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News Article

April 30, 2012
Fishing to Feed the Hungry: Christ the King Fishing Tournament set for May 12th

Freeport, Grand Bahama - Fishing enthusiasts will earn prizes when they catch the
most, the largest and ugliest fish in the upcoming Christ the King Fishing
Tournament, scheduled for 7:00 a.m Saturday May 12th, 2012, at the
Grand Bahama Yacht Club.

The Fishing Tournament is one of many activities planned
throughout the year to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Pro Cathedral of
Christ the King, Freeport's first Church. According to fishing tournament
chairman Lou Carroll, "The tournament will be a wholesome family style
event offering activities for the entire family, and of course cash prizes for
the winners". There will be fun and games for the kids, BBQ, Bingo,
Dominos and Rake 'n Scrape music throughout the day.

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News Article

August 10, 2012
A need for speed

Mechanics are making final checks under the hoods of more than 50 luxury cars that will be paraded through the streets of New Providence, when The Bahamas Speed Week once again takes over the capital in a few months.
With just 106 days left before the drivers rev up their engines to partake in the highly anticipated week, organizers have shifted into another gear preparing for the event that is expected to bring thousands of visitors to New Providence. The series of races and cultural events will be held between November 24 and December 2.
The revival of speed week has been a dream of Jimmie Lowe and David McLaughlin. Lowe is the association's president and McLaughlin an organizer. Both gentlemen were around in the 1950s and 1960s when the event was a big hit in the country. They have given of all their time and effort to ensure that the event, sponsored by the Ministry of Tourism, is a success.
"This year we have worked tirelessly to make this happen," said Lowe. "It has been a dream for about 30 years. This event originated back in the 1950s and 1960s and it was about tourism, putting heads on beds, bringing people in just after the Thanksgiving weekend and (filling) a lull we had between Thanksgiving and Christmas. That is why it is held the time of year it is held this year as well.
"When we started this out we had a five year plan. Our goal is to make this the biggest social must do event in The Bahamas going forward. Our view, going forward, is to some day do it again with golf carts for the kids here in The Bahamas, get them interested."
An 18,000 square foot tent was erected in the parking area at Arawak Cay last year, this time around the organizers are putting up a 26,000 square foot tent. This will accommodate the 60 cars that will compete in the week-long event. So far, more than 30 drivers have confirmed their participation. The route has also been extended making it accessible to all, especially viewers and patrons of Fish Fry.
The event has attracted drivers from the local and international arenas. According to Lowe, most of the cars will be coming out of Europe and will be added to the count of local vehicles. Lowe, as well as Minister of Tourism, Obie Wilchcombe, is pleased to know that the revival of speed week works hand-in-hand with the government's Sports Tourism initiative. Island hopping is high on the schedule of events listed.
Lowe said: "This year we are going to have some out island trips available for people who come to travel. We want them to go out and see the out islands, see what the rest of the islands are about. It is not only about Nassau, it is also about the out islands and the whole of The Bahamas.
"We had quite a few people who came in residents of the out islands last year to visit and be a part of speed week. So there is a little part of domestic tourism we might be able to touch as well. We look forward to advertising that in the out islands, and make sure that people are aware of the event taking place in Nassau."
Mr Wilchcombe congratulated Lowe and McLaughlin for making the dream a reality. He said that there is enormous potential for the country, from the event.
"I believe that your involvement of the vendors, Bahamian people, generally, is the right thing to do," he said. "If the people aren't involved then more than likely, you are not going to be as successful as you want to be. But the buzz is created when the people get involved and talk about what can become that event. Then the world will recognize The Bahamas.
"It is also true that we strongly support Sports Tourism. When the department was created several years ago, it was always intended to use our shores to promote sports. What we are seeing now is this great attraction over the next several weeks. We will be hearing more about major golf events, also our relationship with sporting organization whether it is basketball or professional football, or baseball. The whole idea is to ensure that The Bahamas is, at all times, recognized for the destination that offers you everything you want and fulfilling the dreams that you have. Speed week has an appeal, and I have told the Director General what we must do is contribute more to the marketing of it, to ensure that we are getting the coverage of it around the world. Promote what you are doing to make it that exciting event that we believe will draw people from around the world."
Speed week will kick-off with a concert at Arawak Cay and an Auto Trade Show on November 24. The Antique Auto Club Show and Miss Speed Week beauty pageant will be held on Sunday.

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News Article

August 16, 2012
Flying Fish introduces their Prix Fixe Menus

Experience the difference at Flying Fish! 
With unmatched service and attention to detail. A blend of traditional
& modernist cuisine techniques not used anywhere else in the
Bahamas.

Flying Fish Restaurant is pleased to introduce our Prix Fixe (3-course) Menu which features

your choice of a tantalizing
appetizer, a sumptuous main course item, and a delectable dessert.

Enclosed are our

Dinner, Lunch, and

Brunch Menus for your perusal...

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News Article

August 16, 2012
Flying Fish introduces their Prix Fixe Menus

Experience the difference at Flying Fish! 
With unmatched service and attention to detail. A blend of traditional
& modernist cuisine techniques not used anywhere else in the
Bahamas.

Flying Fish Restaurant is pleased to introduce our Prix Fixe (3-course) Menu which features

your choice of a tantalizing
appetizer, a sumptuous main course item, and a delectable dessert.

Enclosed are our

Dinner, Lunch, and

Brunch Menus for your perusal...

read more »


News Article
Golden Knights Ride GB's Parade Float
August 27, 2012
Golden Knights Ride GB's Parade Float

The Golden Knights' visit to Grand Bahama required much organizing and on-island travel in order for them to be seen by as many locals as possible. The Grand Bahama Shipyard (GBS) was happy to oblige organizers by letting them use the company parade float, which was already well known as star of this year's Independence parade.

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News Article

April 12, 2012
Our laws must be followed by all

Dear Editor,

Once again it gives me great pleasure in writing to the editor of this fine paper. I just want to share my experience with you and my fellow Bahamians.
During the holidays I took my family to the national park off Cowpen Road. I believe it is known as Bone Fish National Park. I was surprised to see some people of Haitian descent fishing at this location. I have no hang-ups with the government granting citizenship to children of illegal immigrants, but they need to be taught to respect and take care of our national parks. We need park wardens to ensure that the parks are kept safe from poachers.
Additionally, I went driving through the streets of Nassau only to return to my neighborhood to the smell of smoke which is still an offense. More importantly, my neighbors are not legitimate homeowners. What a Easter Holiday this turned out to be!

- A proud Bahamian

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News Article

August 31, 2012
Flying Fish Modern Seafood closed till September 12th, 2012

Freeport, Grand Bahama Island - Flying Fish Modern Seafood Restaurant says thank you to all their loyal guests and
staff for a great first 6 months. They are now closed until September
12th and will reopen Wednesday Sept 12th for lunch at 11:30am and then
Happy Hour at 5:00pm, featuring fresh off the plane oysters.

If you
would like to contact them during the break please email them at
reservations@flyingfishbahamas

.com

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News Article

September 11, 2012
Food 99/1: Great Italian wines at a reasonable price

I like to pride myself on finding a great deal on something that is of great value. A few years back, I took courses from the International Sommelier Guild that allowed me to take my prudent nature and find some great value wines at a great price. The thousands of dollars achieving Sommelier status has paid itself back in the bargains I have found because of my knowledge!
The wine list at Flying Fish is made up of a lot of new world wines (Chile, USA, Australia, South Africa, Argentina) that are not the run-of-the-mill household names that one would usually find on a wine list. The price point is intentionally kept on the low side (wines start from $30 and go to $110) because a lot of the varieties and names on the list are unknown and trying something new at a lower price point is always more enticing than trying something new that is expensive.
One of my favorite no-fail "bargains" is a classification in Italy called Indicazione Geografica Tipica or IGT. IGT denotes a wine that is a typical indication of a certain geographical area.
Prior to 1992, there were three classifications for Italian wine: table wine, Denominazione di Origine Controllata (DOC), Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita (DOCG). The DOC and DOCG are very specific to appellations.
Chianti, for instance, is a DOCG and has very specific rules winemakers must adhere to in order to label a wine as a DOCG. Some of the rules include grape variety, irrigation, ripeness of the grapes at picking, ageing and labeling. There are 32 DOCG and over 300 DOC regions in Italy.   You can recognize DOC and DOCG by the pink ribbon along the capsule of the bottle of wine.

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News Article

September 18, 2012
Turning to the caveman's diet

In an age of microwaves, cooktops, fast food and ready prepared meals, the thought of adopting a high protein diet with lots of fresh fruits and vegetables, void of processed food sources, may seem less than palatable and even impractical.
But for the 21st century hunter-gatherer this is a lifestyle change and quite possibly the untapped secret to a healthier, longer life.
The Paleolithic Diet, a diet similar to that of the caveman in the Paleolithic or Stone Age, has changed little from that of the first humans million of years ago.
As noted by family physician Dr. Ben Balzer in "Introduction to The Paleolithic Diet", humans have eaten meat, fish, fowl and the leaves, roots and fruits of plants for millions of years, but a major obstacle to getting more calories from the environment has been the fact that many plants and other food sources are inedible without processing.
Dr. Balzer also noted that a selection of these include, grains, beans and potatoes, which although full of energy, are inedible in the raw form due to the toxins they contain.
An agricultural breakthrough around 10,000 years ago meant that these once inedible foods could be consumed when cooked. Heat destroyed enough toxins to render them edible.
What has occurred in the last few thousand years is the average man, woman and child leading increasingly sedentary lives and eating a highly processed synthetic diet. Here in The Bahamas the problem is acute. According to leading health experts, 70 percent of Bahamians are overweight or obese.

Paleo
The website thepaleodiet.com sets out the basics of the diet, which includes the consumption of fresh fruits, vegetables, lean meats, and seafood and low-glycemic carbohydrates that promote good health. It is low in refined sugars and grains, saturated and trans fats, salt, high-glycemic carbohydrates and processed foods that can frequently cause weight gain and other health problems.
I have had intimate contact with someone who has made the change back to the old way of eating. For my father Royston A. Jones Sr., a previous high carbohydrate consumer who underwent a lifestyle change in mid-July 2007, the Paleo appeared the ideal diet after months of extensive research.
He said there were a lot of opposing views on the ideal eating lifestyle, ranging from vegetarianism, veganism and meat-based diets - all with moderate to extreme versions - but it has been quite the journey after more than five years adapting to Paleo.
"In the first few months it was very, very strange," said Jones, as he recalled the first few months of his lifestyle transition.
"I can only describe it with hindsight as withdrawal, very jittery, cloudy mind. I just couldn't think cleary for periods of time and I was low on energy and irritable.
"I also had a real desire for carbohydrates - sweet things, bulky grainy foods - thinking I need something solid. I was wondering what was going on and this lasted for at least three to four months.
"I now refer to that period as a period of adjustment, and although it improved as I went along it took at least that amount of time before I felt revitalized."
Jones, 53, said after many years of attempting to address some primary health concerns, including high cholesterol, both he and his physician have marked noticeable physical and health-related changes.
"I now have better stamina for long endurance events and I can sustain energy for a longer period," Jones said.
"I think glucose stored in the muscle runs out pretty quickly but fat is a more dense form of energy, a heavier source of calories. When you start burning fat as an energy source you can sustain exercise much longer and a lot of the studies say that.
"You're not necessarily faster but you can go for longer. In terms of eating, I can go for much longer periods of times without food. I can go a whole day without any gastrointestinal discomfort."
Julia Lee, registered dietician and coordinator of clinical nutrition at Doctors Hospital, said there are benefits and drawbacks from leading a Paleo lifestyle.
And while most health professionals would agree that a plant-based diet that incorporates animal-based foods is a good way to go, she added, the Paleo may not be a practical dieting option to comply with in the long-term for the average person.
"One of the foods that is often omitted is white potatoes because they are considered to be a high glycemic index food, but I have really never met anyone with health issues because of eating potatoes," Lee said.
"I think that you could maintain the energy and gain the calories needed to function and live healthily with the Paleo diet. But the more restrictive, the more foods you say no to, the more you may be at risk of eliminating certain nutrients."
Lee emphasized, though, that the closer to nature your food is, the better your diet and long-term health will be because processing food often removes good nutrients, which food producers then try to put back.

Changing your lifestyle
Many historical and anthropological studies show that hunter-gatherers were generally healthy, fit and largely free of the degenerative cardiovascular diseases common in modern societies, according to James H. O'Keefe Jr., MD, and Loren Cordain, Ph.D, authors of "How to Become a 21st-Century Hunter-Gatherer".
"Our remote ancestors consumed only natural and unprocessed food foraged and hunted from their environment," reads the research paper by Dr. Cordain.
"This subsistence strategy provided a diet of lean protein that was high in fiber, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and other beneficial phytochemicals.
"The typical Paleolithic diet compared with the average modern American diet contained two to three times more fiber, one-and-a-half to two times more polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats, four times more Omega-3 fats, but 60 to 70 percent less saturated fat.
"Protein intake was two to three times higher, and potassium intake was three to four times higher. However, sodium intake was four to five times lower.
"Finally, the Paleolithic diet contained no refined grains and sugars (except for seasonally available honey). Clearly, the ongoing epidemic of cardiovascular diseases is at least in part due to these striking discrepancies between the diet we are designed to eat and what we eat today."
Jones also spoke of other noticeable physical benefits he thinks might be the result of his lifestyle change.
"I also used to have a significant case of shifting clouds (Tinea versicolor) on my back and after about six months on the diet someone looked at my back and said, 'What happened to your shifting clouds?' They had just disappeared after 25 years of them being there and getting progressively worse," Jones said.
"It seems that the immune system operates more effectively and does not react to lifestyle problems based on the diet - at least that's my theory.

"Certain foods I hadn't been able to eat for 10 years without causing stomach upset like raisins and grapes, I was able to digest in any volume without any problem, which had gone on for 20 years."
Jones said it is equally important for him to complement his eating habits with workout regimes that match the high endurance activities of his ancestors. An ardent athlete and sports enthusiast, Jones frequently spends two to three hours on average up to four days a week kayaking and rowing, running on the sand and spearfishing.

o For Cordain's and O'Keefe's full publication on Paleo go to the National Institutes of Health's website: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed

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News Article

September 21, 2012
Enjoy Weekend BRUNCH at Flying Fish Modern Seafood

You asked, we listened!

Freeport's

Flying Fish Modern Seafood is open for Brunch

on

both Saturdays and Sundays.

Located conveniently between the Pelican Bay and Grand Lucayan hotels,
we invite you to join us for lunch, dinner or brunch. Your taste buds
will be delighted and you will be spoiled with our professional,
courteous, friendly service.

Brunch runs from 11am -  3pm...

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