Search results for : exuma family is

Showing 281 to 290 of 931 results


News Article

January 28, 2013
'Play and Stay' program moves into the community

Executive members in the Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association (BLTA) officially adopted the residents in the Elizabeth Estates Children's Home, wanting to provide them with equal opportunity in learning the sport of tennis.
On Saturday, director of the 'Play and Stay' program Bradley Bain along with national team member Larikah Russell and Ricardo Demeritte took about 16 of the residents through a series of drills and games. In the introductory lessons, the residents worked on hand and eye coordination, as well as foot work. The 'Play and Stay' program, designed to improve the playing skills of all, has caught on quickly in the country and president of the local association Derron Donaldson is ready to take it a step further.
According to Donaldson, the local association is planning to adopt more homes and use the development program as a form of exercise for residents. Each month, the BLTA will reach out to other organizations in the capital and the Family Islands. Donaldson said: "Now that the 'Play and Stay' program has caught on in the country, we want to do more. We want to make sure that everyone who wants to play tennis in the country is playing. If it means us going out and setting up the courts, we are willing and ready to do so. Adopting the Elizabeth Estates Children's Home is just the first stop on our agenda. We plan to do more, go to more homes and schools.
"Bradley is doing a fantastic job in making sure that The Bahamas at large is playing tennis. His aggressive approach in building the sport is really helping as more and more persons are catching on. He, along with Larikah and Ricardo take the registered persons through a series of drills, that anyone can easily catch on to, so persons who believe that they can play, or always wanted to play can come out to any of our venues especially when we are hosting the 'Play and Stay' training sessions."
The BLTA has already launched the program in several schools in New Providence. In a couple of weeks, a team will travel to Freeport, Grand Bahama, and host a two-day clinic for teachers. In March, they will travel to Exuma and re-visit Eleuthera in April. At the completion of the courses, all participants will be awarded certificates.
"Everyone is under the impression that tennis is an expensive sport, when in fact it is really not," said Donaldson. "It doesn't cost a dime to come and teach, or hold sessions at the schools or other places, so with that in mind, we are encouraging persons to come and join us. The goal is to have everyone in the country pick up a tennis racket at least once or twice. We want to see more persons play."
The 'Play and Stay' program has changed some of the rules in the sport, making it easier for persons to serve, rally and score. Newer balls are now being used on smaller courts that have lower nets. The red balls are for beginners who will eventually move on to the orange and then green. The height of the net, as well as the size of the courts and rackets, will change with each step a player takes while enrolled in the program. The yellow balls, used in regular play, will be introduced during the final step. Persons will then play full games on the standard-sized courts.

read more »


News Article

August 26, 2011
Irene wreaks havoc

Hurricane Irene started its exit from The Bahamas last night, leaving a trail of destruction in its wake.
While New Providence and Grand Bahama were spared the full force of the storm, many Family Islands, particularly the southeastern and central islands, were pummelled, the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) reported.
The center of the storm passed over Eleuthera and Abaco for much of yesterday.
Power lines and telecommunications lines went down in some islands as the category three storm roared across the archipelago.
But no loss of life or injuries were reported.
Damage on Cat Island, Rum Cay, Crooked Island, Acklins and Mayaguana is expected to be in the millions of dollars, as hundreds of homes, churches, other buildings and infrastructure were either damaged or destroyed.
According to NEMA reports, all the islands were impacted in some way.
In New Providence, fallen trees and damaged roofs constituted most of the damage.
In Lovely Bay, Acklins, 90 percent of the settlement is reportedly gone, according to NEMA.
"House roofs and several homes [were] blown away.  Power lines and trees went down in the roads, and the shelter's population increased," said a NEMA statement.
Communication on that island was limited yesterday.
Meteorologist Godfrey Burnside said the Automatic Weather Station in Arthur's Town, Cat Island, recorded gusts of 140 miles per hour around 2 a.m. yesterday, and Moss Town, Exuma, recorded gusts up to 127 miles per hour.
"That is significant and that is why you hear all the damage taking place," Burnside said.
Just over two inches of rain had fallen at Lynden Pindling International Airport at 9 a.m. yesterday, and more was expected.
NEMA said it received reports that 40 houses received major damage in the communities of Betsy Bay, Pirate Wells and Abraham's Bay on Mayaguana.
Concerns were also expressed by the Assistant Commissioner of Police John Ferguson in reference to three people detained at a police station there, NEMA said.
On Cat Island, hurricane force winds brought down scores of power lines and left the island without any form of telecommunication, NEMA reported.
NEMA also received reports that the administrator's home in north Cat Island lost its roof.
Areas in Arthur's Town and Dumfries flooded.  The roof of the police station in Arthur's Town was blown off and police vehicles were flooded.  St. Andrew's Church also lost its roof, NEMA reported.
In Rum Cay, which is home to about 100 people, NEMA received a report that homes have major damage, roads are impassable due to fallen trees and the bridge in Port Nelson is lost.
According to the Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC), residents in most islands with the exception of Inagua -- where power was restored to the majority of customers -- continued to experience outages up to last night due to controlled power station shut downs or downed power lines.
NEMA said at least one school was damaged on Crooked Island.
The school in Colonel Hill lost its roof and two classroom blocks.  Additionally, St. John's Baptist Church and several other buildings also lost their roofs.
That island experienced winds around 120 miles per hour, according to NEMA.
Long Island Administrator Jordan Ritchie said the main concern was flooding in Clarence Town.
However, a number of homes and St. Paul's Anglican Church received roof damage.
Meantime, Central Eleuthera Administrator Chrisfield Johnson said based on initial reports, Eleuthera fared relatively well.
"So far we haven't had loss of life.  There is some structural damage to buildings but we haven't done an assessment so we don't know the extent," he told The Nassau Guardian yesterday evening.
It was still too dangerous to go out, he said.
"The only thing that remains is to do an assessment of the environment," Johnson said.
"There is a tremendous amount of debris on the roads.  Our first priority is to clear the streets, so we're putting together a team of workers to clear the streets to give us access."
He said he would determine the severity of the impact of Irene sometime today, when he expects to be able to conduct a door-to-door assessment.
NEMA Director Captain Stephen Russell said NEMA is still determining how it will access the affected islands, as transportation may be limited over the next few days.
NEMA is expected to release a more detailed statement on the damage caused by Irene sometime today.

read more »


News Article

August 26, 2011
Irene wrecks havoc

Hurricane Irene started its exit from The Bahamas last night, leaving a trail of destruction in its wake.
While New Providence and Grand Bahama were spared the full force of the storm, many Family Islands, particularly the southeastern and central islands, were pummelled, the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) reported.
The center of the storm passed over Eleuthera and Abaco for much of yesterday.
Power lines and telecommunications lines went down in some islands as the category three storm roared across the archipelago.
But no loss of life or injuries were reported.
Damage on Cat Island, Rum Cay, Crooked Island, Acklins and Mayaguana is expected to be in the millions of dollars, as hundreds of homes, churches, other buildings and infrastructure were either damaged or destroyed.
According to NEMA reports, all the islands were impacted in some way.
In New Providence, fallen trees and damaged roofs constituted most of the damage.
In Lovely Bay, Acklins, 90 percent of the settlement is reportedly gone, according to NEMA.
"House roofs and several homes [were] blown away.  Power lines and trees went down in the roads, and the shelter's population increased," said a NEMA statement.
Communication on that island was limited yesterday.
Meteorologist Godfrey Burnside said the Automatic Weather Station in Arthur's Town, Cat Island, recorded gusts of 140 miles per hour around 2 a.m. yesterday, and Moss Town, Exuma, recorded gusts up to 127 miles per hour.
"That is significant and that is why you hear all the damage taking place," Burnside said.
Just over two inches of rain had fallen at Lynden Pindling International Airport at 9 a.m. yesterday, and more was expected.
NEMA said it received reports that 40 houses received major damage in the communities of Betsy Bay, Pirate Wells and Abraham's Bay on Mayaguana.
Concerns were also expressed by the Assistant Commissioner of Police John Ferguson in reference to three people detained at a police station there, NEMA said.
On Cat Island, hurricane force winds brought down scores of power lines and left the island without any form of telecommunication, NEMA reported.
NEMA also received reports that the administrator's home in north Cat Island lost its roof.
Areas in Arthur's Town and Dumfries flooded.  The roof of the police station in Arthur's Town was blown off and police vehicles were flooded.  St. Andrew's Church also lost its roof, NEMA reported.
In Rum Cay, which is home to about 100 people, NEMA received a report that homes have major damage, roads are impassable due to fallen trees and the bridge in Port Nelson is lost.
According to the Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC), residents in most islands with the exception of Inagua -- where power was restored to the majority of customers -- continued to experience outages up to last night due to controlled power station shut downs or downed power lines.
NEMA said at least one school was damaged on Crooked Island.
The school in Colonel Hill lost its roof and two classroom blocks.  Additionally, St. John's Baptist Church and several other buildings also lost their roofs.
That island experienced winds around 120 miles per hour, according to NEMA.
Long Island Administrator Jordan Ritchie said the main concern was flooding in Clarence Town.
However, a number of homes and St. Paul's Anglican Church received roof damage.
Meantime, Central Eleuthera Administrator Chrisfield Johnson said based on initial reports, Eleuthera fared relatively well.
"So far we haven't had loss of life.  There is some structural damage to buildings but we haven't done an assessment so we don't know the extent," he told The Nassau Guardian yesterday evening.
It was still too dangerous to go out, he said.
"The only thing that remains is to do an assessment of the environment," Johnson said.
"There is a tremendous amount of debris on the roads.  Our first priority is to clear the streets, so we're putting together a team of workers to clear the streets to give us access."
He said he would determine the severity of the impact of Irene sometime today, when he expects to be able to conduct a door-to-door assessment.
NEMA Director Captain Stephen Russell said NEMA is still determining how it will access the affected islands, as transportation may be limited over the next few days.
NEMA is expected to release a more detailed statement on the damage caused by Irene sometime today.

read more »


News Article

May 21, 2012
BTC launches 4G in Abaco

Marsh Harbour, Abaco - Thousands of Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC) customers can now experience improved cellular service, as the company launched its 4G network in Abaco over the weekend.
There was no space left in the St. John the Baptist Anglican Church hall, as scores of people lined up to participate in the launch event on Saturday.
Last month, BTC officials confirmed to Guardian Business that the revamp of the island's system would be completed by mid-May.
"We have completed 35 of 41 cell sites on Abaco to date and expect to have the remaining few completed within the next several weeks," said Marlon Johnson, BTC's vice president of brand and communications. "When the work is done, customers will enjoy greatly improved service, fewer dropped calls and much faster speeds as Abaco goes from a 2G platform to the blazing speed of 4G."
Arlene Clarke, BTC's senior manager on the island, stressed the need for residents and visitors to the Abacos to have the latest technology available to them, as the island represents BTC's third largest sector throughout the country.
"We have approximately 7,000 wire line customers and 3,000 cell phone customers. Throughout the Abacos, we have nearly 22,000 customers. From these numbers alone, it underscores just how crucial the Abaco market is, not only to the company's success but to the national economy as well," she explained.
The country's telecommunications giant has undergone major upgrades to its network since the company's privatization last year.

However, Tellis Symonette, BTC's senior vice president of commercial and family islands, admitted to Guardian Business that the upgrades have not been without their share of challenges.
"Over the last year, there have been a lot of upgrades to our network system in order for The Bahamas to now have 4G capability. It required us to rip out the entire network and put in new platforms. Of course when you do that, you are going to have issues with the network. However, as we come across these things, they are being addressed," he noted.
Abaco's 4G launch comes after New Providence has been blanketed in 4G, Grand Bahama is nearly 100 percent converted and Bimini and the Berry Islands went live earlier this month.
4G is the fastest available speed for wireless users.
Now that Abaco has been completed, BTC officials are looking to finish off Exuma and then head over to the island of Eleuthera.
These launches are part of the company's goal to have a national rollout of the network by late August.
BTC launched 4G in Nassau in December 2011, coinciding with the opening of its flagship store in the Mall at Marathon.
Two parties were held for the Abaco community in celebration of the 4G launch. On Saturday night an event was held at Snappa's Bar and Grill in Marsh Harbour, featuring Bahamian artists KB and Veronica Bishop. On Friday night, a pre-party was held in the DNR Sports Pub in Marsh Harbour, which featured Dylan McKenzie.

read more »


News Article

October 14, 2011
Digital signs must go

What is your first impression of New York, Orlando, or Las Vegas? It is most likely a mixture of concrete buildings, roads and flashing neon lights. Is this the image that we want The Bahamas to portray?
An announcement that the fate of a particularly large digital sign would be determined by a court is a welcome reprieve from store and land owners who erect these signs illegally and get away with it.
These signs are unsightly, uninformative, and quite frankly unwelcome.
These signs need to go -- not only for aesthetic reasons but also for motorist and pedestrian safety. These digital signs are blinding and distracting to motorists, particularly at night. When approaching the illuminated digital signs at night, the pupils contract, inhibiting our ability to see things, particularly people, in the shadows.
It's downright dangerous.
The thought that all of New Providence could resemble a glowing neon strip is frightening. Bigger and brighter is not better.
Advertising is integral to any business but these signs are not advertisements; they are tacky neon billboards espousing little ingenuity and little legible or even useful information.
The Bahamas is full of wonderful, funny, quirky signs that can be found abundantly in the Family Islands. These signs are full of character.
Unfortunately, the aesthetic quality of Nassau has continued to deteriorate over the years. Our disjointed and haphazard development forgot to integrate the beauty of our natural environment and historic buildings.
The erection of digital signs is only the latest addition to our already glowing concrete jungle.
We have a choice to make. Do we want to become just another billboard community like those off U.S. interstate I-95 or do we want to retain the understated charm of signs not internally illuminated?
We need to look no farther for enviable sign and lighting standards than Hilton Head, South Carolina. A prominent coastal resort and golf community, the community of Hilton Head created self-imposed lighting standards to protect the aesthetic qualities of the town.
Hilton Head prohibits all internally illuminated signs, neon signs, or any sign that contains a visible light source. Any non-conforming sign can be impounded without notice to the owner.
Nassau should not just enforce its current laws that don't allow for digital signs without permits, but in fact create even more stringent laws that will enhance the aesthetics of our island.
Already, Nassau has forever lost its stars and the wonder of the night. Sadly, the glow of Nassau lights can be seen more than 30 miles away, even from the northern Exumas.
To see the Milky Way with the unaided eyes is a joy that few in the developed nations have enjoyed; we cannot continue to add light pollution to our night skies.

read more »


News Article

September 19, 2014
Ready to strut their stuff

Some of the country's most successful women who are at the top of their careers and who have impacted Bahamian society in positive ways, and/or displayed a spirit of humanitarianism will rip the runway this weekend -- all in the name of charity for the 2nd Red Dress Soiree -- a runway show, cocktail reception and silent auction designed to educate, raise awareness and funds to further the efforts of the Bahamas AIDS Foundation and its work with adolescents affected and infected with HIV/AIDS.
The women committed to strutting their stuff on the catwalk for charity and the category for which they were selected include, Lady Joan Foulkes, wife of former Governor General Sir Arthur Foulkes; Dr. Nicolette Bethel, theater arts; Alexandra Maillis-Lynch, culinary arts; Inga Bowleg, business; Pat Walters, communications; Dr. Tracey Halkitis, health; Karen Carey, tourism; Eldece Clarke, sports; Lisa Sawyer-McCartney, education; Candia Dames, journalism; Antoinette Russell, banking; Patrice Ellis, religion; Amanda Lindroth, creative arts and Marisa Mason-Smith, civil society.
The women will unveil the custom-designed pieces sewn for them by some of the country's top fashion designers tomorrow at the British Colonial Hilton hotel in the Governor's Ballroom. The red carpet is at 6:30 p.m., the runway show at 7 p.m., and a silent auction and cocktail reception to follow. All proceeds benefit the Bahamas AIDS Foundation.
"It is indeed an honor to be in the company of such an amazing group of women. I've certainly made it a point to prioritize philanthropy throughout my career, and while I've given of my time and resources, this will be the first time this conviction has taken me to the catwalk. I guess it can now be said that I would do many things in the name of charity," said Inga Bowleg, who was chosen in the business field.
"The Bahamas AIDS Foundation is to be commended for the great work it is doing in our country. The Red Dress Soiree is only one of several fun filled, creative events hosted by the foundation to further its efforts in assisting those affected by and infected with HIV/AIDS.
Maillis-Lynch, who was chosen to walk the runway because of the fabulous work she's done in the culinary field, said she was honored to be a part of the cause, and that her dress will be hot.
Participating designers include Brynda Knowles, Jeff St. John, Fenna Mae Lopez, Sabrina Francis, Judy Deleveaux, Theodore Ellyett, Phylicia Elllis, David Rolle, Apryl Burrows, Indira Moss, Kathy Pinder, Patrice Lockhart, Javotte Bethel and Rachel Garcia.
"What I love about the Red Dress Soiree is that it's not only a fundraiser, but we're recognizing women in the community who are successful in whatever they're doing and some of the women are humanitarians. We're also recognizing Bahamian designers and highlighting the incredible creativity of our Bahamian designers," said Lady Camille Barnett, Bahamas AIDS Foundation president.
More than 15 luxury packages will be silent-auctioned at the bi-annual charity event, offering patrons the opportunity to bid on luxury items and services, trips and excursions. The silent auction packages offer bidders complete experiences and access to the best products and services in The Bahamas. They include the "Foodie Package" with more than $1,500 in gift certificates in New Providence. Sponsors include the One&Only Ocean Club, Goodfellow Farms, Olive Meze Grill, Luciano's of Chicago, Tru Bahamian Food Tours and Cheesecake Heaven.
Family Island getaways abound in the "Take it Slow Package" including trips to Kamalame Cay in Andros, Cape Santa Maria in Long Island and Pineapple Fields in Eleuthera, inclusive of airfare by SkyBahamas, Bahamasair and Southern Air.
The "Have a Stay-cation" packages include accommodations at The Cove, Atlantis; Comfort Suites and A Stone's Throw Away.
People with a taste for adventure can bid on the "Thrill Seeker Package" which includes dive packages from Stuart's Cove and Bahama Divers, an Exuma excursion on Powerboat Adventures, helicopter rides courtesy of Bahamas Helicopters as well as gifts from Dolphin Encounters and Seahorse Sailing Adventures.
Liquor connoisseurs can bid on the "It's Wine O'clock Package" which will feature a champagne and wine tasting courtesy of Young's Champagne as well as selections from Bristol Cellars, Burns House and John Watling's.
And after all the indulgence, Club One and New Providence Community Centre have donated six-month memberships for the "Break A Sweat" package that is perfect for those people looking to hit the gym.
The Red Dress Soiree was staged in 2012 for the first time and organized by Tyrina Neely. It was so successful that the
Bahamas AIDS Foundation had wanted to do it again in 2013, but Neely was unable to. Lady Camille asked Neely if they could just take over the event. Neely agreed and offered to help where she could.
A new component to the Red Dress Soiree will be the creation of a 2015 calendar which will be shot by photographer Scharad Lightbourne, featuring the women in red along with their designers. The women and their designers will be photographed in creative ways at Sapodilla Estates. Lady Camille is hoping the calendars will be ready by the AIDS Foundation Ball in November.
Tickets for the Red Dress Soiree are $100 and are available at The Bahamas AIDS Foundation on Delancy Street, Imperial Optical and Commonwealth Fabrics.

read more »


News Article

August 07, 2012
MoT targets fund for southern hotels

Southern islands such as Cat Island, Crooked Island, Acklins and Inagua continue to struggle with getting their economies on track, according to the director general at the Ministry of Tourism.
David Johnson shared with Guardian Business that smaller hotels located in the southeastern part of the country have distribution issues. In an effort to generate more business into these properties, the Ministry of Tourism, in conjunction with the Bahamas Out Islands Promotion Board, is looking to start a fund that will enable smaller hotels to have a more effective distribution system.
"The fund won't have much more than $30,000 to provide the technical support, as we look to get them into the digital realm with their bookings. That's what we are talking about. We have agreed in principle, but we are looking to execute this soon. This is really for the smaller hotels within the Family Islands, and most of them are in the southeast," he noted.
Johnson believes initiatives like these will help to improve their marketing strategies.
Other issues, he added, include insufficient and expensive airlift to these islands.
"With these rebate programs that we're offering, we are looking to make an adjustment because airfares are even more expensive than the other islands. These adjustments need to be made, so they are able to be more competitive. We are reviewing how we can make an adjustment and hope to reach an agreement on that very shortly."
According to Charity Armbrister, tourism's director of central and southern Bahamas, these islands are still struggling mostly due to airlift. Until that issue is resolved, Armbrister said it will be difficult for them to reach their potential.
"For example, we have persons coming in from the UK and the connecting flights are just not there, so they have to overnight in Nassau, which is really not what they want. They are coming to the islands and they want to get there as quickly as possible in the most inexpensive way. Airlift is on top of the ministry's agenda," she explained.
"The booking engine is key to addressing this issue. When visitors go online, they book a flight into The Bahamas. Then they say they need to connect, and there is no real global booking engine. So they don't get to see the Pineapple Air, Western Air or the Southern Air. Unless there is a code share with Bahamasair or something like that, the visitors just don't know about it and so it makes it very complicated. We are hoping to see an improvement in that area in 90 days."
Meanwhile, Armbrister further revealed that most islands have seen an increase over the last year in room nights, which is encouraging:
"I would say Harbour Island, Exuma and Eleuthera are the strongest islands. Long Island has shown one of the largest increases, like maybe 20 percent. That's really encouraging.

Most of the islands have seen an increase over last year in room nights, so we are very excited about that. We are hoping that we can get back to 2008/2009 when things were much better. With the Two Fly Free and these kinds of incentives, we think we are going to make it happen sometime soon."

read more »


News Article

June 01, 2011
Campari teams up with Lady Nathalie again

The Campari Lady Nathalie is back... literally!
According to boat owner Eleazor 'Barber J' Johnson, the popular B-Class sloop has re-united with Burns House and the Campari brand, and will enjoy its support and sponsorship for the rest of the year. The sloop has been known as the Campari Lady Nathalie for much of the past two decades, but that partnership was terminated in 2008, and the two entities went their separate ways. With Johnson's Silver Jubilee St. Valentine's Day Massacre set for next year, he said that a better time couldn't have been picked for the two sides to come together again.
"I feel wonderful. It's great to have them back on board but really and truly, our relationship was never stained," said Johnson. "We always stayed in contact and there was always the possibility of them coming back and supporting the Lady Nathalie. Knowing that the 25th Annual St. Valentine's Day Massacre is right around the corner, it's good to know that they are back supporting me. Nathalie is a champion boat and Campari is a champion brand. She is simply legendary, and it's only right that two champions would come together and promote sailing in the country. I see great things happening in the future for the Campari Lady Nathalie," he added.
The Lady Nathalie was sponsored by the Campari brand from 1990-2008. During that time, Johnson's prized B-Class possession has won numerous sailing titles in the country. It has won in Abaco, Acklins, Andros, Bimini, Cat Island, Grand Bahama, North Eleuthera, and of course here in New Providence. However, the sloop has never won the National Family Island Regatta in Georgetown, Exuma nor in Salt Pond, Long Island. The Lady Nathalie finished third overall in picturesque Elizabeth's Harbour in Georgetown this year, and the Long Island regatta is set for this Labour Day Holiday weekend. However, the Lady Nathalie won't be participating in Salt Pond this weekend.
"I never won in Georgetown nor Long Island but the Lady Nathalie is always up there," said Johnson. "I've beaten all the top B-Class sloops except for Buzzy Rolle. He has a fast boat and Nathalie is also fast so it is really just a matter of time, and now with Campari and the Lady Nathalie back together, great things are lying ahead," he added.
So far, Johnson's Lady Nathalie is having a great year. In addition to finishing third overall in Georgetown, the Lady Nathalie won all three series races of the All-for-Regatta with Clyde Rolle at the tiller, and then won the 'Catch Me If You Can' race at the St. Valentine's Day Massacre. Johnson is expecting a good summer for his sloop, and for it to finish the year strong, thereby ensuring that Burns House and the Campari brand stay on board for next year as well.

read more »


Business Listing

Musha Cay and The Islands at Copperfield Bay
Hotels
  • Musha Cay Island
  • Exuma, Bahamas
News Article

June 14, 2011
Butler dealt a bad hand

Dear Editor,

It appears as if Opposition Leader Perry G. Christie is unmoved by the sudden resignation of Craig Butler from the Progressive Liberal Party.  Christie stated that people are always leaving the PLP. He also stated, however, that people are always joining his party. Mr. Christie also added that he wishes Mr. Butler all the best in his future endeavors.
Christie said this much about Craig Butler during a PLP rally that was held at their headquarters Gambier House on June 1st.  Mr. Butler is the grandson of Sir Milo Butler, the first Bahamian governor general.  He was also the treasurer of the PLP.  It appears that Mr. Butler's family connection was not enough to help him get the nomination for the PLP.
Mr. Butler has on numerous occasions expressed an interest in running as a candidate for the PLP.  In fact, just last year after the resignation of Elizabeth MP Malcolm Adderley from the House of Assembly, Mr. Butler, along with Ryan Pinder, both vied to get the PLP nomination for that constituency.  The nomination was given to Mr. Pinder.
He was favored by Mr. Christie to run in the 2010 bye-election in Elizabeth.  However, Mr. Christie, before he had made his final decision on who would run in Elizabeth, sounded as if Mr. Butler had a fighting chance to gain the nomination.

Nevertheless, despite what could only be described as a major disappointment in being rejected by the PLP in Elizabeth, Mr. Butler remained a loyal PLP supporter.  Mr. Butler then turned his attention to the Kennedy constituency.
That constituency is represented by FNM MP Kenyatta Gibson.  Gibson had defected from the PLP in 2008. I understand that Mr. Butler had been canvassing the Kennedy area, with the hope of galvanizing support from PLP supporters.
Many of the PLP supporters in Kennedy were interested in Mr. Butler and his message.  It appears as if Mr. Butler really believed that he would be given the PLP nomination for Kennedy.  According to some political observers, it appears as if Butler was given this impression by the leaders of that party.  This would explain why he was so disillusioned with the PLP and resigned after he was once again rejected by the party.
According to the press, one Dion Smith has been given the nomination to run for the PLP in Kennedy.  It is obvious to myself that Mr. Butler was really disappointed at being overlooked again by the PLP.  According to the press, Butler was denied a nomination because of his past drug addiction.
Butler has admitted that he once struggled with drug addition.  Yet he is quick to add, however, that he has truly reformed.  Christie, however, appears not to be impressed with Mr. Butler.  Perhaps the opposition leader feels that Butler's past indiscretions would turn off too many voters from the PLP.
Mr. Christie obviously wants to present to the Bahamian electorate a slate of candidates that are squeaky clean.  Therefore, it is understandable why Mr Christie is unwilling to accept Butler's nomination. But with that being said, why has Mr. Christie refused to heed the warning of Raynard Rigby, Philip Galanis and George Smith?
These three prominent PLPs had warned Christie not to accept the nominations of Obie Wilchcombe (West End and Bimini), V. Alfred Gray (MICAL), Shane Gibson (Golden Gates), Leslie Miller, Picewell Forbes (South Andros), Anthony Moss (Exuma) and Vincent Peet (North Andros), for the upcoming general election.  Most of these gentlemen listed above have also had their share of issues.  In fact, several of them, including Keod Smith, Kenyatta Gibson and Sidney Stubbs, had caused the PLP to lose the 2007 general election.
Mr. Christie obviously intends to run these men in the general election.  He had written a letter to a prominent tabloid newspaper stating the reason why he had rejected the suggestions of Rigby and co.
Question: If the leader of the opposition is hell-bent on running these candidates, who have also made their share of mistakes, why is Mr. Christie unwilling to do the same for Craig Butler?
If Mr. Christie is willing to overlook the alleged indiscretions of these men, why not do the same for Butler?  After all, what is good for the goose is good for the gander.  If he is determined to reject Mr. Butler's nomination because of his past, then he should do the same thing to his MPs, who were mentioned in that famous letter that was leaked to the press!
Further, the incident with Craig Butler is similar to an incident that had occurred almost ten years ago in Marco City.  The Rev. Frederick MacAlpine was a PLP supporter who himself was given the impression that he would be given the PLP nomination for Marco City to run in the 2002 general election.  I live in Marco City.  I remember the Rev. MacAlpine sending us letters and holding functions in Marco City.  I thought that he would be running in Marco City for the PLP.  However, Miss Pleasant Bridgewater was given the nomination instead.
The Rev. MacAlpine felt slighted by Mr. Christie and the PLP. Therefore, he, like Butler, eventually left the party.  It appears as if Mr. Christie and his party have a penchant for leading people on.
These men had obviously spent a lot of money and time in these constituencies, only to be told at the eleventh hour that they won't be receiving any nomination from the PLP.  If this is what was done to Mr. Butler, then Christie and the other leaders of the PLP should at least apologize to him for wasting his time.
Why tell a man that he has a good chance of securing a nomination, when you have already made up in your mind to run someone else?  This is one reason why I find it difficult to support Mr. Christie.
Mr. Christie needs to understand that you just can't treat people like impersonal objects. People are to be treated with dignity and respect. I believe that Christie dealt Craig Butler a very bad hand in this case!

Yours, etc.,
KEVIN EVANS

read more »