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News Article

May 02, 2012
Lyford Cay Club and Elizabeth on The Bay join the MOB

The Marina Operators of The Bahamas (MOB) has welcomed two more New Providence-based marinas to its membership, bringing the total to more than 50.
"We welcome our newest MOB members Lyford Cay Club and Elizabeth On The Bay Marketplace and Marina, both located in the capital. Lyford Cay Club, the premier and most notably renowned private and gated residential community, boasts a full service marina for its owners and guests, and has been a hallmark property in Nassau since the 1950s," according to Stephen Kappeler, president of MOB.
"Elizabeth On The Bay Marketplace and Marina is located in the famous downtown Nassau district, and is said to mark the beginning of the Nassau Harbour Renaissance. This recently established property boasts offerings such as retail and restaurant facilities as well as dockage."
Kappeler revealed to Guardian Business that he attended a successful marketing and budgeting meeting with the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation last week, however, that meeting's outcome will be unveiled in the organization's upcoming general meeting scheduled for next month.
One issue Kappeler said he is looking to address going forward is the development of education and marketing strategies to ensure that more boaters keep their vessels in The Bahamas during hurricane season.
"There is a misconception that vessels cannot be in The Bahamas during the hurricane season because insurance companies do not permit that. That is entirely not true," he said.
"A larger number of regular boaters who have been in the country for many years would file what is called a Special Hurricane Plan, which is a specific strategy as to what they are going to do in case of the hurricane.
"Once they advise the insurance carrier of that, then they are able to keep their boats inside the country during those months (June-November). There may be a small fee but it is possible and it can be done."
He noted that the economic benefits of boaters doing this are not only reflected in the marina itself but also the nearby restaurants, grocery stores and at the gas pumps. At the end of the day, he believes this seemingly bad time could be something very positive for the country, if marketed properly.
Kappeler also confirmed to Guardian Business that MOB is preparing to work with insurance companies throughout The Bahamas and the United States, as they are the largest insurance carriers for boats that dock in The Bahamas.
"We are hoping that these carriers are able to work together in the interest of better communication with the boaters, so that they can have awareness about being able to leave their boats here. That's important because boaters from Florida, which is our largest market, can find very good pricing on dockage. It represents a savings for them to dock their boats here in The Bahamas," he added.
"The other thing is as the weather begins to change, some of the very best months where the ocean is the flattest and the fishing is the best are those summer months which fall in the hurricane season. They are able to use their boats more over here where the fishing and diving is better.
"It's a double positive because they are able to keep it here and enjoy where they have it, and are able to use it more often than if they were to take it back home and park the boat for the entire season, that's what many of them do."
He pointed out how he hopes the MOB will be able to offer a special incentive that would encourage more boaters to remain in The Bahamas during the hurricane season.
The MOB is preparing to host its general meeting on June 5th.

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News Article

August 09, 2012
Flying Fish introduces their Prix Fixe Menus

Experience the difference at Flying Fish! 
With unmatched service and attention to detail. A blend of traditional
& modernist cuisine techniques not used anywhere else in the
Bahamas.

Flying Fish Restaurant is pleased to introduce our Prix Fixe (3-course) Menu which features

your choice of a tantalizing
appetizer, a sumptuous main course item, and a delectable dessert.

Enclosed are our

Dinner, Lunch, and

Brunch Menus for your perusal...

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News Article

August 16, 2012
Too Many Drum Majors

Dear Editor,

In one of his final sermons, "The Drum Major Instinct", the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. said, "There is deep down within all of us an instinct. It's a kind of drum major instinct -- a desire to be out in front, a desire to lead the parade, a desire to be first."

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News Article

August 17, 2012
The Success Of Urban Renewal 2.0

Dear Editor, It is my humble submission that Urban Renewal 2.0, despite the occasional hiccup, is working and is succeeding within the inner city areas of New Providence. Some of the detractors and others who may subscribe to a politically different view than PLPs are quick to condemn and criticize the value and benefits of the same.

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News Article

August 26, 2012
C.O.B.: Building the Country on its True Wealth

When
Prescott Smith takes visitors to sports fish in the waters of The
Bahamas - as he's done over the last few decades - he sees
what many others might take for granted, the natural wealth of our
ecological and marine resources. But he also sees the threats posed by
unsuitable development models, overfishing and poaching.

  

"People
aren't going to tell you that you have a gold
mine, until they're in control of it," he told administrators at The
College of The Bahamas recently in a presentation on The Economic
Potential of Sports Fishing in The Bahamas. He added that there are real
threats with the potential to permanently...

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News Article

April 12, 2012
The work of the DNA

Dear Editor,

To Dehavilland Moss:
Thank you for your kind complementary letter published in The Guardian on Thursday, April 5 titled "Ben Albury should be commended".
It is my personal philosophy and I have stated it in my campaign, "All that is required for evil to prevail is for good men to do nothing".
I am the Democratic National Alliance (DNA) candidate for Montagu. I have always been involved in trying to build a better Bahamas for my family, and my fellow Bahamians, and to do right as God intends.
In the Montagu-Blair area, our community has seen rising crime and we have for some time now been actively monitoring our area. We are not prepared to tolerate any form of crime. I want better for all of us. I want a better Bahamas.
My involvement in trying to better my area includes cookouts along with the support of many business friends over the past years to generate funds to better assist the hunger in the poorer areas. I am an active member and sit on the board of directors of the Bahamas Motor Dealership Association. I am a member of the Rotary Club of East Nassau and a number of other groups of persons who try to create better conditions for all.
In my Montagu constituency, the DNA is the popular people's movement where I have a lot of support from people wanting change. People are suffering in these times; a lot of social issues need to be resolved. Many of these social issues remain unresolved and manifest themselves in crime being one of the many results. Ironically, sadly and most disappointing is that many politicians just say "drugs is to blame".
I know that our Bahamian culture is rich and diverse with strong religious teachings, and crime is in no way a part of our culture as some would want us to accept.

From our DNA party's founding some 11 months ago and my involvement in the Kemp Road area and environs, one can see many reasons for deviant social behavior: poverty, unemployment, hunger (no "bread on the table"), lack of opportunities, single parents under stressful conditions, teenage parents, uncontrollable youth, a lot of tense social dynamics from other cultures, lack of education, groups of persons replacing the traditional Bahamian families who have moved out of these low income inner city areas to the thousands of low cost homes in the suburbs, and a lack of police presence, among others.
Crime is a multi-faceted problem which my DNA party and I have commented on. We will show by action, hard work and good plans to resolve problems rather than pie in the sky, where have you been all this while, last minute political rhetoric usually about two weeks before the election and last minute grandiose plans jonessing for votes as has been the reoccurring theme for decades. Hot air speeches, catchy insult phrases, free T-shirts, pompoms and mesmerizing and hypnotic mass rally chanting do not solve crime. Action, education, jobs, opportunities, the eradication of grinding poverty and being anchored with good Christian "broughtupsy" are among our plans to reduce crime.
Apart from the issue of crime, I am an avid fisherman, hunter, boating enthusiast and I am also passionately concerned with environmental issues and preserving the wonderful country that God has blessed us with. While I am not averse to oil resources being utilized for the benefit of our nation, I am not willing to exclude other alternative energy sources, especially after seeing the struggles the oil giant British Petroleum (BP) had in containing that devastating oil spill, which cost over $40 billion; and BP set aside some $20 billion for claims.
One must bear in mind that this accident was not supposed to happen. As Bahamians with one major industry and billions of dollars in major tourism hotel assets and ancillary businesses located on beachfront properties, plus our fishing industry and others, we simply cannot be hurling down this road at breakneck speed without ironclad safety precautions and research and consent by the majority, because we have everything to lose. We live here. We are Bahamians. We live in this God-given island paradise we call home.
Again, thank you Mr. Moss for your wonderful and inspiring letter.

- Ben Albury, DNA candidate for Montagu

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News Article

August 31, 2012
Chef Tim explains The Flying Fish Restaurant Philosophy

There seems to be a lot
of chatter on the internet these days about restaurants and service.
 There also is a long discussion recently about Flying Fish.  It seems
like there are a lot of misunderstandings about what we do, and want to
do, at Flying Fish Restaurant.  I would like to take a moment to try and shed some
light on our thoughts for the restaurant.  

From the
inception of the concept of Flying Fish my goal was to create a place
that had quality and luxury never before attempted on Grand Bahama.
 Lots of people said we should do it in Nassau; that's where all the
people are.  Many said you should do it in Abaco; that's where all the
big wallets are...

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News Article
What is WD-40, And What Can It Do
September 12, 2012
What is WD-40, And What Can It Do

Before you read to the end, does anybody know what the main ingredient of WD-40 is? Don't lie and don't cheat. WD-40. Who knew; I had a neighbor who bought a new pickup. I got up very early one Sunday morning and saw that someone had spray painted red all around the sides of this beige truck (for some unknown reason). I went over, woke him up, and told him the bad news. He was very upset and was trying to figure out what to do.... probably nothing until Monday morning, since nothing was open.

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News Article

September 18, 2012
Turning to the caveman's diet

In an age of microwaves, cooktops, fast food and ready prepared meals, the thought of adopting a high protein diet with lots of fresh fruits and vegetables, void of processed food sources, may seem less than palatable and even impractical.
But for the 21st century hunter-gatherer this is a lifestyle change and quite possibly the untapped secret to a healthier, longer life.
The Paleolithic Diet, a diet similar to that of the caveman in the Paleolithic or Stone Age, has changed little from that of the first humans million of years ago.
As noted by family physician Dr. Ben Balzer in "Introduction to The Paleolithic Diet", humans have eaten meat, fish, fowl and the leaves, roots and fruits of plants for millions of years, but a major obstacle to getting more calories from the environment has been the fact that many plants and other food sources are inedible without processing.
Dr. Balzer also noted that a selection of these include, grains, beans and potatoes, which although full of energy, are inedible in the raw form due to the toxins they contain.
An agricultural breakthrough around 10,000 years ago meant that these once inedible foods could be consumed when cooked. Heat destroyed enough toxins to render them edible.
What has occurred in the last few thousand years is the average man, woman and child leading increasingly sedentary lives and eating a highly processed synthetic diet. Here in The Bahamas the problem is acute. According to leading health experts, 70 percent of Bahamians are overweight or obese.

Paleo
The website thepaleodiet.com sets out the basics of the diet, which includes the consumption of fresh fruits, vegetables, lean meats, and seafood and low-glycemic carbohydrates that promote good health. It is low in refined sugars and grains, saturated and trans fats, salt, high-glycemic carbohydrates and processed foods that can frequently cause weight gain and other health problems.
I have had intimate contact with someone who has made the change back to the old way of eating. For my father Royston A. Jones Sr., a previous high carbohydrate consumer who underwent a lifestyle change in mid-July 2007, the Paleo appeared the ideal diet after months of extensive research.
He said there were a lot of opposing views on the ideal eating lifestyle, ranging from vegetarianism, veganism and meat-based diets - all with moderate to extreme versions - but it has been quite the journey after more than five years adapting to Paleo.
"In the first few months it was very, very strange," said Jones, as he recalled the first few months of his lifestyle transition.
"I can only describe it with hindsight as withdrawal, very jittery, cloudy mind. I just couldn't think cleary for periods of time and I was low on energy and irritable.
"I also had a real desire for carbohydrates - sweet things, bulky grainy foods - thinking I need something solid. I was wondering what was going on and this lasted for at least three to four months.
"I now refer to that period as a period of adjustment, and although it improved as I went along it took at least that amount of time before I felt revitalized."
Jones, 53, said after many years of attempting to address some primary health concerns, including high cholesterol, both he and his physician have marked noticeable physical and health-related changes.
"I now have better stamina for long endurance events and I can sustain energy for a longer period," Jones said.
"I think glucose stored in the muscle runs out pretty quickly but fat is a more dense form of energy, a heavier source of calories. When you start burning fat as an energy source you can sustain exercise much longer and a lot of the studies say that.
"You're not necessarily faster but you can go for longer. In terms of eating, I can go for much longer periods of times without food. I can go a whole day without any gastrointestinal discomfort."
Julia Lee, registered dietician and coordinator of clinical nutrition at Doctors Hospital, said there are benefits and drawbacks from leading a Paleo lifestyle.
And while most health professionals would agree that a plant-based diet that incorporates animal-based foods is a good way to go, she added, the Paleo may not be a practical dieting option to comply with in the long-term for the average person.
"One of the foods that is often omitted is white potatoes because they are considered to be a high glycemic index food, but I have really never met anyone with health issues because of eating potatoes," Lee said.
"I think that you could maintain the energy and gain the calories needed to function and live healthily with the Paleo diet. But the more restrictive, the more foods you say no to, the more you may be at risk of eliminating certain nutrients."
Lee emphasized, though, that the closer to nature your food is, the better your diet and long-term health will be because processing food often removes good nutrients, which food producers then try to put back.

Changing your lifestyle
Many historical and anthropological studies show that hunter-gatherers were generally healthy, fit and largely free of the degenerative cardiovascular diseases common in modern societies, according to James H. O'Keefe Jr., MD, and Loren Cordain, Ph.D, authors of "How to Become a 21st-Century Hunter-Gatherer".
"Our remote ancestors consumed only natural and unprocessed food foraged and hunted from their environment," reads the research paper by Dr. Cordain.
"This subsistence strategy provided a diet of lean protein that was high in fiber, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and other beneficial phytochemicals.
"The typical Paleolithic diet compared with the average modern American diet contained two to three times more fiber, one-and-a-half to two times more polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats, four times more Omega-3 fats, but 60 to 70 percent less saturated fat.
"Protein intake was two to three times higher, and potassium intake was three to four times higher. However, sodium intake was four to five times lower.
"Finally, the Paleolithic diet contained no refined grains and sugars (except for seasonally available honey). Clearly, the ongoing epidemic of cardiovascular diseases is at least in part due to these striking discrepancies between the diet we are designed to eat and what we eat today."
Jones also spoke of other noticeable physical benefits he thinks might be the result of his lifestyle change.
"I also used to have a significant case of shifting clouds (Tinea versicolor) on my back and after about six months on the diet someone looked at my back and said, 'What happened to your shifting clouds?' They had just disappeared after 25 years of them being there and getting progressively worse," Jones said.
"It seems that the immune system operates more effectively and does not react to lifestyle problems based on the diet - at least that's my theory.

"Certain foods I hadn't been able to eat for 10 years without causing stomach upset like raisins and grapes, I was able to digest in any volume without any problem, which had gone on for 20 years."
Jones said it is equally important for him to complement his eating habits with workout regimes that match the high endurance activities of his ancestors. An ardent athlete and sports enthusiast, Jones frequently spends two to three hours on average up to four days a week kayaking and rowing, running on the sand and spearfishing.

o For Cordain's and O'Keefe's full publication on Paleo go to the National Institutes of Health's website: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed

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News Article

September 21, 2012
Enjoy Weekend BRUNCH at Flying Fish Modern Seafood

You asked, we listened!

Freeport's

Flying Fish Modern Seafood is open for Brunch

on

both Saturdays and Sundays.

Located conveniently between the Pelican Bay and Grand Lucayan hotels,
we invite you to join us for lunch, dinner or brunch. Your taste buds
will be delighted and you will be spoiled with our professional,
courteous, friendly service.

Brunch runs from 11am -  3pm...

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