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News Article
Fitzgerald warns teachers against taking action
Fitzgerald warns teachers against taking action

Minister of Education Jerome Fitzgerald yesterday warned all public school teachers to show up for work at the start of the new school year next week or face the consequences...

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News Article
Fitzgerald: Schools a lot safer
Fitzgerald: Schools a lot safer

More than 200 police officers permanently assigned to government senior and junior high schools in New Providence, Grand Bahama and Abaco returned to their posts yesterday morning as thousands of students returned to schools throughout the country...

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News Article
Fitzgerald: Work at schools almost complete

After more than a week of disruptions at Stephen Dillet and Uriah McPhee primary schools, Minister of Education, Science and Technology Jerome Fitzgerald assured parents and teachers of both schools that there is no "threat to their health and safety".
Officials from the Ministry of Education, the Department of Environmental Health Services (DEHS) and the Parent Teacher Association (PTA) toured both schools yesterday.
Fitzgerald said with the exception of cleaning the vents, which is ongoing, work at both schools has been completed.
"We expect by the end of this week or next week Monday to inspect the duct work, and to make sure that the air conditioning system is working as it is now," Fitzgerald told administrators and PTA officials at Stephen Dillet Primary School.
"This school has been functioning from last Wednesday... The same thing applies for Uriah McPhee.
"That is up and ready. The contractor completed the repairs on the air conditioning units at that school yesterday (Saturday)."
Fitzgerald said on Friday the air conditioning unit at Uriah McPhee Primary School was "sabotaged" multiple times, forcing education officials to close the school for another day.
He said yesterday that those repairs have been made and there should be no problems moving forward with the security personnel in place.
The Ministry of Education closed the primary schools last Friday because of several health issues and malfunctioning air conditioning units.
Bahamas Union of Teachers (BUT) President Belinda Wilson claimed the schools also have mold, as well as rodent and termite infestation.
The schools opened earlier this week after Fitzgerald said the Ministry of Environment gave the all-clear.
However, the union continued to express concerns about conditions at both schools. Union representatives were not present yesterday.
BUT President Belinda Wilson could not be reached for comment.
The union had its own assessment conducted by Enviro-Clean Company on September 14. Fitzgerald has dismissed that report.
In its report, the company said the air conditioning units and vents on each floor of Stephen Dillet are "extremely dirty, pushing out dust and contaminants".
The company noted that in an opening connecting the second and third floors, exposed fiberglass was used to fix the ceiling and overall Stephen Dillet "is not fit or worthy to open for public use".
During yesterday's tour of Stephen Dillet, Fitzgerald told PTA President Mandel Miller he did not want any misconceptions about the Department of Environmental Health Services' (DEHS) assessment of both schools.
That report was conducted last week Tuesday.
In its report, the DEHS said it is "satisfied notwithstanding the balance of works to be carried out that [Uriah McPhee and Stephen Dillet primary schools] do not pose an imminent danger to teachers and students.
Following the tour, Miller said in a separate interview that the PTA was satisfied the majority of health concerns it had raised have been resolved.
"I believe that the environment can now be conducive for effective learning and as a work area for our teachers," said.
"I would like to encourage all of the stakeholders of Stephen Dillet to now let's get back to the business of educating and developing the young children here."
Stephen Dillet's principal, Sheila Scavella, told The Nassau Guardian the sit-in and closures over the last two weeks have not had a major impact on the school and its students.
"During the industrial action, school kept right on as normal," she said. "We had administrators and other teachers who were making sure that our students had instructions throughout the day.

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News Article
Five BTVI students tapped to pursue studies in Canada

Information technology and security student, Gerrard Russell, will be one of five Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute students heading to Canada in January to continue studies on an Emerging Leaders in the Americas Program (ELAP) scholarship.
Russell, who will study information technology at Fanshawe College, in London, Ontario, Canada, along with Ketely Brown who will pursue studies in the same field, but at Holland College; Elkeno Jones who will study electrical at Holland College, Valentino Burrows, who will study solar thermal energy at Holland College, Rashad Morely, who will study electrical at Vancouver Island University, received the scholarships through the Canadian government. The scholarships are for students from Latin America and the Caribbean.
The scholarships are short-term opportunities at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The purpose is to support the development of human capital and the next generation of leaders in the Americas, which strengthens linkages between post-secondary schools in Canada with Latin America and the Caribbean. The scholarship value varies between ($7,200 and $9,700 Canadian) depending on the duration and level of study for students, according to whether the course of study is four months for college and undergraduate students, or for a period of five or six months of study or research. And cover visa and or study/work permit expenses; funding for the most economical round trip economy class airfare; funding for health insurance; monthly living allowance and required books, supplies and equipment, not including computers.
The student exchange, which began in 2009, requires BTVI students to be full-time and following the experience, they are to return to BTVI to complete their studies.
Russell, a former student of C.C. Sweeting Senior School, who has been enrolled at BTVI for a year-and-a-half, is excited about the opportunity to study abroad. He departs for Canada on December 31, and plans to make the most of the opportunity, especially after he "messed around and threw opportunities out of the window."
He credits an employee at a school for gifted children who told him he could be whatever he wanted to be. That proved to be a light bulb moment for him. And besides God, Russell gives credit to his networking instructor Anthony Ramtula who inspired him to go beyond the ordinary.
"He kicked me into gear. He is brutally honest. He would also teach for hours straight, motivating me to be better than him. I've never met anyone like him," said Russell, who aspires to be a security auditor.
"Coming from nothing, this could only be God," said the 24-year-old who grew up in Chippingham with his parents Anthony and Melanie Russell and his siblings. His 20-year-old brother Ammad is also a student at BTVI.
"I won't disappoint BTVI. I'm just a person who wants to be the best."
And Russell is more than ready to make the leap from BTVI's 1,700 student campus to the approximately 15,000 full-time students he will meet at Fanshawe's main campus.
"This is the opportunity to show the naysayers that God can do everything. I won't let this opportunity slide," he said.
Russell, who said he has already started packing, said he also views the opportunity to study abroad as a chance to become more independent.
The BTVI student is a 3.73 cumulative grade point average student, a far cry from the less than 2.00 average he had when he left high school.
The reason for his change -- life -- and being under bosses who screamed at him made him realize there was more to life. He also did not want to fall prey to the lure of illegal activities. The young man who said he decided to take responsibility for his actions names Dr. Ben Carson, who at one point could not read, but went on to become the world's first black pediatric surgeon as an inspiration to him.
BTVI's manager and consultant, Dr. Iva Dahl told the five students to make BTVI proud and to remain focused on their courses of study. She also encouraged the students to expand their horizons and integrate with other cultures, opening themselves to the international experience.

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News Article
Five straight for the Knights!

The C.R. Walker Knights senior girls have done it again!
They made it five straight on Saturday past, and seven out of 11, as they held on for a 30-26 win over the C.V. Bethel Stingrays in the third and final game of their Government Secondary Schools Sports Association (GSSSA) championship series. The Knights turned in a strong collective performance in a wire-to-wire victory at the Kendal G.L. Isaacs National Gymnasium, on Saturday, but the Stingrays didn't go away easily. After winning game two of the series, the Stingrays came into game three confident of their chances, but just couldn't overcome a poor start. They executed a frantic 17-4 run late in the game, but time ran out on them, and the Lady Knights celebrated another GSSSA basketball title. It was the kind of birthday present that Head Coach Ken Lightbourne said that he will never forget.
"When we started this streak, I would have been happy with just one, but every one afterwards is like a must-win. It feels so good to get five," said Lightbourne on Saturday evening. "I have to thank my Lord and Savior Jesus Christ for helping us along and pulling us through. This feels so great. It's my birthday, and it's the best birthday present ever."
As mentioned, it certainly wasn't easy though. The senior girls series was the only of the four GSSSA divisions to go to the limit, and even thought they built a sizable lead in the decisive third game, the Knights still experienced difficulty in putting away the resilient Stingrays. The Stingrays trailed by 17 points in the second half but kept chipping away at the lead. They eventually got to within four points in the final minute of the game, but didn't have enough time to complete the comeback.
"I just told the girls to keep fighting," said Stingrays' Head Coach Glenda Gilcud. "If they wanted it, they had to go out there and fight for it, and they did that. We just came up a little short. For the most part, the officiating tonight was very poor. If you are going to allow the girls to play, let's play with fairness. Let's stop being biased!
"Otherwise, I think that my girls did a tremendous job. What hurt us today is that my main player was in foul trouble from the start. We felt like that's a championship that we should have had but those things happen. When it's a championship like this, I feel that we should be playing stop time and not running time. I think that cost us as well. Our girls were working hard from day one and to lose like this is unfortunate."
Angel Miller paced the 12 points in the decisive third game on Saturday, and Shavonya Adderley added 10. Atlanya Morris led the Knights with a game-high 14 points and Burdaera Sands contributed nine.
"The key today was trying to contain number 2 (Adderley)," said Knights' coach Lightbourne. "She is an awesome player. She really rallies her team, and her team rallies behind her. We had to take her out of the game. Once we did that and forced other players to beat us, we were okay. We slacked off a lot in the end and almost paid the price. I think fatigue settled in. The girls played a lot of basketball and it showed in the end. C.V. is a young team and they have quick legs. I have to take my hat off to them. They played well and gave us all we could handle."
The other three divisions in the GSSSA ended on Friday in two game sweeps. In the junior girls division, the H.O. Nash Lions completed a two-game sweep of the A.F. Adderley Tigers, in the junior boys division, the T.A. Thompson Scorpions ended the reign of the D.W. Davis Pitbulls, and in the senior boys division, the C.I. Gibson Rattlers won its second straight one-point game over the C.C. Sweeting Cobras, to end that series in two straight games. In both of those games, the Cobras had late leads, but couldn't hold off the charging Rattlers.
"My team really played hard in the last five minutes of those games," said Rattlers' Head Coach Kevin 'KJ' Johnson. "We weren't consistent but we pulled it off. Some of the players didn't step up like they were supposed to, but we were good enough to win and that is what matters. Hats off to C.C. They gave us a good series. Coming down to the end, we just were mentally tough, and showed a lot of desire and passion. We were determined to go out there and win and that is what we did."
Cobras' Head Coach Mario Bowleg said that it was a tough pill to swallow, but his boys will bounce back for the Hugh Campbell tournament and the national championships being staged by the Sports Unit of the Ministry of Education.
"We knew that it was going to be a very tough uphill battle, and it was," said Bowleg. "We played them four times this season and all of the games were close. All season long, they had the will to take the games away from us, or we would literally just give away the games. Taking nothing away from C.I. because they played with a lot of heart, but we have to find a way to execute better when the game is on the line. We continue to turn over the ball with just seconds left in games and we have to work on that."
Both coaches assured that their squads will be ready for the annual Hugh Campbell classic and the nationals. As for the GSSSA championships, for the first time, it was sponsored by BTC in conjunction with Cable Bahamas and the sports unit of the Ministry of Education. Jackie Adderley, assistant to Vice President of Brand and Communications at BTC Marlon Johnson, said that the telecommunications giant is all about helping out the youth of the country and they saw these championships as an opportunity to do that.

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News Article
Fixing The 'Education Crisis'
Fixing The 'Education Crisis'

After the ushering in of majority rule in 1967, one of the mandates for the new Pindling-led government was to remove barriers that prevented poor, average Bahamians from access to a quality, free high school education.

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News Article
Flooded out

Thousands of New Providence residents were left bailing out their homes yesterday after record rainfall created widespread flooding, catching many people off guard.
The nasty weather pounded the island on Tuesday evening and into yesterday resulting in the closure of schools and some businesses.
Stalled-out vehicles littered the eastern and western portions of the island as the raging waters wreaked havoc.
Over on Paradise Island, the tunnel leading to Royal Towers was flooded by the thunderstorm.
Many businesses were also flooded.
Trevor Basden, senior deputy director at the Department of Meteorology, said 12.79 inches of rain were recorded at the Elizabeth Estates Police Station and 15.29 inches in the Camperdown area.
He added that on average 4.54 inches of rain fall in the month of May.
The worst of the flooding was in eastern New Providence.
Some residents said they had to abandon their homes Tuesday night.
Tow truck operator Donald Lloyd slept in his car with his son as bucket loads of rain water filled his Redland Acres home.
Lloyd said when he entered his house yesterday morning to survey the damage he was shocked by what he saw.
The water rose above his knees and nearly everything in his house was submerged beneath the dirty, oily water.
Lloyd, who installed a drain in his yard a little over a year ago to prevent flooding, said he has never seen so much rain settle in that area.
"I've been living here since I was about a year old," he said. "It's never been this bad."
Lloyd said most of the appliances in his house were destroyed.
"My TV, my fridge, the bed and all of that is gone," he said.
The Bahamas Department of Meteorology noted that the system that passed over the Northwest and Central Bahamas resulted in severe thunderstorms, strong gusty winds, dangerous lightning and waterspouts.
Lloyd said his home started to fill with water around 8 p.m. He said by 10 p.m. he was forced to take refuge in his car.
"The area is a low-lying area and the two or three governments knew that for years, but no one has come to deal with it," he said.
Lloyd said area residents were forced to block the road to prevent moving vehicles from pushing more water into their homes.
"We also had to shut down everything in all the houses in this area because the water is up to the [outlets], to make sure that no one got hurt," he added.
His house was one of dozens of homes in that area that flooded.

Waist deep
Kevin Johnson, 44, a dump truck driver, was waist deep in water when he walked into his home yesterday morning.
Johnson, who has been unemployed for the last several months, said he cannot afford to replace anything that was destroyed.
"I'm very [upset] because I was [already] low on cash," Johnson said.
"My house is low so when the rain came it's just like my $100 gone down the drain because [the groceries] that I bought for the week are underwater. Now I don't know how I'll eat for the week."
Johnson said he was unable to save much as the water came into his house very quickly.
"There was nothing I could do," he said.
"I rest the TV on the counter and I'm running a drop cord through the house because I just paid someone to get a little bit of [power] from them. I got an [electrical shock] when I put the drop cord up on higher ground."
The cords were resting atop a cooler in the living room.
Johnson nailed a long piece of wood in front of his door when the rain first started but the barrier was no match for the flood waters.
Johnson said the flood resulted in thousands of dollars in damage.
"The TV stand and fridge and my brand new bed are underwater. All my clothes are underwater with oil and grease...I'm flooded out and I'm hungry now," he said.
Johnson said he's hoping that the Department of Social Services will assist him.
Johnson's neighbor Wade Riley faced a similar dilemma. He said he was asleep when the rain started.
"I woke up about 10:30 p.m. and stepped in water," Riley said. "I had to go and try to turn off all the appliances, but I woke up too late because the fridge was already destroyed.
"I tried to secure the door so the water could stop coming in, but I couldn't stop it. The whole house is flooded."
In Pinewood Gardens, an area prone to flooding, residents said the water rose higher than ever.
Porsha King, a resident of Saffron Street, said she will probably be scooping water out of her house for days.
King shares the home with her family members, including six children who had to be evacuated early yesterday morning during the thunderstorm.
One of King's relatives, who only wanted to be identified as Mary Jane, said she and her family had to take the children out of the flooded house on their backs around 1 a.m.
"We went to the (neighboring) church, but the church wasn't open. Then we had to take them there on our backs," she said, pointing towards a black Hyundai Jeep.
The rain continued to fall yesterday as hundreds of residents cleaned up their homes.
The system was expected to be out of The Bahamas by early this morning.

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News Article
Florida Air Academy To Honor Leevan Sands
Florida Air Academy To Honor Leevan Sands

One of the country's most inspirational athletes is set to receive yet another accolade this weekend.

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News Article
Focused on the future

When nine-year-old Edwin Simmons went to live with his aunt and guardian, Dora Chisolm, she told him that attending college was in his future, but she didn't know how he was going to get there. Edwin is now one of 30 students who have been accepted into the newly-launched Lyford Cay Foundation education enrichment program called FOCUS (Forward and Onward to College. Upward to Success.), which targets deserving, motivated, fourth grade public school students with the goal of setting them on a path to college and career success.

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News Article
Follow the Reader: Rotary's 5th Annual Reading Fair a Success

Nassau, Bahamas -  More than 600
primary school students, parents, teachers and volunteers turned out to turn
pages at the 5th Annual Reading Fair hosted by the Rotary Club of
Nassau Sunrise on Saturday, March 12 at The College of The Bahamas' Band Shell
Grounds.

With a goal
of rousing excitement about reading and the importance of staying in school,
the club and supporters, including Bank of The Bahamas, took time to read to
students from six primary schools located near COB...

"We
definitely want to thank corporate Bahamas and other service organizations for
responding so well not with cash donations but with donations in kind," said
Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise president Karen Pinder...

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News Article
For the love of children

The song "Love that Child" started as a song, and now it's become a movement, as some of the best local and visiting talent take to the stage this weekend at the Rainforest Theatre to perform in the 4th Annual Love that Child Musical Production to benefit three children's homes.
This year Power Surge is the newest addition to an exciting line-up of dancers that will perform at the musical benefit set for Sunday at 3 p.m. at the Wyndham Nassau Resorts.
The Philadelphia dance company was launched in 2006 under the direction of Joanne McBride and has performed on multiple occasions at Walt Disney World and in competitions throughout the United States.
"We are very excited to bring our teen division to The Bahamas to showcase our talents for 'Love that Child'", said McBride.
On Sunday, Power Surge and other United States and local performers will electrify the audience in an effort to raise funds for The Ranfurly Home for Children, The Children's Emergency Hostel and The Elizabeth Estates Children's Home.
The "Love that Child" Musical Extravaganza is sponsored by BOB(Bank of the Bahamas Limited) and will feature more than 100 dancers from seven local dance schools, The Philadelphia 76ers pre-pro dance team, Funky D, The Meridian School Choir, and the Philly hip hop duo Beat Addicts.
The musical show that has mushroomed into a highly anticipated annual event grew out of a chance meeting between someone connected with BOB and Damien Davis, a young man who grew up at Ranfurly. Davis who is now a manager at Atlantis, had returned to the home, as he often does, to teach music and mentioned that he had written a song to raise funds for Ranfurly, but did not know how to get it produced, played or distributed. At about the same time, a group from the New Jersey-Philadelphia area was bringing young stars of the teen movie "Standing Ovation" to The Bahamas. The young movie stars were eager to
perform with local youngsters. Putting the two together with the song written by Davis seemed a natural.
Upon hearing the song "Love that Child" and the idea for a benefit of children helping children, BOB committed to the project. Bank representatives said the beautiful song and the cause it represented touched their hearts. Since then, "Love that Child" has developed into a strong partnership, several sold out performances in Nassau and Philadelphia, and raised thousands of dollars to assist local children's homes.
Tickets for "Love that Child" are $15 adults and $5 Children. They are available at all five BOB branches, The Ranfurly Home for Children, The Meridian School, Diane Phillips and Associates and Phillips Sailmakers. VIP tables are also available.

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News Article
Former BIS Executive Director A. Edward Ellis laid to rest

The government, the public service and staff of Bahamas Information Services BIS bade farewell to retired Executive Director A. Edward Ellis, during a service of celebration at St. Agnes Anglican Church, Baillou Hill Road on Saturday, June 14, 2014.
Among those present were: Governor General Sir Arthur Foulkes; Deputy Prime Minister Philip Brave Davis; Minister of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe, who also paid tribute, and Attorney General and Minister of Legal Affairs Alyson Maynard-Gibson. The officiant was Archdeacon I. Ranfurly Brown, assisted by Reverend Fr. Neil G Nairn.
Ellis died on June 3, 2014 at the Princess Margaret Hospital. He is survived by wife Helen, daughter Jovanna, son Julian and granddaughter Ashley,
A career public servant, Ellis served his country with distinction for some 42 years before retiring in March of 2014. During his career he was instrumental in the development of the communications arm of the government at the Bahamas Information Services (BIS), and the archiving of important legislative proceedings of the Parliament in his capacity as editor of The Hansard.
Through the many incarnations of government information, Ellis' contribution and professional work in communicating the works of the Bahamas government featured prominently. Ellis was also revered as a very patriotic Bahamian and very disciplined; his standard of journalism was second to none.
He was born on January 28, 1949 in Nassau, the eldest of five children born to Adolphus Edward (Duffy) I and Lois (Godet) Ellis. He attended George's Anglican Pre-school, Eastern Junior and Senior Schools and St John's College. In 1975 he was awarded an in-service award and studied journalism at the University of the West Indies, Jamaica.

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News Article
Former athletes to conduct clinics in The Bahamas

Devon McDonald, a former football player with the famed University of Notre Dame Fighting Irish and the Indianapolis Colts of the National Football League (NFL), will be coming to The Bahamas with two other ex-pro football players and a former female softball player for a week-long tour of New Providence and Grand Bahama...

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News Article
Fort Charlotte Office Opening Remarks - FNM Leader Hubert Ingraham
Fort Charlotte Office Opening Remarks - FNM Leader Hubert Ingraham

Ft. Charlotte;
FNMs:
I brought you Zhivargo Laing again and I want you to send him back to me as your MP!
I now live in Fort Charlotte. There are five of us in our house - we are voting FNM!
On Saturday night we will be in Exuma, on Monday the 5th we will be in Long Island, on Thursday the 8th we will be back in Nassau in Golden Gates and we are going to take Shane Gibson out!

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News Article
Forty percent of inmates in study cite economic conditions for committing crimes

A study on the profile of prisoners reveals that 40 percent of the inmates at Her Majesty's Prison (HMP) committed crimes based on their economic conditions.Academics at The College of The Bahamas released their research on crime during a violence research symposium yesterday at the college.

One of the studies explored crime through the eyes of prison inmates.

The profile of sentenced inmates at HMP'revealed that the number one driver of criminal activity among the 336 surveyed inmates was related to economic circumstances

However, most respondents reported that they had jobs at the time of their arrest. Only four percent said they were unemployed.

During her presentation, professor of Sociology Jessica Minnis reasoned that many of the jobs were low paying.

The research further explained that, "For the purposes of the study, an economic reason was defined as any statement that indicated any level of material want or needs; or registered any concern about the means of attaining material wants or needs."

In addition to economic, other reasons listed behind criminal activity were association, drugs, anger, lack of religion, stress, and neglect, among other things.

Among the inmates who were employed, 62 percent were employed in semi-skilled jobs; 21 percent were employed in unskilled occupations; 11 percent were skilled workers, and one percent were employed in professional occupations.

The study further reveals that more than half of the prison inmates in The Bahamas claimed to have been victims of crime themselves.

The data was collected during May and July 2010.

Of the inmates surveyed, 46 percent were in maximum security; 37 percent were in medium security; 10 percent were in minimum security; five percent were from the female prison and another two percent were in the remand center.

The study also shows that 54 percent of the inmates dropped out of school -- 48 percent of that group was expelled for infractions such as fighting, bad behavior, drugs, disrespect for authority or because they simply were not interested in school.

Meanwhile, 31 percent of the respondents said they were abused or mistreated by parents, guardians, other adults, among other people.

Another 49 percent said they witnessed violence in their home.

The type of violence included physical, emotional, sexual and murder. Three percent of the respondents said they witnessed a murder.

The demographic of the sample population included 95 percent males, five percent females and one percent transgender.

Nearly 80 percent said they were single and 12 percent were married. The study shows that 93 percent of the respondents were born in The Bahams. The remainder were born in Jamaica, Haiti and America.

Researchers said there ought to be further lines of inquiry based on profile data of the economy and crime; restorative justice possibilities; education policy regarding school discipline and gender and crime.

Associate Professor of Law Michael Stevenson, who also presented the research, said too many of the children expelled from school turn to a life of crime.

He said something needs to be done with the disciplinary system at schools.

In addition to Minnis and Stevenson, the research was done by E'Thegra Symonette, Yvette Pintard-Newry, and Tonya Gibson.

The study focused on identifying common characteristics of inmates, including demographics, background, criminal history and involvement, prison culture and society and inmate self perceptions.

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News Article
Four Junior Basketball Players Being Recruited By The Patriots

Four of the top junior female basketball players in New Providence are of interest to Melissa Irvin, head coach of the University of the Cumberlands Patriots.

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News Article
Four awarded Tara Xavier Hepburn Foundation scholarships

Four more students have the opportunity to receive secondary private school educations for the 2014-2017 academic years through the Tara Xavier Hepburn Foundation.
Former T.A. Thompson student Ralph Sealy, former C.H.Reeves School student Shania Lewis, former H.O. Nash Junior School student Nastacia Turnquest and Monique Chandler of The T.A.R.A. Project and St. John's College were the hardworking recipients. The addition of the four students brings the total number of scholarships awarded by the foundation since the scholarship program's inception to 26.
The Tara Xavier Hepburn Scholarship is open to graduates of government junior schools and students of St. John's College and St. Anne's School who have successfully completed grade nine. The scholarship is tenable at St. John's College and St. Anne's School, at the cost of approximately $5,000 per student.
To be considered for a scholarship, an applicant must be nominated by his or her school, attain at least a 3.0 grade point average, have demonstrated leadership ability and/or community involvement, be of good moral character and successfully pass a minimum of five Bahamas Junior Certificate (BJC) subjects, receiving a C grade or better in English and mathematics. An applicant also may be required to attend an interview. The Tara Xavier Hepburn Scholarship covers full tuition and the cost of books.
The Tara Xavier Hepburn Foundation was launched on December 29, 2006 to celebrate the life of an Tara Hepburn, who was an exceptional young Bahamian who died at the age of 30 while studying law after earning a psychology degree. Hepburn's family, devastated after their loss, decided to keep Tara's memory alive through a scholarship for high school students.
The foundation is dedicated to the holistic development of young people by empowering them to achieve a positive sense of self and to realize their full potential as productive, responsible and contributing citizens. A goal of the foundation is to encourage young Bahamians to take maximum responsibility for improving themselves.
Donors including Lyndhurst Limited, Richard Campbell Limited, Dr. Livingston Marshall, and the Anglican Central Education Authority, make the work of the foundation possible.

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News Article
Four legends to battle in The Bahamas

Two of the greatest legends in women's tennis history along with two former number one ranked players in the world, are going to face off against each other in an epic doubles match, at the 2nd Bahamas Open in New Providence, on Sunday March 11, at the Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association's (BLTA) National Tennis Center.
Martina Navratilova, considered to be one of the best women tennis player of all-time, will battle Monica Seles, one of the best ever in the sport, in this mega doubles match. Not to be outdone, Jennifer Capriati, a tennis phenom at 13, will team up with Seles to go up against Navratilova and her partner Mary Joe Fernandez, another former top player. Capriati hurt her arm in an exhibition match in Europe and is hoping to be able to play by the tournament date. She is expected to attend The Bahamas Open regardless, and if she can't play, Zina Garrison, another former top player, is expected to take her place.
This historic event is scheduled to take place on March 11, the opening day of the 2nd Bahamas Open, an International Tennis Federation (ITF) sanctioned event, that carries a total purse of $100,000. Both the Tennis Channel and ESPN are expected into town for the broadcast of the mega doubles match and semi-finals and finals of the open singles and doubles.
Last year, The Bahamas made history when it was hosted for the first time ever a major pro women tennis tournament. The event also set a record for the most top players, all in the top 100 ranking in the world, in the Main Draw for a $100,000 prize money tournament. Now, they are set to do it again.
"All the players that were in our Main Draw last year, only play in million-dollar prize money tournaments," said Ty Olander, the owner of the ITF sanction for The Bahamas. "Never had a $100,000 in prize money tournament attracted all 100 ranked players for the Main Draw. Before us, this was unheard of, but the good news is this trend will continue, as we get all of the players eliminated in Indian Wells the first week. They need us and as a result our tournament was formed."
Seles, Navratilova, Capriati and Fernandez have never played in The Bahamas before, even in exhibition matches. They are all looking forward to coming to The Bahamas to kick off the 2nd Bahamas Open, which is expected to be a huge event this time around.
"We have put together an event second to none this time," said Olander. "We are getting everybody involved from the school children, the tourists, the various charities, the expats, the service clubs and the residents. There will be something for everyone."
While here, these tennis stars are expected to visit schools, put on tennis clinics, host receptions and meet the Bahamians as well as tourists up front and personal. They are all on a full schedule for the three days that they will be in town, as organizers hope the tournament kicks off from all of the publicity generated by these legendary players.
"All the contracts are signed, the sponsors are comfortable and we're ready to go," continued Olander. "The good news is that two of them are right in Florida and the other two are in Houston and Philadelphia, so our expenses are minimal."
These players who are considered some of the best in the world in modern history will all be staying at the Cove at Atlantis during their time here and are expected to take part in various events. According to Garrison, who's coming to The Bahamas as a back-up, she's actually looking forward to getting back on the court and playing in The Bahamas if the occasion arises.
"I'm extremely excited about coming to The Bahamas for this event and looking forward to it," said Garrison. "I love The Bahamas, I have a lot of friends there and it's going to be very exciting."
The Bahamas Open is expected to start on Friday March 9, with a Welcome Reception at the Tennis Center where all of the players are expected to sign up. The qualifiers are on Saturday March 10, and Sunday March 11, followed by the Opening Ceremony which starts with the legendary doubles match with the star players at 5:00 p.m.
The Main Draw starts on Monday and ends on Saturday with the presentation of the Lady Edith Turnquest Championship trophy to the winner. Tickets go on sale next week at various box offices and online at www.thebahamasopen.com.
Several travel agencies are already booking accommodation at the official hotel and also at Atlantis. This event is expected to catapult The Bahamas to new heights in sports tourism, as hundreds of players, coaches, family members, managers and fans are expected in town for the historic event.
Each player will be playing for a local charity, and according to Olander, they are going to approach the Red Cross, the Ranfurly Home for Children, the Cancer Society and the Crippled Children's Committee. Each of their purses will go to their respective charities.

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News Article
Fourth annual Shipyard fishing tournament to help east Grand Bahama schools

FREEPORT, Grand Bahama -- One of The Bahamas' favourite sports, fishing, will be pulling in the big ones shortly to help a worthy cause. The Grand Bahama Shipyard (GBS) is finalising plans for their fourth annual Youth Benefit Fishing Tournament, which will be held March 22nd at the Grand Bahama Yacht Club.
While last year's tournaments assisted schools in West Grand Bahama, this year's tournament hopes to benefit Sweeting's Cay, Grand Cay, as well as the Sir Charles Hayward Children's Library and the Grand Bahama Youth Choir.
Ed Pavey, Tournament Director and Director of Technical and Planning, noted that the Shipyard hopes that this year's tournament will see a larger turnout, "We have a bigger number of boats coming from the US, Nassau and the Family Islands to participate," said the Director. "Last year we had 30 teams enter, we'd like to surpass that and see if anyone can beat Team Executive Marine, Mellors, who have dominated the tournament for the last two years."
Pavey and Creighton Moxey, the GBS Tournament Co-Director, hope that they can also can beat the funds raised last year.
"Each year we've managed to beat our previous year's fundraising," stated Moxey. "We are hoping for more fishermen but also a larger turnout at the family fun day, where we have food, games, a great dunking booth and a raffle with a flat screen TV as the final prize."

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News Article
Fourth grade student wins Dolphin Encounters baby naming contest
Fourth grade student wins Dolphin Encounters baby naming contest

Eden Cox, a nine year-old, fourth grade student of Xavier’s Lower School was announced the winner of the Dolphin Encounters Baby Naming Contest.

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News Article
Fox Hill Office Opening - Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
Fox Hill Office Opening - Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham

Fox Hill;
Bahamians everywhere;
FNMs:

Before I say anything else, I wish to address some matters related to City Markets. For the benefit of the 400 workers and the general public I will strictly limit my remarks to specific comments on what contributed significantly to the decline of that well-known supermarket chain.

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News Article
Fox Hill after school programmes help kids gain educational skills

Nassau, The Bahamas -
Children in the Fox Hill Constituency are  involved in after-school
programmes at the area's Urban Renewal Centre to gain other educational
and social skills.    

"The challenges we
see in Fox Hill are educational.  We have an after-school programme during
the months that schools are open.  We offer homework help, the boys'
club and girls' club, a band practice, liturgic dance lessons, these
are talented children and we try to enhance their talents," said Brenda
Murray, assistant manager facilitator for the Fox Hill Urban Renewal
Centre. 

"We find that children
are better, one on one. So, our programmes run from three in the afternoon
to five, and some until seven.  We go beyond our working hours.  But if
it helps the child, then it is worth it in the end..." 

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News Article
Fr. Marcian Peters Tourney Gets Underway
Fr. Marcian Peters Tourney Gets Underway

The opening day of the 28th Annual Fr. Marcian Peters Basketball Tournament featured 10 of the 16 teams competing for the title in the primary school boys' division. As for the second day of competition, that featured the intermediate boys as action continued at Kendal G.L. Isaacs National Gymnasium.

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News Article
Free National Movement Rally R.M. Bailey Park
Free National Movement Rally R.M. Bailey Park

Fellow Bahamians;
Young People;
Residents of Over-the-Hill;
F-N-Ms:

Let me begin by congratulating our Carifta swimming team. They fought hard. They came from third place and passed Trinidad and Tobago to come in second.

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News Article
Friends of IAAF 2014 World Relays Unveiled
Friends of IAAF 2014 World Relays Unveiled

Nineteen local businesses, fourteen media companies and three (3) local hotels have been named Friends of 2014...

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News Article
Friendships Formed Between Kart Stars and Bahamian Students

A love story - that is what started last week when children from the UK Formula Kart Stars met children and students from Bahamian schools. They made a genuine and touching connection with each other.

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Business Listing

Froggies Out Island Adventures Bahamas
Dive Operators
  • Elbow Cay
  • Hope Town
  • Abaco, Bahamas
News Article
From Teacher to Entrepreneur

Well another "son of the Bahamian soil", has "put pen to paper" and written his autobiography and what an interesting life story it is!  He is none other than Mr. Patrick J. Bethel, who after a most distinguished career in education, returned to his beloved Abaco and managed to become a successful entrepreneur.
The book has as its title, appropriately, "From Teacher... To Entrepreneur".  As may be expected in the case of a literary work by one proud to be known as "a Cherokee boy", its cover is most attractive, featuring a picture of Cherokee Sound, a scene most beautiful with a white sandy beach, green cedar trees and multi-colored seascape.  The writer has adopted a direct, lucid easy-to-read style which retains the attention of the reader.  If you begin to read this volume you won't stop until you have read all 80 pages!
Now, there can be no doubt that this book has great historical value. This is precisely because Mr. Bethel is gifted with a "photographic memory" enabling him to recall in great detail and precision, events which took place from when he was less than two years of age.  Thus he describes, in vivid detail, all aspects of the visit of the Duke And Duchess of Windsor (King Edward VI who left the throne in order to marry the Duchess) and was then Governor of The Bahamas) in 1942. There are also nostalgic memories of events which took place during World War II and also of incidents which took place during his years of service as an officer in the Ministry of Education. Concisely, Patrick Bethel's autobiography is a valuable historical gem.
As may be expected in a book by a leading educator, there is a lot of sound advice on education and the proper nurture of children.  He makes an observation which merits most careful consideration: "My grandson recently asked me how come I have so much knowledge about The Bahamas and the world. My reply was reading."
Today, the computer, video, cell phones, Facebook, etc., have replaced reading and I fear we are producing a generation of non-readers. Let me finish with the following statement: "Reading is power. If you cannot read you have no power."
Now, this is a word most relevant to the young people of The Bahamas, and indeed of the world today for you see, many of them are adept at using the computer and sending messages via Facebook: but do not have good reading and writing skills. They find it hard to write a proper essay.  We are distressed that we still have a low average mark in our national exams -- D to D+.  Well, this will not change unless, and until we encourage our children to read! The observation of Mr. Bethel should be placed in every classroom in our schools.
Considering Mr. Bethel's wide experience, this book could have easily been much longer.  As Mr. Hartis Pinder, attorney-at-law, who also hails from Cherokee Sound, points out in his foreword: "It represents but snippets of a very fruitful life."
While all Bahamians should read this book, it is submitted that there are two groups in our society who would most certainly benefit from it.  These are young Bahamian teachers struggling "to make their mark" in education and young couples trying to raise their children in the right disciplined way.
The latter especially would benefit from exercising discipline by instructing their children to spend less time on Facebook and more time reading a book.
Mr. Bethel is a very patriotic Bahamian who enjoys "things Bahamian".  Thus, this book is truly a Bahamian product. Whereas many other Bahamians, who have written books, have elected to have their works printed and/or published abroad, Mr. Bethel had his book published by a company in Abaco.  It is, therefore, a literary gem -- written by a Bahamian, about The Bahamas, published in The Bahamas for Bahamians.
Although the writer hints that this may be his last major literary effort, it is my "gut feeling" that he has more to contribute. Thus, he is at one with Mr. Mike Lightbourn, who, in his foreword, makes this stirring appeal: "Pat, thank you for putting pen to paper again. Please do not stop."
All in all, a most interesting, informative, inspiring read. This book certainly should be placed in every school library and on the bookshelf of every home in The Bahamas. Get yours today!
While the author claims that his main purpose in contributing this work is to share his life story with his children, grandchildren and future offspring, there can be no doubt that his book will have a tremendous appeal to a much wider audience than that of his own family circle.  As a veteran educator, Mr. Bethel has exerted great influence and touched the lives of hundreds of Bahamians active in education and other fields of human endeavor throughout the length and breadth of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.
The life story of Mr. Bethel is extremely interesting. Born on February 11, 1933 in the picturesque little settlement of Cherokee Sound, Abaco, Patrick Bethel received his early education at the primary school there, where he proved to be a brilliant student.
He was recognized as the leading male student during the historic visit of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor to Cherokee Sound in 1942.  As a man with a strong sense of history, the writer tells us a lot about his background, revealing that his ancestors came to The Bahamas as United Empire Loyalists back in the eighteenth century after the American war of independence.  His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Granville Bethel, were devout Methodists and young Patrick received his nurture in the Christian faith at Epworth Methodist Chapel, attending worship three or four times every week.  His Christian faith proved to be a source of spiritual strength throughout his long and distinguished career in education, business and social activism.
In the year 1977, having completed 30 years in the field of education, he took early retirement and returned to Abaco. There, he and his faithful wife, Margaret operated several small businesses.

Title: "From Teacher . . . To Entrepreneur" "A Cherokee Boy"
Author: Patrick J. Bethel
Date: 2011 AD
Publisher: Abaco Print Shop
Place: Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Bahamas
Cost: $19.98
Available at Logos Book Store and other book stores in Nassau.

read more »


News Article
From Teacher to Entrepreneur

Well another "son of the Bahamian soil", has "put pen to paper" and written his autobiography and what an interesting life story it is!  He is none other than Mr. Patrick J. Bethel, who after a most distinguished career in education, returned to his beloved Abaco and managed to become a successful entrepreneur.
The book has as its title, appropriately, "From Teacher... To Entrepreneur".  As may be expected in the case of a literary work by one proud to be known as "a Cherokee boy", its cover is most attractive, featuring a picture of Cherokee Sound, a scene most beautiful with a white sandy beach, green cedar trees and multi-colored seascape.  The writer has adopted a direct, lucid easy-to-read style which retains the attention of the reader.  If you begin to read this volume you won't stop until you have read all 80 pages!
Now, there can be no doubt that this book has great historical value. This is precisely because Mr. Bethel is gifted with a "photographic memory" enabling him to recall in great detail and precision, events which took place from when he was less than two years of age.  Thus he describes, in vivid detail, all aspects of the visit of the Duke And Duchess of Windsor (King Edward VI who left the throne in order to marry the Duchess) and was then Governor of The Bahamas) in 1942. There are also nostalgic memories of events which took place during World War II and also of incidents which took place during his years of service as an officer in the Ministry of Education. Concisely, Patrick Bethel's autobiography is a valuable historical gem.
As may be expected in a book by a leading educator, there is a lot of sound advice on education and the proper nurture of children.  He makes an observation which merits most careful consideration: "My grandson recently asked me how come I have so much knowledge about The Bahamas and the world. My reply was reading."
Today, the computer, video, cell phones, Facebook, etc., have replaced reading and I fear we are producing a generation of non-readers. Let me finish with the following statement: "Reading is power. If you cannot read you have no power."
Now, this is a word most relevant to the young people of The Bahamas, and indeed of the world today for you see, many of them are adept at using the computer and sending messages via Facebook: but do not have good reading and writing skills. They find it hard to write a proper essay.  We are distressed that we still have a low average mark in our national exams -- D to D+.  Well, this will not change unless, and until we encourage our children to read! The observation of Mr. Bethel should be placed in every classroom in our schools.
Considering Mr. Bethel's wide experience, this book could have easily been much longer.  As Mr. Hartis Pinder, attorney-at-law, who also hails from Cherokee Sound, points out in his foreword: "It represents but snippets of a very fruitful life."
While all Bahamians should read this book, it is submitted that there are two groups in our society who would most certainly benefit from it.  These are young Bahamian teachers struggling "to make their mark" in education and young couples trying to raise their children in the right disciplined way.
The latter especially would benefit from exercising discipline by instructing their children to spend less time on Facebook and more time reading a book.
Mr. Bethel is a very patriotic Bahamian who enjoys "things Bahamian".  Thus, this book is truly a Bahamian product. Whereas many other Bahamians, who have written books, have elected to have their works printed and/or published abroad, Mr. Bethel had his book published by a company in Abaco.  It is, therefore, a literary gem -- written by a Bahamian, about The Bahamas, published in The Bahamas for Bahamians.
Although the writer hints that this may be his last major literary effort, it is my "gut feeling" that he has more to contribute. Thus, he is at one with Mr. Mike Lightbourn, who, in his foreword, makes this stirring appeal: "Pat, thank you for putting pen to paper again. Please do not stop."
All in all, a most interesting, informative, inspiring read. This book certainly should be placed in every school library and on the bookshelf of every home in The Bahamas. Get yours today!
While the author claims that his main purpose in contributing this work is to share his life story with his children, grandchildren and future offspring, there can be no doubt that his book will have a tremendous appeal to a much wider audience than that of his own family circle.  As a veteran educator, Mr. Bethel has exerted great influence and touched the lives of hundreds of Bahamians active in education and other fields of human endeavor throughout the length and breadth of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.
The life story of Mr. Bethel is extremely interesting. Born on February 11, 1933 in the picturesque little settlement of Cherokee Sound, Abaco, Patrick Bethel received his early education at the primary school there, where he proved to be a brilliant student.
He was recognized as the leading male student during the historic visit of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor to Cherokee Sound in 1942.  As a man with a strong sense of history, the writer tells us a lot about his background, revealing that his ancestors came to The Bahamas as United Empire Loyalists back in the eighteenth century after the American war of independence.  His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Granville Bethel, were devout Methodists and young Patrick received his nurture in the Christian faith at Epworth Methodist Chapel, attending worship three or four times every week.  His Christian faith proved to be a source of spiritual strength throughout his long and distinguished career in education, business and social activism.
In the year 1977, having completed 30 years in the field of education, he took early retirement and returned to Abaco. There, he and his faithful wife, Margaret operated several small businesses.
 
Title: "From Teacher . . . To Entrepreneur" "A Cherokee Boy"
Author: Patrick J. Bethel
Date: 2011 AD
Publisher: Abaco Print Shop
Place: Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Bahamas
Cost: $19.98
Available at Logos Book Store and other book stores in Nassau.

read more »