and for what you've gone through at home is special," she said. "So in terms of getting the numbers of survivors, [it] has not been a challenge.
"There is another event taking place at the cancer society, [where] many of the local physicians that deal with breast cancer issues, as well as representatives from the Susan G. Komen Foundation who are here and have travelled from all across the United States are having a medical round table."
The 3rd Annual Marathon Bahamas will take place on Sunday, starting at 6:00 a.m. The race will start at Junkanoo Beach and end at Arawak Cay.  Runners can choose to compete in the full marathon, which is 26.2 miles, the half marathon or the four-man relay.
The half marathon will also start at Junkanoo Beach Club and end at Arawak Cay. Unlike the past two years, when a six-man relay was held, registered teams will consist of only four participants.

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News Article
Official: Road works will miss target completion date

Two days after Public Works Minister Neko Grant reported that the New Providence Road Improvement Project (NPRIP) was on course to be completed in the first quarter of 2012, an official in his ministry confirmed to reporters that that target will not be met due to major challenges.While giving an update on the project yesterday, Environmental Specialist in the Ministry of Works Shenique Albury reiterated some of the challenges they've been experiencing.

She said work, which is being conducted underground, has been a lot more challenging to carry out because of rain and utilities involved.

"Rain is generally a major challenge... When it comes to paving roads, it cannot be done when it's raining. Workmen have to wait for materials to dry out sometimes for several days," Albury said.

But Albury said the ministry is working to get the road works completed as close to the 2012 deadline as possible.

Albury could not comment on any specific challenges with the contractor.

Earlier this week, about 20 workers employed with Jose Cartellone said they were on go-slow claiming unfair treatment by their employer.

Both Grant and Labour Minister Dion Foulkes promised to look into their claims.

Many motorists have also expressed concerns that there are not enough diversion signs, particularly on Baillou Hill Road, which is now opened to northbound traffic only.

"Diversion signs are up and I have seen them," Albury said. "We have had challenges with people taking or knocking the signs down and putting graffiti on them."

Referring to the Prince Charles Drive portion of the work, Albury said it has progressed just east of the entrance of St. Augustine's College.

On Wednesday, some residents and business owners in the area expressed frustration with the slow progress of road works on that major thoroughfare.

Albury said underground works are complete up to Academy Street with the exception of a carrier drain, but due to a new request for additional work from a utility company, paving has been delayed between the Shell Gas Station and College Garden Road.

It is anticipated that paving should take place in three to four weeks, according to Albury.

She said that recently the contractor commenced underground work on Prince Charles Drive between Beatrice Avenue and Garden Road. Installation of service ducts and an eight-inch water main have progressed well, according to Albury.

As of Friday, the contractor will extend the closure on Prince Charles Drive to Wilson Way, which is the corner near Kentucky Fried Chicken, she said.

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Event
Wine, Art and Jazz Festival
Wine, Art and Jazz Festival

Saturday 14th May 2011  5:00 PM

May 14th, 2011 5 - 9 PM Pelican Bay Hotel@ Lucaya Tickets are $25.00 and include include a complimentary bottle of wine. Join us as we taste wines from all over the world including Kendall Jackson, Santa Margherita, Montgras, Mirassou, Barefoot, B&G and more. Experience smooth jazz music by Shelley Carey & True Music and Panache Band. Get the chance to view and purchase beautiful art work such as paintings, wood sculptures, costume jewelry, and other crafts. Featured artists include Sheldon Saint, Kino Coakley, Alisa Streather, Terry Lord-Rolle, Roopi (Rupert Watkins) and many more. Bring the whole family to enjoy Wine, Art & Jazz!


News Article
Senator Dr. Jacinta Higgs Gives Her Students the Gift of Creative Wealth

Nassau, The Bahamas -
Senator, now founder and principal of Akhepran International Academy,
Dr. Jacinta Higgs recently gave her students the keys to wealth by
introducing them to author and youth financial educator Keshelle Kerr.

Ms. Kerr, who has collaborated with the likes of Rich Dad, Poor Dad
co-author Sharon Leichter and self-made youth millionaire Dr. Farah
Gray, provided the students with her highly sought after financial
literacy skills geared toward youth. Known for her success in teaching
young people to budget and invest, Ms. Kerr has inspired scores of
youngsters to become entrepreneurs before they are even old enough...

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News Article
12M green development 'breath of fresh air'

An innovative green development might have a hefty price tag attached to it, but developers say the expected energy saving costs make owning a piece of South Ocean Palms a smart investment for the long term.
The $12 million project, comprising an exclusive five-acre subdivision in the southwestern end of New Providence, is banking on a rising demand for healthy and environmentally conscious living as the infrastructure breaks ground.
The development's chief financial officer, Shelley Darville, revealed to Guardian Business that approximately $2 million has been invested so far.
"I grew up with my grandmother who was very conscious not to waste anything around the house," she said.
"She instilled that principle of conserving in us. It is still something that I believe in. So I wanted to create an intimate eco-friendly community that's conducive for any family type or size. So partnering with Debby (the project manager) was the perfect fit. She has more than 20 years experience in building and has built a number of green homes. Her company already constructed a number of comfortable, durable environmentally friendly homes. I am impressed with her work and energy, so the development is in great hands."
Currently, the underground electrical utilities are being installed, while the water infrastructure was completed nearly a month ago.
The 13-home development will feature green products such as solar powered streetlights, energy star appliances and range in price from $460,000 to $778,785.
There are seven models to choose from, including a one story home with three bedrooms and 2.5 bath, or a two-story residence with four bedrooms and 3.5 baths.
All houses are "luxurious", turnkey and outfitted with laundry and a garage.
Darville admitted to Guardian Business that no homes have been sold, but said serious inquiries have been made by buyers.
"There are two serious buyers pending completion of infrastructure which is in progress and will be completed within the first quarter. A model home, "Wood Rose", a two-story model is in progress," Darville explained.
Ryan Knowles, realtor at Mario Carey Realty, called South Ocean Palms a breath of fresh air.
"It's truly the first green development in The Bahamas. We are finally catching up with the rest of the world. In Europe, it is mandated that a certain percentage of their buildings must be green," he said.
"I think sales and interest have been slow because it's a new concept and Bahamians tend not to think green."
He applauded their efforts.
"The location is ideal for those that are tired of the hustle and bustle of city life and want to live in a safe, remote community," Knowles noted.
Once a model is chosen, depending on the size of the home, it can take either six or nine months to construct.

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Event
The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise
The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise

Saturday 12th March 2011  10:00 AM

Sunrise's Reading Fair will be held on Saturday March 12th 2010, between 10:00 am Ė 2:00 pm, on the grounds of COBís Band Shell, Poinciana Drive. March is literacy month for Rotary around the world and this event is a very special one for our Club. The Reading Fair (RF) has been in existence since 2006 and we look forward to celebrating our 5th year with greater success. We are expecting 600-800 kids to attend and will need lots of help. There will be an informational meeting at COB's Chapter One Bookstore on Thursday, March 10, 2011 from 6pm to 7pm to discuss assignments. There will also be an information booth at the fair for all volunteers to check-in. Please see the attached flyer(s) with the event schedule and general information about the event. If you would like to volunteer, please contact Tanya Woodside at 376-2001.


News Article
Termeco Anton Bonaby Jr., 3

A funeral service for Termeco Anton Bonaby Jr., 3, of Hamster Road will be held on Saturday 18th June, 2011 at 10:00am at United Christian Cathedral, Flamingo Gardens. Officiating will be Bishop Albert Hepburn, assisted by other ministers of the gospel. Interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.
Left to cherish his precious memories are his: mother: Shantel Miller; father: Termeco Anton Bonaby Sr.; sister: Dariel Stubbs; grandparents: Mr. and Mrs. Cephas and Elmer Miller, Mr. and Mrs. Tryrone and Antionette Bonaby; great grandparents: Mrs. Marnetha Miller, Mr. and Mrs. Hubert and Gloria Rolle; great grandmother: Ethel Fernander; aunts: Carla, Cece, Erica, Brenda, Margaret, Porter, Venessa, Murphy, Latoya, Tanya, Dezrean, Nadia, Anitina, Christine, Shavonne, Margo, Latina William; uncles: Cephas, Jarred, Otis, Terrelle, Perdo Strapp, Perdo, Berkly, Vanbyrd, Andrew, Louis, Berry, Leroy, Calvin, Peter; grand aunts: Emma Scavella, Wakita Hinsey, Taylor, Angla, Jerry, Ruth, Noame, and Doramae Miller, Anita Strachan, Ann Pearl; grand uncles: pastor Cyril Miller, Neman Joshua Miller, Shawn, Terry, Mavin, Dennis, Sindney, Havard, Cleveland, Tommy Poitier; numerous of relatives and cousins too numerous to mention; friends of the family: Martin Johnson, Rev William and Betty Thompson, Whitlean Burrows and Family, Arnold Gilbert, Elizabeth, Sada, Judy Johnson and Family, Brent Duncombe, Chantel Arnett, Brenda Rolle, Sherly McPhee, Wakita Hinsey, Taylor and Family, Shantell Lockhart and Family, Betty, Majore and Family, Rev. Albert Hepburn and Family, Mr. Seymour, Kim Henry, Kemone, Tamika, Ruby and Family, David Hagan, Parick and Family, Shelly and James, Miss Cooper and Family, Sue and family, Naldo, Gracie, Mrs. Thurston, Mrs. Gardner and the United Christian Cathedral Family, United Christian Academy Family, Charles Williams Saunders and Family, Bahamas Baptist Community College Family, House Keeping of Ocean Club Staff Family, Mr. and Mrs. Moss and Family, Pam and family, Michelle and Family, Lawnly and Family, Gladson Thurston and Family, Alsada Hanna and Family, William Dean and Family; other relatives of Gambier Village Family, Friend of the Laundry Department of Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre.
Viewing will be held in the Celestial Suite at Restview Memorial Mortuary and Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and Soldier Roads on Friday from 10:00am to 6:00pm and at the church on Saturday from 8:30 am until service time.

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News Article
Stranger than Paradise

In Blue Curry's solo show at the Nassauischer Kunstverein Wiesbaden gallery in Weisbaden, Germany, viewers are dropped into a strange space. Tropical signifiers like conch shells are paired with strobe lights or tires covered with black and white beans, and in every untitled sculpture lies a possibility of meaning, if only the complete misuse of these paired objects could be reconciled.
"Sometimes I look at that object and think, I know what the use of that object is; what would be the best misuse of it, or the most genius misuse of it?" Blue says.
"Stranger than Paradise" is a collection of two years of work by the artist, which came on the heels of his finished MFA in Fine Art studies at Goldsmiths. The Nassauischer Kunstverein Wiesbaden Gallery is no stranger, however, to Bahamian work -- in 2006, it was the site of "Funky Nassau", the group show by Bahamian artists, including Blue. Curators Elke Gruhn and Sara Stehr invited him back for a solo show years later, and also to take part in the gallery's educational program, where Blue guided and gave critical advice to high school students' artwork for a student show in the gallery space.
Some of Blue's pieces have appeared in group shows already -- his black and white beaded tire can seen in the Fifth National Exhibition at the National Art Gallery of The Bahamas, and the cement mixer filled with sunscreen appeared in the 6th Liverpool Biennial -- but this is the first time all of these pieces have appeared in one exhibition together. He considers it his first solo show as a mature artist -- it's his first solo show in roughly a decade.
"One thing I said to my curator is 'I think my work looks better in group shows'," he laughs. "Just in a funny way initially, because I hadn't seen so much of my stuff together in such a long time. Many times one of my pieces would work really well in a group show because it sits apart, really apart, whether its in materials or colors or critical thinking, it's usually a jarring effect. But when you walk into here it's not so jarring as what I'm used to, and I'm walking around thinking wow, this stuff goes well together."
The effect instead is exactly the show's title -- bizarreness, an environment of both fantasticality and weirdness. From the get-go, visitors first encounter a black bucket placed upside-down on the floor, three shells stuck on in a triangle so one can discern a blackface figure.
"It really divides opinion because I think people get so frustrated with it because it's too easy. I'm fully aware of how easy that piece is, and that's why I put it there, so people can walk in and say 'well I can make that', and then walk into the next room and say, 'ok, I can't make that.' Something that involved five minutes of labor gets placed next to the tires that involve months and months of labor. Also the bucket is understated, while others are very overstated. I like to play back and forth with that. With the knowledge I have about the art world, the knowledge I have of artwork, it can be both ways, sometimes it can be that simple and brilliant, and sometimes it has to be more complex and hundreds of hours to execute."
But this piece especially -- like all of them in their own ways -- is a nod to the encounter, as well as the performance, of "the other," the identity constructed by both visitors and residents to create the idea of "paradise." In all of Blue's pieces this self-constructed environment is evident -- conch shells strung together with strobe lighting within allude to the "lighting of the stage" of our performance, as well as attempts to jazz up the novelty of the tropical landscape -- for he plays with the idea of the fetishized objects that make up the culture of the other. He calls it "performing the tropical."
"We're still marketing the other, we're still marketing the black body, the potential of some sexual rendezvous or encounter with the other," he explains. "There's still a dependency on that performance we're doing for people who already have set ideas, you can't work outside of that, so you recycle the same old clichés over and over again. So my thesis idea (at Goldsmiths) is that everything has to go post-tropical because the tropical are just all of those clichés and everything that limit us. My idea of going post-tropical goes beyond using those set tropes that are expected of us."
Blue's pieces both engage and resist this performance at once in his very choice of materials -- pairing familiar tropical signifiers with unlikely candidates that become a misuse of both. Take his spears surrounded by the inner diskettes of floppy disks. Though a stunning and beautiful object in itself (also untouchable with the sharp edges of both objects, indicating some sinister or edgy element), it alludes to the idea that such developing cultures primitively misuse such technological material for decorative or crafty "folk art" purposes.
"You just have to imagine, if I were in one of the 'primitive' societies in which we advertise that we live in, how would I approach this material? Because obviously we don't have any computers," he says. "I feel like I'm simplifying the process a lot, so I look at the material and I think, it's just material, so you use it in a kind of decorative way to create this fetishized object."
Blue also admits he is also concerned with the very nature/technology divide, and finds such magnetic media beautiful as a material to work with -- one may remember seeing images of his piece in the Goldsmiths graduate show where yards and yards of cassette tape pour from the great bone jaw of a shark suspended in the air, cascading down and piling onto the floor below. The very choice of the type of technological material used though -- floppy disks, cassette tape -- allude also to an obsolescence that ties back into the assumption that only such underdeveloped societies on the fringe of the developed world use these outdated materials.
"I was collecting those diskettes from markets around London and when an office was going out of business. But I found that in order to have three thousand discs, a lot of material for the piece, I needed to buy some," Blue remembers. "I found a wholesaler in London selling them and his argument was that he couldn't go too far down in his prices because he sells these to Nigeria. So he wants me to believe Africans are still using technology that's so out of date it's ridiculous. So these obsolete materials also connect back in to what's expected of us."
A humor is being cultivated here -- how many times have Bahamians traveled abroad and been asked if they use computers or have Internet or even wear clothes "where they are from"? Though some of these statements may be made in jest, the manifestation in the world consciousness that--despite rapid and almost complete globalization -- these tropical or "primitive" societies remain in "The Heart of Darkness" is evident of a constructed fantasy that persists today.
This is something Blue examines in his piece where black plastic buoys are ringed in Swarovski crystals, again bringing together two unlikely worlds -- industrial and luxurious -- to create a manifestation of tropical society and the veil of fantasy that is applied to such places as vacation destinations "to escape it all," as well as the idea of "selling ourselves cheap."
"There's an intentional cheapness about this world which goes back to creating an image," Blue explains. "Fantasies can operate over those images no matter how cheaply they are constructed. So a lot of this stuff is about other people's fantasies of these places, because some of these places these objects are ironic of don't even exist."
But in all of Blue's sculptures, there's a uselessness -- none of these objects are entirely useful for anything practical. One can't use the spears to fish or use in a computer. One can't use the buoys for their boat or wear them around their neck. They become the very uselessness evident in our constructed identities, and exist also in the limbo many residents of such places find themselves -- between the outdated perceived notion of the tropical and its stark modern reality.
The fact that all of Blue's pieces are "Untitled" create this very unstable environment explored -- he provides no guidance with which to approach his work, which allows the viewer to approach it with all of their preconceived notions about paradise and apply it. Blue recognizes that this is where it is evident viewers either buy into the fantasy, or move beyond it, as his pieces do.
"To have some sort of a contrived title which leads somebody into one direction or one way of understanding doesn't work for me. I'd like people to try and connect the materials, to try to get their own understanding of it," he says. "To me, the most interesting art opens up a space where I've never been before and I'm not being told what to think and I don't know what to think but I like it. The two dots never quite join up, and that's the most interesting space to be. If a title names what you're looking at, then you've got all the answers. If it goes off into this mysterious land completely off the wall, then it's too self-indulgent. My response for the moment is to keep it open and people can take what they want from it."
But at the same time, Blue recognizes that the danger of his pieces lie in their very ambiguity. Displaying such pieces abroad means the visitor--once they know the artist is from The Bahamas -- may not fully move beyond their assumptions.
"What they do is they come and see something that they think is highly decorative and emblematic of what you might find from that region and then they walk away -- then you have people who understand that there's a critical background to my work, who know I studied and Goldsmiths, that I do that with a great deal of knowledge," he says. "It works in my favor and it works against me; some people get it and some people don't. I shoot myself in the foot sometimes with the work in an odd way because I know that what I'm talking about is that very perception -- you put it in front of someone and either they rise to that challenge and they understand that idea is being challenged, or they think it just reinforces that idea."
Is there a longing for the absolute idea of the primitive? Is there a resentment? A pride? The fact is, Blue applies little emotional guidance in his work as possible as an artist -- his approach is to focus on materials at hand rather than their connotations, to play with familiar objects in unfamiliar ways and let that object take on the meaning implied by such relationships and the mindset of the viewer. There's a disproportionate amount of responsibility placed on the viewer here -- but perhaps that's how it should be. Few Caribbean artists are carrying the torch abroad, and until the world can get comfortable with a wide range of artistic work coming out of this region that critically examines our place in the world, no one will reach the post-tropical he speaks about. Like those two dots that never meet, those two objects that never reconcile, paradise exists in a detached space. So perhaps the real question you must face before viewing his work is this: What is paradise? And are you there yet?
 

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News Article
(VIDEO) Pew: Protect Our Sharks, Say Bahamas' Children

Hear from Bahamian children from various islands of The Bahamas along with Bahamas National Trust Education Officer, Shelly Cant deliver a message on protecting sharks in The Bahamas.

This video Public Service Announcement This PSA was produced by The Bahamas National Trust (BNT), in collaboration with Pew environment Group, in support of a grassroots petition to protect sharks in Bahamian waters.

Sharks are in trouble globally, and there are few locations where healthy shark populations still exist. In The Bahamas, a 20 year-old ban on longline fishing gear has left its waters as one of the few places in the world with relatively healthy shark...

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News Article
The Trust Agenda

By Philip C. Galanis

Two and one half years ago, the country was in the thick of a general election campaign. The two behemoths, along with several other marginal variables, were at it again, each vying for political domination, salivating over the spoils that would go to the victor.
The campaign culminated on the night of May 2, 2007 with some spectators shell-shocked by the surprise upset, others bewildered and befuddled as to how this could happen with so many positive developments on the drawing board. Alas, the people had spoken, and as Sir Lynden said on that fateful night of August 19, 1992:"The voice of the people is the voice of God."
The FNM had won the election. They were swept ...

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News Article
DOSM Status For BISX Sparks U.S. Interest

Some interest has already been expressed by a U.S. based company in using the Bahamas International Securities Exchange (BISX) to raise funds from international investors as a prestigious designation simplifies the process and creates new opportunities.

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Movie
The Shining
  • Genre : Drama, Horror, Mystery
  • Rating : TBC - To Be Classified

A family heads to an isolated hotel for the winter where an evil and spiritual presence influences the father into violence, while his psychic son sees horrific forebodings from the past and of the future....


News Article
Why I think Dion Foulkes lost his bid for the FNM chairmanship

Dear Editor,

I would like to congratulate Darron Cash for his successful bid at winning the chairmanship post of the Free National Movement (FNM).
I think the elections of Cash, FNM Leader Dr. Hubert Minnis (Killarney) and Deputy Leader Loretta Butler-Turner (Long Island) represent a paradigm shift within the power structure of the FNM. Minnis took a lot of flack from diehard Ingrahamites for saying that the Ingraham era is over. But I believe that the new FNM leader is on to something. Maybe these rabid Ingrahamites feared what would become of the FNM after Ingraham. Whatever their reasons are for giving their new leader a hard time, at least these people should admit that the FNM must sooner or later fend for itself without Ingraham being at the helm.
The election of Cash, in my view, is a turning point or a watershed moment for the FNM. As well, the overwhelming rejection of former Cabinet minister and senator in the Ingraham administration Dion Foulkes is an obvious indication that the party is ready to move in a different direction. According to press reports, Cash bested Foulkes by 70 votes. Cash reportedly received 120 votes to Foulkes' 50 votes. Cash's victory over Foulkes should not be interpreted as insignificant, by any stretch of the imagination. Foulkes is a political heavyweight in the FNM. He was active in the party when it was led by Sir Cecil Wallace-Whitfield and Sir Kendal G. L. Isaacs. His father, Governor General Sir Arthur Foulkes, was one of the Dissident Eight who broke away from the Progressive Liberal Party (PLP) administration under Sir Lynden O. Pindling and formed the Free PLP, later to be renamed the Free National Movement.
What's more, Foulkes was Tommy Turnquest's deputy leader of the FNM in the run-up to the 2002 general election. I vividly recall hearing former FNM Leader and Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham proclaiming him as prime minister material. Foulkes was also chairman of the FNM. And he was elected to the House of Assembly on two occasions, 1992 and 1997. By all accounts, Foulkes' political resume is more substantial than Cash's. That is why I considered him to be a frontrunner in the chairmanship race against Cash. But the overwhelming majority of the members of the National Central Council decided to back Cash instead of Foulkes, a man I consider to be a quintessential FNM.
Why did Foulkes lose the chairmanship race? And why did he lose by such a wide margin? I think it has to do with Foulkes' inability to win a seat in Parliament. We must bear in mind that Foulkes hasn't been a member of Parliament since May 2002. The last time Foulkes won a seat in the House of Assembly was in March of 1997. That was 15 years ago. Fifteen years ago, Sir Lynden was still alive, Bill Clinton was the president of the United States of America and the citizens of New Providence were just getting used to cable television. In a nutshell, that was a very long time ago.
While I can appreciate Foulkes' disappointment in the chairmanship race results, he must understand the mindset of the council members. Their party was badly defeated in the May 7 general election, and had lost two by-elections, in 2010 and 2012. Perhaps the disappointing results of the recent North Abaco by-election have made the hierarchy of the FNM finally realize that something desperately needs changing in their party. I don't care who you are, at some point you get tired of losing. It is likely that party stalwarts were thinking that if Foulkes couldn't win a seat in the House of Assembly in 2012, 2007 and 2002, then chances are he will not be able to help the FNM win the 2017 general election.
I truly believe that council members were thinking that Foulkes hadn't won an election in 15 years, and they were not willing to give him such an important post at this crucial juncture in their party's history.
Who knows? As an experienced politician, Foulkes knows very well that in politics it all has to do with being able to appeal to the masses. The overwhelming majority of blue-collar, working-class and underprivileged Bahamians may not have college degrees or a lot of money, but they have something that every politician wants every five years: votes. For some odd reason or another, stalwart FNMs such as Foulkes, Carl Bethel and Tommy Turnquest are not resonating with underprivileged and working-class voters as they used to in the 1990s. Maybe the three should use the next four years to connect with these people. That said, I hope that Foulkes will continue to assist the party that has given him the opportunity to play an active role in frontline politics. I commend him for all that he has done for the FNM and the country. And now that the leadership question of the FNM has finally been settled, the new leaders must find ways to resonate with the grassroots in the inner city communities of Nassau.
I have said over and repeatedly that the PLP has a monopoly on this vital demographic. Without the support of the people of the lower socio-economic strata, the FNM will continue to struggle to win general elections. The FNM must prove to the masses that it is also the party of the small man, not just the PLP. I hope Cash and the other FNM leaders heed my advice.

- Kevin Evans

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News Article
Bahamas broker: 'Next to zero effect' from SEC closure

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

A Bahamian broker/dealer said the Friday settlement it and its parent group had reached with the Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) would have "next to zero effect on our business" in this nation, since it had not opened any US client accounts since 2001.

Craig Lines, head of LOM (Bahamas), said the company and its ultimate parent, Bermuda-based LOM (Holdings), were "glad to get behind us" the SEC's allegations that they had committed securities fraud by "manipulating the stock prices of [two] publicly traded shell companies".

Describing the company's relief at settling an almost two-year court case th ...

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News Article
Bahamian Jamaal Rolle becoming known as The Celebrity Artist

Jamaal Rolle of Nassau Bahamas was born to Harry Rolle, an artist and bronze sculptor, and to Judy
Rolle, a conch shell artist, and says his family
of 12 siblings all have artistic abilities. "I draw because there
is hardly anything in life that is better to do," said Rolle. "My
motivation is fueled by life itself. To awake and smell the freshness
of the air each morning and see the sun rise to another glorious day is my inspiration."

Rolle has been a professional artist
since 2001, but said he's been freelancing since grade school. "My first paid
portrait was actually a mischievous sketch of my math teacher that I
doodled in the same class," he said. When the teacher discovered the sketch by
mistake, instead of scolding him as expected, he laughed and bought it
from him for $10; telling him that if this is what he wanted to do for
a living...

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News Article
Two men murdered

By SANCHESKA BROWN

Tribune Staff Reporter

sbrown@tribunemedia.net

A 23-YEAR-OLD man was found dead, bound and gagged in what police are describing as a "execution style" killing.

In one of two murders on Wednesday night, the body of Akyto Samuel Smith, of Faith Gardens, was found riddled with bullets in the trunk of a car.

Police say officers on routine patrol on Sir Milo Butler Highway noticed a suspicious vehicle parked hard against a wall just south of the Shell Service Station.

During a search of the vehicle they popped the trunk and found the body. He is said to have been shot at least six times.

Police believe he was in the trunk for only a few hours as rigor mortis had just beg ...

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News Article
Papa's Roads

Dear Editor,

Previous to the start of the latest version of the New Providence Road Improvement Project (NPRIP), I thought the road network in New Providence was a complete disaster. Gridlock was the order of the day.

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News Article
Miss World Bahamas To Face Her Competition
Miss World Bahamas To Face Her Competition

She has represented The Bahamas as a national track and field athlete, and won a number of medals in the heptathlon at the CARIFTA level, for glory not only to herself, but to the country.† Sasha Joyce hung up her cleats for high heels and takes on another arena of competition -- the 61st annual Miss World Beauty Pageant.

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Event
My Girlfriend's Business
My Girlfriend's Business

Thursday 11th November 2010  7:00 PM

Prepare - Partner - Promote Come, Connect & Celebrate with smart, savvy and sophisticated female entrepreneurs and aspiring girlfriends in business and enjoy an evening of education, entertainment & empowerment. Host: Keshelle Kerr Attire: Elegant Casual Tickets: Double (With a Girlfriend), $50; Single, $30 Start Time: November 11th at 7:00pm End Time: November 11th at 11:00pm Where: Mario's Bowling & Entertainment Palace, Tonique Williams-Darling Highway For more information, contact 242-676-3626 or 242-376-9449 Email: mgbbahamas@gmail.com