Search results for : massage

Showing 1 to 10 of 210 results


News Article
Get the Comfort you Need: Adjustable Beds from Island Bedding

Freeport, Grand Bahama Island - Get the comfort you need with an affordable adjustable bed at Island Bedding and Furniture!

With its upscale features and congenial price tag, it's no wonder the
S-cape adjustable bed base is one of our most popular. The bed adjusts
to your every whim, soothes you with luxurious massage, and incorporates
the very latest in comfort technology. We appreciate your
individuality. So there's no limit to the number of position
permutations. Adjust away until you find your bliss. And then stop. Take
a deep breath, and savor the moment.

read more »


News Article
Restore balance in all aspects of your life

It's a tough world out there and people are suffering through so much stress that it's almost impossible to keep their lives and health -- much less their finances - on an even keel. In an effort to help people restore some semblance of balance, The Nassau Guardian hosts an annual Health & Financial Fair.
The Nassau Guardian's Health & Financial Fair takes place on Saturday, February 22, at The Mall at Marathon between 11 a.m. and 5 p.m. Health and financial information, aerobic demonstrations, Zoomba demonstrations, health screenings, healthy food sampling, a sports fashion show, a blood drive, skin analysis and massages are all events that will take place on the day.
Health is a dynamic process because it is always changing. People all have times of good health, times of sickness and maybe even times of serious illness. As lifestyle change, so do levels of health.
People who participate in regular physical activity do so partly to improve their current and future levels of health as they strive toward an optimal state of wellbeing.
As lifestyles improve, health improves and people experience less disease and sickness. But physical health is only one aspect of overall health.
Other components that are just as important as physical health include social health (ability to have satisfying personal relationships), mental health (ability to learn and grow intellectually), emotional health (ability to feel comfortable expressing yourself and doing so appropriately) and spiritual health (which has the concept of faith at its core).
Wellness is the search for enhanced quality of life, personal growth and potential through positive lifestyle behaviors and attitudes. By taking responsibility for their own health and wellbeing, people can improve their health on a daily basis.
Certain factors influence people's states of wellness including nutrition, physical activity, stress-coping methods, good relationships and career success.
With non-communicable diseases accounting for most of the global burden of diseases, doctors the world over are doing their best to stem the tide through stress prevention rather than cure.
In recent years medical professionals have been placing an even greater emphasis on health and wellness by encouraging people to take charge of their health and get on the path to wellness. They urge people to strive to live their lives fully with vitality and meaning.
Through its annual Health & Financial Fair, The Nassau Guardian aims to show people that wellness is optimal health and vitality, encompassing physical, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, interpersonal and social and environmental wellbeing. Through the fair The Nassau Guardian hopes to encourage people to have a greater awareness about their own health, and about taking care of their bodies.
To achieve balance people need to take care of mind, body and spirit and they should always remember that finances should not be left out of the equation.
While most people who hear the word "wellness" think of health first, through its fair The Nassau Guardian does its part in educating the public to the fact that there are several other forms of wellness that must be considered; with financial wellness being one of them, and getting them to look at subjects like controllable debt, the ability to afford to retire and the ability to educate their children at the collegiate level.
Through the fair the company wants people to realize that "un-financial health" can cause stress, health problems like blood pressure and heart disease, relationship stress, which can lead to abusive relationships and divorces, and family interaction friction.
As a lifestyle based on good choices and healthy behaviors maximizes the quality of life, through the Health & Financial Fair The Nassau Guardian hopes to help people avoid diseases, remain strong and fit and maintain their physical and mental health as long as they live.

Health and Financial Fair exhibitors
Ardyss International
Bahamas Wholesale Agency
Colina Insurance
CFAL
D.E.A.R.S (Blood Drive -2 beds)
Family Guardian
GNC
Handling Your Health
Primordal Touch
Ida's Plant Beverages
Life Chiropractic Center
Lowe's Wholesale (2 booths)
Nassau Agencies
New Life Natural Vegetation
PAS Pharmaceuticals
Redefining Health Ltd.
Skin Solutions
Sky Bahamas
St. Luke's Diagnostic
National Insurance Board
The Walk In Medical Clinic
Weight Watchers
Wellness Organics
Bahamas Foot and Ankle Institute
Peardale Seventh Day Adventist
Print Masters
The Nassau Guardian
Primordal Touch
Better Living Health Center
The Wellness Center
Pain & Wellness Clinic
Roscoe's Healthy Treats

read more »


News Article
Sub three-hour Marathon Bahamas!

When asked what was his motivation for going out there and running the fastest Marathon Bahamas ever, American Bryan Huberty's answer was simple: To hurry up finish and rest so that he could watch his Green Bay Packers play the New York Giants later in the day.
Well, it didn't go too well for his Packers yesterday, but the Wisconsin native came with his game face on.
Representing the WildSide Online Elite Racing Team out of South Florida, Huberty powered through the streets of downtown Nassau en route to a stunning 2:42.53 run in the third annual Marathon Bahamas yesterday morning. It was a new Marathon Bahamas record for Huberty, and his third marathon title in his distance running career.
Huberty, who came here in November to study the course, said that he was training for the past year to actually run a 2:30 marathon. He said that a re-occurring hip injury along with leg cramps prevented a sub 2:40 race, but he is still satisfied with the run and the new record.
"It's always fun leaving America and doing an international marathon," he said after the race yesterday. "It was a challenge, especially with the hill, but it's a very beautiful country. The support medical staff was excellent. I needed some medical attention afterwards and they were there for me. I've done 20 marathons and this one is right up there with my favorites. It will always have a very special place in my heart because I was able to win and set a new course record. To me, that was very pleasing," added the 33-year-old Marathon Bahamas Champion.
Bahamian runners finished second and fourth overall behind Huberty yesterday. Sidney Collie, who finished second behind Delroy Boothe in the inaugural running of the event two years ago, ran 2:47.40 for second yesterday, and former Marathon Bahamas Champion Boothe settled for fourth. National record holder Boothe ran 2:59.31 two years ago, but crossed the finish line at Arawak Cay in fourth place yesterday, in 3:01.19. American female Angela Cobb split the Bahamian pair, running 3:00.17, for third.
Collie, who is coached by Ashton Murray of Bahamas Turbulence, said that he was training twice a day to get ready for this year's event. He didn't take part in Marathon Bahamas last year, but shaved about 24 minutes off his time from two years ago.
"I tried to pull him (Huberty) in but he was a little too far out and he managed to get away," said Collie yesterday. "I know him from racing him abroad. I felt like it was not my best effort today, but it was okay. I'll try to improve on it for next year."
Collie said that he felt good knowing that he ran the fastest time ever by a Bahamian in the event, and that it took a new course record to beat him.
"Overall, I was satisfied. There were a lot of people along the route cheering and that helped me to keep going," said Collie. "I felt myself getting tight coming down to the end of the race, but I just pushed it. The course itself was a bit challenging, but through the grace of God, I made it through. My family was here to support me all through the race, so that was a motivating factor as well. Just the thought to be so close to being number one kept me going. It's an awesome feeling to be the fastest Bahamian in this event, but I would have loved to catch the overall winner."
Overall winner Huberty, who now lives in Miami, Florida, said he definitely plans on coming back next year to defend his title. In addition to running a new course record yesterday, he also ran a personal best time by about 10 seconds.
"The last five miles I really started laboring a bit," said Huberty. "I just decided to keep on pushing through the pain so that I can watch my Green Bay Packers play and hopefully beat the Giants. The scenery was amazing. I've done marathons in New York and Chicago, but nothing compares to The Bahamas. The beautiful scenery was one of the main reasons why I wanted to come here. I came here in November and studied the course and felt like I had to come back. Having that fresh breeze from the ocean was ideal for running and I loved it. The wind was a little bit of a challenge, but it wasn't too bad. The heat didn't bother me, but I have a history of cramping up, so I just wanted to pace myself in the first portion of the race, especially the bridge. The goal was to stay relaxed and not use too much energy in the first half of the race. Overall, it was a challenge, but it was a lot of fun."
The first woman to cross the finish line in the full marathon yesterday was Angela Cobb from Melbourne Beach, Florida. When asked about her experience yesterday, Cobb used an old Bahamian tourism slogan: "It's better in The Bahamas."
The 28-year-old American finished third overall behind Huberty and Collie.
"It's my first time here and I love it," said Cobb. "I feel good. The wind was kicking a bit on the last half and that had an effect on me, but I just kept pushing. I just came out here to have fun today. To be the first female to finish is a good feeling. I was trying to get a 2:49 or a 2:50, but to come out in good health and be the first woman in the process is a good feeling," she added.
The first Bahamian female to finish the full marathon yesterday was Cheryl Rolle. She finished in 4:10.03.
Sunshine Insurance Marathon Bahamas Chairman Franklyn Wilson said that his degree of satisfaction with the event includes the following: growth and time reduction. He witnessed both yesterday.
"The main thing for us was improvement," said Wilson yesterday. "We recognize that it is a growing business and we have to get better and better. We had runners here today from 20 different countries and that was a first for us. It was a good thing to hear runners speaking on how awesome it was and how well it was organized. These are the foundations on which we will build.
"When you look at the range of sponsors that we have this year, clearly the business community is beginning to understand the importance of Marathon Bahamas, and that's locally and regionally. Overall, I feel tremendous that evidence of progress is apparent to so many different people. We're not there yet but our goal is to work hard to ensure its overall success.
"In addition, the times are now in a range where world class runners can appreciate the quality of running here. What was important for us this year was to get the finishing times in a respectable range and a time like 2:42 begins to attract the attention of world class runners. That was significant for us."
Wilson said that Marathon Bahamas might not be as lofty as some of the more established marathons in the world, but added that they are indeed headed in the right direction.
"We can't beat other world class marathons in terms of prizes. We're not there yet but Marathon Bahamas is unique in so many different ways," he said yesterday. "Where else in the world can participants run against such a beautiful backdrop? Everyone wants to come to The Bahamas. To be here running, and to get massages on the beach afterwards is first class treatment. You can't beat that," he added.
As for the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure on Saturday, Wilson said that he was ecstatic about the large number of participants and added that it was a terrific prelude to the third running of the marathon yesterday morning.
"What the Susan G. Komen Race has done, is turn this event into a multi night event," said Wilson. "One of our motives is tourism so it was ideal to increase the length of stay for some of the visitors. The Susan G. Komen Race is one way of doing that, and with tomorrow (today) being a holiday in the United States, it has turned into a four-night stay for some visitors. That was part of the strategy.
"In addition to that, the fact that we are doing it in connection with Komen, allows us to tie into a very important point about breast cancer. It is a global problem and it is affecting our women in particular to a degree that is exceptional. Younger women are getting it and when they are diagnosed, it is at a more advanced stage than normal. When you look at this thing, it is spreading a very powerful message about health, wellness and breast cancer, and we in Sunshine Insurance are very happy and encouraged to be associated with that."
The Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure was held early Saturday morning, starting on Church Street in front of St. Matthew's Church, and finishing in the open area adjacent to the Atlantis Tennis Courts, on Paradise Island.

read more »


News Article
Get the Comfort you Need: Adjustable Beds from Island Bedding

Freeport, Grand Bahama Island - Get the comfort you need with an affordable adjustable bed at Island Bedding and Furniture!

With its upscale features and congenial price tag, it's no wonder the
S-cape adjustable bed base is one of our most popular. The bed adjusts
to your every whim, soothes you with luxurious massage, and incorporates
the very latest in comfort technology. We appreciate your
individuality. So there's no limit to the number of position
permutations. Adjust away until you find your bliss. And then stop. Take
a deep breath, and savor the moment.

read more »


News Article
Roadmasters set to stage fourth charity run

For the average distance runner, one goal is to compete in a half marathon and then eventually a full marathon, whether it's for his or her own personal gratification or just for a worthy cause. For the past three years, the Bahamas Roadmasters Club has provided both opportunities.
Now into its fourth year, the Roadmasters annual charity run is set for Saturday, September 17 and the interest is brewing from a cross section of the society. Last year, the proceeds went to the Pilot Club of Nassau in their quest to build a pool for the Physically Disabled. Previously, the Aids Foundation and the Aids Camp were among the beneficiaries. This year, Bahamas Roadmasters' goal is to raise at least $10,000 to assist the Ranfurly Home for Children.
The club, founded by president George Smith and others, provides an avenue for Bahamians to develop their dreams of being marathon runners. It also catered to those members who were primarily interested in losing weight or just improving their physical conditioning.
Kimley Saunders, chairman of the organizing committee for the run, said they are opening doors for so many other Bahamians to participate because of the charity aspects attached to the event. Although it's not a full or even a half marathon, the run features a number of aspects that will cater to just about every causal or competitive runner, from a five-mile run or walk from Montagu Beach to Charlotte Street and back.
There's also a 10-mile run/walk that leaves Montagu Beach and travels all the way to Goodman's Bay and back. If a participant dares to be more adventurous, there's the 20-mile run that leaves Montagu Beach and travels all the way to Blake Road and back to Montagu. Additionally, there's also the 20-mile uniformed officers relay that already has a team from the Royal Bahamas Police Force (RBPF), two from Her Majesty Prison and three from the Royal Bahamas Defence Force (RBDF) signed up to compete. There is also an open relay.
For those doing the 20-mile run, the start time is 4:30 a.m. The five and 10-mile races will begin an hour later at 5:30 a.m.
Saunders noted: "We hope to have at least 150-200 participants or more and that everyone will have fun and enjoy themselves and at the same time support the Ranfurly Home. We hope that we can raise the $10,000 or more that we are anticipating to raise for the Ranfurly Home."
In July, 2009, Angela 'Grandmother' Rahming decided to increase her mobility by moving up from walking to running. She did her first charity run two years ago and returned for her second appearance last year. This year, however, Rahming has decided to work closely with the organizing committee. She serves as the assistant secretary, but she said she was so inspired by her ability to "complete the run" without any problems that she's made it her goal to encourage others to get involved.
"It can be for anybody," she insisted. "You don't have to worry about keeping up with anybody. As long as you are consistent, you can finish. Every day you go out, you can add your mileage. Being consistent is the key."
Through her new found love, the actual 'grandmother' of one said a lot of the members were taken aback when she started, but she never allowed anyone to discourage her. In fact, they are all in awe of her achievement in just three years. Last year, Rahming participated in her first half marathon on January 31 at the ING in Miami. Her nephew, who lives in Florida, was so thrilled about her commitment and dedication, that he decided to join her.
With the support of her daughter, grandson, sister and niece on the sideline cheering her on, Rahming completed the course in three hours and 10 minutes.
"For me, that was good, really good. Obviously, it's not elite running time, but for me it was super," she quipped.
That has led to Rahming making strides in a series of other events. In October, she did a half marathon on a Saturday in Washington and on Sunday, the following week, she did her first full marathon. In April, Rahming duplicated the feat when she ran the Kentucky Derby, then drove back to Ohio and did a half marathon.
"I didn't tell anybody in the club that I was going. I just went with another friend," she stated. "They were all surprised that I did it."
Although it was a new event last year, the RBDF has dominated the relay competition and this year, sports officer Ramone Storr said the Defence Force will be back to do it again.
"I guarantee a repeat in the relays," said Storr of their dominance of the first, second, third and fifth place finishes. "We have a couple solid young fellas in training and on the squad now, so I guarantee we will repeat with the relays."
Known for their athletic prowess, Storr said the Defence Force is always capable and ready.
"This road race will just showcase our talent," he pointed out. "We really are in it because we want to do to our part to assist with charity."
For a registration fee of just $20, each participate will receive a T-shirt, Eco friendly bag, a water bottle and free food - stew conch, chicken souse, Johnny cake, fruits - Gatorade, juice and water. A number of prizes will be offered, including tickets on the Bahamas Fast Ferries, dinner for two at British Colonial Hilton and gift certificates from the Sports Centre, Mystical Gym, Lickety Split, Dominos Pizza and a full body massage from International Orthopedics.
Registration sites are the Palmdale Vision, the Reef Restaurant and the Ranfurly Home for Children.

read more »


News Article
Renu Day Spa opens its doors in downtown Freeport

Freeport, Grand Bahama Island -  Relax,
rejuvenate and Renu your mind and body at Renu Day Spa on Mall Drive in downtown Freeport.

Unwind in an environment where
privacy and individualized attention are always ensured. Our Skin Care
specialists, Manicurists, Pedicurists, Makeup Artists and Massage
Therapists are at your disposal, bringing combined experience of over 20
years together to pamper you!

Acrylic
nail refills; gel nail polish; natural nail care; waxing; body scrubs;
facials; deep tissue, prenatal and therapeutic massages are merely...

read more »


News Article
Amazing Grace

Like many parents, Brennamae and Fernley Cooper want only the best for their children -- success, health and for them to maximize their full potential. With a thriving, striving eight-year-old son and a perfect second pregnancy with all of her checks balancing out, the Coopers were shocked to learn just days after their daughter was born in 2009 that she had a congenital heart disease. The mother described the feeling as she was told of what was wrong with her daughter as "heart-wrenching".
"Shock is an understatement. It was so unreal," she said. "I recall when the doctor was explaining it that I immediately started crying because everything up to that point was good. My pregnancy was great, I felt good and I had been up-to-date with all my checks, so there was no indication."
At her first post-natal visit, the doctor heard a heart murmur and referred the Coopers to pediatric cardiologist Dr. Jerome Lightbourne. Grace was diagnosed with a heart condition called Trilogy of Fallot. She had a hole in the lower chamber of her heart, a common thing, but in Grace's case it was multiple, and that the pulmonary vessel that takes blood to the lungs was too narrow, restricting the proper flow of blood to her lungs. Dr. Lightbourne made plans for the just days old baby to fly to Florida for life-saving medical help. In the first two years of her young life, Grace has already undergone a number of operations, to repair a number of defects, including having surgery to remove a portion of her small intestine after she developed intestinal infection after one of her surgeries. The baby had to undergo open-heart surgery in 2010 at one year and two months of age to repair the hole in her heart and the valve.
The Coopers know their daughter will have at least one future surgery to replace a stent that was put in to open a valve which they know will have to be replaced as Grace grows and it becomes too small. But they say God's will be done.
As she approaches her third birthday, Grace is thriving, having met all of her milestones. And her mother marvels at the milestones she said her daughter has achieved.
"Initially, the motor skills we had to work on and thankfully while I was by her bedside I was able to watch the physical therapists as they massaged and worked her legs, arms and neck, positioning her so she could hold up her head and do the different things to strengthen her because she was in a sedated state for such a long time that the body could become stiff in certain areas," she said.
"So I learned to do the exercises and when we returned home, my husband and I continued doing them with her at home for a few weeks. After that, Grace was just striving -- feeding, sitting up and crawling. Now she's walking, talking and doing well."
Her mother describes her as a toddler with a strong personality who loves to sing and smile. "She's just a happy soul," said Cooper.
Grace was able to have all of her surgeries done in the United States courtesy of The Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamas) Heart Foundation, a privately funded charity that raises funds primarily through donations and from the annual Heart Ball held in February, and which will be held on Saturday, February 18 at Sheraton Cable Beach Resort. Over 97 percent of each dollar raised goes directly to the aid of children.
"Prior to 2009, I honestly did not even know about the Sir Victor Sassoon Heart Foundation ... and honestly I don't know if that's sad or whatever, but often times you don't know about these things until you have to use them yourself."
She said as Dr. Lightbourne made arrangements for her daughter to seek life-saving medical help in the United States, she still was unaware to what extent the organization would be able to help them. Cooper said she was left speechless when the doctor explained that the foundation would cover the bill. Today, she is eternally grateful and still does not know how much it cost for her daughter's life-saving surgeries.
"I recall one day when one of the medical personnel came by and asked if I wanted to have a look at what the bill was so far, but I said to her I really didn't want to know because I didn't want a headache that day. Later on she kind of gave us an idea, and it was thousands of dollars -- money that my husband and I would not have been able to come up with at that time -- and not even now. From when this happened, we knew we would not be able to pay back monetarily -- not dollar for dollar, but what we can do is tell people about the foundation."
Reliving the ordeal they went through with their daughter is still painful to the Coopers, but the mother said she and her husband agreed to share her story as their way of giving back.
"If it touches the heart of people who hear the story to give to the foundation, we would do it every time because we are eternally grateful. I know of situations where parents who got bad news from doctors that their loved one has to go into surgery, and they have to come up with 'X amount' before the surgery can even be done, and we cannot relate to that thanks to the foundation. We don't know how that feels."
Cooper said they've made one or two monetary contributions to the foundation since, but nothing they do in comparison can compare. And she encourages people to make donations to the organization because they're not just making a donation, but saving lives.
Through the generosity of others, she says Grace's life -- which she knows has a purpose, has been saved.
"I work with children who sometimes have certain disabilities that prevents them from leading a full life, but because of the opportunity that the foundation has afforded us, Grace can live a normal life. Grace can run around like her peers now, and the teachers don't have to be cautious, and if they are cautious, it's only out of their own fear, and they want to be extra careful. It's not because she's ailing," she says.
With Grace "out of the woods", Cooper says their goal is to help Grace to live a full life, grow up and use her existence as a testimony to let people know.
"We are firm believers in God and I know that even going through it, if I had a different spirit ... a different mindset, I can honestly say I wouldn't have been as mentally stable as I am today because even the way Grace's body changed, and things we saw with our eyes could have blown our minds. As a young couple we were close," said the 35-year-old mother, but this whole experience has brought us even closer because we went through this together and that made it even more easy to deal with."
After the ordeal her family went through she says many people have told her that they expect Grace to be "spoiled", but the mother says she disciplines her daughter when necessary, but has noticed that her daughter has a mind of her own and is very strong-minded. She says if Grace wants to do something she will let them know. And that Grace doesn't stop calling for her mom until she has her attention.
With the foundation's major fundraiser, the Heart Ball scheduled for Saturday, February 18 at the Sheraton Cable Beach Resort, the Coopers are planning to attend for the first time. She says for the past two years they weren't able to attend because they weren't able to financially, but this year the Cooper's are making the sacrifice to pay the $500 per couple price tag, for tickets plus travel into New Providence for the event. She says it's the least they can do.
The Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamas) Heart Foundation was established as a living tribute by Lady Sassoon following the death of her husband, Sir Victor Sassoon, in 1961, to assist Bahamians with heart disease. Lady Sassoon had asked that instead of sending flowers to honor her husband, that people send a donation to the local heart fund. A few weeks later the hospital called to tell her that a substantial amount of money had been donated in her husband's memory, but that there was no local heart fund. She took it upon herself to create one.
Through the foundation's fundraising efforts, over 4,000 children have been afforded quality medical care. The foundation currently has a list of 11 children that need immediate life-saving surgery.
Donations can be made to the Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamas) Heart Foundation at P.O. Box N-8189, Nassau, Bahamas.

read more »


News Article
Lowe looks to rebound from injury and defend title

Defending champion Simon Lowe is hoping to recover from a broken collarbone suffered seven weeks ago to defend his Pineapple-a-thon title on June 2.
The Pineapple-a-thon triathlon covers a 500-meter swim in the beautiful Gregory Town cove, 11 kilometers (k) of hilly biking and a 5k run. Lowe, 29, one of the stars of the growing sport in The Bahamas, set the course record a year ago, in his first-ever pineapple-a-thon. This year, he is just easing back into the sport after the fluke injury that occurred after his shirt got caught in his front wheel.
"I started biking and running again about two weeks ago," Lowe said via Facebook. "I still have not tried any swimming since the accident so I will just have to wing that. My cycling and running is coming back quite fast."
Lowe edged three-time defending champion Ken Bots of Port Orange, Florida, last year winning the race in 52 minutes and 37 seconds. The Pineapple-a-thon course is renowned for 'The Hill' that riders climb four times in the saddle and twice in their running shoes.
"I try to incorporate as much hill training as possible into my routine," Lowe said. "It's not easy in Nassau but I do a bit of bridge running between Nassau and Paradise Island and try and hit the hills around Love Beach on my bike."
The race is part of the annual Pineapple Fest's slate of activities and hopes to match or eclipse last year's record turnout of 37 racers. Racers compete in men's, women's and team divisions for prizes donated by Pineapple Air, Sands Beer, Rainbow Inn, Island Touch Massage, and the Laughing Lizard Café.
Lowe, who also won the inaugural UWC Triathlon in New Providence last September and is a former Conchman Champion (Grand Bahama), said: "I love Eleuthera for many reasons. The relaxed vibe and friendliness of the locals is always a treat. I'm really looking forward to the Pineapple Fest. I had a great time at that event last year."
Also, UWC women's champion Alana Rodgers is expected to compete in her first pineapple-a-thon, and Tennessee native and long-time Eleutheran Abe McIntyre said he's in training for his record sixth pineapple-a-thon.

read more »


News Article
No cross no crown: The cost of leadership

The Bahamas is a nation founded and built upon Christian principles. It is therefore expected that this week and in particular during the weekend, a vast majority of Bahamians will commemorate and reflect upon the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. The reality is that the Easter story is one that we can all relate to in our personal and professional lives. The suspension of all rallies and political activities by all political parties in observance of Holy week is welcome news as it suggests a certain level of reverence for religion and spirituality by our political leaders . However, one can't help but wonder whether the candidates for this year's general elections, leaders and aspiring leaders in general appreciate the true cost of leadership with all of its triumphs and trials.
The life of Jesus tells the story of a man who was so sure of his calling from a very early age that even the temptation of being afforded the world before the debut of his ministry could not deter him from His ultimate purpose to save the world. He performed miracles and preached a gospel of repentance during his three and a half year ministry. However, Jesus received mixed reviews during this period and was not always accepted by all, but what is clear is that he bore the mark of a great leader and left behind a legacy for many generations to come.

The triumphant entry
The triumphant entry witnessed Jesus riding into the town of Jerusalem on a colt being greeted to shouts of joy and gladness from the multitudes that were present singing Hosanna unto Him. Leaders and aspiring leaders can learn a thing or two from this event which was well attended by genuine followers, disciples and sycophants. The irony of the Triumphant Entry is that the same crowd that praised Him within a matter of days ridiculed Him and called for his death. However, Jesus was not deterred by this because He was always sure of His calling and denied himself in spite of opposition. Leaders must be mindful of the vast audience that so easily massage their egos and appear to loathe them for such crowds are fluid and allegiances or positions are unpredictable.

Rejected by the system
The system indicted and convicted Jesus for his non-conformity with the status quo and His desire to bring freedom to the human race. The nature of the system is one that is comfortable with business as usual and taking a stand contrary to popular belief(s) is often frowned upon. A leader should be prepared to stand for his beliefs regardless of its contradiction to the general held notion and obvious opposition within the system. True leaders must be willing to be blacklisted for their beliefs to achieve their dreams.

Betrayals and denials
The betrayal by Judas and denial by Peter as clearly documented in the Bible will probably be recited multiple times during the course of this week. It is my hope that leaders, aspiring leaders and Bahamians in general accept the fact that they will have their fair share of Judases and Peters as they journey through life seeking to fulfil their God-given assignments. In the end as is commonly stated, we must be true to ourselves and be willing to walk alone. The betrayal and denial as noted in the preamble to the Easter story speaks to the role of greed, the love of money, loyalty and fear in discipleship and the following of any leader.

Crucifixion
As Jesus prayed in the garden of Gethsemane, He asked His Father to "let this cup pass over me", speaking in relation to having to go to the cross to be crucified and all of the humiliation that came along with that. The thought of the burden of a mission and sacrifices attached to achievement of a vision can be so overwhelming on a leader that he/she tries to abort the dream. However, great leaders persevere; they push through the challenges with the ultimate goal in sight and declare like Jesus did - "Not my Will but Your Will Be Done".
The road to the Crucifixion is a painful, agonizing and lonely one. Jesus bore and carried His cross alone as He journeyed to Calvary to the jeers and insults of the crowd. One cannot help but reflect on the radical shift in the scenery of the Triumphant Entry compared to that of the Crucifixion. It is no news that the people that once applauded your great works are very seldom around to rescue you from going to the cross. In fact, it is not unusual for these persons to be on the other end of the spectrum demeaning your achievements and person. The actual death of Jesus which marks the climax of the tragedy may come in different forms to leaders ranging to character assassinations, persecutions and losses. However, this is inevitable at some points in the life of every leader or aspiring leader.

Resurrection
We celebrate Easter because Jesus rose from the dead. Indeed the darkest of nights must always give way to the rising of the sun. In spite of it all, one thing that we can always be assured of is the fact that if you are willing, there is a resurrection after the crucifixion. Your mindset is transformed in the resurrection and you will become a stronger and better person as a result. Jesus' ability to be true to His ministry and His calling gave birth to the Christian church as we know it today. Consequently, there are millions around the world that follow his teachings and practice. Hence, Jesus left behind a legacy that has spanned over centuries. Indeed, this was the crowning moment for the cross that He had to bear.
Triumphs and trials are a bittersweet mix in leadership. But one must always be mindful that the goals they are seeking to achieve and the eventual legacy that they will leave behind, ultimately supersedes any temporal challenge that one may face. After all no student is greater than his master/teacher and Jesus taught us all how to become great leaders.

Arinthia S. Komolafe is an attorney-at-law. Comments can be directed at arinthia.komolafe@komolafelaw.com.

read more »


Event
John Bull's
John Bull's

Friday 5th March 2010  10:30 AM

John Bull hosts a Beauty Festival. Festival features international makeup artists and offers beauty workshops, complimentary makeovers (by booking), skin consultations, mini massages, mini manicures, product demonstrations, special discounts and free giveaways. . Start Time: March 5th at 10:30am End Time: Marh 5th at 4:00pm Where: John Bull, Bay Street For more information, contact 242-302-2800