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News Article
Violence against women: Leslie Miller and the PLP's veil of silence

Approaching International Women's Day, the country witnessed a day of infamy in the House of Assembly, one of the most repugnant moments in the chamber in living memory.
Tall Pines MP Leslie Miller boasted, emphatically and unequivocally, that he had inflicted violence on, assaulted and brutalized a woman. In a 105-word horrendous analogy Miller noted, as reported in this journal: "'That's like beating your wife or your girlfriend every time you go home. You just beat her for looking at her. I love ya. Boom, boom, boom. I had a girlfriend like that.
"'When I didn't beat her she used to tell me I ain't love her no more cause I don't hit her. But seriously I had one like that. I had one. She used to tell me,' he insisted as other members murmured and chuckled.
"House Speaker Dr. Kendal Major injected, 'We know that you're joking with that.'
"However, Miller said he was 'serious with that'.
"'I tell her I get tired, man,' he continued, laughing. 'My hands hurting a little bit... give me a break.'
"After a comment from a sitting member inquiring whether he was joking, he reiterated, 'I am telling you the truth. One thing I don't do is lie.'"
Miller "entertained" his colleagues with braggadocio and misogynistic machismo. He twice said that he was serious. He said that he was telling the truth. He said that he doesn't lie. He could not be clearer. There is no way to misconstrue the remarks.
Equally infamous, many of his party colleagues erupted in laughter. Recall that this was before Miller later claimed that he was joking, making the laughter even more contemptible.
Laughter
Aside Miller was Central and South Andros MP His Excellency Picewell Forbes, the country's high commissioner to CARICOM, shaking uncontrollably with laughter, throwing his arms wildly in the air, howling his enjoyment.
A few weeks ago Forbes told Foreign Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell on the floor of the House that he had "some different views" with him about LGBT issues.
With Mitchell generally voicing the views of successive governments, was Forbes disagreeing with government policy and non-discrimination of gays and lesbians?
It is clear from those remarks and in his delight in Miller's woman-beating story, that Forbes represents an antediluvian mindset. In his public career he has proved an intellectual troglodyte. He is not alone.
Sadly, revealingly, Forbes was also not alone in his raucous snickering at the horror of a woman being brutalized.
What particularly tickled his funny bone and that of certain PLP colleagues? Was it when Miller sighed: "I tell her I get tired, man. My hands hurting a little bit... give me a break." At that point Miller insisted that he was telling the truth.
How long is it into a beating before one's hands start hurting "a little bit"? How long before one's hands start hurting a lot? What is the equation of brutality? Is the victim supposedly to feel more loved the more she is brutalized: "I love ya. Boom, boom, boom"? Miller's comments packed more than a punch or a punch line.
As deafening as the laughter, the misogyny, the nauseating sexism, was the silence, not just in the moment, but more egregiously, the veil of silence of the PLP in the weeks after Miller's revolting statement.
Miller's story of brutality was repugnant enough. The aftermath is as disturbing and as revealing. It was a week before his comments gained notoriety amidst a gathering storm of disgust and rebuke.
Outrage
The outrage on social media exploded, with a Photoshopped image quickly going viral of Miller beating a woman on the ground, surrounded by PLP colleagues, including three female MPs, standing aside laughing. Comments on Facebook are running heavily against Miller, with the PLP's silence equally condemned.
An audio of Miller's repulsive comments was placed on YouTube. On March 8, nearly 630 people had listened to the comments, that number climbing the next day to approximately 1,500, climbing approximately another 400 by the following night to around 1,900, and climbing still.
Having plunged the PLP into a quandary, Miller made matters considerably worse. Instead of humility and restraint in his defensive words and offensive tone, he has appeared belligerent and bullying, continuing to offend. His exercise in damage control has been slapdash, ineffective, unconvincing.
The speaker of the House said that he believes that Miller was joking. Many do not share the speaker's opinion. They take Miller at his first words. Why did it take him approximately a week and enormous pressure before he addressed his remarks?
With Miller having taken nearly a week to backtrack, many concluded that either he did not understand his offense or that he was mostly engaging in damage control or some combination, none of which speaks well of his mindset.
Especially for many women, his eventual apology was too little, too late. It has often been said of misogynists that they simply don't get it. Had Miller's comments not come under scrutiny, he may never have apologized.
An expression of remorse is typically the response of someone who appreciates that they have offended others. But when Miller first took to the floor of the House to address his prior comments, contrition was not his first impulse.
Incredibly, he raged against The Nassau Guardian for reporting his remarks. He threatened to return fire to Long Island MP Loretta Butler-Turner who had upbraided him earlier.
A number of the male PLP MPs who laughed a week earlier at his claim of beating a woman cheered on as he promised to deal with Butler-Turner if she persisted in her criticism. Tourism Minister Obie Wilchcombe suggested that Butler-Turner should apologize to Miller for having criticized him!
Revived
The exchange revived misogynistic remarks Miller made during the 2012 general election in reference to Butler-Turner.
In 2014, Miller's misogyny went even beyond his prior sexist remarks, with his mea culpas growing in proportion to the political heat he was taking.
Full contrition is unconditional: "I was wrong and I am sorry." By contrast, Miller played the victim. His apology was conditional.
He bemoaned: "Unfortunately, the media choose to highlight certain words without executing the entire story and truth... that's how papers are sold and unnecessary drama unfolds. This is common in our society, but unacceptable on all [sic] levels. I will continue to challenge anyone that tries to assassinate my character, especially on such a sensitive topic.
"To anyone that my analogy may have offended, I sincerely apologize. We [sic] are one Bahamas, let's make an effort to put politics and hidden agendas aside and live that way."
It's mostly the media's fault. My words were taken out of context. I'm angry that they reported exactly what I said. Let's put politics aside and love each other. Odd, that the latter is not his modus operandi when he is viciously attacking his opponents.
His is the language typical of faltering damage control campaigns. There was the classic conditionality and half-apology typical of such public relations: "To anyone that my analogy may have offended ..." May have offended?
Miller has condemned himself and assassinated his own character by the rank misogyny he spewed and by the fuller and unconditional apology he could not bring himself to offer.
He can go on wildly blaming others. But it is he and he alone who is responsible for the position in which he finds himself. The more he attacks others in this debacle the worse his position.
Miller has done irrevocable damage to his public standing. He has significantly damaged his party. Still, it is the party that is doing greater damage to itself by remaining coldly silent.
There is the silence of the men of the PLP including Prime Minister Perry Christie. There is the silence of the women of the PLP including Social Services Minister Melanie Griffin, whose words rang hollow in commemoration of International Women's Day.
Historically, silence in the face of racism, sexism and homophobia have suggested a certain complicity with those who would dehumanize others with the most repugnant remarks, as did Miller.
Had an FNM MP uttered Miller's contemptible words, Christie and a host of PLP men and women, including Griffin and her female colleagues, as well as possibly Miller, would have lined up to vehemently assail the FNM in question.
The PLP's silence is more than hypocrisy. It is vile and nauseating.
Sadly, where are the apologies of those PLP MPs who laughed along with Miller? Having failed to apologize, they are even more complicit in the misogyny and the sexism, as is the PLP generally for refusing to rebuke Miller.
Following the 1987 general election, widely thought to have been fraudulent and underhanded, Miller noted, "All's fair in war and love", an idiom suggesting that in love or war or politics one does not have to abide by certain rules of fair play or ethics.
Surely Miller was being "serious about that" back then, just as perhaps most Bahamians view him as having been deadly serious in his more recent comments.
o frontporchguardian@gmail.com, www.bahamapundit.com.

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News Article
Miller says he never intended to accuse Bowe of murder
Miller says he never intended to accuse Bowe of murder

Tall Pines MP Leslie Miller said yesterday it was never his intention to accuse businessman Dion Bowe of the 2002 murder of his son, Mario Miller.

"When I speak, I speak with sincerity and I speak with truth," Miller told The Nassau Guardian...

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News Article
Miller says two BEC employees held hostage

Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC) Executive Chairman Leslie Miller said yesterday two female employees of BEC were briefly held "hostage" by a group of men in Pinewood Gardens as they attempted to disconnect a customer's electricity supply on Tuesday.
Miller said the women visited the home, but were forced to stay in their vehicle and called for assistance after the men locked the gate of the property and repeatedly threatened to "smash their faces in with a rock".
"The gentleman picked up a rock -- and when I say a rock, I mean a big rock -- and told her he would smash their faces in if she was to disconnect his light," said Miller, at a press conference at BEC's headquarters.
"...Five men in the neighborhood then went to the gate and stopped them from leaving the gate and they were threatened.
"One man said he would go home and get his nine millimeter and kill all two of them if they came in his yard and turned off his light."
Miller said BEC supervisors and the police responded and assisted the women and the matter is now under investigation.
Police confirmed that two men were arrested in connection with the incident.
The women, although shaken by the ordeal, were unharmed, Miller said.
He said BEC disconnected the customer's electricity supply pending the outcome of the matter.
Miller said BEC employees in the field have been harassed, threatened and assaulted in past years, but there has been an increase in reported incidents in the past few weeks.
He said in the last three weeks at least three employees reported they were threatened, and in at least two cases rocks were thrown at them.
Miller said while the corporation understands times are hard, BEC instructs employees to disconnect households and it is nothing personal.
He said accounts in arrears where there is no evidence that a customer has made an attempt to pay a portion of the bill will be disconnected.
According to Miller, the average customer in arrears in New Providence has a bill at around $5,000.
"We are asking the public to please show some restraint, and to the men, show some class; you do not threaten women," Miller said.
"And you are now going to face the full extent of the law. And only God knows when your light will be turned on again, but it isn't going to be [any time] soon.
"Those men should be ashamed of themselves. They have no shame...I want to apologize to those two women."
There are 32 employees who disconnect supplies, according to Miller. He said six are women.
He said they have now been instructed to execute their duties in twos.
Miller warned that BEC would disconnect any customer who threatens and/or assaults a BEC employee.

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News Article
Miller praises web shop operators

Tall Pines MP Leslie Miller last night defended web shop owners as Bahamians who have made the country proud and said they should not be degraded or compared to gangsters.
During debate on a compendium of anti-crime bills, Miller said he heard an opposition MP opine that web shop operators were organized criminals.
"The people who they refer to as... hoodlums or to use a better word, organized criminals, are well-meaning Bahamians who have made us more than proud," Miller said.
"I remember when I was in college, [FML CEO] Craig Flowers appeared on the cover of Jet magazine; that's a subsidiary of Ebony."
Miller said Flowers was the first black pilot to fly for a national airline in the Americas.
"That is the caliber of person that some would degrade and put a bad omen to his name," he said.
"I daresay that the other ones who are in that same business are generally decent, hardworking Bahamian businessmen who had the ingenuity, who had the background, who had the wherewithal to risk it all to go into a business that has been around for years.
"These good gentlemen have taken it to the next level, to another stratosphere. They have shown Bahamians that you should believe in Bahamians. That you can do what anyone else can do. I don't think we should degrade them."
Miller also admitted that he has gambler.
"I went to the barber yesterday (Tuesday) and a [man] tried to sell me numbers," he said. "I can't even buy numbers. I spent $20, and I didn't catch anything."
Miller also said web shop owners contribute to local charities.
On January 28, a majority of people who voted in a referendum on gambling voted against the establishment of a national lottery, and the regularization and taxation of web shops.
A day later, Prime Minister Perry Christie ordered all web shop operators to shut down their gaming operations immediately or face arrest and prosecution.
The matter then went before the Supreme Court and a legal battle is underway.
Miller did not comment on the case, but said web shops in the country employ thousands of Bahamians.

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News Article
MP Miller laments second class status of sports

Leslie Miller is a straight talker. Expect that from him whatever the circumstances. Accordingly at the memorial this past Monday, organized by the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture at the Thomas Robinson National Stadium, Miller let loose, albeit, briefly.
While paying tribute to the late national hero Robinson, he emphatically noted the relatively small crowd. His view is that the occasion was one whereby thousands of Bahamians would have adjusted their schedules to be present. He lamented the general lack of appreciation for our heroes.
In a conversation, a few days later he said: "If one of those musicians from abroad, Jamaica or someplace was there, you would not have had standing room. But that was for our boy Tommy, I mean, as great as a person could be, and just a small portion of the stadium had people in seats."
I support his comments.
Complimentary words are said but the real test of demonstration is often failed when it comes time for true recognition of our sporting heroes.
Let me use Miller as a perfect example.
He has not in all these years been a part of any of the various classes for the National Hall of Fame. Incredibly when one understands the accomplishments in track and field that Miller represents, it becomes crystal clear that the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture ought to put in place a panel that overlaps the eras, in order to do justice to the list of inductees.
The present panelists might have a difficulty with this position of mine, but I suggest that they don't see it as a criticism, rather a suggestion for the future.
Yes, let's look at Leslie Osborne Miller.
During the mid 1960s, he was the finest quartermiler in the entire state of Florida. He was the 400 meters rocket of Palmetto High School. His credentials etched in stone a reputation as one of the greats in the history of track and field in Florida. He followed that tenure by becoming one of the frontline varsity athletes at the University Of Texas at El Paso (UTEP).
You wonder about his intensity and tenacity as a politician?
Well, during his time in college, the circuit included people like Lee Evans, Tommie Smith, Charlie Greene, Ronnie Ray Smith, Cliff Branch, Jim Hines and countless others.
Miller had to run against the lions of the sport, outdoors during the summer and indoors during the winter.
You didn't back up against the competitors of his day. You forged ahead or you were destroyed. Miller survived handsomely enough most times, to earn varsity letters. On a national scene, he was the forerunner to today's quality Bahamian runners over 400 meters.
When he broke the 47 seconds barrier (46.8 in the Mexico Olympics of 1968) it was another five years or so before another Bahamian was able to do the same. I submit also that the vast majority of those who remember the track star Leslie Miller, recall only his exploits as a quartermiler.
I knew him as one of the best long jumpers this country ever produced. Amazingly, he never trained for the event. Nevertheless, he could get up in the dead of night, stumble over to the long jump pit and without warming up, leap beyond 24 feet. This was 44 years ago.
I'm not exaggerating. At the Bahamian Olympic Trials in 1968, he ambled over to the long jump pit. Miller didn't do any jumping warm-ups, and never took a trial run down the strip.
When his name was called, he stepped to the runway, briefly got set and rumbled to the mark. He took off and landed with the winning jump of 24 feet-plus. Yes, that is history. It was Leslie Miller who the long jump trials for the 1968 Olympic Games. He had already earned a spot on the team in the 400 meters, so backed away for UTEP teammate Jerry Wisdom to earn a slot. That's generosity of a special kind.
That was the caliber of the man. His credentials are much better than many who have been inducted into the National Hall of Fame.
There seems to be no real appreciation for Miller and others, like a certain Leroy Archer Sr., a former high jump local champion who went on to become the greatest soccer player, thus far, in Bahamian history.
It is definitely a second-class approach when those who don't really know the true backgrounds, are positioned to list our heroes.
Sadly, they seem to know just a small percentage of them.

o To respond to this column, kindly contact Fred Sturrup at sturrup1504@gmail.com.

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News Article
MP Miller laments second class status of sports

Leslie Miller is a straight talker. Expect that from him whatever the circumstances. Accordingly at the memorial this past Monday, organized by the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture at the Thomas Robinson National Stadium, Miller let loose, albeit, briefly.
While paying tribute to the late national hero Robinson, he emphatically noted the relatively small crowd. His view is that the occasion was one whereby thousands of Bahamians would have adjusted their schedules to be present. He lamented the general lack of appreciation for our heroes.
In a conversation, a few days later he said: "If one of those musicians from abroad, Jamaica or someplace was there, you would not have had standing room. But that was for our boy Tommy, I mean, as great as a person could be, and just a small portion of the stadium had people in seats."
I support his comments.
Complimentary words are said but the real test of demonstration is often failed when it comes time for true recognition of our sporting heroes.
Let me use Miller as a perfect example.
He has not in all these years been a part of any of the various classes for the National Hall of Fame. Incredibly when one understands the accomplishments in track and field that Miller represents, it becomes crystal clear that the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture ought to put in place a panel that overlaps the eras, in order to do justice to the list of inductees.
The present panelists might have a difficulty with this position of mine, but I suggest that they don't see it as a criticism, rather a suggestion for the future.
Yes, let's look at Leslie Osborne Miller.
During the mid 1960s, he was the finest quartermiler in the entire state of Florida. He was the 400 meters rocket of Palmetto High School. His credentials etched in stone a reputation as one of the greats in the history of track and field in Florida. He followed that tenure by becoming one of the frontline varsity athletes at the University Of Texas at El Paso (UTEP).
You wonder about his intensity and tenacity as a politician?
Well, during his time in college, the circuit included people like Lee Evans, Tommie Smith, Charlie Greene, Ronnie Ray Smith, Cliff Branch, Jim Hines and countless others.
Miller had to run against the lions of the sport, outdoors during the summer and indoors during the winter.
You didn't back up against the competitors of his day. You forged ahead or you were destroyed. Miller survived handsomely enough most times, to earn varsity letters. On a national scene, he was the forerunner to today's quality Bahamian runners over 400 meters.
When he broke the 47 seconds barrier (46.8 in the Mexico Olympics of 1968) it was another five years or so before another Bahamian was able to do the same. I submit also that the vast majority of those who remember the track star Leslie Miller, recall only his exploits as a quartermiler.
I knew him as one of the best long jumpers this country ever produced. Amazingly, he never trained for the event. Nevertheless, he could get up in the dead of night, stumble over to the long jump pit and without warming up, leap beyond 24 feet. This was 44 years ago.
I'm not exaggerating. At the Bahamian Olympic Trials in 1968, he ambled over to the long jump pit. Miller didn't do any jumping warm-ups, and never took a trial run down the strip.
When his name was called, he stepped to the runway, briefly got set and rumbled to the mark. He took off and landed with the winning jump of 24 feet-plus. Yes, that is history. It was Leslie Miller who the long jump trials for the 1968 Olympic Games. He had already earned a spot on the team in the 400 meters, so backed away for UTEP teammate Jerry Wisdom to earn a slot. That's generosity of a special kind.
That was the caliber of the man. His credentials are much better than many who have been inducted into the National Hall of Fame.
There seems to be no real appreciation for Miller and others, like a certain Leroy Archer Sr., a former high jump local champion who went on to become the greatest soccer player, thus far, in Bahamian history.
It is definitely a second-class approach when those who don't really know the true backgrounds, are positioned to list our heroes.
Sadly, they seem to know just a small percentage of them.

o To respond to this column, kindly contact Fred Sturrup at sturrup1504@gmail.com.

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News Article
Christie hit out at Miller

Cables obtained by The Nassau Guardian through the whistleblower WikiLeaks reveal deep concerns Perry Christie had about the Petrocaribe agreement with Venezuela while he was prime minister, and his worries about certain moves then Minister of Trade and Industry Leslie Miller was making, allegedly without Cabinet approval.
In fact, the cables reveal that the Christie Cabinet was "sharply divided" on Petrocaribe, a program under which countries purchase oil from Venezuela on conditions of preferential treatment.
One cable claims Christie made a direct negative comment relative to Miller as a minister.
"Some ministers, the PM continued, were brought into the Cabinet because of their qualifications; others, like Minister Miller, were included in an effort, at times unsuccessful, to keep an eye on what they're doing," said the cable, which was classified by then U.S. Ambassador to The Bahamas John Rood.
The cable said that at a private meeting Rood had with Christie in July 2005, the then prime minister discussed several energy matters as well as his political future.
"The PM indicated that he has concerns about the Petrocaribe agreement signed on behalf of The Bahamas on June 29 by Trade and Industry Minister Leslie Miller," the cable said.
"He stated that Minister Miller 'got way out in front of the Cabinet' on the issue and suggested that Cabinet's eventual consideration of the Petrocaribe agreement would not be favorable.
"...The PM recalled that there were no disruptions to local fuel supplies during [the 2004] busy hurricane season.
"He doubted that government, given its poor record running hotels, airlines, and utilities, would be able to do as well as the international oil companies had done.  The PM confided that the Trinidadian government had expressed to him its displeasure that Minister Miller signed the Petrocaribe agreement."
In another cable penned about a month earlier, a U.S. Embassy official wrote that Christie had up to that point remained silent on the issue but "has shown no inclination to embark on the type of sweeping project that Minister Miller envisions".
"On the other hand, Christie has also shown no inclination to silence a minister whose more outrageous comments regularly make for embarrassing headlines," the June 2005 cable said.
"Minister Miller is an erratic figure within the Christie Cabinet and his frequent dramatic pronouncements on issues ranging from Petrocaribe, to hurricane relief funding, to liquefied natural gas projects are taken with a large grain of salt.
"His recent comments on high gasoline prices have focused less on Venezuela and more on decreasing the fixed markups that local gasoline importers and retailers are permitted to charge," the cable said.
The American diplomat observed: "The Bahamas is sufficiently interested in possibly lowering its energy bill to keep sending Minister Miller to Petrocaribe meetings, but it has little in common politically with President [Hugo] Chavez.
"The one possible exception is Cuba, with which The Bahamas shares a pragmatic working relationship based on migrant issues and other people-to-people matters such as tourism and medical training and treatment."
That same cable reveals that a high level government official had privately expressed concern that a "loose cannon" like Miller would be representing The Bahamas at an upcoming meeting between CARICOM and Chavez.
The Bahamian official suggested to the Americans that rather than request Miller to speak out, "it might be better for both countries (The Bahamas and the United States) if he stayed in the background and made no other substantive comment."
MILLER'S RESPONSE
According to that cable, Miller called a U.S. Embassy official to discuss his trip.
Responding to the official's urging that the best long-term solution to the energy situation would be a market-based solution within the context of a stable, democratic political system, Miller said that in petroleum, economics and politics are always mixed, the diplomat recorded.
"He called on the United States to itself construct new oil refineries in the U.S. to relieve supply shortages," the cable said.
"Miller then went on to describe himself as a 'nationalist' saying that he understood why 'dirt poor people in Ecuador, Bolivia, and Argentina' were upset with oil companies.
"When [the embassy official] cautioned against concluding an agreement with an unstable government whose president had a penchant for tearing up and re-writing contracts, Miller responded by declaring that paying royalties from extracted natural resources of 'one percent' was 'ridiculous and unfair'."
The embassy official, according to the cable, told Miller that investment required stability, transparency, and predictability and that all of these were in short supply in Chavez's Venezuela.
In another cable, the Americans wrote that Miller had returned from Venezuela "waving the Petrocaribe agreement and declaring cheap gas prices in our time."
Miller was quoted as saying, "What we got from the Venezuelans is a dream come true.  This is an extraordinary agreement, one that I have been behind for the past two and a half years."
But the Americans wrote: "Reducing the price of gas in The Bahamas without reducing either wholesaler or dealer profit margins or the government tax has long been one of Leslie Miller's signature theme projects.
"His past predictions of cheap gas in our time have gone unfulfilled while he has lurched from political gaffe to political gaffe.  The local oil companies have long been suspicious of his maneuverings and have challenged his proposals both publicly and privately.
"His permanent secretary, the senior civil servant in his ministry, has long given up trying to explain to him the economics of the oil business in general and in The Bahamas in particular."
The diplomat said the lack of consultation with the local oil companies suggested that any real changes to The Bahamas' energy market "remains a distant dream".
In the comment section of the cable, the American diplomat wrote: "Local reaction to Petrocaribe has been skeptical ever since its signing.
"Minister Miller's actions have been criticized in terms of process (not having Cabinet's authorization) and on substance (creating another inefficient government entity, relying on a single source of supply, and endorsing Venezuela's political agenda)."
The cable said that while Miller was pushing Petrocaribe, Christie indicated to the ambassador that he intended to walk away from the agreement.
Miller has said he will not ever accept a cabinet appointment again.  He has already been ratified by the PLP to run again in Blue Hills, a seat he lost to attorney Sidney Collie in 2007.
The July 2005 cable also revealed that Christie, at the time, was unsure as to whether he would be able to lead the Progressive Liberal Party (PLP) into the 2007 general election, as he was still recovering from a mild stroke.
"The PM stated that he has already begun internal discussions on the timing of the next elections, which he must call no later than May 2007," the cable said.
"He believed he would know by his party's annual convention in November whether or not he is strong enough to lead the party into elections for another five-year term.  If he is fit enough to run, the PM is confident that no one will be able to defeat him."
Christie was strong enough to lead his party into the election.  However, his party was defeated.
When the Free National Movement (FNM) came to office in 2007, it made it clear that The Bahamas government was not interested in the oil alliance with Venezuela.
In a May 2007 cable, a U.S. Embassy official wrote, "We do not expect any warming of relations between Caracas and Nassau.
"Indeed we expect the FNM government to be a stronger partner of the Untied States in addressing Venezuela-related issues."
Not long after, Minister of State for Public Utilities Phenton Neymour confirmed that Petrocaribe was not, and would not be, a priority for the new Bahamian government.
An embassy official later wrote that Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham called the Petrocaribe accord a "stupid proposal".
The Americans noted: "The Bahamas has a wholly privatized oil distribution system that is incompatible with Petrocaribe.  Further, both FNM and PLP senior leadership are leery about being beholden to Venezuela."
 
 
 
 

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News Article
Miller started elite 400m era

The 13th International Association of Athletic Federations Championship events are going on in Daegu, South Korea. As has been the case for more than a decade, The Bahamas sent a respectable group of athletes.
Always among the medal favorites are the Bahamian quarter milers. This time, the 400 meters standouts are led by veteran Chris Brown, who is the defending World Indoor champion; National Collegiate Athletic Association Indoor winner Demetrius Pinder and Ramon Miller.
None of them managed to get into the open 400 meters final but much of an entire nation is anticipating the 1600 meters relay event and hoping the locals get into medal stride collectively.
Among the many Bahamians following the competition in Daegu closely and wishing for an error-free outing is a certain Leslie Miller.
Today, most Bahamians across the length and breadth of this archipelago know Miller as the fiery politician who speaks out loudly and clearly for the "little man" and who is also one of the more noted businessmen in the country.
A rather small percentage of the population know of his distinguished athletic background, though.
It was Leslie Osbourne Miller who in fact started the elite 400 meters era for The Bahamas. He was the first star collegiate performer in the event and the first to break the 47 seconds barrier. He did that with a 46.8 clocking at the 1968 Olympic Games.
He was superb as a senior athlete indeed.
However, as a high school performer, he was phenomenal and set a standard in the South Florida area that placed him forever in a very special category.
There was the 1967 season.
Miller was one of the athletes featured in the prestigious "High School Runners and Their Training Programs" book. That was the year he was Florida State Champion, an All-American and demonstrated versatility in events, second to none as he went undefeated in his specialty, the quarter mile.
Miller established Florida prep records in the long jump (24-1); the triple jump (45-11 ½); ran 21.9 in the 220 yards; 47.5 in the 440 yards and 1:57.4 on the 880 yards.
Those prep statistics compare very favorably with some other senior milestones that he registered. For instance, Miller won a collegiate 600 yards title at the Houston Astrodome with the time of 1:08.9 in 1969 and had 46.6 and 45.8 splits, respectively, in the 440 yards and 400 meters.
Today, The Bahamas is regarded widely as one of the two most consistent nations in the 1600 relay event ( the United States is the other).
It was Miller who blazed the elite trail over the one lap distance.
(To respond to this column, kindly contact Fred Sturrup at frobertsturrup@gmail.com)

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News Article
Miller: I should report union leader to Commissioner of Police
Miller: I should report union leader to Commissioner of Police

UNION boss Stephano Greene's assertion that BEC workers will turn to robbery if they do not get their Christmas bonuses was labelled "unfortunate and callous" by BEC chairman Leslie Miller...

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News Article
FNM Chairman: Miller comments show hypocrisy of PLP

PRIME Minister Perry Christie and House Speaker Kendal Major were yesterday accused of "rank hypocrisy" for failing to insist that the remarks of Leslie Miller be expunged from the parliamentary record after the Tall Pines MP blamed a private citizen for the murder of his son...

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