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News Article
Jerome Thomas Franks, 88

Funeral Service for the Late Jerome Thomas Franks, 88 years of Coral Heights Estates and formerly of Port Nelson, Rum Cay will be held on Saturday May 5th, 11:00 a.m. at St. Mary's Anglican Church, Virginia Street. Rev. Fr. Dwight M. Bowe will officiate. Interment will follow in the Western Cemetery, Nassau Street.
He was predeceased by his son Jerome Franks and Left to morn are his 4 Sons: Anthony and Philip Franks, George Leslie Sealy and Jermaine "Choo Choo" Mackey; 4 Daughters: Maxine Benjamin,Wilhelmenia Shearer, Pamela Frnaks Rolle and Monique Campbell; Grand-Children: Raphael Lynes and Shantell Franks, Antonia Culmer, Dahria Franks, Barbara Za' Conliffe, Anita and Philippa Franks, Nicole Sealy, Jermaine Jr., and Jernaine Mackey, Sandy Campbell, Raquino Franks, Allen, Crispin and Tanya Benjamin, Crystal Brice, Tovera, Tomiko, Tomia, Feodor Shearer, Deandra, Demetrius and Uriah Rolle, Eugene II, Shaquille, Kyle, Jewel and Jasmine Campbell, Beverly Alfreus and Henry Francis; Great-Grandchildren: Aimee Franks, Carynn Culmer, Christian Sealy, Ashtel and Amye Fox, Cameron and Kai Brice, Andrew and Hailey Benjamin, Zhyon and Zaria Lynes and Timothy Ward Jr.; 2 Sisters: Avilda Scavella and Hermie Bain Of Port Nelson Rum Cay; 1 Sister-In-Law: Rosie Grant; 1 Brother-In Law: Anzlo Strachan; 3 Daughters-In-Law: Dr. Bonnie Franks Of Grand Bahama, Gina Rodgers Sealy and Rose Ann Franks of Miami, Florida; 3 Sons- In-Law: Andrew Benjamin, Macloid Shearer, Eugene Campbell I; Numerous nieces and nephews including: Delores Wilson Of Port Nelson Rum Cay, Dr. Lesley and Kirkland Culmer, Zelma Dean, Rodney Braynen, Marsha Deveaux, Ingrid Culmer and Russell Franks Of Grand Bahama. Other relatives and friends including: Bishop Gilbert Thompson, Osborne and Christine Sawyer, Meta Bethell and Family, Brenda Archer, Henry Brooks, The Strachan Family, The Rahming Family, The Butler Family, The Robinson Family, The Culmer Family, The Gran Family, Dr. Charles Carter, kernita Sands and  Family, Doreen Deveaux and Family, James Johnson and Family, The Campbell Family, Terresa Bnett, Bishop Kirkwood Murphy and Family , All the decedents of Rum Cay, Mervin Greene, Peter and Yvette Turnquest, Rev. and Mrs. Andrew Stuart, Mrs. Cunningham and Family, Eleanor Black, Paulette Wilson, Bertha Lunn and Niccara Deveaux also the One and Only Club, Queens College, Family Guardian, Going Places, Atlantis Table Games Dept and The church family of St. Mary's The Virgin.
Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday at the Church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

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News Article
Miss Grand Bahama Top Model Talent Competition: May 4th

Freeport, Bahamas - The Miss Grand Bahama Beauty Pageant's

Top Model & Talent Competition will be on

May 4, 2012  at 8pm

at

Island Sea Resort.

Please come out and support these
lovely young ladies, of which one will wear the crown and represent her
island and country. Tickets are only $10 and include a free a drink.

This year's contestants are

Gabrielle
Wong sponsored by TurnIng Bar, Abilene Jones sponsored by Lneliba,
Carlene Johnson sponsored by Ocean Reef Resorts, Miss Grand Bahama 2011
Keriann Stuart, Mone't Johnson sponsored by Sawyers Fresh Market, Kristi
Farah sponsored by Bella Rose, Christen Barrow sponsored by Alvernia
Foods (Cat Island), and Andria Miller sponsored by Pier 1 Restaurant...

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News Article
Bahamian Short Film on Multiple Sclerosis Sudden Onset premieres Thursday, May 10th

Nassau, Bahamas - Bahamian
Short Film on Multiple Sclerosis premieres Thursday, May 10 at 6pm
College of The Bahamas Harry C. Moore Library

The short film "Sudden Onset" written and directed by Bahamian Katherine
Beneby II will premier at the College of The Bahamas Harry C. Moore
Library and Information Centre on Thursday May 10 at 6pm with guest
presenter Dr. Charles Rahming and Host for the evening Jerome Sawyer. An
educational forum will follow the film.

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News Article
Nothing wrong with millionaire candidates

The public candidate financial disclosures are always a major point of discussion before elections. We are all curious about the financial well-being, or lack thereof, of the people who seek to lead us.
Last week, we published 32-pages of those public disclosures and there are 56 millionaires running to be members of the next Parliament. This was close to half of the 133 people seeking a spot in the House of Assembly.
These millionaires are members of the Free National Movement (FNM), the Progressive Liberal Party (PLP), the Democratic National Alliance (DNA) and some are independents.
Minister of Health and Killarney MP Dr. Hubert Minnis (FNM) disclosed a net worth of $10.9 million. Bain and Grants Town MP Dr. Bernard Nottage (PLP) declared a net worth of $8.18 million. Others such as PLP businessman Gary Sawyer ($7.8 million), South Abaco candidate, and FNM accountant Hubert Chipman ($6.85 million), St. Anne's candidate, are also in the millionaires club.
Some are troubled when these disclosures are released and the vast wealth of politicians and would-be politicians is disclosed. Their concern is that so many wealthy people are seeking political power. This mindset, however, is misguided.
People who seek public office should have accomplishments. They should have been successful at something before offering themselves for public service. And quite simply, successful people earn more.
Those who cannot even figure out how to personally achieve financial security surely are not likely to figure out how to lead a large number of people to that destination.
We should also want candidates who after their time of service are excited about returning to private life and those things they are good at. We have said many times that politics should not be a career. It should be a sphere people enter for a time, serve and then depart in order to allow new ideas to enter the system to take the country forward.
To be clear, we are not arguing that only the rich should seek elected office. Anyone who meets the eligibility criteria can run, but sensible members of the electorate should only consider those who have some track record of accomplishment and success in some aspect of their personal lives and careers for service.
Parliament makes laws. Its members also serve as advocates for the residents of our communities. People who hold these posts should have the capacity to contribute to these activities. Those unable to sustain themselves financially do not demonstrate the capacity to deliver on these responsibilities.

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News Article
Is it time to abandon the Privy Council
Is it time to abandon the Privy Council

In recent times, some Bahamians have been intensely engaged in a debate over the June 15 Privy Council ruling in the matter of the Maxo Tido murder case.

The Privy Council held that the circumstances that led to the death of 16-year-old Donnell Conover were not gruesome enough to mandate the death sentence on the convicted murderer.

Conover's skull was crushed and her body was burnt. Many people have denounced the reasoning of the court and have expressed open disappointment in the decision.

This has led to a renewed call in some circles for The Bahamas to sever its links with the Privy Council as our final court of appeal. Since our independence in 1973, the Privy Council has maintained this position as the head of the Bahamian judicial system.

Article 105 (1) of the Constitution of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas states: "Parliament may provide for an appeal to lie from decisions of the Court of Appeal established by Part 2 of this Chapter to the Judicial Committee of Her Majesty's Privy Council or to such other court as may be prescribed by Parliament under this Article, either as of right or with the leave of the said Court of Appeal, in such cases other than those referred to in Article 104 (2) of this Constitution as may be prescribed by Parliament."

As noted on its website, the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council originated as the highest court of civil and criminal appeal for the British Empire.
It now fulfills the same purpose for many current and former Commonwealth countries, as well as the United Kingdom's overseas territories, crown dependencies, and military sovereign base areas.

The judicial experience of the foreign Law Lords has been garnered from their experiences at the bar and on the courts in the United Kingdom. In recent years, members of the Privy Council have traveled to The Bahamas on the invitation of the former President of the Court of Appeal retired Madam Justice Dame Joan Sawyer and have sat in The Bahamas and have heard and determined cases.

During their 2009 visit, then Attorney General and now Chief Justice Sir Michael Barnett noted that the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council affects "the lives of Bahamians, the region and people in the wider common-law world."
The Law Lords' visits have perhaps been the executive's and the judiciary's way of familiarizing the Privy Council with some of the customs and norms that we enjoy in The Bahamas.

The compelling question in light of the Maxo Tido decision is whether the Privy Council remains relevant to the evolving customs and norms of Bahamian society.
Through its various decisions, the Privy Council continues to write policy for The Bahamas and other such jurisdictions that send it appeals. The most contentious have related to the death penalty.

In some quarters in The Bahamas, there is a widely held view that convicted murderers ought to be subject to the death penalty -- as stated by the law.
Even with opponents continuing to point out that there is no evidence to show that capital punishment serves as a deterrent to crime, the call for the resumption of hangings more than 11 years after the last one was carried out continues to resound.

However, there are some Bahamians who remain opposed to any form of capital punishment. No government, in light of the years of debate since the landmark Pratt and Morgan decision in 1993, has thought it appropriate to have a referendum on this vexing question of the death penalty.

In that judgment, the Privy Council ruled that it would be cruel and inhumane to execute someone who has been under the sentence of death for more than five years. Given the lack of any timelines, the appeals process in many instances since that ruling has dragged well beyond the five-year mark, and many murder convicts have escaped execution.

There is also a push in some legal circles for The Bahamas to withdraw from the Inter American Commission on Human Rights, another avenue for appeal for murder convicts. In 2006, the Privy Council imposed an even stricter standard for the imposition of the death penalty when it ruled that the mandatory death sentence was unconstitutional.

All the men who at the time were under the sentence of death had to be resentenced, and according to the Office of the Attorney General, a few still await resentencing.

A referendum is perhaps the only way that any government could know with a degree of certainty the views and opinions of the Bahamian people on the issue of the death penalty.

It is generally accepted that the talk shows and the public commentary emanating from certain quarters may not give the impression of a broad based support or opposition to the death penalty.
 
Continuing support for Privy Council
There are some lawyers, including the recently re-elected President of the Bar Association Ruth Bowe-Darville, who have expressed continuing support for the Privy Council as our final court of appeal.

Bowe-Darville's recent comments came in the context of discussing civil and commercial matters arising from the use of our country as an international commercial center.

The point that she was advocating is that the Privy Council is still relevant for the certainty of these disputes and to confirm the country's reputation as a stable judicial center for the determination of major commercial cases.
There are perhaps few lawyers who would disagree with this proposition.
Veteran attorney Maurice Glinton said, "We need the Privy Council."
"The Privy Council represents competence," he said.

"It also represents a standard of performance that we are not accustomed to in this jurisdiction...The concern for all of us who believe in the rule of law is that we always have judges who are competent.  That minimizes the opportunity for error.  No person should die because of judicial oversight.

"And to the extent that we have a further court to hear us, so that they can see finally with more objective eyes, then that speaks to our humanity, that speaks to our civility."

However, it does not appear that the distinction between commercial matters and criminal matters generates a similar liking to continue with the Privy Council. Some proponents who wish to sever our links to the Privy Council appear to be in favor of The Bahamas joining the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) as our final court of appeal.

The CCJ, inaugurated in 2005, sits in Port of Spain, Trinidad & Tobago.
As noted by the regional appellate court, there is still some lingering opposition to the CCJ.  Surveys in some CARICOM member states, however, have showed as many as 80 percent of the persons surveyed supported the court, the CCJ says on its website.

In some jurisdictions, while there is little opposition to the court in its original jurisdiction, there is more opposition to it in its appellate jurisdiction.
In 2005, then Minister of Foreign Affairs Fred Mitchell announced that The Bahamas will not join the CCJ.   And the current administration has also shown no interest in that court.
The Bahamian Constitution allows us to amend the necessary article to sever our ties with the Privy Council. It is to be noted that in the ill-fated 2002 attempt to amend the constitution that this was not a provision that the Free National Movement government sought to put before the Bahamian people for approval.

At the very crux of this discussion are two questions: whether The Bahamas can have a dual final court of appeal (that is the Privy Council for civil and commercial matters) and the CCJ for criminal matters.

Secondly, whether it is within our national interest, long term and short term, to sever ties with the Privy Council in circumstances where we appear to be opposed to that court's standing on the issue of capital punishment.
As an aside, the Privy Council does not appear to be that enthused about the demands placed on it by Commonwealth countries.

In 2009, Lord Phillips, the senior Law Lord of the Judicial Committee, expressed the view that the Privy Council was feeling burdened by appeals emanating from jurisdictions like The Bahamas. In an interview reported in the Financial Times, he was quoted as saying that he was searching for ways to curb the "disproportionate" time he and his fellow senior justices spent hearing legal appeals from independent Commonwealth countries to the Privy Council in London.

Lord Phillips also suggested that "in an ideal world", Commonwealth countries would stop using the Privy Council and set up their own final courts of appeal.
 
Clarifying death penalty cases
The European Court of Human Rights has taken a position on the death penalty, which it appears is a universal approach and therefore the further question that has to be asked is whether The Bahamas wishes to be out of step with a universally recognized principle of the sanctity of life.
The question of the sanctity of life is one which is embodied in a religious concept which stems from the Golden Rule -- that you ought to do unto others as you wish others to do to you.

The Catholic denomination has always been strongly opposed to capital punishment based on religious reasons.  Some other denominations have generally been pro-capital punishment and this is perhaps in line with the recent comments made by a group of pastors.

The pastors -- among them former crime commission chairman Bishop Simeon Hall -- expressed outrage at the recent Maxo Tido ruling. They said in a statement, "This ruling of the Law Lords is more than a ruling.  It is a message to all would be murderers, and the message is: 'As long as you can benchmark your murder to the level of brutality of murders like that of Donnell Conover's, you can fully expect to be spared the death penalty'."

After the Maxo Tido ruling, Hall said it is time for The Bahamas to abandon the Privy Council. "The ruling by the Privy Council raises serious questions as to what is happening," Hall said. "I understand to some degree the Privy Council has the last word, but certainly my big problem I'm wrestling with is what is the justice system saying to families of victims of murder, and then to persons who do the murder?

"It seems that the whole system now is lending its way to criminality.  For the Law Lords to conclude that this was a bad murder but it's not counted as the worst of the worst, I think it's time for us to cry shame on the justice system."
Even among church leaders, there exists a divergence of views on this question of capital punishment.

There is no doubt that the death penalty issue is an emotive one.
Some observers argue that the balanced approach, however, requires not just an appreciation and sympathy toward the families of the victims of murder, but there ought also to be a willingness to understand and to sympathize with the anguish that will be felt by the murderers' families.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham recently announced that he intends to table before Parliament a bill to address the issue of the death penalty.
That bill will set the criteria of murders that require the death penalty and those that may require life sentences or lesser sentences.

This bill is also likely to address the factors that the court must take into account when it exercises its discretion when sentencing a convicted murderer.
The need for clarity in the law emanated from the 2006 Forrester and Bowe ruling handed down by the Privy Council outlawing the mandatory death sentence.
Retired Supreme Court Justice Jeanne Thompson noted in a recent letter to the editor that this was a clear signal to the legislature that it was necessary to put in place guidelines for judges to use in sentencing convicted murderers.

Indeed, Dame Joan, then president of the Court of Appeal about four years ago, called upon the government to put in place the necessary guidelines, Justice Thompson noted. "However, nothing was done and judges were obliged to use their discretion with the aid of attorneys, social workers and psychiatrists to decide upon appropriate sentences," she wrote.

"This created a lacuna in our law and has allowed the Privy Council to use its own principles in adjudging what is an appropriate punishment for persons convicted of murder in The Bahamas. "Ideally we should have followed the example of the United Kingdom, which, prior to the complete abolition of the death penalty, divided murder into capital and non-capital."

In the recent Tido ruling, the Privy Council repeated the kinds of murders that warrant the death penalty. The Law Lords said the worst cases of murder that may call for the imposition of capital punishment would be those in which the murder is carefully planned and carried out in furtherance of another crime, such as robbery, rape, drug smuggling, human smuggling, drug wars, gang enforcement policies, kidnapping, preventing witnesses from testifying, serial killers, as well as the killing of innocents "for the gratification of base desires".
"The legislation which will be tabled in Parliament is a step in the right direction, but it is very, very late," said Damian Gomez, a prominent defense attorney, who also pointed to Dame Joan's call for legislation to be passed to bring some certainty in the area of sentencing.

"Her calls for statutory clarification fell on deaf ears for quite a while, and we're paying the price for it." Clearly, there has been some time that has lagged between the 2006 decision and the formulation of clear guidelines to assist the court in its determination on this issue.

One has to wait to see the contents of the bill to fully assess its suitability and whether in fact it will answer this question of the death penalty once and for all.
One jurist told us that it is likely that the bill if passed by Parliament may lead to constitutional challenges which may further delay but will hopefully make certain the law in The Bahamas on the issue of the death penalty.

Other details of the bill are uncertain at this time. What is clear though is the question of the Privy Council as the final court of appeal for The Bahamas remains a controversial one -- not unlike the question of the death penalty itself.
 

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News Article
Miss Grand Bahama Top Model Talent Competition: May 4th

Freeport, Bahamas - The Miss Grand Bahama Beauty Pageant's

Top Model & Talent Competition will be on

May 4, 2012  at 8pm

at

Island Sea Resort.

Please come out and support these
lovely young ladies, of which one will wear the crown and represent her
island and country. Tickets are only $10 and include a free a drink.

This year's contestants are

Gabrielle
Wong sponsored by TurnIng Bar, Abilene Jones sponsored by Lneliba,
Carlene Johnson sponsored by Ocean Reef Resorts, Miss Grand Bahama 2011
Keriann Stuart, Mone't Johnson sponsored by Sawyers Fresh Market, Kristi
Farah sponsored by Bella Rose, Christen Barrow sponsored by Alvernia
Foods (Cat Island), and Andria Miller sponsored by Pier 1 Restaurant...

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News Article
CIBC FirstCaribbean staffers turn out in large numbers for Atlantic Fun Walk

Last week Saturday, executives of the Atlantic Medical Fun Walk Committee rewarded CIBC FirstCaribbean for registering over 100 participants for the annual event. It seemed as if the message of healthy lifestyles, launched at the financial institution just over a month ago, quickly reached some of the bank's staff, as for the first time, 154 persons registered to participate in the walk. From senior executives, leaders, managers and staff, employees turned out in large numbers. Some completed the shorter three-mile fun walk while the more competitive ones, embarked on the grueling six-mile walk, that included walking over the Paradise Island Bridge twice. The CIBC FirstCaribbean team finished second just to BTC in terms of corporate participation. Managing Director Marie Rodland-Allen, who proudly completed the six-mile course, congratulated the team for their participation. "We all came out and were recognized as a team, united and focused on accomplishing goals... no matter what that goal is," she said. "That is excellent." Staff members winning prizes included Terah Strachan, Lashon Sawyer, Brigitta Seymour and Desdemona Gibbs.

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News Article
Bahamian Short Film on Multiple Sclerosis Sudden Onset premieres Thursday, May 10th

Nassau, Bahamas - Bahamian
Short Film on Multiple Sclerosis premieres Thursday, May 10 at 6pm
College of The Bahamas Harry C. Moore Library

The short film "Sudden Onset" written and directed by Bahamian Katherine
Beneby II will premier at the College of The Bahamas Harry C. Moore
Library and Information Centre on Thursday May 10 at 6pm with guest
presenter Dr. Charles Rahming and Host for the evening Jerome Sawyer. An
educational forum will follow the film.

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News Article
(Documentary short ) Caribbean Crime Wave documentary

Journeyman Pictures
has just released a documentary which features The Bahamas called,

Caribbean Crime Wave. The film features an interview with

Jerome Sawyer.
It also features

Minister Tommy Turnquest and

Dr. Myles Munroe.

Journeyman.TV writes, "To the outside world, the Bahamas are an idyllic holiday hotspot, but
for its residents, a surge in violent crime is turning these islands
into one of the most dangerous places in the Caribbean."

"Type
'Bahamas' into Google and it throws up pictures of beautiful beaches and
luxury resorts. But there's another side to this holiday haven. Easy
access to weapons from the United States along with the country's weak
laws has brought a rise in violent drug and gun crime. "I don't see my
country the same way I saw it..."

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News Article
(Documentary short ) Caribbean Crime Wave documentary

Journeyman Pictures
has just released a documentary which features The Bahamas called,

Caribbean Crime Wave. The film features an interview with

Jerome Sawyer.
It also features

Minister Tommy Turnquest and

Dr. Myles Munroe.

Journeyman.TV writes, "To the outside world, the Bahamas are an idyllic holiday hotspot, but
for its residents, a surge in violent crime is turning these islands
into one of the most dangerous places in the Caribbean."

"Type
'Bahamas' into Google and it throws up pictures of beautiful beaches and
luxury resorts. But there's another side to this holiday haven. Easy
access to weapons from the United States along with the country's weak
laws has brought a rise in violent drug and gun crime. "I don't see my
country the same way I saw it..."

read more »


News Article
National stadium construction progresses

Nassau, Bahamas -

The
15,000-seat national stadium is on target for a June 2011 completion,
when it will be ready to contribute to sporting, cultural, and tourism
events.

"This
will position us better for sports tourism," said Tyrone Sawyer, director
of Sports Tourism in the Ministry of Tourism & Aviation. "It will
give us the opportunity in conjunction with our hotel partners to host
quite a bit of different events here in the Bahamas, and from a sports
tourism perspective, our goal is to stimulate sporting events that will
bring people to the Bahamas to spectate and participate."

Phase
one of the stadium will feature two grand stands... 

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News Article
A spring affair

It was a spring affair as the Usher Board of Transfiguration Baptist Church hosted its first Lenten Tea Party with a twist -- children participated in a fashion show and gave the event a special touch. The children's participation reminded everyone that they must become like a child to enter the Kingdom of Heaven, and that children can be loving, kind, have great faith, forgive easily, fall down and get up, heal quickly and people can learn from them.
The Usher Board decided to let the children lead the way during the spring affair, and corralled the preschool and primary school children to model the fashions. The models for the afternoon were Andria Astwood, Anthonique Hall, Anthony Hall, Charlise Gaitor, Charnae Gaitor, Rihanna Gibson, D'Asia Bain, Deandrea Johnson, Dermott Sawyer II, Ebony Taylor, and Mashan McDonald.
The room was beautifully decorated by Paulamae Rollins and Patricia Newry reflecting God's creation -- the plants, the birds, the butterflies, colors of the rainbow. The tables were decorated by members of the usher board and parents and family assisted with clothing. The hostess for the afternoon was Shantell McDonald assisted by Marlene Hall. Bush teas and desserts were provided by Faye Delancy, the event organizer.
"I was happy to see the outcome. Spring time is when everything comes into bloom. It was ideal, especially after celebrating the death and resurrection of Christ Jesus. The infusion and celebration of life is wonderful," said Delancy.
Reverend Sherma Bowe, the church's associate minister, reminded guests that the whole man consists of mind, body, spirit and soul, and that they must become as children to enter the kingdom of God.
The Usher Board Ministry allows individuals to serve as doorkeepers for the church, preparing the sanctuary for visitors and members to worship. Additionally, ushers act as special assistants to the pastor and ministers, assisting with the orderly flow of the service, providing comfort and support, handing out programs and directing people to their seats. However, their role does not stop there, and like everyone else, they embrace opportunities for Christian fellowship, love and laughter.
Transfiguration Baptist Church is located on Market and Vesey Streets and is pastored by Reverend Stephen Enoch Thompson. The church has various ministries that cater to children, women, men and families.

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News Article
George Nathaniel Levarity, 77

Funeral Service for the Late George Nathaniel Levarity, 77 years of Thompson Court, Oakes Field, and Formerly of Abaco, will be held on Saturday April 21st, 2:30 p.m. at St. Agnes Anglican Church, Baillou Hill Road. Rev'd. Fr. Neil G. Nairn assisted by Canon Warren Rolle will officiate. Interment will follow in the Western Cemetery, Nassau Street.
Wife: Irma Levarity; Daughter: Tanya Mackey; Grandsons: Taran and Travis Mackey; Brother: Michael Levarity of Green Turtle Cay, Abaco; Sisters: Iris Miller and Adelaide Levarity - Pinder of Freeport, Grand Bahama; Adopted Brother: Livingston and Leonard Stuart; Adopted Sisters: Iteah  Ritchie and Ruby Davis of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Carnetta Rahming , Jocelyn Hanna and Minerva Benson; Nephews: Richard "Mackey" Bain, Eugene "Benjamin", Abraham, Apostle Paul and Apostle David , Nathaniel, Michael, Rev. Dr. Ivan F. Jr., Wrensworth , Johnathan, Supt. Samuel , Nathan and Rev. Emmanuel "Kevin"Butler, Earl Miller, Arthur, Rudolph, Rev. Patrick and Malcolm Levarity, Ademian and Alexian "AP" Pinder, Lester Bernardo, Dennis, Willis and Rontonio Levarity, Kirk Pedican; Nieces: Louise Butler-Simmons, Elizabeth "Mary" McMinns, Marie Lyvonne Thorpe of  Michigan, Christine Neely, Joan, Ingrid and Virginia Levarity, Una Delancy, Alelia Adderley, Caron Green, LaTrese Torres, Breanne Williams and Cynthia "Cindy" Levarity; Children of the late Myrtle Hanna - Paul, Marie & Andrew. Children of the late Sybil Blyden - Veta, Calliope, Persis, Gershwin, Louise and John; Children of the late Leroy Nicolls -Eugene, Melvern, Sharon, Anthony; Children of Maria Turner- George, Charles, Philip, Andrea, Cleomie, Jesse & Karen; Children of the late Kenneth Nicolls - Everett, Roman, Sheila & Marco. Children of the late Eric Nicolls - Rose, Philip, Perry, Percy, Pam, Patricia, Prescola, Eric, Erica, Zelma, and Janet; Children of the Late Lorraine Saunders, Terrance, Sharon, Joanne, Antoinette, Laverne, Vansharee & Anthony; Brothers-in-laws:

Arlington Miller, Rev. Ivan Butler Sr., Adolphus Pinder , Wallace Nicolls; Sisters-in-law: Melrita Levarity of Green Turtle Cay, Abaco, and Victoria Levarity of Freeport, Grand Bahama , Maria Turner, Eloise Saunders, Ruth Nottage; Other relatives and friends include: Joan Beckford (caregiver), Nelson and Malvese Sands, Audrey Tucker and Family, Constance Mackey and Family, Joyce Bain and Family, Louise Adderley and Family, Vern Hutchinson and Family, Ellen Grant and Family, Chris Francis and Family, James Butler and Family, Annette Cartwright and Family, Antoinette Weech, Willa-Mae Sawyer, Prescola Lockhart, Warren and Vera Levarity, Lillis Ramsey & Family, Janet Levarity, Cyprinna Deveaux, Claudette Bees, Edna Levarity and  Family, Carl and  Madeline Levarity and Family, Marteen Levarity and Family, The Francis Family, Michael Levarity, The Levarity Family, Bimini and Florida, The Weech Family, Family of the Late Leanor Franklin, New York,  The Family of the late Christopher  Johnson, Miami Florida,  Melony Hanna and Family, Gertrude Neely and Family, Paula Cunningham, Linda Fitzgerald and Family, Denise McPhee and Family,  Ezra and Ezrika Pratt, Wyome Hulyer, Dr. Joseph Evans and the Bahamas Urology Centre Staff,  The Old Timers Softball League, The Parcel Post Department and the entire St. Agnes Church Family.
Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon and at the church from 1:00 p.m. until service time.

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Business Listing
News Article

The 16-year-old St. George’s High School student seriously injured when he was struck in the head by an aluminum window louvre thrown through his classroom window by a fellow student during the melee on the school’s campus last week is in stable condition at Princess Margaret Hospital.

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News Article
56 millionaires nominate

Independent candidate Whitney Bastian leads the field of 56 millionaires vying for seats in the House of Assembly, according to financial disclosures submitted for 133 general election candidates who nominated on Tuesday.
These millionaires are members of the Free National Movement (FNM), the Progressive Liberal Party (PLP), the Democratic National Alliance (DNA) and some are independents.
Forty-three millionaires sought seats in the House in 2007, when 110 candidates nominated.
Since 2007, some current members of Parliament have done extremely well, while others have lost ground financially.
However, the combined net worth of the top 10 candidates in the current class of millionaires falls far short of the 2007 group, with former heavyweights Brent Symonette ($58 million), Jackson Ritchie ($18.8 million), Shandrice Rolle ($16.4 million) and Allyson Maynard-Gibson ($11.6 million) not offering this time around.
Bastian declared a net worth of $11.4 million. He is offering himself for Mangrove Cay and South Andros.
His net worth was listed at $10.1 million in 2007.
Minister of Health and Killarney MP Dr. Hubert Minnis (FNM) isn't too far behind, with a net worth of $10.9 million. His fortune has grown considerably from the $7.1 million he declared when he nominated for the last general election.
Bain and Grants Town MP Dr. Bernard Nottage (PLP) has seen a relatively slight increase in his fortune. He was worth $7.8 million in 2007, but declared a net worth of $8.18 million in 2012.
Businessman Gary Sawyer (PLP), who is running in South Abaco, is worth around $7.8 million.
Accountant Hubert Chipman (FNM), who is running in St. Annes, is worth $6.85 million.
DNA Leader Branville McCartney is by far the wealthiest party leader. He has also seen his wealth grow over the past five years. McCartney declared a net worth of $6.5 million on Tuesday.
In his declaration for the year ending December 31, 2007, McCartney's net worth was listed at $2 million.
FNM Leader and Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham declared a net worth of $1.9 million on Tuesday. That is a slight increase from the $1.6 million net worth he declared for 2007.
PLP Leader Perry Christie declared a net worth of $2 million on Tuesday. He was worth nearly $2.2 million at the end of 2007.
PLP Tall Pines candidate Leslie Miller listed his net worth at $6.5 million. He was worth just over $4.5 million in 2007.
Elizabeth candidate Dr. Duane Sands (FNM) declared a net worth of $6.2 million on Tuesday. His fortune is down. He declared a net worth of $6.785 million in the 2010 Elizabeth by-election. He ultimately lost that contest to current Elizabeth MP Ryan Pinder (PLP), who disclosed a net worth of $435,000 on Tuesday.
The PLP's candidate for Marathon, Jerome Fitzgerald, declared a net worth of $6 million. He has lost considerable ground after declaring nearly $8.4 million for 2007.
Attorney Paul Moss, who is running as an independent in Garden Hills, declared a net worth of $5.9 million.
Architect Wellington Woods, the DNA's Pinewood candidate, has a net worth of $5.66 million.
DNA South Beach candidate Wallace Rolle declared a net worth of $5.4 million.
Accountant Peter Turnquest (FNM), who is running in East Grand Bahama, declared a net worth just over $5 million.
Attorney Richard Lightbourne (FNM), who is running in Montagu, is worth $4.66 million.
Attorney and MICAL MP V. Alfred Gray declared a net worth over $4 million.
Businessman and pilot Randy Butler (DNA), who is running in North Andros and the Berry Islands, declared a net worth of $3.87 million.
The PLP's Central and South Eleuthera candidate, Damian Gomez, is worth $3.5 million.
Arnold Forbes (PLP), who is running in Mount Moriah, is worth $3.4 million.
Attorney Craig Butler, the independent candidate for Bamboo Town, declared a net worth of $3.3 million.
Attorney Wayne Munroe, the DNA candidate for Mount Moriah, declared a net worth of $3.25 million.
Attorney Kenyatta Gibson (FNM), who is running in Southern Shores, declared a net worth of $3 million.
Of course, the majority of candidates are not millionaires.
Jay Armbrister, who is running in Elizabeth, declared $1,441.31, the lowest net worth among all the candidates.
The individual details of these and all the other candidates' disclosures can be found in today's edition of The Nassau Guardian.

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News Article
DPP accused of 'abusing process'

By NATARIO McKENZIE

Tribune Staff Reporter

nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

DIRECTOR of Public Prosecutions Vinette Graham-Allen has been ordered to appear in the Court of Appeal on Monday after coming under fire for claiming the court had erred in a judgment, a charge the court claimed was "baseless."

Mrs Graham-Allen was criticised yesterday for misleading the appellate court in making an urgent application for leave to appeal a judgment in the case of former death row inmate Godfrey Sawyer.

Mrs Graham-Allen and prosecutor Jillian Williams, who signed the notice of motion, have been ordered to appear in court at 2pm Monday to explain the circumstances under which the application wa ...

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News Article
(VIDEO) Bahamas featured in Caribbean Crime Wave documentary

Journeyman Pictures has just released a documentary which features The Bahamas called, Caribbean Crime Wave. The film features an interview withJerome Sawyer.

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News Article
Let's change politics through the DNA

Dear Editor,
The elections are upon us. As I move around I can hear and feel the frustration that engulfs our society. We are angry at the Progressive Liberal Party (PLP) and the Free National Movement (FNM) because we feel that our present economic, crime and social crisis is the result of, or contributed to by, years of failures by respective governments. As enunciated by then Senator Barack Obama in 2008, "Those who drove the bus into the ditch are asking us to re-engage them to drive the bus out." Yet, we are afraid to step into unknown territory. My own suspicion is that our fears are unwarranted and that the Democratic National Alliance (DNA) can be no worse than the PLP or FNM, and in fact may very well do better than either party has done in the last 10 to 15 years.
Although each party claims to have taken in new blood, they are still restricted by the stranglehold of the existing order. They have each promised to pass leadership to a new generation. Even if that is true, left unchecked it will pass to the chosen without consideration of the best.
Even though the DNA is building support nationwide, the nature of our system is such that even if you get 33 percent of the vote in every constituency, you will still end up with no seats. Each of the traditional parties already boasts that simply giving a candidate their designation means 30 percent to 40 percent of the vote.
I would like to offer a solution that allows us to venture out of our caves safely and yet send a message to our leaders. You do not need to abandon your parties and you need not fear more change than you feel you can accommodate right now. What it does require is for the electorate to think independently and act for the good of the country as a whole without blind allegiance to one or the other traditional political party.
Imagine what would happen if at least five seats in the House of Assembly were not held by either of the two giant parties. It would be a clear message to both parties to straighten up and fly right. It would give us in the future greater and clearer alternatives. It would give us a chance to view and evaluate. You will no longer be asked to choose between "the lesser of two evils".
I have considered the candidates in the DNA as best I could and whilst I personally would have no objection to a DNA government, I reluctantly accept that it may be a little too much for the cautious ones among us to stomach at this point. If I may, I put forward five candidates in New Providence and two in the Family Islands for your exceptional consideration, bearing in mind the undoubted specific effect they can have in shaking things up and the support they may already have in their constituencies. This is not to belittle other DNA candidates not chosen or even the opponents of those chosen, but really in consideration of the effect. Think of what these people will contribute to the quality of the debate in the House of Assembly.
New Providence: Branville McCartney -- Bamboo Town; Christopher Mortimer -- Nassau Village; Ben Albury -- Montagu; Madlene Sawyer -- Southern Shores; Wayne Munroe -- Mt. Moriah.
Family Islands: Roscoe Thompson -- South Abaco; and Randy Butler -- North Andros and The Berry Islands.
Think about it, you can safely register your disapproval without leaving your party. You need not fear that it will result in an inexperienced government and you will have a unique opportunity to shake up politics in this country forever. If this is acceptable to you and you live in those constituencies, then you should seriously consider voting for them. If you do not live in those constituencies but know people who do, perhaps you should seek to convince them of the wisdom of this.As the song says, "You may say I'm a dreamer, but I'm not the only one".

- Luther H. McDonald

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News Article
Bahamas E Marketing - Weekly Store Specials to lower your grocery bills.

 

The quest to locate the best deals in grocery shopping is a lot easier when you are a subscribers of Bahamas E Marketing service!  Become a subscriber today by filling in the form below.

Your weekly guide to the best shopping values is also right here on

TheBahamasWeekly.com;

 

Simply click on the flashing "WEEKLY STORE SPECIALS" button OR on the grocery store banner adverts on the left-hand column of each and every page of The Bahamas Weekly.

oSolomons

oCostRight

oSavemore Food Store  o

Sawyer's Fresh Market

To receive weekly store specials advertisements via email, be sure and subscribe to The Bahamas E Marketing below.

Enter your Email
address below to subscribe:

FeedBlitz

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News Article
Annie Woods-Munnings, 86

Funeral services for the late Annie Woods-Munnings, 86, who died at the Princess Margaret Hospital, August 31st, 2010, will be held at St. Michael's Methodist Church, Churchill Avenue at 11:00 am. Burial will be in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road. Rev. Philip Stubbs, assisted by Rev. Lavern Lockhart, Rev. Kenris Carey & Rev. Denise Sawyer officiating.

Her memory will forever live in the hearts of her children, Judy Deveaux, Vanria Munnings-Fisher, Sandra Munnings-Rodgers and Ava Munnings-Rolle; sons, Cedri, Anthony and Wendell Munnings; grandchildren, Kim Munnings, Michelle Munnings-Minus, Jennie Moxey, Tanya Wars, Shawn and Franky Munnings, Chris Strachan, Anthonecia Welton, Rheynischka Mu ...

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News Article
Understanding BTCs next Generation Network

Members of the Bahamas’ Press Corp recently toured the Bahamas Telecommunications Company’s (BTC) hub of operations to learn about the advancement of the ongoing nation-wide build out of its Next Generation Network (NGN)...

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News Article
Margaret Caroline Ferguson, 79

Funeral Service for Margaret Caroline Ferguson, age 79 of Dignity Gardens who died on March 28th 2012 will be held on Saturday at 10 a.m. at the Church of God of Prophecy, East Street, Tabernacle, East Street North.  Officiating will be Bishop Franklin M. Ferguson, assisted by Minister Kendal Simmons.  Interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.
She is survived by her HUSBAND: Minister Elkin Alfred Ferguson; CHILDREN: Anthony Reuben Theodore, Oramae Loretta and Kim Derek Ferguson, Andrea Vernice Parker and Gary Raphael Ferguson;  DAUGHTERS-IN-LAW:  Sherry and Shirley Ferguson;  SON-IN-LAW, Elton Parker;  GRANDCHILDREN:  Dericka, D'Andrea, D'Antae,and Gary Ferguson, and Marco Parker;  BROTHER: Vanderson Ferguson;  SISTERS-IN-LAW: Rennie Ferguson and Olga Iva Ford and Family;  BROTHERS-IN-LAW: Cleveland, Hayward, Vernal and Benjamin Ferguson; and their Families;  NIECES AND NEPHEWS: Jeffrey and Sandra, Trevor and Holly, Stanley (Jerry) and Cara, Loren, Darrel and Deborah and Emile (Rocky) Ferguson; Elizabeth Johnson, Antoinette and Andrew Sawyer, Kenneth Ferguson, Frances Stewart, Dorothea Ferguson-Outten, Arnold and Lydia Ferguson, Deborah Smith and Dr. Theodore Ferguson;  Bernard and Sheila, Carolyn, Deidre, Bethsheba (Binky) and Keith Munroe;  Jeanette and Albert (Mackey) McKenzie, Maria and Errol Simmons, Pauline Norris, Winston and Linda Williams, Ceola Charles, Carmen and Victor, Dawn and Leon Francis;  Michelle Ferguson;  and their families;  COUSINS: Bishop Romeo Ferguson, Valentine Farquharson, Lelah Cunningham, Verdiemae Farquharson- Kriz, Joanna Miller, Glenville Farquharson, John Deleveaux, Rodney, Philip and Eloise Farquharson, John (J.D.), Patricia Miller and Rose Denton; OTHER FAMILY MEMBERS INCLUDE: Enamae Cox and Family, Dr. Albert Ferguson and Family, Deacon Herman McClain and Family, Ellen Ferguson and Elizabeth Ferguson; Families of the late:  Bishop Phalmon Collie, Bishop Nathaniel Beneby, Bishop Herbert Ferguson, Bishop Errol Simmons, Deacon Whittington Deleveaux, Joanna Miller, Era McFall and Olive Hanna.; A HOST OF OTHER RELATIVES AND FRIENDS INCLUDING: Bishop Franklin and Rovena Ferguson, Bishop Brice and Advira Thompson, Bishop Elgarnet and Minister Jacqueline Rahming, Bishop Rudolph and Veronica Bowe, Bishop Eliakim and Dorcas Ferguson, Bishop Woodley and Vernique Thompson, Pastor Kendal and Lorna (Joy) Simmons, Bishop Hulan and Valerie Hanna, Deacon Hurai and Cynthia Ferguson, Minister Salathiel Simmons and Family, Doreen Campbell, Minister Donna Delancy, Mary Moss, Betty Cox, Pastor John Wesley Ferguson, Craig Forbes, Anamae Delva, Vera Newbold and Family, Ronald Newbold and family, Dwayne Butler, Magistrate Derence Rolle and Family, Nivian Hall and Family, L. Roye and Family, Rubyann Burrows, Enadel Lundy, Bernice Cox-Munroe, Leslie and Lehenza Curtis, Cynthia, Amanda and Cyndera Parker, Brenda Knowles, the entire family of the Church of God of Prophecy, especially East Street Tabernacle, Englerston Mighty Prayer Warriors, East St. Soup Kitchen, Wulff Rd., Englerston and Minnie St. COGOP Churches, Nassau Fellowship Centre, Miami St. Community, Neighbours of Dignity Gardens, Oncology Dept. and Female Medical 1 Ward of the Princess Margaret Hospital, Physiotherapy Dept.- Geriatric Hospital, Nurses Cooper and Davis of Flamingo Gardens Clinic, Dr. Theodore Ferguson, Dr. Acheabea Ferguson-Dyer, Dr. Keith Rivers, Dr. Budha, Dr. Quentin Richmond, and her home care givers: Oramae Ferguson, Andrea Parker, Deidre and Bethsheba Munroe and Nurse Nicole Hanna.

Friends may pay their last respects at East Sunrise Mortuary, Rosetta Street, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and again at the Tabernacle from 9 a.m. on Saturday until service time.

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News Article
Alfred Williams, 74

Retired Deputy Superintendent of Police Alfred Williams affectionately called "Mr. Penal Code" and "Sarge" age 74 years of #28 Johnson Terrace  and formerly of  Behring Point, Andros died at his residence on Tuesday April 10th, 2012
 He is survived by his wife: Anita Williams; daughter: Detrice Hanna; sons: Alfred Williams Jr. and Shane Williams; son-in-law: Sherlin Hanna; daughters-in-law: Jackie Williams and Simone Gardiner; numerous grandchildren, nieces and nephews; special friends: Henry Thurston, Wilmore Dames, Patrick Arthur, Cathy Key, Mervin Fynes, Hayward Duncombe, Frank Wells, Emily Petty, Sharon McKinney, Agatha Cumberbatch and Windsor Bethel and other relatives and friends including  Dr. Lunn, Dr. Roberts and Dr. A. Sawyer.
 Funeral Announcements will be announced at a later date.

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News Article
Don't blame it on the Privy Council

Dear Editor,

The recent decision from our highest court, the Privy Council, in the Maxo Tido case, which resulted in the overturning of the death penalty for the appellant, has resulted in almost mass hysteria in the country.

Some are calling for the abolition of the Privy Council as our final court of criminal appeal, while others are referring to the court and its judges in abusive terms, and politicians, always quick to attempt to gain votes by espousing what they determine the majority of voters deem important, are indicating that if elected they will enforce the death penalty.

However, can we blame the Privy Council for its position on death penalty matters?  More than 10 years ago this august body in the landmark Jamaican case of Pratt and Morgan vs. the Queen ruled that it constituted cruel and inhumane treatment to hang a condemned person who had been languishing in prison under a death sentence for a long period of time (now uniformly accepted at five years).

Subsequent to that decision the Privy Council ruled in another appeal that it was not proper to condemn all persons convicted of murder to death and the sentencing in each case had to be decided on its own facts. This was a clear signal to the legislature that it was necessary to put in place guidelines for judges to use in sentencing convicted murderers. Indeed, Dame Joan Sawyer, then president of the Court of Appeal about four years ago, called upon the government to put in place the necessary guidelines.

However, nothing was done and judges were obliged to use their discretion with the aid of attorneys, social workers and psychiatrists to decide upon appropriate sentences.

This created a lacuna in our law and has allowed the Privy Council to use its own principles in adjudging what is an appropriate punishment for persons convicted of murder in The Bahamas.

Ideally we should have followed the example of the United Kingdom, which, prior to the complete abolition of the death penalty, divided murder into capital and non-capital.  The government has indicated that it intends to bring some legislation to the House of Assembly, and it is believed that this would be along the lines of a distinction between capital and non-capital murder.  Examples of capital murder offenses include:
1. The killing of a peace officer or a prison officer,
2. Murder by firearm or explosives.
3. Conviction on two or more murders.
4. Murder in the course of the commission of a felony. (This would have covered the Maxo Tido case as it has been reported that this crime was committed during the commission of a rape, which is a felony.)

Therefore, as I see it there is no need to rant and rave at the Privy Council or call its judges and its decision "stupid". For, it is not clear having regard to the constitution if it would be an easy matter to abolish the Privy Council for criminal matters, and persons involved in the financial sector continually tell us that we need the Privy Council for our offshore clients to have confidence in the Bahamian judicial system.

In recent days it has become clear that more Bahamians are aware that capital punishment is not a deterrent to crime. Consequently it can be assumed that the cry for the death penalty is for revenge.

So, if what we want is the state killing of a convicted murderer, we can keep the Privy Council and satisfy our blood thirsty desires, provided we pass the right legislation. But I would like our citizens to remember this warning:
"Revenge at first though sweet,
Bitter ere long, back on itself recoils." (John Milton "Paradise Lost")

Yours, etc.,
JEANNE I. THOMPSON

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News Article
Talent is one thing, patience is another

Industry position: Technical Support Officer, Underwriting, Bahamas First General Insurance

What attracted you to the sector?

Initially I desired to be a teacher. During my high school years, however, I developed a love for economics. After summer jobs at Lloyd's and Commonwealth Bank, I became interested in banking, particularly trust administration.

How long have you been involved in financial services? What keeps you motivated?

I have been involved in financial services for the last 10 years

and have been employed at Bahamas First General Insurance for seven-and-a-half years.

I am motivated by the person that I know that I am and the potential that lies within me, along with my desire to be the best and to truly be a person of excellence. I must be my best not because someone is watching but because of me. I do not judge myself based on others' actions. I am also motivated by the support I receive from those around me. Knowing that persons are pushing you to succeed is great motivation.

Why do you think you have been successful?

I have been successful predominantly because of the favor of God.

As I reminiscence, I realize that throughout my life He has allowed me to "stand out" with various key persons who have presented me with opportunities and caused me to gain the necessary exposure.

My "success" is also due to the hard work of my parents, Bradley Pratt and Theresa Hopkins. They ensured that I was educated and that I had the tools needed to succeed. I watched them push to success in spite of obstacles. Beyond that, they loved me and pushed me to success. Just about every person that I have come into contact with has believed in me, sometimes beyond what I believed in myself. This provided a great impetus and I was driven to discover what they saw in me; in other words, to see if I could actually do and achieve what they thought I could.

Finally, I would not downplay my hard work, discipline and determination.

Did mentoring play a part in your success?

It sure did. In the personal arena, I was mentored by the late Ruthmae Bonnie Miller and I continue to be mentored by Kelson Miller. Careerwise, Oscar Sawyer "took me under his wings" when I first arrived at Bahamas First and continued to ensure that I had a firm foundation and understanding of policies throughout his time at the company.

Bonnie Nguyen may not know that I consider her a mentor but she is to me. She has helped me to grow in confidence and challenges me to perform many tasks that I would not "take on" without her guidance.

What qualifications do you feel are the most useful in helping you perform in the sector?

All of my post secondary education was geared toward financial services. I knew that I wanted to be a part of the industry. The CII courses which I became involved in after my official entry to the sector were a tremendous source of knowledge and greatly assisted my understanding, paticularly of the insurance sector.

What has been the biggest challenge in your career? How did you overcome it?

This is somewhat of a hard question for me.

My biggest challenge in my career to this point, I would say, has been wanting to be promoted too quickly. Because I know who I am and what I can do, I sometimes become frustrated with where I am. I have learned to remember that some things take time and that continued diligence, efficiency, initiative and excellence in my work and personal life will take me to where I need to be in time.

What advice would you give young people just starting out in the industry?

I would tell young people that this is definitely an interesting industry. I particularly like insurance because it "touches on" many different sectors, law, medicine, construction.

I would encourage them to work hard, work well, not get caught up in office politics, contribute and participate in work related social activities as it helps to deepen your commitment to the job and wanting to see your company succeed.

Having an open mind and believing in themselves can position them to take advantage of the many wonderful opportunities that will be presented to them.

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News Article
Merle Louise Lightfoot, 62

Merle Louise Lightfoot age 62 years of Florida Court formerly of United Estates, San Salvador died at the Princess Margaret Hospital on Thursday March 22nd, 2012.
She is survived by her sons: Shorn Lightfoot, Sidney Rolle, Alvarez Rigby; daughters: Shaneka and Gladys Lightfoot and Kimberly Miller; sisters: Irene Sawyer, Isabella, Patricia, Malvese and Grace Lightfoot; and a host of other relatives and friends too numerous to mention.
Funeral Announcements will be announced at a later date.

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News Article
Mervyn Mansfield Hepburn, 90

Funeral Service for the Late Mervyn Mansfield Hepburn, 90 years of Sear's Road, Chippingham and Formerly of Rum Cay, will be held on Saturday March 31st, 10:00 a.m. at St. Francis Xavier Cathedral, West Hill Street. Fr. Glen Nixon will officiate. Interment will follow in the Catholic Cemetery, Infant View Road.

Left to forever cherish his memories are: 4 Daughters: Remilda Sweeting, Andrea
Fountain, Theresa Bastian and Patrice Hepburn; 5 Sons: Sir Garet Finlayson,
Michael, Albert, Leo and Paul Hepburn; 4 Daughters-in-Law: Rowena Finlayson, Barbara Y., Ainsa and Barbara G. Hepburn; 2 Sons-in-Law: LeRoy Fountain and Terrance Bastian; 26 Grandchildren: Heida, Aisha, Shameka Visna, Nikki, Tanya, Leah, Ainsa, Royanne, Michelle, Theodosia, Tiffany and LeTrice, Mark, Rae, Alexander, Jelani, Justin, Mitchell, Gerard, Gerald, Adrian, Brendan, Dominick, Mikael and Jaime; 2 Grandsons-in-law: Allen Rigby and Ray Bain; 3 Granddaughters-in-Law: Najah and Michelle Finlayson, Shavonya Fountain; 17 Great-grandchildren: Alana and Ashley Rigby, Ravi and Marion Bain, Marjahn, Jhanee, Deriree, Radia, Rahim, Garet and O'chea Finlayson, Mattieu and Eric Beouf, Malia and Gernelle Hepburn, Shania and Brenae Fountain; sister, Dacel Williams; 1 Brother-in-law, Wellington Richards Sr.; Nieces: Constance Adderley, Francis Simmons, Willamae, Delores and Ruth Hepburn; Connie Daniels, Sandra Gordon, Dorothy, Cynthia, Leona and Elizabeth Braynen; nephews: Henry, David, Philip and Isaac Hepburn, Rodney, Richard and Clinton Saunders, Richard, Charles, David and Timothy Braynen and Wellington Richards Jr.; Other relatives and friends: LaGloria Demeritte and Family, Viola Rahming and Family, Zelda Pearson and Family, Joyce Morris and Family, Joseph Hepburn and Family, Marina Hepburn and Family, Leticia and Donald Curry, Dr. Nicole Adderley, Olga Richards, Sir Arlington and Lady Sheila Butler, Freddie and Beverley Russell and Family, Dr. Marcus Bethel and Family, Henry and Shirley Saunders and Family, Maxwell and Melverne Demeritte and Family, Edward and Theresa Minnis and Family, Valderine Adderley and Family, Richard and Janet Lightbourne and Family, Patrick and Lorna Lightbourne and Family, Barbara Bastian and Family, Florence Greenslade and Family, Juanita, Fenrick and Therez Tynes, Dunstan Babbs and Family, Drs. John Carter and Christina Thompson, Caretakers: Sharon Scott and Jackie Beckford; Conrad Sweeting, Vaughn Albury, The Women's Auxillary of St. Francis Xavier Cathedral, The Men's Group of St. Francis Xavier Cathedral, The Parish Family of St. Francis Xavier Cathedral, Sunshine Pilot Club of Nassau, Rotary Clubs of West and South Nassau, Bahamas Taxi Cab Union Association, SAC Class of 1974, Staff of C.W. Sawyer Primary School, Staff of S. C. McPherson Junior High School, Staff of Michael Hepburn and Co., Staff of Esso Baillou Hill Tiger Mart, Mr. Alfred Sears and Family, Staff of Lafayette Gardens and members of the Diocesan Chorale.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #34 Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday at the church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.

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News Article
Downtown International Food Cultural Festival this Weekend!

DOWNTOWN
INTERNATIONAL
FOOD & CULTURAL FESTIVAL

JUNE 17
& 18

 

Downtown
Freeport - Tasty dishes from all
over The Bahamas,

International Cuisine,

Arts & Crafts,

Cultural Displays,

Musical Groups,

Kiddie-corner,

Two Junkanoo Rush-outs! 

FREE
ADMISSION!

Friday June 17th,
3pm - 10pm -

Opening ceremony 6pm,
Friday June 17th

Saturday 18th,
1pm - 10pm, 

Featuring
Guest Artist, 'KB'!

 

Platinum
Sponsors -

Bank of The
Bahamas

GB Power 

Freeport Harbour Company, 
Freeport Container Port, GB Airport Company,

The Grand Bahama Port
Authority, Limited, 

Gold
Sponsor

BTC, 

Silver
Sponsors -

RBC/Finco, 

Sawyer's, 

GB Shipyard,

 

Bronze
Sponsors -

Scotiabank 

Polymers 

Coca Cola

 

Partners:

BAIC

Ministry of Tourism

International Cultural
Festival

Love 97 

Cool 96. 

 

 

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News Article
William John Pinder Jr., 53

Funeral Service for MR. William John Pinder Jr., age 53 years of Bailey Town, Bimini will be held on Saturday, March 31, 2012 at 9:30 a.m. at Holy Name Roman Catholic Church, Bailey Town, Bimini. Officiating will be Father George K assisted by Deacon John Sears. Interment will follow in the Catholic Cemetery, Porgy Bay, Bimini.

Cherished memories are held by his father: William Pinder Sr.; daughter: Avarelle Pinder Williams;

adopted children: Jerry, Sophie, Shirvan, Shirlease, Shirvoughnte, Danielle and Danavier; son-in-law: Pastor Ronnell Williams; grandchildren: Ronnell Jr. and Hezekiah; brothers: Insley, Ellon, Elvin and Patrick Pinder; sisters: Jeanie and Lilly Pinder; aunts: Doris Walker, Esther Rolle; uncle: Malcolm Pinder; nieces: Julia Hanna, Shirlene Bain, Lindsay, Kaityre, Leann, Leronda, Jodyann, Elviann, Julyette, and Geomantha Rolle; nephews: Levell and Levon Rolle, Melvin, Kairo, Kadre, Julyen and, Antwon Pinder; grandnieces: Levonya Rolle; grandnephews: Brian Cargill, Levell Jr. Levondre and Leano Pinder; sisters-in-law: Birdie, Cyrene, Franka, and Ellen Pinder; godchild: Wayne Neely Jr.; godmother: Willamae Sawyer; numerous cousins: Austin and Gia, Lionel and family, Raymond, Franklyn and family, Kelsie Pinder and family, Laurice and Laurine Pinder and family, Cynthia and family, Ludell and family, Rosa, Stanley Stuart and family, Rose Stuart and family, Howard Stuart, Eunamae Smith and family, Stephanie and Juliette Dottin and family, Rex Grant and family, Terry Rolle and family, Sheila Rolle and family, David Rolle and family, Verlease Rolle, Ailene and Howard Wilson, Benjamin, Reverend Jeff and Peter Francis and family, Rodney Dottin and family, Darrell Dottin, Cardinal and Fabian Bain and family, Hillary Cargill and family; and a host of other relatives and friends including Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Ellis and family, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Jones and family, Mr. and Mrs. Oriel Rolle and family, Mr. and Mrs. George Weech and family, Gregory and Stephen Baker and family, Emma Rolle and family, Pastor and Mrs. Edmund Ellis, Pastor and Mrs. Oriel Ellis and family, Ebbie David and family, Marionette Sands and family, Mae Rolle and family, Thurman Saunders, Wayne Neely Hon. Obie Wilchcombe M.P. for West End and Bimini, Corvell, Norine Francis and family, Karen David and family, Veronica Pritchard, Marionette Thompson Jerome, Winkie, Fabian, Matt and Walter Stuart and family, Anna and Stella, James Brown, Toya, Pastor Dave Ellis, Larry, Kendall, Chadwell, Rhoda Braynen, Shawna. Administrator Sherrick Ellis and family, Chief Councilor Lloyd Edgecombe Sr. and family Karen Sherman, Shannon Bullard, Wayne Neely, Dion Moss, Thurman, Julie, Jason, Tassie Saunders, Kendall, Creswell, Anthony, Alethia Romer, Robbie Smith, Dianne Robins and family, Mae Rolle and family, Corvell, Montez, Joe Pinder, Billy Joe, Shereka Higgs, Noel McNeil, Orlando Sands, Joe Jones and family, Treco, Ossie, Gina, Ken, Quint, Toya, Richie Hepburn, Candy, Anthony Rolle, Altico Opato, Lachresha, Diane Robins and family, Jenkins Rolle and family, Doctor Simms, Edward Williams and family, Amanda Knowles and family, Roslyn Ritchie and family, Jerry Fisher and family, Holy Name Catholic Church Family and the entire community of Bimini especially Porgy Bay; Management and Staff and T.S.L Water Taxi Crew, Management and Staff at The Bimini Community Clinic and The Staff of The Rand Memorial Hospital.

Viewing will be held in the "Serenity Suite"at Restview Memorial Mortuary and Crematorium Limited, #11-A Coral Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama Thursday from 12:00 noon to 4:00 p.m. and at Holy Name Roman Catholic Church Hall, Bailey Town, Bimini on Friday from 1:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday from 8:00 a.m. until service time.

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