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News Article

August 06, 2013
Almost half of Baha Mar loan spent

With 17 months until opening, Baha Mar has spent "just under 50 percent" of the proceeds of its $2.6 billion Chinese-financed loan to date, and has procured 90 per cent of all goods and materials needed to complete the $3.5 billion project, according to Senior Vice President of Administration and External Relations Robert Sands...

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News Article

April 05, 2013
American Citizens Abroad Blasts FATCA in Comment to House Working Groups, Calls for Repeal as Part of Tax Reform Framework

Washington, DC - In an
April 4, 2012, submission to the leadership of the International Tax
Reform Working Group and the Financial Services Tax Reform Working Group
of the Committee on Ways and Means of the U.S. House of
Representatives, American Citizens Abroad (ACA) - the flagship
association representing the interests of some seven million Americans
residing outside the United States - has again called for repeal of
FATCA ("the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act") as part of a
comprehensive overhaul of the U.S. tax system.   While focusing on the
particular damage FATCA does to U.S. citizens living abroad, ACA pulls
no punches in spelling out the broader harm this 2010 law (now pending
implementation) threatens to inflict on the American economy as a whole,
while failing in its stated purpose of curbing offshore tax evasion.

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News Article

May 23, 2011
American chef injured in home invasion by armed men

A YOUNG American chef at a Nassau restaurant was treated in hospital for head and other injuries after being beaten in his home by armed invaders.
Dan Quirk, 25, had just returned to his Western Road residence shortly after midnight on Wednesday from his job at the Mahogany House, near Lyford Cay, when he was met inside by two men.
The men ambushed and punched him, and a struggle followed, according to a family member, who did not wish to be identified. “He was beaten all over. He got two blows to the head. He’s doing okay now though,” the relative said yesterday.

Mr Quirk, who moved to the Bahamas from the US to work at Mahogany House, the restau ...

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News Article

May 21, 2014
An open letter to the FNM: Don't abandon the people of Bimini

Dear Editor,
Poor Bimini. Poor Bahamas.
That is all that comes to mind as I witness one of the rarest and most precious gems of our national birthright being systematically destroyed, torn apart before our very eyes.
Bimini is the cradle of our fisheries, the source of the whole country's abundant marine wealth upon which tens of thousands of our people still rely for their livelihood and sustenance.
Where is the Free National Movement as thousands of years of natural history are wiped from the face of the earth? Where is the voice of Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition? So far there is only silence.
FNM, the people of Bimini need you. I don't refer to the so-called 'leaders' of that community, who no doubt have their own reasons for selling the people a false vision of the future.
The locals, the average Biminites, have been 'shocked and awed' by the political might of the central government and the financial might of a colossal foreign conglomerate. They are overwhelmed, intimidated, voiceless, and in the true sense of the concept, utterly leaderless.
Meanwhile, fatal damage is being inflicted upon the bountiful environment that has fed local families for generations; has attracted thousands of awe-struck visitors who spend millions a year to partake of Bimini's natural wonders; and has afforded many Biminites the opportunity to earn a good living.
How many will soon have to exchange the freedom of the open water for the tyranny of the punch-clock, the bonefisherman's pole for the janitor's mop?
It is the end of a culture, a history, a way of life.
This is to say nothing of the complete breakdown of due process that led up to this disaster. Form elevated over substance, the rule of law trampled underfoot, local opinion disregarded, local rights tossed aside.
I despair of living in a country thus governed.
The FNM I once supported was dedicated to respect and upholding of the rule of law.
The FNM stood for principal; stood for what was right; stood strong, independent and alone if necessary in the face of wrong or in the face of majority abuse; it stood for individual rights; for local rights.
Was all of that for nothing? Did the FNM spend three terms in power for nothing? Did the FNM struggle to win elections and pass laws for nothing?
Mark my words: this fight is not simply about what the local leaders are intimidated into accepting for Bimini.
At the end of the day, the fight is not so much about Bimini as it is about how the Bahamas is governed. It is about respect for our laws; it is about respecting local rights; it is about respecting due process; it is about respecting our heritage, culture and the wonderful diversity that exists in various Family Islands; it is about protecting what is left of The Bahamas as opposed to giving it away wholesale for pennies.
It is about governing civilly and not savagely!
This PLP government doesn't seem to have any respect for the spirit of our laws. There have been no permits issued in accordance with the Protection of the Physical Landscape Act; the warnings in the developer's own Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) have been ignored.
The destruction of Bimini is but the exposed tip of the iceberg. It is a symbol of the breakdown of a country.
I suggest that the FNM should stand for more than quiet resignation to this abuse, meek acceptance of the complete collapse of good governance, which the party worked so hard to create.
If the FNM does nothing here, it will be a complete betrayal of the confidence of its voters and supporters, who have struggled so hard, for so many years, to keep at bay those who have a very different way of doing things.
This is a watershed moment for the FNM, when the country will see what the party really stands for.
I beg the FNM to see the bigger picture here, to use Bimini as the flag you fly when charging your opponents.
Start a national movement in defense of priceless local culture and in opposition to the generic sameness of the mega-resort and anchor project; a movement in defense of civilized governance and the rule of law.
I believe in due process, local rights, respect for Family Island cultures, respect for the environment, proportionate development and sustainable development.
I am willing to fight to my last breath to try and create the kind of Bahamas that my children and future generations can live in.
Please put your vision of a better Bahamas over the fear of the leaders of Bimini and stand for what is right.
- Fred Smith

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News Article

February 06, 2012
Angelo Dundee's Bahamian history

The names read like a who's who of the best in boxing history.
Carmen Basilio, Willie Pastrano, Ralph Dupas, Cassius Clay/Muhammad Ali, Louis Rodriguez, Sugar Ray Leonard and Jimmy Ellis are just some of the noted boxing figures the late, great trainer Angelo Dundee guided through historic bouts.
There is though, that Bahamian connection also, that has been very special in the overall progress of boxing in The Bahamas.
Angelo Dundee passed away on Wednesday in Tampa, Florida and left to mourn along with a multitude of associates throughout the boxing world are those of us whose early positive boxing activities were crafted by the legendary one.
From South Philadelphia originally, Dundee spent a lot of years in New York being mentored and following the boxing manoeuvrings of older brother Chris, very closely.
When Chris moved to Miami Beach in Florida prominently and became a promotional fixture as early as the 1950s, Angelo came right along. Together, they made the Fifth Street Gym on the Beach one of the more fabled boxing locations in the history of the sport.
The proximity of this country to South Florida was an easy fit for locals who became closely associated with boxing.
Gomeo Brennan, one of those superb athletes who hailed from Bimini, turned professional in 1956 and soon found himself under the guidance of Angelo. That relationship would lead to Brennan becoming one of the great fighters of the Commonwealth and a world top-rater for years in the middleweight and light heavyweight divisions.
The high points of that relationship of course were four championship victories on the two occasions that he held the British Commonwealth middleweight title and a world title fight near the end of Brennan's career. He fought Vicente Rondon for the World Boxing Association's light heavyweight crown and lost when the referee became concerned after the 13th round about swelling around Brennan's eyes.
I remember in particular Angelo's frustration on many occasions during the fight when Brennan just was not able to unleash his famous powerful right hand when the openings came. Our guy had lost a little of that edge overtime. That's all it takes in the ring to be unable to pull the trigger.
I recall at the end, Angelo embracing Brennan and telling him how proud he was of him to go on so valiantly with swollen eyes.
Then, there was Baby Boy Rolle. Angelo steered the Exuma native to his best ever ring appearance.  It happened on the night of October 23, 1973 in a ring in Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, United Kingdom. It was Rolle's finest moment in a solid career. For 15 rounds he stood up to John Conteh and was not once in trouble. In fact in the fifth round he came very close to one of the all time great upsets.
Angelo had arranged for me to substitute for him as he was busy with two other fighters whose bouts sandwiched the Rolle/Conteh event. I asked my other boxing mentor, Charlie Major Sr., to accompany us. Charlie and I were in Rolle's corner. Rolle and Boston Blackie had mastered a punch that we called the overhand bolo. The Cuban, Kid Gavilan, had introduced the underhand bolo during a fabulous career that saw him become a welterweight champion in the 1950s.
Against Conteh, we told Rolle to hold back on the "bolo" until round five. Rolle left the corner, walked across the ring to his opponent and let go with a vicious overhand right. Conteh just barely got under the blow, receiving the full impact on his back. He stayed away from Rolle for the rest of the fight, content to utilize his better speed and win on a majority decision.
Angelo also factored significantly in the rise of Elisha Obed to world championship success.
In June of 1971 when Obed won a decision over Ray Minus Sr. to capture the Bahamas welterweight crown, he was handled then by the Steve Acunta group, of New York. Dr. Norman Gay had made that arrangement for Obed. However the cold climate and some other circumstances became uncomfortable for Obed. He knew of my close association with Chris and Angelo and asked for me to make contact.
I called Angelo and he said he would get back to me. He called later to inform that the situation with Acunta had been resolved and Chris had agreed to monitor the career of Obed. The veteran Moe Fleisher would be the trainer and Chris' son Mike would be registered as manager. (Let me emphasize here that Mike is the son of Chris Dundee, not Angelo. Even Wikipedia has it wrong).
Of course, the rest is history.
With Angelo watching from a distance and sometimes from close-up, Obed went on to defeat Miguel de Olivera on November 13, 1975 for the World Boxing Council's junior middleweight crown.
Angelo paid close attention to the Bahamian boxing scene and interacted as well over the years with Sugar Cliff, Jimmy Mackey, Ray Minus Sr. and Ray Minus Jr.
He also played an interesting and noteworthy role for amateur boxing in the country.
Multiple local heavyweight champion Bert Perry came up with the idea about an amateur boxing program in The Bahamas. He solicited the support of Charlie Major Sr., Virginius Knowles, Amos Ferguson and this journalist. They all told me that I would have to make the connection with the international body.

What did I do?
I reached out to Angelo and he pointed me in the right direction. Some 40-plus years later the amateur boxing program is going on marvelously.
His impact on Bahamian boxing has indeed been tremendous. For this the Bahamian boxing fraternity is grateful.

Farewell Angie!
Sleep on and may your soul forever rest in peace.
 To respond to this column, kindly contact Fred Sturrup at fredericksturup@gmail.com

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News Article

March 07, 2012
Another rivalry would excite professional boxing scene

There is nothing better than a good rivalry to excite boxing fans.
Last year at a boxing show staged at the Nassau Stadium, Ryan "Big Youth" McKenzie tossed a bold challenge right at former Commonwealth super middleweight champion Jermain Mackey. Not content with the loud shouting match, separated by seats and rows, McKenzie went over to where Mackey was seated and confidently predicted he would be the knockout winner if the match could be made.
Mackey did not back down. They did not come to blows but it was evident that a fire was ignited. Spectators, with great interest, watched and listened to the two pugilists. In general there is a great deal of curiosity to see a Mackey/McKenzie bout. It was clear on that occasion to observers that the incident had left the two boxers unsettled, as indicated previously in this space. More than likely, they will clash in the ring. If they don't, both will no doubt wonder for the rest of their lives about a possible outcome.
Boxing rivalries have sparked interest throughout the history of the sport in this country. Old boxing fans still talk about Battling Douglas' bouts with Stoney Godet and Iron Baby. Then there is Leonard "Boston Blackie" Miller. He had memorable matches with Bert Perry and Baby Boy Rolle. Ray Minus Sr. and Cassius Moss packed the Nassau Stadium a couple of times.
Now, McKenzie and Mackey are poised to add their names to the list. A bout between the two would be a classic, and no doubt leave spectators with a thirst for more. McKenzie, the current light heavyweight champion of The Bahamas, would go up against Mackey, a comfortable super middleweight. The super middleweight maximum pounds limit is 168 and it's 175 for the light heavyweight class. McKenzie said repeatedly during the aforementioned
verbal altercation that he would come down in weight for Mackey.
With a bit of a height advantage and punching power, McKenzie would present a real challenge for Mackey who has not fought since 2009. However, the former Caribbean and Commonwealth king has proven his toughness in the ring.
He was a courageous and difficult opponent on his way to the Commonwealth crown. He routinely wore down opponents. This is where he will be dangerous for McKenzie who in early bouts displayed a tendency to fade. He has gained a world of confidence though over the last two years.
This would be one of those dream matches for a promoter. Once sufficiently advertised, Mackey and McKenzie would draw a big crowd. Mackey is working closely on his return to the ring with former boxer turned promoter Elkeaner Saunders.
McKenzie, on the other hand, has a close relationship with Meacher Major who now fights out of the Major Boxing and Entertainment Promotions camp. The two groups could join forces for this potential blockbuster show. I believe that once it is promoted properly, the show would be enormously successful.
At this point, despite Mackey's experience, I would give the 9-0 McKenzie a slight edge. Mackey had started to look a bit worn out prior to his two successive knockout defeats at the hands of Canadian Adonis Stevenson and Kirt Sinnette of Trinidad & Tobago, respectively in 2009. He looks quite fresh these days and alert, but the jury is still out on him. If the promoters can get together for the bout, Mackey would need to be in top condition.
McKenzie longs for the kind of recognition Mackey once had... and more. A McKenzie/Mackey match could be one for the ages.
(To respond to this column, kindly contact Fred Sturrup at fredericksturrup@gmail.com)

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News Article

March 05, 2012
Another unanimous win for Taureano Johnson

Two weeks after he scored a unanimous victory, Bahamian middleweight fighter Taureano Johnson stepped back into the ring, putting together a series of punches that will keep his winning streak on the professional level going.
A six-rounder with Edvan dos Santos Barros was held at the Westin Diplomat Resort in Hollywood, Florida on Friday night. Not even a cut, underneath the right eyebrow, suffered in the opening minutes of the first round, could slow down Johnson. He landed a number of punches throughout the fight to win every round.
"It was a difficult fight. I went up against a very tough fighter," said Johnson, who improved to 7-0, 5KOs with the win. "He is an experienced fighter, an ESPN and HBO favorite. He has a good record, more than 28 fights, but that didn't stop me from going in there and giving it my all. I landed a lot of vicious punches, power punches and combinations. My technique, speed and condition, everything was perfect, but he is tough and I know that the knockout would have been hard. I didn't get to pull it off like I wanted to.
"A victory is all good for me. I consider myself to be the number one fighter in the world, not just in the Caribbean or in The Bahamas. I consider myself to be a world champion so in that case, in order to compete with the guys on that level, I should be able to take out my opponents with ease. I took the fight every round, won on a unanimous decision but I am not too pleased with the results. Not getting the knockout was tough."
Johnson moved up from the amateur ranks, turning professional in 2010. His debut was against Cleoney Fuqua, March 5 in Atlanta, Georgia. He knocked out Fuqua in the first round. Ever since, Johnson has been landing the knockout blows. His bout against Ryan Bianchini was stopped in the first round as well. That fight was held in Memphis, Tennessee on April 16, 2010. Several days later Johnson went up against Anthony Bowman and knocked him out in the fourth round. His last fight in 2010 was against Roy Ashworth. That bout took place in Tunica, Mississippi in July. He won in the first round.
Johnson said he used last year to "clean up" his boxing affairs, and as a result he did not fight. He is now under new management and has a loaded schedule.
Johnson said: "It is kind of complex when it comes to the professional ranks. I went to the 2008 Beijing Olympics and thank God I was able to make it through that and qualify, but right now, as it stands, I was off for 14 months after being under a very difficult contract. Right now I only have seven fights so I am way behind. I am with new management now. My management has gotten me three fights in less than eight weeks. I think that deserves an applause. Eight weeks and I have already gotten three fights - this is a boxer's dream."
The middleweight fighter has already stepped into the ring twice for the year and will return to the ring again at the end of the month. Johnson's opponent for the March 31 fight is still unknown. The fight will take place in New York.

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News Article

August 07, 2014
Anthony M. Bertram keeps up the Bahamian Tradition by becoming the New Star on L.A. Entertainment Horizon

'The' Bahamas, the shining islands on the vastness of Atlantic Ocean, is known for its spectacular natural beauty...

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News Article
April 2010 will have highest number of arrivals to Guyana, says minister
April 30, 2010
April 2010 will have highest number of arrivals to Guyana, says minister

As fans across the cricketing world prepare to support their favourite teams and players, the Government of Guyana, through the Ministry of Tourism, Industry and Commerce is putting forth greater efforts to ensure that all necessary protocol and regulatory systems are in place to facilitate an easy process, as the spotlight will be focused on the National Stadium, at Providence, East Bank Demerara, on Friday.

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Event
Ardastra Gardens Zoo Presents...
Ardastra Gardens & Zoo Presents...

Saturday 8th May 2010

Callin' all mothers... Take advantage of our Mother's Day treats and specials, including free admission for all mothers, a complimentary fruit/rum punch, and an 8" x 10" souvenir family portrait with 'Toby' and her sidekick, Salvador! Mother's Treat: Free Admission