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News Article

April 16, 2013
Mentors, Recruiters from Top U.S. Companies and Universities Seek Bahamian Students

CALIFORNIA, USA --
STEMBoard, a science, technology, engineering and mathematics job
placement firm, is looking for Bahamian students to submit resumes and
be among the first to join its growing network of early-career
professionals and technical mentors from top companies, universities and
government agencies.

Co-founded by Aisha Bowe, a prominent
Bahamian-American engineer, STEMBoard bridges the gap between education
and placement. STEMBoard's comprehensive talent and resume-review
process pairs candidates with members of a handpicked team of mid-career
and senior professionals with diverse technical backgrounds...

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News Article

April 09, 2013
Pathologist's Testimony Over Custody Death Victim

Pathologist Dr Caryn Sands testified yesterday that Aaron Rolle had multiple injuries at the time of his death, including two broken ribs, a ruptured intestine, haemorrhaging around the pancreas and left kidney, bleeding in the bowel and contusions on his lower back, shoulder blade and left clavicle - all caused by...

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News Article

April 10, 2013
Baha Mar Recruits Bahamians at Student Conference

Nassau, Bahamas - This
past weekend, attendees at the Florida Caribbean Students Association
(FCSA) conference in Daytona Beach, Florida had the opportunity meet
Baha Mar Associate Vonya Ifill and to learn about Baha Mar and the
career opportunities at luxury development.

Approximately 600
students typically attend the FCSA conference, participating in
professional and cultural workshops with leading professors and
professionals from universities and companies throughout the U.S. and
the Caribbean. About sixty Bahamian students and young professionals
representing sixteen colleges...

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News Article

April 08, 2013
Mentors, Recruiters from Top U.S. Companies and Universities Seek Bahamian Students

CALIFORNIA, USA --
STEMBoard, a science, technology, engineering and mathematics job
placement firm, is looking for Bahamian students to submit resumes and
be among the first to join its growing network of early-career
professionals and technical mentors from top companies, universities and
government agencies.

Co-founded by Aisha Bowe, a prominent
Bahamian-American engineer, STEMBoard bridges the gap between education
and placement. STEMBoard's comprehensive talent and resume-review
process pairs candidates with members of a handpicked team of mid-career
and senior professionals with diverse technical backgrounds...

read more »


Business Listing

Budget Food Stores
Food Stores/Supermarkets
  • Store 1 Bernard Rd
  • Nassau
  • Nassau / Paradise Island, Bahamas
News Article
Remarks by Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham - Sybil Blyden Centre Opening
April 14, 2011
Remarks by Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham - Sybil Blyden Centre Opening

I am very pleased to participate in the official opening and naming of the Sybil Blyden Centre here at the Stapledon School. I wish to extend sincerest thanks to The Bahamas Association for the Mentally Retarded led by Mr. Lowell Mortimer and other generous donors who embraced Mrs. Blyden’s dream of a centre to provide vocational training and instruction for the students of the Stapledon School.

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News Article

March 26, 2013

News Article

November 20, 2013
Chamber calls for work permit data release

The release of data identifying the number and types of work permits applied for in The Bahamas has been requested from the Department of Immigration by the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce and Employers Confederation (BCCEC), as it seeks to establish a "gap assessment" to encourage Bahamian employment.
Chester Cooper, chairman of the BCCEC, said that the organization has agreed to collaborate with the Department of Immigration to conduct this assessment which would help guide "company, sector and government training".
"One of the areas of concern that we have discussed with the Department of Immigration is developing a program to address the skills gaps in our economy. We have requested that they release to the public the number of work permits being applied for in each category. This will not only be used by businesses in planning for resource gaps, but also as a guide for students who may be in college or Bahamians living abroad who may wish to train for available gaps," said Cooper.
His comments came after the Bahamas Hotel and Tourism Association (BHTA) indicated that it is concerned about a "huge talent gap" in The Bahamas, which it indicated is set to be further exposed in 2014 by the forthcoming demand for management level staff by developments such as Baha Mar.
The BHTA is putting on a
forum addressing leadership and succession planning on December 5, specifically to focus on how Bahamian businesses can best prepare to respond to the "unprecedented changes coming to the workforce at the management levels over the next year as a number of major developments undergo massive recruitment campaigns to attract top talent".
Like Cooper, James Smith, CFAL chairman and former minister of state for finance, threw his support behind a more detailed analysis of the Bahamian labor market, saying on Monday it should be possible to have a better and more useful picture of what skills exist and where there may be gaps.
However, he said he would be suspicious that hiring by Baha Mar or other developments coming on stream could put significant pressure on the economy in terms of a "management void" without more detailed analysis given current levels of unemployment.
"The Bahamas is not a very large place and one ought to be able to get fairly good estimates on what's out there."
Smith noted that a job opening at CFAL recently attracted a large number of people with a great range of qualifications.
"Based on the applications we were receiving I would hazard a guess that there's a lot of people out there with management level experience who are searching for jobs. I would hazard it should be subject to more quantitative analysis," added Smith.

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News Article

March 05, 2013
Bahamas Princess Pageant Program information meeting: March 8th

Freeport, Grand

Bahama Island - Registration for the
Princess Pageant for The Bahamas is underway. Pageant organizers say
that the program will provide character-building activities for the
candidates.  Star Model Management has begun recruiting young ladies
between the ages of 3 to 13 years to participate
in its upcoming Princess Pageant Program. 

Director of the Program,
Oswald Ellis who has over fifteen years of pageant experience local,
national and international stated "This new pageant program is
much needed on the island and will focus on the development of young
girls while participating in friendly competition."  He
admits that there are several other pageants on the
island, but the Princess Pageant will following a different and unique
judging criteria that awards points on individual merits rather than
comparative judging...

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News Article

February 27, 2013
Bahamas Striping Brings In Trainer For New Recruits

Nassau, Bahamas - Bahamas Striping, the road marking company that
has spawned a new local industry that was once monopolised by foreigners,
recently completed three days of training for five new staff.

Dan Brocksmith, Sales Manager of Florida TransCor,
Inc, Florida's leading supplier of road safety supplies, flew in from
Jacksonville to train Bahamas Striping's new and existing staff...

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News Article
Don't Let Your Feet Ruin Your Day at the Beach
July 24, 2014
Don't Let Your Feet Ruin Your Day at the Beach

When planning your trip to the beach this summer, consider the following foot safety precautions...

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News Article

February 18, 2013
Sex Attack on Cruise Claim

A TEAM of detectives from the capital flew into Galveston, Texas, yesterday to investigate an alleged sexual assault that occurred on the Carnival Triumph, The Tribune has learned.

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News Article

March 17, 2011
Joint OAS - CARICOM Mission in Haiti Calls on all Actors Involved in the Electoral Process to Fulfill their Role with Responsibility and Civility

All

of the various actors involved on Election Day in Haiti have a key

role to play. The Joint OAS-CARICOM Electoral Observation Mission

(JEOM) calls on all of them to fulfill their roles with neutrality,

a sense of civic responsibility and respect for the stipulations of

the Electoral Law.

The training of election officials that is

currently underway will be essential to the success of the process

and the JEOM wishes to underline the importance of recruiting

competent and experienced staff to perform these functions. The

Mission reminds that improving the quality of training of election

officials and particularly supervisors and members of polling

centers (MBV) was central to the recommendations provided to the

Provisional Electoral Council (CEP) by the JEOM and the OAS Mission

of experts...

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News Article

March 15, 2011
Controlling pesky beetles and eating the right fruit

Q. We are losing some of our banana plants to some form of beetle that bores around the inside of the base of the plant. Is there any way to control this pest?
— F.K., Winton Meadows

A. Your banana plants are being attacked by the corn borer beetle. The female lays her eggs at the base of the banana corm. When the eggs hatch they quickly bore into the banana plant. The adult beetle is about 1/2-inch long and rarely wanders far from the infected patch. Unfortunately, there is no control. A new banana planting can be started from pest free plants in a new location.

Q. There were some white specks on my tomato plants and my neighbors said I?had mites. I?doused th ...

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News Article
Andros field trip includes Androsia factory, grapefruit farm
February 28, 2011
Andros field trip includes Androsia factory, grapefruit farm

Grand Bahama Island, The Bahamas - It wasn't a typical school day for 32 students and teachers of Holmes Rock Primary School when they journeyed to the 'Big Yard' recently. Instead of studies at desks and chairs in the classroom, the delights of Andros unfolded before their eyes during their one-day excursion arranged by Bahamas Educational Tours (BET).

"As teachers we always seek ways to bring our lessons to life. This trip was planned so that these students would be able to see things firsthand that they formerly only read about in textbooks," explained

T'shuria Moss, grade 3 teacher, Holmes Rock Primary.

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News Article

May 05, 2014
Wannah Bail expected to have resurgent sophomore season

Last season may not have gone the way that Wannah Bail, who is recovering from knee surgery, would have liked, but next year he could be in line for a breakout season at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).
Bail got off to a slow start at UCLA, averaging just 1.6 points per game in his freshman season. Next season, Bail could find himself in a similar situation to that of National Basketball Association (NBA) player Thomas Robinson of the Portland Trailblazers, during his sophomore and junior seasons for the Kansas University (KU) Jayhawks.
Robinson's game style was similar to the one that Bail possesses. He was an athletic power forward who played tough defense and had offensive potential, but found himself coming off the bench behind twins Marcus and Markeiff Morris, who now play for the Phoenix Suns.
Other schools offered Robinson the opportunity to play more minutes right away but Robinson elected to stay because of the confidence, skills and competitive spirit that he felt he gained battling against the Morris twins every day at practice.
At times when Robinson was on the floor with both brothers simultaneously, he would find himself getting wide open looks due to the attention that they drew. Those open looks helped to build Robinson's confidence. Kansas Head Coach Bill Self rewarded him, as he often went to the three-forward line-up.
Bail found himself in a similar position behind the Wear twins, David and Travis, at UCLA.
After the Morris twins left Kansas, Robinson was able to raise his game to the next level and become the Jayhawks' leading scorer and rebounder. Going into the 2014-15 season, Bail has a chance to make the same strides with his game. The 6'9" forward is just 21 years old and is still growing into his 215-pound frame. With the departure of UCLA starter Kyle Anderson and key reserve Zach Lavine, more minutes will be opened up to Bail.
Next season, he could float between the small and power forward positions. At small forward, he will have a chance to show off the athleticism that made him such a sought-after recruit. He has the length and foot speed to keep up with the smaller, faster wing players and the strength to resist being bullied around banging down low with the larger forwards.
There is still a lot of work that needs to be done to his offensive game, which is still very raw, but Bail should be able to rely on his athleticism to become a consistent scorer in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I basketball.
Bail may not be ready to make the jump to the NBA after this season, but with enough work to his offensive game he will have a chance to establish himself as a potential draft candidate in the very near future.

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News Article
Sole survivor of Bahamas cruise murder tells her story
May 14, 2010
Sole survivor of Bahamas cruise murder tells her story

What was supposed to be a dream vacation for a Green Bay family turned into a horror story.

In November 1961, the Duperrault family boarded a sailboat to spend a week in the Bahamas. Now the sole survivor of that trip is finally sharing what happened next, in “Alone: Orphaned on the Ocean,” a book she co-authored.

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News Article
Priorities
August 15, 2011
Priorities

"It is not an arrogant government that chooses priorities, it's an irresponsible government that fails to choose." - former British Prime Minister Tony Blair We are approaching the end of summer, the beginning of a new school year for many thousands of students and the commencement of the political season that will stimulate the sensibilities and passions of many. 

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News Article

November 22, 2012
Bananas: The Super Fruit that is an Absolute Must for Your Garden

The banana is one of
many favorite plants which I have in my backyard, and believe me when I
tell you that I have spent quite a few dollars acquiring those banana
herbs.

Aside from being a favorite in food stores, bananas have
quite a few medicinal values as well. Bahamian folk have used banana
leaves mixed with other ingredients to treat blisters, diarrhea and
fever. Bananas are also great as organic matter for the garden.

Bananas
grow year round in The Bahamas, and you really can't go wrong with
bananas. Regardless of where you are located in the world, you can find...

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News Article
Bahamas Striping Recruits U.K. Trainer
October 16, 2012
Bahamas Striping Recruits U.K. Trainer

A U.K.-certified striping technician and trainer, Brian Bostock, has arrived in The Bahamas to help create a robust and strong Bahamian striping industry.

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News Article

September 25, 2012
Urban Renewal Already Bearing Fruit In Grand Bahama

Freeport, GB, The Bahamas - Minister for Grand Bahama, the Hon. Dr. Michael Darville said Monday, September 24 that over the past few months they have made strides to revitalise Urban Renewal of Grand Bahama and restore it to the position of being an aggressive tool to combat many of the social ills in the community.

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News Article

August 06, 2014
Tourist arrivals grow 1.1 percent up to April

The Bahamas saw a slight uptick of 1.1 percent overall in visitor arrivals by air and sea by April 2014, in comparison to the same period in 2013, the latest statistical data has shown, with arrivals moving up to 2.32 million from 2.29 million for the same period.
In the key high-value stopover segment, visitor arrivals, overall, were up 3.1 percent, to 476, 367, in the period.
Average daily room rates also rose to their highest level in at least the past seven years, reaching $227.72. While positive at face value, this higher rate, up from $197.68 in 2007, also indicates higher costs for stopover visitors.
A key tourism official has described the minor rise in visitor arrivals as "healthy", given other mitigating factors.
Broken down by first port of entry, official statistics reveal that Grand Bahama saw a 33.2 percent rise in air arrivals during the first four months; Bimini saw a 13.8 percent rise; Andros experienced a 7.1 percent rise; Exuma experienced a 14 percent rise; Long Island saw a 20 percent rise and San Salvador experienced a 21 percent increase.
Those destinations which saw a decline include the Berry Islands, down 7.5 percent; Cat Island, down 10 percent, and Eleuthera, which took a 1.7 percent hit.
The Family Islands overall recorded a four percent hike in air arrivals during the period leading up to the end of April 2014.
However, Grand Bahama's growth in air arrivals was offset by a 30.7 percent fall in its sea arrivals, for a net loss of -22.9 percent.
In Nassau/Paradise Island, a 1.2 percent rise in sea arrivals offset a zero percent growth rate in the air segment, for a 0.9 percent overall arrival increase for the first four months.
David Johnson, chief executive officer (CEO) of the Tourism Development Corporation and former director general of tourism, said the results are positive, all things considered.
"One must take into account that you've lost inventory - you've basically lost an entire hotel in the former Wyndham (which was announced to have closed in May 2014).
This was probably six percent of the inventory in Nassau and what's there is in the middle of a construction site, so under those circumstances we have nothing to feel uncomfortable or ashamed about. I think the marketplace would generally deal you a more severe decline, so being able to hold our own or have any increase or achieve the same level of revenue and occupancy is a victory under those circumstances."
The figures were provided by the Ministry of Tourism's Research and Statistics Department and are the latest available. They are based on manual counts of immigration cards and include all foreign visitor arrivals, excluding returning residents and ship crew.
Looking ahead, Johnson said that the industry has also seen some "strengthening since April".
"I think May was strong, and Paradise Island is improving each month. My guess is that it's an improving trend that we can anticipate (for the rest of 2014). Nothing great, but slightly improving."
He added that some adjustments will need to be made to projections based on the delay in full opening announced by Baha Mar last week.
"Obviously we have to recalibrate with regards to December given what we've learned from Baha Mar. We were counting on a significant boost in December; now that'll be less significant. But come the winter next year that will be significantly stronger because all of the rooms will be there and they'll be full."
The overall increase comes after The Bahamas experienced overall growth in tourist arrivals of 3.54 percent for 2013 overall, with one percent growth in stopover visitors and the remainder made up of sea and cruise arrivals.
According to the BHTA's 2013 Industry Performance and 2014 Outlook Survey, 47 percent of responding Bahamas hotels reported a net loss in 2013, up from 33 percent in 2012.
Again demonstrating the country's continued heavy reliance on the U.S. as its major source market, in 2013, new data also shows that 78 percent of stopover visitors came from the U.S., nine percent from Canada and six percent from Europe. One percent came from the Caribbean, two percent from Latin America and three percent from the rest of the world.
Following an overall decline of two percent in stopover arrivals in 2013, the decline in Latin American arrivals came to a halt in 2014. Stopover arrivals to The Bahamas from Latin America grew by six percent between January and February, primarily due to growth in stopover business from Brazil, Argentina and Mexico.
European arrivals were up in 2013 by two percent in January. The growth came primarily from Spain and France. Meanwhile, by February 2014 stopover arrivals were up again by seven percent, primarily driven by growth from France, the U.K. and Germany.
Surveys of consumer sentiment have revealed that 94 percent of stopover visitors said they were likely to recommend the destination to friends and family, including 94 percent of those visiting Nassau /Paradise Island, 92 percent of those who went to Grand Bahama, and 97 percent who visited the Out Islands.
Customer satisfaction surveys revealed that approximately nine out of 10 visitors (89 percent) to The Bahamas in 2013 said they were likely to return, including 88 percent of those visiting Nassau/Paradise Island, 87 percent visiting Grand Bahama and 91 percent who went to the Out Islands.
Two in every three visitors to the Out Islands had been before, while more than half of those who came to Nassau/Paradise Island and Grand Bahama had.
Stopovers were influenced to visit The Bahamas because of the beaches (64 percent), climate (55 percent) and rest and relaxation (40 percent). For Grand Bahama, good package deals and the perception that they would receive the best value for money were also major influences. For the Out Islands sports, friendly people and safety of the islands were also major influences. Some also mentioned the desire to go to a casino or on an island tour.

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News Article

April 23, 2014
Cove: Dive industry on 'razor sharp edge'

Calling for higher taxation of foreign liveaboard dive boats, the Bahamas Diving Association states that there is "no way" Bahamian dive operations can compete with foreign liveaboard operations at present and as a result opportunities for local business growth are being lost.
This includes opportunities for larger operations like Stuart Cove's, and for start-ups which could support development in the Family Islands.
They argue that the Foreign Charter Yacht Act, established in an effort to encourage foreign commercial charter yachts to base their operations in this country, is being "exploited" in a way the government never intended. As a result, the government is leaving "$5 million in revenue on the table", Stuart Cove told Guardian Business.
The situation will become even more acute, should the government choose to move ahead with VAT, he added.
"We're walking on a razor sharp edge with prices, and we're competing internationally. Luckily we haven't lost any jobs yet, but if you increase it another three or four percent...this could be the straw that breaks the camel's back."
Under the law as it exists presently, foreign boats have to obtain a permit from the Port Department, submit to an inspection, possess liability insurance, pay an annual fee based on the length of their boat of up to $2,500, and pay a voluntary four percent of their gross sale for their charter as well as an additional $50 per dive customer.
Not only is this a low tax yield to begin with for boats which are using local resources and diverted business from local operations, but the four percent of gross sales is easily evaded, added Cove.
The Bahamas Diving Association, in a recent proposal to the Port Department, suggested that in addition to the current licensing fee, any foreign boat should pay $8,000 per berth annually, based on its certification.
"For instance, if the boat were certified to carry 10 divers, the yearly fee would be $80,000 to conduct dive operations," said the association.
In addition, they called for rules demanding that any foreign boat must not conduct any diving operations within 10 miles of any land-based Bahamas Diving Association member; must be based or docked within the Bahamas for at least nine months of the calendar year; and must be a current active member of the Bahamas Diving Association, therefore ensuring they follow the agreed upon standards and in accordance with the Association's guidelines.
Cove told Guardian Business he is confident the additional taxing of foreign boats would not cause any loss in business.
"The government seems to think that if we do this to these boats they're going to go somewhere else, but they aren't because there's not another country in the world that doesn't tax these boats. We don't want to run these people away, but let's even the playing field," said Cove.
However, Bruce Purdy, owner of Blackbeard's Cruises and the Aquacat, which operates liveaboard dive vacations out of a Nassau base, said that The Bahamas is "by far the most expensive" place to operate out of competitor jurisdictions for diving liveaboard operations.
"I only operate in The Bahamas but I know from competitors that the fees are way higher here than anywhere else. Of course, each island has its own set of problems, some that don't exist in The Bahamas, some that do, but the Bahamas is by far the most expensive.
"In Turks and Caicos they don't have the four per cent fee, the food costs are lower. In the Windward Islands and the British Virgin Islands, there are almost no fees down there. A lot of the companies say the licensing fees keep them out of the Bahamas. It's borderline and they say they would very easily go elsewhere."
Purdy said that his company pays a significant amount in tax, unlike some of the U.S.-based operations.
This includes duties on supplies and maintenance equipment, which worked out to around $35,000 in duty last year.
The company also spent around $200,000 on fuel in the Bahamas last year, he added.
"We pay on our food, on our maintenance supplies, we have people working there on the boats. We pay a sizeable amount that the boats coming in from the U.S. don't," said Purdy.
Purdy said it would be a challenge to pay an $8,000 per berth fee on some of the boats he has chartering for Bahamas vacations.
"We have two boats, one with 20 berths and one with 18. Some charter for almost nothing, they cater to inexpensive college groups. These are all people coming into The Bahamas. I think that would put an end to those. That would wipe out their profit for the year," he said.
Other boats will enter The Bahamas for short periods of time in certain months, and therefore a requirement of being based in The Bahamas for nine months out of the year would be a major deterrent, he suggested.
With respect to asking that foreign operations stay at least 10 miles from a local land-based dive operations, Purdy said that his operations try to do this, but in some cases this is difficult to avoid.
"If we have to clear Customs at Bimini or West End (Grand Bahama), our boats are slow and so we would do a dive there before we head back. It might be workable overall, but it would be difficult for us as we would have to cut a couple of days of diving out."
Purdy also suggested that the government would need to be careful not to "scare off" the lucrative charter yacht business from The Bahamas with new taxes, given that many of these vessels, which enter primarily for purposes unrelated to diving, are governed by the same legislation as the dive boats - the Foreign Charter Yacht Act of 1991.
"Most operate out of The Bahamas, most are yachts or large sailboats and they charter for large sums. The government is getting the four per cent; the revenue from these boats is huge. They pay dockage, they have people staying ashore. The Bahamas is getting a lot of benefit from them."
However, Purdy agreed that boat based in the U.S. could "definitely" afford to pay more tax in The Bahamas.
"These boats don't spend any nights in the islands," he said.
Cove, who has for some time been running a training scheme for Bahamians from low income neighborhoods to become dive instructors, said many of those who become certified face stiff competition from foreign operators because of their lesser tax burden and its impact on their pricing.
"Our government panders too much to these foreign entities. They run out of Florida, they use the resources and they pay some minimal fee that is voluntary and then they go back to the U.S. and reload. We pay duties, if we have foreigners we pay work permits, we pay our business tax which went crazy this year; they don't pay any of that."

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News Article

September 13, 2012
PLP cannot fulfil its mortgage bailout plan promises

Dear Editor,

According to Taneka Thompson, senior reporter at The Nassau Guardian, the mortgage bailout plan announced by the Progressive Liberal Party (PLP) recently is significantly different from the 10-point plan promised ahead of the May general election.
With an estimated 3,000 people not able to qualify for the new mortgage bailout plan, maybe the PLP deserves some credit for listening to the critics, or should I say realists, who told it it was impractical and it realized its initial idea was impossible to implement without putting the country further along the road to financial ruin. Seems governing is a little different than campaigning?
Many of us, or family members, have been touched by the international economic troubles in one way or another, but that does not give government the authority, moral or legal, to increase the national debt and by extension the taxes every Bahamian will have to pay as a result of even the revised program.
Meanwhile, banks are being forced to write off debt that is legally owed them according to the terms of a mortgage all the while paying their depositors a pittance in interest, possibly forcing retirees, (people on fixed incomes) etc., into hard times.
The Clearing Banks Association now tells us the new plan reflects what it was doing all along, and if the revised plan helps but a few people, that makes it worthwhile. But what about all the people who were given false hope because of politics? At least they deserve an apology.
There's no easy answers but one thing we've learned is one bad policy like the mortgage bailout plan can have far reaching effects on the general welfare of all Bahamians, as there is not enough wealth to go around. Just because the additional taxes necessary to pay for it will be dispersed among all taxpayers does not make the bailout any more palatable.
For some reason the policies preferred by so many in the political class destroy wealth, rather than policies that will create it so we will all be better off.
To paraphrase Margaret Thatcher, former prime minister of the U.K., the trouble with bad government policies like this is they eventually run out of other people's money, and then the entire society is worse off.

- Rick Lowe

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News Article

August 01, 2012
New offerings bear fruit at CAB

As new product and service offerings pick up steam, Cable Bahamas (CAB) has reported strong growth so far in 2012.
The launch of the BISX-listed firm's fixed line product, combined with CAB's new video-on-demand service, were both contributing factors to a revenue increase of 23.5 percent during the first three months of this year, coming in at $27.9 million.
Meanwhile, internet services have also experienced a gain of 4.9 percent, reaching $2.7 million compared to the same period last year.
"Our data sector contributed positively to the overall revenue growth by 3.3 percent, up from $2.5 million for the same period in 2011," CAB's latest report said. "Cumulatively these results highlight the strength and value of our products and services despite the current economic and competitive environment."
CAB has placed a great deal of stock into its triple play package, the first of its kind in The Bahamas. The company has been pushing for greater consolidation of these three services among consumers, which could ultimately lead to more efficient service and lower prices.
CAB has emerged as a leader in television, especially with the advent of video-on-demand. However, executives at the Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC) have recently noted that the firm plans to pursue a television product in the near future.
Marlon Johnson, BTC's vice president of marketing, sales and business development, said the company is "seriously exploring" the service, with tests likely to occur in the second half of the fiscal year, in the hopes of bringing a television product to market.
Like many other BISX-listed companies, operating expenses are a source of concern for CAB. For the first three months of the year, this segment grew more than $3 million compared to the same period in 2011. That said, earnings before interest, taxation depreciation and amortization rose nearly 22 percent for the first quarter.
Earnings per share also rose during this period to $0.47 compared to just $0.25 last year.
The company has prided itself on broadening the local offerings through televising local and international events of significance.
Perhaps most notably of late is the deal with the Broadcasting Corporation of The Bahamas (commonly known as ZNS) to achieve shared coverage of the London Olympic Games.
ZNS reportedly paid in the region of $300,000 for the service, and while the total paid out is unclear, sources close to the matter indicated CAB's fee could have been in excess of 50 percent.
"All of these accomplishments are a very significant contribution to the expanding broadcasting efforts in the country and certainly to the growth of our community channel - Cable 12," the CAB report said.
"Viewership numbers have increased 25 percent since we moved our signature program NB12 to seven days per week. The nightly newscast is gaining ground as a reputable and preferred source for news and information."
CAB's total assets rose 9.06 percent to $220.26 million, primarily from the purchase of SRG and equipment.

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News Article

September 14, 2010
Discovery Cruise Line and Kelly's partner to assist The G.B. Home for the Aged

Freeport, Bahamas -

In October, The Grand Bahama Home and Daycare for the Aged will be
celebrating its 20th anniversary of caring for the elderly. Not only do
they provide a clean safe and caring environment for Grand Bahama Island
residents, but also for persons in the Family Islands, as well as,
those with family members from the Turks and Caicos.  There are
currently 17 persons who reside at the Home, however, throughout the
years, they have filled all 20 beds.

The Home provides a critical service as they accept persons from 60
years old who can no longer care for themselves and since there is no
residential care facility for the disabled on the island, they have
stepped up to the plate when the need arises and filled this gap...

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News Article

July 20, 2012
Palm Cay steps in to assist Acklins Regatta

With funding being secured for the upcoming Acklins Regatta, chairman Curtis Hanna is ready for the sloops to hit the water.
The two-day race event, being held in honor of 'King' Eric Gibson, got financial assistance from Palm Cay Marina Living. The home-coming festival will get underway August 3-6.
'King' Eric said: "In my whole life of traveling and dealing with people, I have never heard anyone who is so enlightened and excited about what is going on. I know that he is not doing this just for speech. I am positive that this is from his heart. The things that he comes up with, only 'King' Eric or Sir Durward Knowles can come up with it in this country. I've been listening and have been around for a long time and this guy (Palm Cay Marina CEO Richard Browning), if it is possible, I will recruit him as a member of my committee. I will definitely find out if it is possible and do so, and officially get him on because the ideas that you have for regattas, the advancement for the people and the country, are incredible. I can't get over it."
Mr Browning has launched his full support behind local regattas. The financial assistance offered is just the beginning for Browning, who got involved earlier in the year with the introduction of the Sir Durward Knowles Cup. Browning promised that he will continue to back regattas and will continue his involvement in the sport. He said that he will do all he can to ensure that regattas are successful.
"It is something as developers creating a new lifestyle we lose track of, what we think as modern lifestyles, and so often we forget about the traditions that keep the country going," said Browning. "If we lose sight of that we lose a whole lot. As a visitor to the country it is always important to understand what made the country strong and the people strong. In that way we need to show our respect of that. We started at the beginning of the year with the Sir Durward Knowles trophy. It is a floating trophy for the Montagu Regatta. Sir Durward will decide year by year where he wishes to present that, around The Bahamas at the various regatta events.
"'King' Eric and I are working on a number of different things together. This will not only look at the tradition of the regatta season but also to bring it up to date. One of those things is obviously the Acklins regatta. We feel like we actively need to give some support to that and see if we can make it a big success, like it normally is. It is a smaller island and it needs all the external support it can get, and we feel that through Palm Cay in the capital we can get to do something to assist all of the islands around here. We want to be integrated into the whole Bahamas. We thank 'King' Eric for his assistance and we thank the government and hopefully we can work together closely."
The regatta will feature top boats from around The Bahamas competing in the three major classes. 'King' Eric also challenged Browning and Minister of Labour and National Insurance to a race in the upcoming regattas. Minister Shane Gibson, who sat in for V. Alfred Gray, the minister with responsibility for regattas, thanked Browning for his contribution. The Gibsons are descendants of Acklins. Minister Gibson said: "It is always good to see these type of things happening for Acklins where persons from the corporate Bahamas can step forward. Even though these are really trying and difficult times economically, despite that they are still able to come forward and make generous and sizeable donations to the events such as regattas. Being a son of a sailor, it always gives me great pleasure to see that the sport is still alive. I know personally how expensive it is to put on regattas."

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News Article

July 20, 2012
Who needs summer in the Caribbean with Midsummer Night swing in New York

I have not visited New York City for a while; returning to the city after a long stay away from the Big Apple has been for me an enchanting experience.
Definitely, the citizens of New York City must find a way to keep their patrician mayor in power for one more term. He might be the best mayor that any city in the world may have, as he puts in a full day of engaging work for the symbolic income of one dollar a year, while he leads his phalanx of commissioners to do the same for a much higher income, of course.
I can hardly recognize old neighborhoods such as the flower district in Manhattan, where giant buildings such as the one accommodating the Sofitel hotel perched along the Avenue of the Americas provide a majestic urban column that rivals the uptown Sixth Avenue vista, near the Rockefeller Center and the Hilton hotel.
Times Square, with its plaza-like setting, is an open air cafe amongst the tohubohu of the cars cruising on both sides of the oasis divider. Late at night, this center of the world is filled with people of all nations who play the narcissist game of admiring themselves on a giant television screen.
The New York renaissance is all over town, whether you are wandering in the old Park slope in Brooklyn where the town houses rival in price and in splendor the Park Avenue district of Manhattan. It is also in Queens that has now its own casino where a deluxe bus will bring you there for the modest price of one dollar per trip.
More 'waou' gasping is the rendition of the new Lincoln Center. The oracles of Adelphi would feel at ease in such a setting, three majestic buildings, a modern imitation of the Acropolis of Athens in a 6.8 acre campus-like setting, with fountains, flowers, and seats under the trees to gasp the panorama that might be the best imitation of God's lost paradise.
It is in this plaza that the trustee of Lincoln Center has regaled the commoners with free public events to compensate for the high priced concerts, dance and theater produced all year long inside the majestic buildings for the society people, who dress up almost nightly for the occasion.
For the last 40 years, I have been a regular to these outdoor events, where the musical roots of almost every ethnic group has a chance to exhibit itself for the privilege of sharing with the larger citizenry the strong emotions that their cultural roots engender. I have missed some few nights; as such, I rushed to gain what I could from the reminder of the program.
The Lincoln Center has redesigned the Damrosch Park bandshell to suite a dancing lounge (with a modest fee of $17) , a stage for the musicians, a seating area for the VIP who prefer not to mingle with the crowd, and a large setting for the public to mingle, dance and frolic at ease, freely.
Upon presenting my press credentials to be admitted freely on the dancing stage, the director of the program entered into a bargaining deal with me. You will be let in free, if you agree to publicize the program on Haitian roots, suspecting through my French namesake, I was from Haiti. I promised I will: Haitian Heritage Day with La Troupe Mackandal will take place on Sunday, August 5.
I even promised more; I will write a story about the event and profiting from the bargaining session I will advocate for Trinidadian and Jamaican music in next year's program. Yes they will be there, I was told.
The program consists in two different major undertakings. The Midsummer Night swing that started on June 26 to finish on July 14, The Lincoln Center Out of Doors follows almost immediately from July 25 to August 12. Stay a little bit more in New York and you will be regaled by free outdoor classical music in the parks and later the West Indian Carnival on Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, followed by the U.S. Open in Flushing.
It is the Mecca of tennis lovers, where the aficionados continue their vagabond wandering from Roland Garros, France, to Wimbledon, England, admiring the tennis players, usually featuring Serena Williams beating each and every opponent.
While the Midsummer Night swing is about music by big bands such as Harlem Renaissance Orchestra (July 14) and other bands such as Johnny Colon and his orchestra, more legendary big bands are also in residence at the Lincoln Center Out of Doors.
It is more about seeking and presenting the roots music of the different ethnic groups that represent the citizenry of New York City. It is indeed an innocent pleasure to watch grownups let go in the magic of dancing.
I asked the organizer of the event, how much it costs to stage this extravaganza. The policy of Lincoln Center is not to talk about money but to use money to satisfy its customers. Indeed they did. Everything was designed to please the senses, with no concern for the price: sight, sound and sensation, it lacks only the jasmine plants to produce the strong perfuming smell of its open white flowers at night.
The crowd responds to that generosity; at the plaza of Lincoln Center you find men and women at their best, smiling, and dancing with each other in that communal feeling of bonding that Barbara Ehrenreich in Dancing in the Streets called the ecstatic ritual practiced by the aborigines as well as by the modern man to cement the society.
Who needs the Caribbean in summer? I do.
In fact, I am packing to go back to Haiti, so I will not miss the rituals of the collective effervescence of the fiesta of the Saints. From mid-July to the end of August, several towns that celebrate their patron saints abandon themselves to the spirit of dance, where voodoo and Catholic rituals intermingle freely.
People will come from all over the nation to give themselves into the Fiesta of St. Marguerite on July 20 in the town of Port Margot, followed by the very voodoo spell fiesta of St. Jacques le Majeur in the town of La Plaine du Nord on July 24, then proceed to the very Catholic and frolic fiesta of St. Ann in the town of Limonade on July 26, followed by the fiesta of St. Martha in the bucolic village of Marmelade. They are all rural fiestas that need much international promotion because they represent the last vestige of Middle Ages pilgrimages in this very modern world.
I will be remiss not to invite guests from everywhere, in particular the Catholic community to come and visit my home town of Grand River on August 30, which is celebrating the 300th anniversary of its foundation as the parish of St. Rose. The atmosphere will rival the piety of Easter Mass at Easter at the plaza of St. Peter's Basilica in Rome, as well as the debauchery of St. Patrick in New York on March 17.
Watching my father at 100 years old holding tight on life, I reflect and ponder that life is short but sweet if one remembers to take advantage of all the rituals that this world offers. I will miss New York, while frolicking in the Caribbean awaiting the next Midsummer Night swing of the year to come.
In the meantime, the invitation is open to come to the Caribbean during winter time when the grip of frigid weather renders New York not as hospitable as it is during summer time.

o Jean H. Charles MSW, JD is executive director of AINDOH Inc., a nonprofit organization dedicated to building a kinder and gentle Caribbean zone for all. He can be reached at: jeanhcharles@aol. Printed with the permission of caribbeannewsnow.com.

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News Article

May 29, 2012
National Culinary Team on display tonight at Blu

Members of the National Culinary Team have been selected and practicing for several weeks for the Taste of the Caribbean regional competition later in June in Miami. Meanwhile, the team will display their culinary skills at two upcoming public events starting with 'Sunset Tapas on the Bay' set for Tuesday, May 29 at Blu Restaurant and Lounge on Elizabeth and Bay.
According to team manager Executive Chef Devin Johnson, the team will showcase an assortment of tapas menu items at the reception which will be a blend of locally infused international works of culinary art.
"I believe the public will delight in both the creativity and taste of what the team is putting together," states Chef Johnson. "Mixing indigenous foods with traditional appetizers helps to hone our chef's skills. At the Taste of the Caribbean competition the judges will look for an infusion of international and local flair."
Tuesday's event will run from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. "With the backdrop of cruise ships berthed in Nassau Harbour, against the sounds of live Bahamian music, and the team's unique tapas selection and beverage offerings, this is a great opportunity for people to unwind from a busy day while showing their support for our up-and-coming young chefs," according to Bahamas Hotel Association President Stuart Bowe.
The tapas selection will include: cracked conch sushi; jerk chicken tartlets with guava BBQ sauce; Bahamian crawfish spring rolls with Asian dipping sauce; vegetable spring rolls; homemade combined veal, pork and beef meatballs with fresh sage and a tomato basil fondue; an asparagus, wild mushroom and roasted pepper pinwheel; and watermelon, papaya, cucumber and goat pepper gelee.
"The team has been practicing for six weeks and every week we see improvement," states Chef Johnson. "They've been working on techniques, beginning to gel more, and everyone knows their role. In the coming weeks it will come down to execution. That's why the tapas event at Blu and an upcoming team dinner at Atlantis on June 12 are so important."
The competition is sponsored by the Bahamas Hotel Association, the Ministry of Tourism and the Bahamas Culinary Association with support from team member hotels and restaurants and corporate sponsors Bahamas Food Services and Bristol Wines and Spirits. Blu and Atlantis are also assisting with hosting the team's two showcase events.
This year's team is comprised of: Team Manager Chef Devin Johnson from the Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort; Team Captain Chef Jamal Small from Blu Restaurant; Chef Mychal Harris from Atlantis; Junior Chef Kevyn Pratt from One&Only Ocean Club; Chef Charron McKenzie and Pastry Chef Wenzil Rolle from the Lyford Cay Club; Chef Shanique Bodie from the Old Fort Bay Club; Bartender Gerard Knowles from the British Colonial Hilton; and Dwayne Sinclair, the National Young Chef from Temple Christian High School.
Over 14 Caribbean culinary teams will be vying for the culinary honors next month.
For additional information or tickets contact the BHA at 322-8381 or the Ministry of Tourism at 328-7810. Tickets will be available that evening at the door.

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