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News Article
A Young Man Worth Heralding
A Young Man Worth Heralding

Amidst the bad rap that young men today receive, Queen's College (QC) senior Shannon Butler, stands out as an example of a young man to be heralded. The high school senior snagged the coveted Best Overall Performance in the 2012 Bahamas General Certificate of Secondary Education in The Bahamas.

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News Article
A civic-minded student who sees the bigger picture

A smile -- a facial expression formed by flexing the muscles near both ends of the mouth. It is an expression that denotes pleasure, joy or happiness. A smile is understood by everyone despite culture, race or religion. It is internationally known. But for some people, that expression that for many is so simple, can be a source of great embarrassment because of a facial deformity known as a cleft lip or cleft palate.
The gift of a smile may not be something that can be put in a box, wrapped with pretty paper and tied with a bow, but it is something that Operation Smile, an international medical charity has provided to more than 200,000 children and young adults born with cleft lips, cleft palates and other facial deformities around the world. And it's this organization that 16-year-old Natalie Hernandez is a member of.
The Year 12 student of St. Andrew's School, a volunteer student educator for Operation Smile, recently traveled with the medical mission organization to Phnom Penh, Cambodia, as part of a 48-member volunteer team that performed 81 life-changing smile surgeries, free-of-charge on underprivileged children with cleft lips and palates.
Natalie did not actually perform surgery, but she went into schools where she taught local children about basic health and hygiene such as handwashing, dental hygiene and burn care and prevention. Prior to leaving for Cambodia, she also spent months collecting donations to take to Cambodia. She took over 200 stuffed animals and toothbrushes as well as more than $600 that she raised with her school peers.
"The trip was absolutely amazing," said Hernandez. "It was a life-changing experience. It was so great to see the kids learning and it made me happy to know I was making a difference in their lives in this small way. It also taught me that a mother's love is universal and that a baby born with cleft impacts the whole family. A mom, regardless of where she lives in the world, or her social class, will do whatever she can for her child. "They scrapped together whatever money they could, to ensure that their child could have a chance at a better future."
Natalie witnessed people arriving on mules and buses, who traveled from hours away to take advantage of the free surgeries.
"The trip also helped me to put everything in perspective and see the bigger picture. Life isn't about a particular bag, or going out on Saturday night, as many high school students think. It's about helping others. We have been blessed with so many things -- an education, a house, and food. It's our responsibility to give back and help those who aren't as fortunate," she said.
Persons as young as six months up to age 65 showed up to have surgeries on their cleft lip and palate. Over 20,000 Cambodians suffer from the deformity in a population of 14.8 million. Every year about 600 more babies are born with a facial deformity.
Being a part of this legendary organization may not seem like all that big of a deal to many people but Natalie said it was important to her. She thinks of the many children who go through life with low self-esteem, health issues or those who even die because of complications with their cleft palate or lip and said she couldn't help but want to be a part of improving the quality of their lives.
Now in her third year volunteering with Operation Smile, Natalie was finally able to go into the operating rooms as an observer. It made her appreciate the before and after even more
"It's fulfilling to know I helped out in a bigger way this time around," she said.
In preparation for the mission, Natalie underwent two weeks of training in Beijing, China, last summer to be a student educator on health and hygiene.
While the high school senior is proud of the work she did in Cambodia, she believes it is just as important to encourage her peers to be civic-minded.
"People who can eat three meals daily, have a roof over their heads and access to an education should be grateful for all they have and be able to be compassionate enough to share their wealth -- be it time or money to help the less fortunate," she said.
If more young people learned to care about other people, and get involved in charitable organizations, she said, they could learn to be less selfish and see life in the perspective it should be viewed in.
"Being a part of organizations like [Operation Smile] or going on a trip where you physically assist in changing lives makes things like not getting the perfect present, or grades, or being the perfect size or being allowed to go to a party seem insignificant. Things young people consider to be the end of the world no longer compare when you see the big picture. I am glad I am a part of Operation Smile because it has done me good and I hope for other young people to find something they can relate to in charitable services and get on board. It's our duty to give back because most of us are so fortunate," she said.
In hopes of inspiring other students to do more, Natalie founded a Project Smile club at her school. It currently has 10 members. They have done a number of bake sales from which the proceeds benefit the needy. They have also visited children's homes to lend a hand.
It is also important for the young charity worker to be well-rounded which is why she is also president of her school's chess club and vice president of Model United Nations (MUN) club. She also keeps on top of her studies and has a 3.90 grade point average which is just a slight drop from the 4.00 GPA she maintained for most of her high school years prior to transferring to The Bahamas.
Natalie lived in Honduras for two years before moving to The Bahamas. It was while there that she became involved with Operation Smile. She translated for English-speaking doctors. She was able to help doctors and families communicate about procedures and follow-up care.
"After seeing the amazing results they had, I wanted to become more involved. I am so lucky to have gone on this trip, and thank everyone who made it possible," she said.
Natalie believes her involvement as a local translator on four previous Operation Smile mission trips in the South American country played a role in her getting accepted to participate in the latest mission. But no matter the reason, she said the experience was truly life-changing.
"I was so excited, really happy and proud to get accepted to go on a mission trip with Operation Smile. I always wanted to make a difference in the world and this was a great first step. I think I was chosen because I was president for two years of a group called Jovennes En Accion (Youth in Action) in Honduras, which was a social service group that brought kids from different social classes to volunteer at orphanages and retirement homes."
Out of the hundreds that apply for Operation Smile medical missions, only 30 high school students are accepted.
The St. Andrew's School senior has numerous ambitions which include following in her mother, Sally Sternal's footsteps and working with U.S. embassy especially since she enjoys seeing different parts of the world. Her other option has her becoming a plastic surgeon. She was inspired in the second career choice through her exposure to Operation Smile.
No matter where life's road takes this community-minded young lady she said she would always have a passion for community work and will make creating a better world a priority in her life.
Operation Smile is a non-profit organization that goes around the world to give free cleft palate and cleft lip surgeries to unpriveleged children around. It was founded in 1982 by Kathy and Bill Magee who went to the Phillipines on a medical mission and saw so many underprivileged children and adults afflicted with cleft lip an/or palate. They were moved to organize something significant that would benefit these individuals. The couple knew they had to do something more than just one non-profit mission trip and as a result Project Smile was created. It has brought together thousands of medical professionals and volunteers for hundreds of trips to many areas around the world to perform life-changing surgeries. Since its establishment more than 140,000 children worldwide have been treated.
A cleft occurs when the body's natural structures fail to fuse. This forms before birth. According to statistics, one in 700 children worldwide are born with a cleft lip and/or cleft palate. An older term is harelip, based on the similarity to the cleft in the lip of a hare. A cleft lip or palate can be successfully treated with surgery, especially if conducted soon after birth or in early childhood.
If the cleft does not affect the palate structure of the mouth, it is referred to as cleft lip. It is formed in the top of the lip as either a small gap or an indentation in the lip (partial or incomplete cleft) or if it continues into the nose (complete cleft). Lip cleft can occur as a one-sided (unilateral) or two-sided (bilateral). It is due to the failure of fusion of the maxillary and medial nasal process.
Cleft palate is a condition in which the two plates of the skull that form the hard palate (roof of the mouth) are not completely joined. The soft palate in these cases cleft as well. In most cases, cleft lip is also present.

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News Article
A few thoughts on gambling referendum

Public Weather Forecast for The Bahamas for today and tonight, Wednesday 09th January 2013 General Situation: A high pressure ridge continues to create fresh breezes over The Bahamas. Weather: Mostly sunny, warm and breezy today, turning fair and windy tonight Advisory: Small craft should continue to exercise caution

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News Article
A foot stomping, finger snapping, exhilarating journey of street beats hits a Grand Bahama stage

"The Street Beats Group" out of New York will star in the Grand Bahama Performing Arts Society (GPBAS) last performance of the season, which promises to be an energetic and colorful finale to the GBPAS' third season.
The team of young performers based in New York City bring their high energy, urban movement of hip hop and break-dancing while drumming on everyday objects such as five-gallon plastic buckets, household brooms, trash cans and computer keyboards in a performance that is similar to the off-Broadway show "Stomp", to the stage at the Regency Theatre on Saturday, October 1 at 8 p.m.  The interactive shows also has segments of audience participation.
Grand Bahamians will enjoy a class act of performers who have performed at the Royal Bank of Scotland, Sears, AT&T, Pepsi, Nike, and at the U.S Tennis Open.  Tickets are priced at $25 for adults and $15 for students/children, and are available at the Seventeen Shop, the Art of Giving (International Bazaar), and Antoni's Pizzeria in the Seahorse Plaza.
Hip hop, break-dance, tap and drumming enthusiasts will also be excited to know that the group will conduct two workshops, one for dance and one for drumming on the morning prior to the performance, at 10 o'clock at the theater.
"The Street Beats Group's interactive workshops are great for beginners and advanced students," saus Zoilo Ruiz, president of the group.  "The fundamentals we teach will inspire and give a great new perspective on how you can make music by being creative with everyday objects."
Individuals wishing to participate in either of the workshops can contact Gloria McGlone, a (GBPAS) committee member, at 373-2887 for workshop details.  Special discounts are available for workshop and concert combos.
The GBPAS is a charitable organization that was launched in January of 2009 by volunteers who are passionate about the performing arts.  The objective of this society is to provide its members and the community of Grand Bahama with a variety of international musical, theatrical and dance performances throughout the year.  They also seek to encourage and expose the Grand Bahamian youth to the endless possibilities of a career in the performing arts field through the provision of scholarships to local music and dance schools, as well as summer camps and colleges abroad.

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News Article
A young man who has his 'head on right'

At first glance, he seems to be like just any other young man his age with the usual air of confidence and a seeming nonchalant attitude, but if you take a closer look and get to know him better, you realize that 15-year-old Brennan Williams is much more than meets the eye. He's smart and he has a passion for saving animals -- particularly cats.
Williams, a ninth-grade student at North Eleuthera High School, was recently recognized at the Ministry of Education's 19th annual national award presentation as co-winner of the best results for the Bahamas Junior Certificate (BJC) examinations in the government schools, and the male with the best overall BJC results in government schools.
He believes that if young men live in the shadow that society casts upon them, they will never live up to their potential. And he worked hard to prove that he is capable, earning seven A grades in General Science, Health Science, Mathematics, Technical Drawing, Family and Consumer Sciences, Social Studies and Religious Knowledge and a B grade in English Language.
"When I started grade nine I said to myself that I really wanted to do the best in my school when I took the BJCs," he said. "I even thought it would be great to do the best on my island but I didn't imagine that I would get the overall best results in the country for a government school or even a male. It was amazing when I did all of that. To me this proves that nothing is impossible once you are willing to work hard for it."
The honor roll student, who has a grade point average (GPA) of 3.44, has always set the bar high for himself and is glad when he achieves far beyond his expectatons. Due to his determination to outdo himself he does not let the views of society hinder his dreams or dicatate what he can or cannot do. He truly believes nothing is impossible.
Although he has a lot of ambition, he gives credit for his success to his family who he says has always supported him in excelling in everything that he sets his mind to.
His mother, Thakurdaye Williams, a primary school teacher, constantly encourages him to work harder in his weakest subject, English. His father, Brian Williams, an agriculture teacher at his school, helps him with his math and sciences. But he says his greatest motivator was his elder sister Brianne, who never let him take no for an answer and was always interested in her education and discovering new things. He says it was her who pushed him to be the same way too.
"I guess since my parents are teachers and my sister was really smart, great things are expected of me as well. For some this may seem like a lot of pressure but it's a good motivation for me to keep doing better and better," he said. "My sister really pushed me the hardest sometimes. She was a really good student and could explain anything to me. She was valedictorian of our school last school year, and seeing how well she did always encourages me."
Williams adheres to a strict study schedule. He hits the books for at least two hours after school on subjects that are easiest for him. He spends an additional hour on the subject he has the most difficulty with -- English. And the study method that he has found that works best for him is to rewrite all of his notes and repeat what he understands to himself. It's a method he doesn't always stick to as he switches things up so that his study habits don't become monotonous. He sometimes makes up questions to himself so that he can think of all the answers, which he said he's found to be a good way to prepare for exams.
Tutoring students who don't understand something the way he does also helps. He said he's found that it's a good way to ensure that he understands the subject too. But he always prefers a quiet area when he's studying.
Now a tenth-grade student, Williams says it was nice to be recognized for his work during the national awards presentation, but he says that is behind him and his focus in on the future. He aspires to become an aeronautical engineer. Passionate about the field, he has chosen a course of study towards that end, taking optional courses in physics, chemistry and graphical communication.
Williams has not started looking at colleges as yet, but he is doing everything he can to ensure that he's a good candidate for any school he applies to.
But brains aren't everything to the teenager, he also has a passion for animals. When he isn't studying or trying to escape to the beach for a quick swim, his hands are full taking care of the cats in his settlement. He was appalled that people did not take care of their animals, and remembers sneaking strays home to feed and take care of them. He never thought about keeping the animals and always set them free once they were better.
"It really hurts me to see animals not being taken care of properly. I think everyone has a role in helping the animals that live around them," he says."Some of them [animals] just need homes and can be really loyal if you take care of them. I don't like to see them being kicked or abused and I think we all can do something about it."
The tenth-grade student believes it's important for young people to find things they like to do, so that they can develop their personality and discover their strengths. While he does not participate in a lot of extracurricular activities at his school, he makes an effort to participate on the track team.
And he does not feel disadvantaged attending a Family Island school. He says he may not have as many options in classes or after-school activities as students at schools in the capital, but he says he has peace and quiet and that he appreciates every class he does have.
"Students should appreciate every small blessing they have when it comes to their education. Make the best of whatever you have and remember that studying is important, but doing other things in your community or around your school is just as good. Caring about what's going on around you or doing things to develop yourself outside of your school work helps to make you a better person I believe."
Williams encourages students -  particularly young men - to find their niche when it comes to their school work and communities. He said not everyone will be strong in the same areas, nor will they be able to study or enjoy things in the same way. He hopes that in the future he can hear more good news about young men excelling in society instead of hearing about fighting and violence.
To contribute to his dream for young men, Williams is aspiring to continue to excel in his school work by first conquering English and finally earning an A grade.  He hopes to achieve a 4.0 GPA before his high school years end and he also dreams of returning as an awardee in the national awards ceremony for his Bahamas General Certificate of Secondary Education exam results. He says there is nothing a person can't do if they put their mind to it. And while he dreams big he hopes other young men join him and dream even bigger.

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Academic excellence and exemplary behavior awarded

A little over 300 of the 1,007-strong student body population at Sadie Curtis Primary School were recognized for their academic achievements as well as their positive behavior, at the school's recent annual awards ceremony.
Leading the way among the list of honorees were second grade students Steven Bain and Kamran Rolle, and third grade student Perrell Cooper, who were named to the Principal's List with 3.8 grade point averages (GPA).  To make the Principal's List, students must have GPAs between 3.8 and 4.0.  They also have to be reading two or more grades above their current grade level.
Another 23 students were named to the honor roll, for which students had to earn a GPA of at least a 3.5 to 3.79 and had to be reading at least one grade above their current level.  A slew of other students, 145 in total, were named to the Merit List. Those students must have grades between 3.00 and 3.49, and must be reading at least one grade above their current level.  In a twist, 70 students were also recognized for their exemplary behavior or leadership skills even if they did not make honors status.
Whether they were being recognized for their academic ability or positive conduct, the awardees at Sadie Curtis' annual award ceremony were shining examples of greatness in action.
For Perrell, seven, it was a proud moment to walk across the stage as one of the three students who made the lofty Principal's List.
"It makes me feel very jubilant and happy to get an award," said the third grader.  "I felt excited that I did better than many of my friends because we all work hard to do well.  I work hard all year long and I am happy to get a prize.  I hope to do even better next time and get a 4.00 GPA."
Kamran was also excited to be recognized for his hard work and believes listening to his teachers and doing his work on time really paid off.  He said he's now more encouraged to always do well so he can be awarded every year from now on.
The ceremony, which inspires achievers to continue their good work, is also meant to encourage those students who didn't make the mark to keep on trying so they too can have a moment of glory.
In-school ceremonies are a small way to encourage students to continue to strive for excellence," said organizer and fifth grade teacher, Shantell Paul. She says it is more important to point out the good in students rather than negative.
"We have the award ceremonies to recognize students who do exceptionally well academically and we also highlight those students who do well in other areas.  We want the kids to see that good work and behavior pays off," she said.  "We don't want to only tell students when they do poorly, but we want to pay more attention to when they do good things.  We always like to focus on the good so the students can gravitate toward these things, rather than making a bigger deal about the bad.  We hope these ceremonies really encourage them and push them to do better every year."
At Sadie Curtis Primary they not only acknowledge academic excellence, but promote good behavior and positive attitudes, which is why over 50 students were recognized for exemplary behavior.
Ten-year-old Arshantae Knowles, a sixth grade student, was happy to receive an award for good behavior even though she didn't make the honor roll.
"I was really happy I got an award.  I know I didn't do as well as I should to get on the honor roll, but my teachers saw that I behaved well and still worked hard in class, so I guess that's why I got an award," she said.  "I like that if you do well and listen to the teacher and really try, you can still get a prize.  I will try harder next time to get an award for my grades too."
Paul says it is important to also encourage students in other ways as well, as not all students will be academically inclined, but they can still aim to be good students when it comes to morals and behavior.
"You want to highlight the students in all aspects of what they do.  We don't just want to say good grades are everything," said the teacher.  "It's about the whole child too.  We promote good behavior at the school and having a special award for this reason encourages students to not only be competitive academically, but also be on their best behavior at all times.  I think it's a great way to encourage students to be better citizens."

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News Article
Accused rapist tells judge he's unable to comply with bail conditions

A man accused of the rape and armed robbery of a policewoman told a judge yesterday that he has been unable to comply with the conditions of his bail.
Audley Ward, of Price Street, Nassau Village, was released on $20,000 bail on April 25 on the condition that he reports to the South Beach Police Station on Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays and wears a GPS ankle bracelet.
However, Ward told Senior Justice Jon Isaacs that he could not meet the reporting conditions because he did not have any government-issued identification.
Ward said police officers would not allow him to sign in without presenting identification. According to Ward, police seized his passport when they arrested him in July 2011.
Isaacs advised Ward to continue reporting to the station in compliance with the court order.
The judge directed prosecutor Jillian Williams to get Ward's passport from police or alternatively his mug shot.
Prosecutors allege that Ward and Dominic Thompson raped the officer after they broke into her home in southwestern New Providence on July 3, 2011.
The men are also accused of robbing the woman of a 2008 Honda Accord, jewelry and a digital camera, with a combined value of $19,800. They also face a charge of receiving the stolen car between July 3 and July 14.

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Acklins residents concerned fishing guides being displaced

ACKLINS - Bonefish lodge operators in Acklins are calling on the central government to investigate "rogue" bonefish lodge operators who have entered the sector.
Bonefish lodge operators in Acklins were among those who attended a special meeting organized by the Combined Churches Committee held recently at Acklins Community Centre at Spring Point to address residents' concerns.
Some lodge operators at the meeting complained that a few lodge owners are not following the law. Newton Williamson, owner of Grays Point Bonefish Lodge, said: "I have been in this business for many years and have adhered to the rules and regulations governing the sports fishing and I don't like what I see going on nowadays. I think it is wrong for guests to be allowed to go out on the flats by themselves. First of all that practice is dangerous for the guests, and secondly, it deprives the local guides from earning a living and taking care of their families."
Concerns with guests going on the flats alone escalated a year ago after new entrants joined the sector. These guests pay a discounted rate to some lodges, are provided with vehicles and are allowed to roam the island and its fishing grounds at will. These guests, who have visited before, have logged the coordinates of the major fishing grounds in their global positioning system (GPS) devices and they know exactly where to go to fish without the service of fishing guides.
"Guests simply cannot be allowed to go out on their own," said Francita Neilly, island administrator, to the gathering.
"Acklins must be the only place that allows them to do that foolishness. I know that they cannot do that in Andros. I will inform the ministry about the situation so that they can deal with those lodges who are breaking the law."
Lodge operators also complained about a shortage of sports fishing guides. Neilly said a training session will be initiated early this year for new fishing guides and for those who wish to sharpen their skills.

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Affordable & Elegant Wedding Planning Service
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  • Nassau / Paradise Island, Bahamas
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Aircraft donaton to Bahamas Habitat
Aircraft donaton to Bahamas Habitat

May 1, 2012 --- Bahamas Habitat (www.bahamashabitat.org) announced today the donation of the Beechcarft Baron E55 N63JL aircraft to the organization by Thierry Pouille, President of Air Journey in Jupiter FL, for use by the organization in its Bahamas mission work.

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Albury's Alarm Surveillance & Protection
Alarm Systems
  • Mackey Wilton Street's
  • Nassau
  • Nassau / Paradise Island, Bahamas
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Amazing Painters Company's
Painters & Painting Contractors
  • Jubilee Garden
  • Nassau
  • Nassau / Paradise Island, Bahamas
Movie
American Gangster
  • Genre : Biography, Crime, Drama
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In 1970s America, a detective works to bring down the drug empire of Frank Lucas, a heroin kingpin from Manhattan, who is smuggling the drug into the country from the Far East....


News Article
American para-triathlete, Hector Picard to host Triathlon for The Beacon School

American para-triathlete and motivational speaker Hector Picard, the first and only "Double Arm Amputee" 3x IRONMAN will be visiting Grand Bahama Island March 24th - March 31st...

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Amour Affairs
Wedding Planners,Party & Event Planning
  • Sabastian Way
  • Nassau
  • Nassau / Paradise Island, Bahamas
News Article
An Out Of This World Experience
An Out Of This World Experience

Eight weeks at a NASA summer experience have forever changed the lives of two young men -- one now has the confidence that he can get into the university of his choice, and the other believes the experience factored in heavily into him recently obtaining employment.

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An inspiring, unforgettable experience

For as long as she can remember, Nikita Smith has dreamed of being a doctor, so it was a dream come true for her to be invited to attend the National Youth Leadership Forum in Medicine (NYLF/MED), the United States' foremost program in pre-medical education for high school students which allows them to get a valuable head start on their career path.
At the NYLF/MED program, which took place in Atlanta, Georgia, at the Emory School of Medicine at Emory University, Nikita, 16, who will commence her senior year at Kingsway Academy in September, was able to experience a hands-on, interactive curriculum that included shadowing practicing physicians, clinical site visits at top medical centers, and meet and interact with faculty from world-renowned medical institutions.
Students gain the opportunity to attend the Forum on Medicine through nomination from a teacher or educator, through NYLF alumni nominations, or based on information provided on pre-college surveys. To qualify as a Forum on Medicine scholar, a student must be in ninth through twelfth grade and have demonstrated academic achievement. Nikita's cumulative grade point average is 3.10.
While Nikita is unclear who recommended her for the forum, she is glad they did. She said the experience has cemented for her the fact that she wants to pursue a career in the medical field. She has narrowed it down to cardiology or pathology.
"I was lucky to be a part of the program. I am not sure of my school or teachers recommended me but I am glad it happened because I had an amazing and unforgettable experience," she said.
Nikita was among 358 high school students from around the United States and the Caribbean.
"[It] was more than just about discussing important topics in global medicine. It was also about helping young people like myself to discover just how suited to the medical field we are. From this experience I can really say this is my calling and I am excited to get into medical school and get even deeper in this field," said the Kingsway Academy student. "I really feel enlightened and even more determined to get into medical school now."
Some of the topics addressed with Nikita and her peers included emergency medicine, how stressful but rewarding it can be and how to deal with not being able to save every single patient. Another speaker spoke to them on HIV and AIDs, what's new in the field and how best to combat stereotypes and ignorances about the topic. And they got the opportunity to hear from a patient who had multiple heart surgeries who was able to give the students an idea of how patients feel, and how valuable good doctors are in saving lives.
The students were also split into groups to debate essential topics in medicine as well. Smith's group discussed universal health care and supported the concept by saying everyone has a right to good health care no matter their financial or socio-economic status. And that regulating health care for everyone would put less strain on the government. They also discussed sex selection and animal testing.
The high school senior also got the opportunity to see exactly how medical students learn through problem-based learning exercises and limited, but vital hands on experience with medical simulators and live patients. She also sat in on lectures given by professionals on emerging issues and past discoveries. Participation in the Forum on Medicine is also a great resume opportunity for her as it can be used as a reference on her college application and interviews.
The NYLF/MED program takes place annually at different intervals in 10 cities throughout the United States -- Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, New York, Philadelphia, Raleigh-Durham, San Francisco and Washington, D.C.
Smith chose the Atlanta program not only because it was the first of the series, but also because it would allow her to visit the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM), which is one of her dream schools.
"I really was excited to visit the PCOM. It was a school among others that participants in the program could visit. I liked it so much I now want to study medicine there when I finish high school," said the young lady. "I like their program which allows me to have hands-on experience and simulate real medical work and surgeries throughout my studies."
With a 3.10 grade point average, Smith said she knows she will have to "buckle up" to raise her grades even higher so that she can be considered for acceptance into the school of her choice. She hopes to have at least a 3.5 GPA by the end of her senior year.
She has six Bahamas Junior Certificates (BJCs) with an A grade in Mathematics, B grades in General Science, Health Science and Social Studies and C grades in English and Mathematics.
She sat two of her Bahamas General Certificate of Secondary Education (BGCSE) in tenth grade and has achieved an A in English Language and a C grade in Mathematics. She sat six more exams in elventh grade -- Biology, Chemistry, History, Food and Nutrition, Spanish and retook Mathematics because she wanted a better grade. She hopes she aced them all, so that she can concentrate on taking only science national exams in her final year.
Nikita is also focused on doing well on her Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) examinations.
"Besides really pushing me to do better in school, the best part of the 10-day program was the information I was able to gather. The forum was like a real college experience. I was living in a dorm room and had a roommate. I had a schedule to follow and lectures to attend. It was a lot of fun and it really opened my eyes. This was also the first time I was travelling on my own so that was new and great for me. I was nervous, but the trip really gave me a real idea of what I will find in college or university one day."

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Andros Lighthouse Yacht Club and Marina
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  • Fresh Creek Andros
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  • Andros, Bahamas
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News Article
Are Smartphones The New Laptop

Since the cell phone was dubbed the "smartphone", it has easily become one of the fastest selling electronics products of all time.

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Arts Calendar

Exhibitions
"Emblematic", a 40th independence show by Doongalik Studios Art Gallery, continues at the gallery on Village Road. For more information, visit www.doongalik.com.

"40 Years of Bahamian Art" continues at the National Art Gallery of The Bahamas (NAGB). For more information, visit www.nagb.org.bs, email info@nagb.org.bs or call 328-5800/1.

"The Bahamian Collection", photographs by Duke Wells, continues at the National Art Gallery of The Bahamas (NAGB). The opening is free and open to the public. For more information, visitwww.nagb.org.bs, email info@nagb.org.bs or call 328-5800/1.

"Master Artists of The Bahamas" continues at The National Art Gallery of The Bahamas. Featured artists are John Beadle, Jackson Burnside, Stan Burnside, John Cox, Amos Ferguson, Kendal Hanna, Brent Malone, Eddie Minnis, Antonius Roberts, Dave Smith and Max Taylor. For more information visit www.nagb.org.bs, email info@nagb.org.bs or call 328-5800/1.

Theater

Shakespeare in Paradise Theatre Festival is looking for new plays to be read at the festival's customary Play Reading Series. All submissions are to be sent to scripts@shakespeareinparadise.org, Dr. Nicolette Bethel, festival director, (242) 677-8900. The submission deadline is Saturday, August 31. For additional information on Shakespeare in Paradise, visit ringplay.org/wordpress/ orwww.facebook.com/ShakespeareInParadise.

Workshops

Introduction to Acting

The Introduction to Acting class will be offered at The College of The Bahamas in the Fall 2013 semester on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 6pm-9pm. Learn method and movement, characterization, and stage and screen techniques.

Writing Workshop
Gaulin Project Online Writing Workshops will be offered by Helen Klonaris for Fall 2013. 'Writing down the Body: A Creative Writing Workshop' runs September 6 - October 5; 'Writing Down a Life: Beginning a Memoir' runs October 11 - November 29; 'Remembering Ourselves: Healing Our Colonial Legacy - A day-long retreat' will run October 12 10am - 5pm. To register, emailthegaulinproject@gmail.com.

Tours
Islandz, having acquired Downtown Art Tours, offers its Islandz Gallery Hop tours, examining art spaces downtown on Saturdays. Tickets are $20 per person for the two-hour tour. For more information or to book tickets, call 601-7592 or visit Islandz online at www.islandzmarket.com.

Tru Bahamian food tours offers a "Bites of Nassau" food tasting and cultural walking tour to connect people with authentic local food items, stories and traditions behind the food and the Bahamians that prepare and preserve them, through a hands-on, interactive, educational tour and culinary adventure. Tickets are $69 per person, $49 for children under 12. Tours are everyday from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., starting at the British Colonial Hilton and ending at Tortuga Rum Cake Company. For more information visit www.trubahamianfoodtours.com.

Call for works
All artists interested in participating in the third biennial All Ceramics Exhibition, under the theme "My Beautiful Teacup and Bowl", can contact Jessica Colebrooke at 324-3533 or at email:jessicastileworks@gmail.com.

The 30th Annual Central Bank of The Bahamas Art Competition and Exhibition invites entries for its Open Category under the theme "The Independents", in commemoration of the 40th anniversary of Bahamian independence, which is being celebrated this year. The objectives of the competition are to identify, recognize and encourage Bahamian visual artists. To qualify, participants must be citizens of The Bahamas, 18 or older (as of October 1, 2013) and not registered in secondary school. The Open/Senior Category Competition and Exhibition component will be held from Tuesday, October 1 to Friday, November 1. Artists under 30 are especially encouraged to embrace this opportunity of the theme of "The Independents" as a challenge in terms of material and/or the role and responsibilities of independent thinking in art in The Bahamas, as well as, thinking of the larger political symbolism of independence of the country.

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News Article
Arts Calendar

Exhibitions "Chan Pratt: The Art of Passion", opens Friday, August 9, 7-9 p.m. at The Central Bank Art Gallery on Market Street. The exhibition is open for viewing until Friday, August 30.

"Bahamaland", photography by Roland Rose, continues at the D'Aguilar Art Foundation on Virginia Street. For more information, contact the foundation at 322-2323, 325-1957 or 357-9263 or atsds.bahamas@yahoo.com...

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News Article
Arts Calendar

Exhibitions
"Feel The Rhythm", new works by Nadine Seymour-Munroe, opens Thursday, September 26 at 6 p.m. at Hillside House. RSVP at 327-0287 or 445-5307 or email creativeml1@yahoo.com.

"Emblematic", a 40th independence show by Doongalik Studios Art Gallery, continues at the gallery on Village Road. For more information, visit www.doongalik.com.

"40 Years of Bahamian Art" continues at the National Art Gallery of The Bahamas (NAGB). For more information, visit www.nagb.org.bs, email info@nagb.org.bs or call 328-5800/1.

"The Bahamian Collection", photographs by Duke Wells, continues at the National Art Gallery of The Bahamas (NAGB). The opening is free and open to the public. For more information, visit www.nagb.org.bs, email info@nagb.org.bs or call 328-5800/1.

"Master Artists of The Bahamas" continues at The National Art Gallery of The Bahamas. Featured artists are John Beadle, Jackson Burnside, Stan Burnside, John Cox, Amos Ferguson, Kendal Hanna, Brent Malone, Eddie Minnis, Antonius Roberts, Dave Smith and Max Taylor. For more information visit www.nagb.org.bs, email info@nagb.org.bs or call 328-5800/1.

Casting call

Fash|Art is having a casting call for emerging fashion designers and visual artists Saturday, September 7 at Doongalik Studios from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information, visit www.facebook.com/fash.art.event or email fashartevent@gmail.com.

Theater

Shakespeare in Paradise Theatre Festival is looking for new plays to be read at the festival's customary Play Reading Series. All submissions are to be sent to scripts@shakespeareinparadise.org, Dr. Nicolette Bethel, festival director, (242) 677-8900. The submission deadline is Saturday, August 31. For additional information on Shakespeare in Paradise, visit ringplay.org/wordpress/ or www.facebook.com/ShakespeareInParadise.

Workshops

Writing Workshop
Gaulin Project Online Writing Workshops will be offered by Helen Klonaris for Fall 2013. 'Writing down the Body: A Creative Writing Workshop' runs September 6 - October 5; 'Writing Down a Life: Beginning a Memoir' runs October 11 - November 29; 'Remembering Ourselves: Healing Our Colonial Legacy - A day-long retreat' will run October 12 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. To register, email thegaulinproject@gmail.com.

Tours
Islandz, having acquired Downtown Art Tours, offers its Islandz Gallery Hop tours, examining art spaces downtown on Saturdays. Tickets are $20 per person for the two-hour tour. For more information or to book tickets, call 601-7592 or visit Islandz online at www.islandzmarket.com.

Tru Bahamian food tours offers a "Bites of Nassau" food tasting and cultural walking tour to connect people with authentic local food items, stories and traditions behind the food and the Bahamians that prepare and preserve them, through a hands-on, interactive, educational tour and culinary adventure. Tickets are $69 per person, $49 for children under 12. Tours are everyday from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., starting at the British Colonial Hilton and ending at Tortuga Rum Cake Company. For more information visit www.trubahamianfoodtours.com.

Call for works
All artists interested in participating in the third biennial All Ceramics Exhibition, under the theme "My Beautiful Teacup and Bowl", can contact Jessica Colebrooke at 324-3533 or at email: jessicastileworks@gmail.com.

The 30th Annual Central Bank of The Bahamas Art Competition and Exhibition invites entries for its Open Category under the theme "The Independents", in commemoration of the 40th anniversary of Bahamian independence, which is being celebrated this year. The objectives of the competition are to identify, recognize and encourage Bahamian visual artists. To qualify, participants must be citizens of The Bahamas, 18 or older (as of October 1, 2013) and not registered in secondary school. The Open/Senior Category Competition and Exhibition component will be held from Tuesday, October 1 to Friday, November 1. Artists under 30 are especially encouraged to embrace this opportunity of the theme of "The Independents" as a challenge in terms of material and/or the role and responsibilities of independent thinking in art in The Bahamas, as well as, thinking of the larger political symbolism of independence of the country.

read more »


News Article
Arts Calendar

Exhibitions
"Shakespeare in Paradise Celebrates five years of Poster Art: 2009-2013" opens Friday, September 27, 6:30-9 p.m. at Popopstudios International Center for the Visual Arts. For more information, visit www.popopstudios.com or shakespeareinparadise.org.

"Feel The Rhythm", new works by Nadine Seymour-Munroe, opens Thursday, September 26 at 6 p.m. at Hillside House. RSVP at 327-0287 or 445-5307 or email creativeml1@yahoo.com.

"Emblematic", a 40th independence show by Doongalik Studios Art Gallery, continues at the gallery on Village Road. For more information, visit www.doongalik.com.

"40 Years of Bahamian Art" continues at the National Art Gallery of The Bahamas (NAGB). For more information, visit www.nagb.org.bs, email info@nagb.org.bs or call 328-5800/1.

"The Bahamian Collection", photographs by Duke Wells, continues at the National Art Gallery of The Bahamas (NAGB). The opening is free and open to the public. For more information, visit www.nagb.org.bs, email info@nagb.org.bs or call 328-5800/1.

"Master Artists of The Bahamas" continues at The National Art Gallery of The Bahamas. Featured artists are John Beadle, Jackson Burnside, Stan Burnside, John Cox, Amos Ferguson, Kendal Hanna, Brent Malone, Eddie Minnis, Antonius Roberts, Dave Smith and Max Taylor. For more information visit www.nagb.org.bs, email info@nagb.org.bs or call 328-5800/1.

Theater

Shakespeare in Paradise Theatre Festival is looking for new plays to be read at the festival's customary Play Reading Series. All submissions are to be sent to scripts@shakespeareinparadise.org, Dr. Nicolette Bethel, festival director, (242) 677-8900. The submission deadline is Saturday, August 31. For additional information on Shakespeare in Paradise, visit ringplay.org/wordpress/ or www.facebook.com/ShakespeareInParadise.

Workshops

Writing Workshop
Gaulin Project Online Writing Workshops will be offered by Helen Klonaris for Fall 2013. 'Writing down the Body: A Creative Writing Workshop' runs September 6 - October 5; 'Writing Down a Life: Beginning a Memoir' runs October 11 - November 29; 'Remembering Ourselves: Healing Our Colonial Legacy - A day-long retreat' will run October 12 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. To register, email thegaulinproject@gmail.com.

Tours
Islandz, having acquired Downtown Art Tours, offers its Islandz Gallery Hop tours, examining art spaces downtown on Saturdays. Tickets are $20 per person for the two-hour tour. For more information or to book tickets, call 601-7592 or visit Islandz online at www.islandzmarket.com.

Tru Bahamian food tours offers a "Bites of Nassau" food tasting and cultural walking tour to connect people with authentic local food items, stories and traditions behind the food and the Bahamians that prepare and preserve them, through a hands-on, interactive, educational tour and culinary adventure. Tickets are $69 per person, $49 for children under 12. Tours are everyday from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., starting at the British Colonial Hilton and ending at Tortuga Rum Cake Company. For more information visit www.trubahamianfoodtours.com.

Call for works
All artists interested in participating in the third biennial All Ceramics Exhibition, under the theme "My Beautiful Teacup and Bowl", can contact Jessica Colebrooke at 324-3533 or at email: jessicastileworks@gmail.com.

The 30th Annual Central Bank of The Bahamas Art Competition and Exhibition invites entries for its Open Category under the theme "The Independents", in commemoration of the 40th anniversary of Bahamian independence, which is being celebrated this year. The objectives of the competition are to identify, recognize and encourage Bahamian visual artists. To qualify, participants must be citizens of The Bahamas, 18 or older (as of October 1, 2013) and not registered in secondary school. The Open/Senior Category Competition and Exhibition component will be held from Tuesday, October 1 to Friday, November 1. Artists under 30 are especially encouraged to embrace this opportunity of the theme of "The Independents" as a challenge in terms of material and/or the role and responsibilities of independent thinking in art in The Bahamas, as well as, thinking of the larger political symbolism of independence of the country.

read more »


News Article
Arts Calendar

Exhibitions
Orginal works by Giovanna Swaby and Steven Schmid will be auctioned today at 12 p.m. at Hillside House Gallery and Studio, 25 Cumberland Street. All funds will aid in their continued studies at the University of Dundee, Scotland.

"40 Years Later", new work by John Beadle, John Cox, Antonius Roberts and Heino Schmid, opened Wednesday, July 17 at Hillside House Studio and Gallery on Cumberland Street. The discussion with the artists continues Saturday, July 20, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at Hillside House. For more information, call 322-7678.

"Bahamaland", photography by Roland Rose, is open for viewing at the D'Aguilar Art Foundation on Virginia Street. For more information contact the foundation at 322-2323, 325-1957, 357-9263 or at sds.bahamas@yahoo.com.

"Emblematic", a 40th independence show by Doongalik Studios Art Gallery, opens Thursday, July 25 6-9 p.m. For more information, visit http://www.doongalik.com/.

The D'Aguilar Art Foundation presents "The Growth Series", new work by Alistair D. Stevenson, which opens Thursday, August 15 at 6 p.m. at the D'Aguilar Art Foundation on Virginia Street. This event will celebrate Stevenson's final exhibition before pursuing ceramic studies in The People's Republic of China. Work will be available for purchase to aide Stevenson's studies. Please RSVP by August 7. For more information, contact 448-7209 or 357-9263 or emailastvnson@gmail.com.

"40 Years of Bahamian Art" continues at the National Art Gallery of The Bahamas (NAGB). For more information, visit www.nagb.org.bs, email info@nagb.org.bs or call 328-5800/1.

"The Bahamian Collection", photographs by Duke Wells, continues at the National Art Gallery of The Bahamas (NAGB). The opening is free and open to the public. For more information, visit www.nagb.org.bs, email info@nagb.org.bsor call 328-5800/1.

"The Independence Exhibition", featuring work from the Central Bank Art Gallery collection, continues at the Central Bank of The Bahamas Art Gallery. The exhibition runs through to Wednesday, July 31.

"Material and Sculpture", new work by John Cox and Heino Schmid, continues at Liquid Courage Gallery in Palmdale. For more information, visit www.facebook.com/LiquidCourageGallery.

"Master Artists of The Bahamas" continues at The National Art Gallery of The Bahamas. Featured Artists are John Beadle, Jackson Burnside, Stan Burnside, John Cox, Amos Ferguson, Kendal Hanna, Brent Malone, Eddie Minnis, Antonius Roberts, Dave Smith and Max Taylor. For more information, visit www.nagb.org.bs, email info@nagb.org.bs or call 328-5800/1.

Theater
Auditions for "The Shrew", a Bahamian adaptation of Shakespeare's "The Taming of the Shrew", take place 10 a.m. today at The Hub on Bay Street. Men and women ages 18-75 can download audition pieces fromwww.shakespeareinparadise.org. "The Shrew" is the signature Shakespearean production for Shakespeare in Paradise Theatre Festival, running throughout Nassau October 4-12. For more information, visit ringplay.org/wordpress/ or www.facebook.com/ShakespeareInParadise.

Shakespeare in Paradise Theatre Festival is looking for new plays to be read at the festival's customary Play Reading Series. All submissions are to be sent to scripts@shakespeareinparadise.org, Dr. Nicolette Bethel, festival director, (242) 677-8900. The submission deadline is Saturday, August 31. For additional information on Shakespeare in Paradise, visit ringplay.org/wordpress/ or www.facebook.com/ShakespeareInParadise.

Workshops and Summer Camps

The Toni Gallery is hosting a Summer Art Workshop for kids 10-17 to teach drawing fundamentals and painting techniques. The workshop will run Monday, July 29 to Friday, August 16. Daily sessions are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Friday. For more information, call 428-3760 or email alexiaroach@gmail.com.

Bahamas Music Conservatory will hold its Summer Music Camp from July 1 to July 26 at the Duke Errol Strachan Music Centre on Village Road. The camp is geared toward young musicians ages eight to 18 and offered instruments are piccolo, flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, trumpet, trombone, tuba, viola, cello and double bass. The cost of the workshop is $600. For more information, visit www.bahamasmusicconservatory.com.

Tours
Islandz, having acquired Downtown Art Tours, offers its Islandz Gallery Hop tours, examining art spaces downtown on Saturdays. Tickets are $20 per person for the two-hour tour. For more information or to book tickets, call 601-7592 or visit Islandz online at www.islandzmarket.com.

Tru Bahamian food tours offers a "Bites of Nassau" food tasting and cultural walking tour to connect people with authentic local food items, stories and traditions behind the foods and the Bahamians that prepare and preserve them, through a hands-on, interactive, educational tour and culinary adventure. Tickets are $69 per person, $49 for children under 12. Tours are everyday from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., starting at the British Colonial Hilton and ending at Tortuga Rum Cake Company. For more information, visit www.trubahamianfoodtours.com.

Call for works
All artists interested in participating in the third biennial All Ceramics Exhibition, under the theme "My Beautiful Teacup and Bowl", can contact Jessica Colebrooke at telephone (242) 324-3533 or at email:jessicastileworks@gmail.com.

The 30th Annual Central Bank of The Bahamas Art Competition and Exhibition invites entries for its Open Category under the theme "The Independents", in commemoration of the 40th anniversary of Bahamian independence, which is being celebrated this year. The objectives of the competition are to identify, recognize and encourage Bahamian visual artists. To qualify, participants must be citizens of The Bahamas, aged 18 or older (as of October 1, 2013) and not registered in secondary school. The Open/Senior Category Competition and Exhibition component will be held from Tuesday, October 1 to Friday, November 1. Artists under 30 years are especially encouraged to embrace this opportunity of the theme of "The Independents" as a challenge in terms of material and/or the role and responsibilities of independent thinking in art in The Bahamas, as well as, thinking of the larger political symbolism of independence of the country.

read more »


News Article
Arts Calendar

"Chan Pratt: The Art of Passion" at The Central Bank Art Gallery on Market Street until Friday, August 30.

"Emblematic", a 40th independence show by Doongalik Studios Art Gallery, continues at the gallery on Village Road. For more information, visit http://www.doongalik.com...

read more »


News Article
Atlantis Crown Gymnastics Event Only Weeks Away!
Atlantis Crown Gymnastics Event Only Weeks Away!

The heat of battle for supremacy is rising. Teams from the United States, Trinidad & Tobago and the Bahamas will all converge on the Atlantis Crown Convention Center for the largest competitive meet in the Caribbean for 2011.

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News Article
Awareness And Capacity Building Workshop In South Andros Set For January 7-8

The South Andros Chamber of Commerce in collaboration with the Global Environment Facility (GEF) Small Grants Programme (SGP), The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce, The Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture (IICA), and The Bahamas National Trust (BNT) will conduct an Awareness and Capacity Building Workshop at Sun Rise Inn in Kemp's Bay, South Andros January 7-8, 2013.

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