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Movie
The Counselor
  • Genre : Crime, Drama, Thriller
  • Rating : C - 18yrs and Older

A lawyer finds himself in over his head when he gets involved in drug trafficking....


Event
Drug Education at Greek Church

Thursday 27th August 2009  7:00 PM

The Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church's Youth Department hosts a Drug Education Forum. Presenters/Discussion lead by: The Embassy of The United State's Drug Enforcement Agency, members of the legal profession, members of the medical profession and The Royal Bahamas Police Force. All are welcome. Start Time: August 27th at 7:00 pm Where: Church Hall, West Street For more information, contact Alexandra Maillis-Lynch at 242-557-3557.


Movie
Homefront
  • Genre : Action, Crime, Thriller
  • Rating : C - 18yrs and Older

A former DEA agent moves his family to a quiet town, where he soon tangles with a local meth druglord....


News Article
In the fight of her life

To look at her, you couldn't tell that Tamika Pratt, 36, is battling a disease that can cause life-threatening bleeding. A disease that is rare in people under age 40, and which generally occurs around age 60 and is a disease that is more common in men than women.
The mother of two is fighting for her life as she battles acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a cancer that starts inside bone marrow, the soft tissue inside bones that helps form blood cells. It's a cancer that grows from cells that would normally turn into white blood cells. The bone marrow, which helps the body fight infections, eventually stops working correctly. People with AML become more prone to infections and have an increased risk for bleeding as the numbers of healthy blood cells decrease. And it develops quickly, replacing healthy blood cells.
Pratt, a mother of two, Davonte, 17 and Jermika, 11 was diagnosed with the disease in September 2010. Since then her life has been a revolving door of hospital stays for chemotherapy treatment and blood transfusions. (She's had so many transfusions that she's stopped counting). And she's been in and out of remission. What she really needs to turn the tide of this disease is a bone marrow transplant. And she and her family have tried a few inventive ways to get her plight before the public, including offering cell phone cards in $5 and $10 denominations to the public in an effort to get them to donate blood to her cause. Most recently, Pratt took to the Internet to explain her plight in hopes of identifying a bone marrow transplant donor to hopefully provide her with a cure for the aggressive cancer that she has.
She is registered with bone marrow donor programs, but a compatible donor has not been found. And doctors in the United States have told her that the percentage for black Americans in the registry is very low.
"For me, time is running out. This is why I have decided to reach out to my Bahamian people for bone marrow. You could save my life," she said in her Internet appeal.
People between the ages of 18 and 60, in good general health who aren't greatly overweight or have or at a high risk for contracting HIV can be a potential donor. Even people with elevated blood pressure (hypertension) can still be a donor, once their hypertension is well controlled by medication. But they need to get tested to see if their bone marrow matches with Pratt's, through a simple swab of their cheek. The test costs approximate $200, but if you don't want to get tested in her e-mail, Pratt asks people to help someone with funding who would like to be tested to cover the cost of the test.
Symptoms of AML include bleeding from the nose, bleeding gums, bruising, bone pain or tenderness, fatigue, fever, heavy menstrual periods, pallor, shortness of breath (gets worse with exercise), skin rash or lesion, swollen gums (which is very rare) and weight loss.
At the time of Pratt's diagnosis she said she was just feeling extremely tired all the time. During her regular physical, her results showed that her counts were not normal. She was referred to a hematologist who did a bone marrow biopsy. It was determined she had myelodysplastic syndrome [MDS], or what is known as pre-leukemia. She was not worried at that point because she was told it was treatable, but that she had to seek treatment abroad. Less than a month later she had traveled to the United States to seek medical care. It was there that she was given a second bone marrow biopsy. The result this time was that the aggressive cancer had moved beyond MDS and she had leukemia.
The mother of two spent five weeks in hospital receiving chemotherapy treatments. From then to now, hospitals at home and in the United States have been a "revolving door" for her.
"I knew from the beginning that I would have to have a bone marrow transplant, but I was hoping the chemotherapy treatments would work and it wouldn't get to that," said Pratt. "But since this is my third relapse, I said I'd better try see what I could do for myself, so this is something I'm doing on my own trying to find people. I don't know where I'm going to get the money from, but somehow it's going to happen," said Pratt. People wishing to be tested have to pay out of their own pocket, or Pratt will have to "pony up" the cash and pay for them.
Sadly, she does not have any full siblings that can be tested to donate marrow. She has two half-siblings born to her mother, and another 10 half-siblings from her father who have not been tested, because there is only a one-percent chance they would be a match for her. Her mother and one sister have both been tested, but they are still waiting on the results. Her father is deceased.
Most of the time, a doctor cannot tell what caused AML, but there are things that they believe lead to some types of leukemia, including AML, like certain chemicals, certain chemotherapy drugs or radiation. It is also believed that problems with genes may also play a role in the development of AML and that the risk increases if a person has a weakened immune system due to organ transplant, or certain blood disorders.
Since her diagnosis, Pratt said she has not cried once or adopted a woe is me attitude. She says she has accepted what has happened and is taking one day at a time. She says while she tries to maintain a smile on her face and be upbeat, she admits to having her moments.
"Sometimes the devil comes in my mind," she said. "Christmas gone I went and picked up little things, and the devil came in my mind and said, 'Girl, what you picking up these things for? You ain't going to live to see Christmas,' but I simply said, 'Devil, you're a liar.' My son is graduating high school in June and sometimes I wonder if I will be there, but I'm going to be there," she said confidently.
As she searches for a bone marrow donor, she is appealing to Bahamians to donate blood to the hospitals because getting transfusions which has been getting her by, has also been a problem for her.
"I'm just pleading to the public to come forward ... and I wouldn't even go as far as the bone marrow transplant. If they could just put themselves in somebody else's shoe and commit to once a month donating a pint of blood, they could save somebody's life," she said. "If it don't hit them home, they don't feel like they need to do it. And I didn't realize how bad it was until it happened to me."
She admits to not knowing how important it is to be a blood donor until she found herself in the situation she is now in needing to have blood transfusions performed almost every other week.
Pratt's battle has also been expensive and she is thankful for her husband's insurance coverage. But exactly how much she has left of that gives her cause for concern.
"I'm scared to even try to add up the amount I've spent. I'm even scared to call the insurance company to find out how much coverage I have left. My first bill from [the U.S.-based facility] was almost $200,000 for the five weeks I spent there. I have my hospital bill there, my hospital bill here, and I have my doctor bill here. I have stopped asking. I'm afraid to ask," she says.
As she looks forward to her future she says she has no reason not to smile and be depressed because God has been good to her. And her husband, Jermaine Pratt stands by her. Plus she does everything she can to keep up a happy front for her children which she said was challenging initially because she tried to keep her illness from them.
"I didn't want to burden them down, so that was a challenge for me. Even when I went away the first time I told them I went away to do testing, but not what was going on with me. And that really had me stressed. After a while I told them separately and explained it to them differently, taking into account their ages. My daughter was pretty good, and the only thing my son wanted to know was whether it would happen to him too. But I told him no that he would be fine. They handled it so well. I didn't give them enough credit. Sometimes my son comes to me with questions, and once I answer him, he's fine.
As she searches for a bone marrow donor, in her fight to live, Pratt has been thrown a number of curve balls, including losing her job in the middle of 2011, which she says she's understanding of because she realizes her employer's office had to continue to run and her home was burgled. Thieves made off with money she had in a drawer to pay for an airline ticket to receive treatment. That was followed by her husband's car being broken into.

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Movie
3 Days to Kill
  • Genre : Action, Crime, Drama
  • Rating : C - 18yrs and Older

A dying Secret Service Agent trying to reconnect with his estranged daughter is offered an experimental drug that could save his life in exchange for one last assignment. ...


News Article
First woman jailed under new gun laws

A 30-year-old became the first woman jailed for firearm possession under harsher new gun laws.Police arrested Emmajane Fritzgerald, of 142 Limewood, Freeport, and her 51-year-old mother Claudette Smith when they found a black Hipoint 9mm pistol and six grams of marijuana in their home on December 21.

Fritzgerald pleaded guilty to drug and gun possession charges at an arraignment before Gun Court Magistrate Joyann Ferguson-Pratt yesterday.

Ferguson-Pratt sentenced Fritzgerald to the mandatory minimum of four years in prison on the firearm charge and 18 months on the drug charge.

Prosecutors withdrew the charges against Smith because of Fritzgerald's guilty plea.

As of November 4, persons convicted of firearm possession face four to seven years in prison.

The FNM government removed the magistrates'sentencing discretion on charges of gun possession and drug possession with intent to supply in the face of a rising crime rate.

In December 2000, the Ingraham administration abolished mandatory minimum sentences.

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News Article
Portrait of the bulldog
Portrait of the bulldog

For the last three weeks I have been asking myself the question (and by extension asking you), what type of leader do we need to take us forward as a people in this trying season? I told you that there are four kinds of politicians: The lotioner (the silver tongued one), the grunt (the follower who reaps the rewards of following), the lone wolf (the man who is too temperamental or idealistic to fit in for long), and the bulldog. Today I give you the bulldog.

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Movie
Better Living Through Chemistry
  • Genre : Comedy, Drama
  • Rating :

A strait-laced pharmacist's uneventful life spirals out of control when he starts an affair with a trophy-wife customer who takes him on a joyride involving sex, drugs and possibly murder....


Movie
Sabotage
  • Genre : Action, Crime, Drama
  • Rating : C - 18yrs and Older

Members of an elite DEA task force find themselves being taken down one by one after they rob a drug cartel safe house....


News Article
Launch of National Job Readiness Programme

National Job Readiness And Training Programme

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Event
BIFF Film Series Presents
BIFF Film Series Presents

Wednesday 27th October 2010  7:30 PM

ROAR 16 MINS Short Drama A socially awkward Londoner is lonely at Christmas. When a cold city girl rejects his gesture of goodwill, he takes drastic action. Roar is a smart and subversive short film that will haunt you for months. Filmmakers: Adam Wimpenny, Director, J.S. Hill Writer, Adam Credited Cast: Russell Tovey Jodie Whittaker Tom Burke MORENITA 92 MINS Drama Director / Writer: Alan Jonsson Producer: Annabel Oakes Writer (screenplay): Ozcar Ramírez - Producer Desperate to save his family from death threats by a notorious drug dealer, Mateo Cruz steals the venerated image of the Virgin of Guadalupe causing pandemonium throughout Mexico. Credited cast: Mario Almada ... Miguel Everardo Arzate ... El Pinto Michelle Marie Benoit ... Anchorwoman Octavio Castro ... Joven Basílica Cost: $12/per screening; $100/complete package, including popcorn. Snack menu & bar available Start Time: October 27th at 7:30pm Where: Old Fort Bay For more information, contact 242-325-5747 www.bintlfilmfest.com


News Article
OAS Presents New Report on the Progress of Drug Control in the Americas

The Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD) of the Organization of American States (OAS) today published its latest report on the progress of drug control in the region, containing 350 recommendations for countries facing this problem, of which 38 percent involve control measures, 28 percent demand reduction, 24 percent supply reduction, and 17 the strengthening of institutions.

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Event
NAGB Environmental Film Series Presents
NAGB Environmental Film Series Presents

Thursday 18th November 2010  7:00 PM

Trouble the water opens the day the filmmakers meet 24 year old aspiring rap artist and ex-drug dealer Kimberly Roberts and her husband Scott at a Red Cross centre in central Louisiana, then flashes back two weeks, with Kimberly turning her new video camera on herself and her neighbours trapped in their Ninth Ward attic as the storm rages, the levees fail and the flood waters rise. Weaving 15 minutes of Roberts' ground zero footage shot the day before and the morning of the storm , with archival news segments, other home videos, and verite footage they filmed over two years, director/producers Tia Lessin & Carl Deal document the journey of a young couple living on the margins who survive the storm and seize a chance for a new beginning. Directors: Tia Lessin & Carl Deal Runtime: 93 mins Start Time: November 18th at 7:00pm Where: National Art Gallery of the Bahamas, West & West Hill Sts For more information, contact 242-328-5800


News Article
Those we lost this year

This year was marked by the loss of several Bahamians who strove to make The Bahamas a better place. Their legacies reflect a deep commitment for developing the moral and cultural fabric of society, making them irreplaceable national treasures.
On February 7, Bishop Michael Hartley Eldon passed away.
Ordained as deacon in 1954 and then as priest in 1955, Eldon was consecrated Bishop Suffragan of New Providence in 1971.  He served as Diocesan Bishop from 1974 until his retirement in 1996.
At his funeral on February 15 at Christ Church Cathedral, Bishop Eldon was remembered as 'the people's bishop' as he was always with them even beyond his capacity as a church leader.  Indeed his influence extended to education as a founding chairman of The College of The Bahamas board of directors, as well as to service in feeding the needy and assisting recovering drug addicts.
In helping to mold all sectors of society, Bishop Eldon was a true conscientious citizen and community leader.
The Bethel family suffered a double loss as Dr. Keva Marie Bethel, Bishop Eldon's sister, succumbed to cancer on February 15, hours before her brother's funeral.
Dr. Bethel was described by the prime minister as an "extra-ordinary Bahamian".  Like her late husband E. Clement Bethel, Dr. Bethel was dedicated to the promotion and advancement of Bahamian culture.
Most notably, Dr. Bethel was also a pioneer in education, joining her brother on the founding board of directors for The College of The Bahamas.  Dr. Bethel acted as principal of the college from 1982-1995, and then as its president until 1998.
As an educator for more than 50 years, Dr. Bethel never stopped in her efforts to advance the intelligent development of Bahamian citizens -- efforts that were honored by her students and colleagues at her memorial service on February 18 at the college's Centre for the Performing Arts.
She was a quiet hero and a magnanimous leader -- with a kind spirit, a purposeful vision, she inspired countless Bahamians to work towards building a dynamic nation.
Another Bahamian icon, Basil Dean, passed away on February 11 in Florida while being treated for cancer.
Beloved and respected by police and feared by criminals, Dean changed the face of crime fighting in The Bahamas. Joining the police force in 1966, Dean served selflessly for 31 years, retiring as assistant commissioner of police.
He then took up the position of vice president of Security and Surveillance at Atlantis resort.
At his military funeral at Christ Church Cathedral on February 22, the beloved Dean was remembered for his no-tolerance stance on crime and his personal integrity.
As his son Brent Dean pointed out during the service, his father left the police force with his integrity intact, considering that his greatest achievement in a time where some policemen readily received bribes and could at times hardly be separated from criminals themselves.
Those who worked with him after retirement looked on him fondly as an important mentor in their lives, for whether in the police force or at Atlantis resort, Dean molded the moral integrity and pride of many a student as an exemplary model.
This year, the Bahamian community also mourned the loss of a great cultural figure, Jackson Logan Burnside. He died on May 11 after suffering a brain aneurysm on April 15 at age 62.
Burnside was a true cultural icon passionate about all things Bahamian.  As an architect under Doongalik studios, Burnside preserved in all of his design projects the 'Bahamianness' in local architecture. Such efforts are seen in many of his projects, including the iconic Atlantis Marina Village.
Considered one of the master artists of The Bahamas, Burnside's colorful paintings invoked in viewers pure joy and appreciation for their heritage.
As Burnside was also a founder of One Family Junkanoo group along with his brother Stan, an elaborate Junkanoo rush-out in his honor followed his funeral service on May 19 where his role as a mentor to many young Bahamians -- whether future architects, artists, or Junkanoo icons -- was remembered.
Though the loss of Burnside is a huge blow to the cultural development of The Bahamas, his passion will live on for he shared it with every single person he came across in his life.
In December, The Bahamas faced the unexpected loss of Canon Neil Roach. As the longest-serving rector of Holy Cross Parish, his death came just days before he planned to celebrate the 54th anniversary of being an ordained priest.
His influence extended beyond his religious post however, for as an honorary consul to Trinidad and Tobago, Canon Roach helped to shape regional foreign policy and contributed to the civic life and development of The Bahamas.
Remembered by many as a particularly jovial and outgoing person, Canon Roach always urged people to see the glass half full, to practice thankfulness and to celebrate life. Nevertheless, with unwavering faith, he was adamant about upholding certain cultural norms about the Anglican Church. Indeed, he was a major icon in the Anglican community who even after his retirement remained dedicated to teaching and guiding people in the community.
Also in December, Bahamians lost a national hero when Sir Clifford Darling died after a long illness at the age of 89.
The fourth Bahamian-born governor general, Sir Clifford had a long and significant career in politics. He served as a Progressive Liberal Party MP for about 25 years.
Appointed as the Minister of Labor and National Insurance in 1971, he introduced the National Insurance Programme on October 7, 1974, ensuring every Bahamian received assistance in their time of need.
From 1977 to 1992, Sir Clifford served as the speaker of the House of Assembly and in 1992 was sworn in at Government House as the governor general of The Bahamas, a post he held until 1995.
Indeed, Sir Clifford fought for significant change in The Bahamas, and not only as a politician. From his beginnings as a taxicab driver and general secretary and then president of The Bahamas Taxicab Union, Sir Clifford sought to ensure fairness in Bahamian businesses and society. From the early 1950s he worked with hotels to ensure Bahamian taxicab drivers received fair treatment and share of passengers from the resort clientele.
Through a general strike in 1958 where he worked with the union to blockade the airport, Sir Clifford helped to forge an agreement involving hotels, tour services and taxicab operators that has persisted to this day.
Sir Clifford was knighted by the Queen in 1977 and was a stalwart councillor, the highest honor that can be bestowed on a member of the Progressive Liberal Party.
In December, Reginald Dumont, the husband of former Governor General Dame Ivy Dumont also died. Dumont was 88.
Of course there were many other beloved Bahamians who made contributions to the development of The Bahamas who died this year.  They too will be fondly remembered by many.  Though their journeys on earth have ended, the legacies of these great Bahamians will be felt for many years to come as they live on in the lives of those they changed.

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Event
George Gershwin's Porgy Bess
George Gershwin's Porgy & Bess

Tuesday 5th July 2011  7:30 PM

5th - 10th July, 2011 7:30 p.m. The Rain Forest Theater The Whyndam Nassau Resort & Crystal Palace Cable Beach Tickets: $30.00, $40.00 and $50.00 Booth:(6 persons) $400.00 with wine Porgy and Bess tells the story of Porgy, a disabled black beggar living in the Catfish Row slum of Charleston, South Carolina. It deals with his attempts to rescue Bess from the clutches of Crown, her violent and possessive lover, and Sportin' Life, the drug dealer and deals with themes of love and abuse. Its more familiar songs include Summertime, It Ain't Necessarily So, Bess, You is My Woman Now, I Loves You Porgy and Oh I Can't Sit Down.


News Article
Former MP in tears for next generation

By AVA TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter

aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

FORMER member of parliament Edward "Dud" Maynard broke down in tears yesterday over the growing disparity between the ideals and aspirations of the country's "trailblazers" and the younger generation.

Addressing students at a symposium commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Women's Suffrage Movement, Mr Maynard said he felt that young people were wasting hard-earned opportunities by indulging in drugs and distancing themselves from social history.

"We have taken over our country politically, but our children are falling behind," Mr Maynard said.

"That is a grievous feeling to me ...

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Event
Nassau City Opera presents Porgy Bess
Nassau City Opera presents "Porgy & Bess"

Wednesday 6th July 2011

July 6, 7 & 10th, 2011 Porgy and Bess tells the story of Porgy, a disabled black beggar living in the Catfish Row slum of Charleston, South Carolina. It deals with his attempts to rescue Bess from the clutches of Crown, her violent and possessive lover, and Sportin' Life, the drug dealer and deals with themes of love and abuse. Its more familiar songs include Summertime, It Ain't Necessarily So, Bess, You is My Woman Now, I Loves You Porgy and Oh I Can't Sit Down. Tickets available at the Dundas Centre for the Performing Arts at 393-3728.


News Article
Miller wants truce

Former Cabinet Minister Leslie Miller has called for a 'truce' between the Progressive Liberal Party (PLP) and the Free National Movement (FNM) during the remainder of the election season.
Over the past few weeks several PLP and FNM candidates have hurled insults at each other during their respective rallies and constituency office openings.
Miller, who has launched several verbal attacks against National Security Minister Tommy Turnquest and State Minister for Social Development Loretta Butler-Turner, said yesterday politicians on both sides should focus on the issues during the rest of the election season.
However, Turnquest said he would not give in to a verbal ceasefire. The Mount Moriah MP said he plans to sue Miller unless he publicly apologizes for certain disparaging comments.
Turnquest said the allegations - which were made by Miller on Monday night at the opening of the PLP's Golden Gates constituency office - have hurt his wife and family.
"What Leslie Miller did on Monday night was despicable," Turnquest told The Nassau Guardian. "I'm seeking legal advice at the moment, and until he apologizes to my wife, there will be no truce. My wife is very hurt that someone would [speak about her] that way and [of] her husband that way.
"He can [say those things] and expect everything to be okay? Now he wants a truce? You got to be joking. He says he's a 'potcake'? Well Bahamians keep 'potcakes' in the yard, not in the house and definitely not in the House of Assembly."
Miller said Bahamian politicians should focus their campaigns on the real issues affecting voters. He said his earlier gibes were only made in self defense after jokes were made about him "stealing toilets".
"They attacked me first," Miller said. "I was minding my own business. If you don't defend yourself, people will believe it. This is so gutless and unnecessary and so contrary to what we are as a people. Let everybody call a truce and act like sensible people.
"It [isn't] going to stop until we as grown men and women decide we are going to stop. This has nothing to do with the issues going on in our country."
Miller has made public jokes about Butler-Turner's weight.
Last night, the Montagu MP, who is now running on the FNM's ticket for Long Island, said while the disparaging remarks about her size have not hurt her, they have turned off some female voters.
"Everybody knows I am a big person," Butler-Turner said.
"I am comfortable in my own skin. I'm full of self-esteem. But the way he disrespected me clearly demonstrated how he disrespects females in general. I'm glad that he now wants a truce in the wake of the fact that so many females have called me to let me know that they won't even consider supporting him."
Butler-Turner admitted that she referred to Miller as a self-described 'potcake' during an FNM event in Southern Shores, but said, "I never called this man something he never called himself.
"When we look at this gutter politics, more and more persons want to hear the issues and they do not want to hear the negativity. If somebody throws something at you, what are you are going to do?"
In the election season so far, there has been a lot of mudslinging and claims of corruption being hurled back and forth.
At a political event last week, Turnquest made homosexual innuendos about PLPs, and also used words like rape and prostitution.
The FNM's candidate for North Andros and the Berry Islands Desmond Bannister said the PLP had a bunch of geriatrics at their North Andros event last week. Among those sitting up front were former Governor General A. D. Hanna, Dame Marguerite Pindling and retired Archbishop Drexel Gomez.
And Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham recently questioned the motives of long-time director of the National AIDS Programme Dr. Perry Gomez, who is now the PLP's candidate for North Andros and the Berry Islands.
Ingraham asked at a recent political event: "Ask him when did he become interested or concerned about North Andros or about people like you who [don't have] AIDS? When did he become concerned about you?"
Gomez's family and many PLPs saw it as an unfair attack on a man who has spent decades fighting HIV/AIDS in The Bahamas.
The prime minister has also sought to link PLPs to known drug dealers.

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Event
Nassau City Opera presents Porgy Bess
Nassau City Opera presents "Porgy & Bess"

Thursday 7th July 2011

July 6, 7 & 10th, 2011 Porgy and Bess tells the story of Porgy, a disabled black beggar living in the Catfish Row slum of Charleston, South Carolina. It deals with his attempts to rescue Bess from the clutches of Crown, her violent and possessive lover, and Sportin' Life, the drug dealer and deals with themes of love and abuse. Its more familiar songs include Summertime, It Ain't Necessarily So, Bess, You is My Woman Now, I Loves You Porgy and Oh I Can't Sit Down. Tickets available at the Dundas Centre for the Performing Arts at 393-3728.


News Article
BAHAMAS URGED: ADDRESS FINANCIAL LAW WEAKNESSES

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE US government has again urged the Bahamas to strengthen its anti-terror financing laws and make membership of organised criminal gangs a criminal offence, according to a recently-released US State Department report.

The annual 2012 International Narcotics Control Strategy Report (INCSR), which details efforts by world governments to fight the illegal drug trade and associated money laundering, largely repeated prior US criticisms of the Bahamas' financial regulatory system, such as the resources provided to supervisors and the absence of a public registry detailing all beneficial owners of Bahamian-domiciled entities.

Indeed, many of the wea ...

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Event
Nassau City Opera presents Porgy Bess
Nassau City Opera presents "Porgy & Bess"

Sunday 10th July 2011

July 6, 7 & 10th, 2011 Porgy and Bess tells the story of Porgy, a disabled black beggar living in the Catfish Row slum of Charleston, South Carolina. It deals with his attempts to rescue Bess from the clutches of Crown, her violent and possessive lover, and Sportin' Life, the drug dealer and deals with themes of love and abuse. Its more familiar songs include Summertime, It Ain't Necessarily So, Bess, You is My Woman Now, I Loves You Porgy and Oh I Can't Sit Down. Tickets available at the Dundas Centre for the Performing Arts at 393-3728.


News Article
Chronic diseases under National Prescription Drug Plan expanded

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham yesterday signed off on an order expanding the amount of chronic diseases covered under the National Prescription Drug Plan (NPDP).
New ailments added to the list are benign prostatic hypertrophy, epilepsy, sickle cell anemia and thyroid disease, according to a statement released by the Office of the Prime Minister (OPM) yesterday.
The NPDP previously covered 11 chronic conditions: Arthritis, asthma, breast cancer, depression (major), diabetes, glaucoma, high cholesterol, hypertension, ischemic heart disease, prostate cancer and psychosis.
The government enacted the drug plan in 2009 and it came into effect on September 20, 2010.
The statement noted that the new order amends conditions previously listed under two existing categories of illnesses, replacing 'ischemic heart disease' with 'ischaemia disease' and 'major depression' with 'psychiatric disease'.
Last December the government also widened the group of Bahamians that would benefit from the program.
Originally under the first phase of the plan were National Insurance Board (NIB) pensioners, NIB invalids, Bahamian citizens over 65 years of age who are not eligible to receive a NIB pension, children under 18 years of age and students under 25 years of age.
The government added as a part of the second phase, indigent people; staff of Her Majesty's Prisons and the industrial schools; members of the Royal Bahamas Police and Defence Force; people receiving medical care associated with pregnancy; people receiving 100 percent NIB disablement benefits; people receiving a NIB retirement grant and people age 60 and over in receipt of NIB survivors who have been diagnosed with one or more of the chronic conditions covered under the plan.
The NPDP is designed to assist the Bahamian public with medications generally prescribed to treat chronic conditions.
According to the statement, nearly 18,000 people presently receive benefits under the plan.

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Event
Career Achievement Tribute
Career Achievement Tribute

Friday 2nd December 2011  6:00 PM

Friday, December 2 / 8:00pm Atlantis Theatre Heather Graham to Receive Career Achievement Tribute The Career Achievement Tribute ceremony featuring Graham will take place at the Atlantis Theater on the evening of Friday, December 2nd. Jeffrey Lyons, host of the TV show “Lyons Den”, will be moderating the evening’s conversation. Details of the event and its participants were revealed today by BIFF Founder and Executive Director Leslie Vanderpool. Heather Graham discovered her passion for acting at an early age and caught the attention of filmmakers with her breakout role in Gus Van Sant's Drugstore Cowboy, for which she received an Independent Spirit Award nomination. Graham went on to score unforgettable roles in the 1997 classic Boogie Nights, for which she received the MTV Movie Award for Best Breakthrough Performance, and 1999's Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me. Also in 1999, Graham was named ShoWest Female Star of Tomorrow. Up next, Graham will star in Cherry opposite James Franco and Heartland opposite Dennis Quaid and Zac Efron. Most recently, she starred in Judy Moody and the Not Bummer Summer, 5 Days of War, Scream4 (2011) and opposite Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms and Zach Galifinakis in The Hangover (2010). She also starred with a stellar ensemble in Emilio Estevez's Bobby, about the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy, which premiered at the 2006 AFI Film Festival. Throughout her career, Graham has worked with some of the industry's most respected actors and directors. Her performances include that of a doe-eyed girl in Swingers, with Jon Favreau and Vince Vaughn; an ambitious young actress in Frank Oz's Bowfinger with Steve Martin and Eddie Murphy; and the tragic Mary Kelly in Albert and Allen Hughes' From Hell opposite Johnny Depp, as well as roles in The Guru with Marisa Tomei; Hope Springs opposite Colin Firth; Committed with Luke Wilson; Ed Burns' ensemble Sidewalks of New York; James Toback's Two Girls and a Guy with Robert Downey Jr.; Lost in Space with Gary Oldman and William Hurt; and Six Degrees of Separation starring Will Smith. Her upcoming film projects include Baby on Board opposite Jerry O'Connell and John Corbett, and Boogie Woogie alongside Stellan Skarsgard and Gillian Anderson (for director Duncan Ward). Graham executive produced and starred in the feature film Cake, a romantic comedy also starring Sandra Oh and Cheryl Hines. In 2004-2005, she received rave reviews for her guest starring stint on NBC’s critically acclaimed series “Scrubs.” On stage, Graham made her theatrical debut off-Broadway in Playwrights Horizons' “Recent Tragic Events.” BIFF’s Career Achievement Tribute honors an actor or actress whose work has had a major impact and advanced the frontiers of cinematic artistry around the world. Past recipients include Academy Award® winner Alan Arkin, multiple Academy Award® nominee Johnny Depp, Academy Award® winner Nicolas Cage, Academy Award® nominee Laurence Fishburne, critically acclaimed actress Daryl Hannah and the esteemed Roger Corman.


News Article
Singer Amy Winehouse dies at age 27
Singer Amy Winehouse dies at age 27

Amy Winehouse, the beehived soul-jazz diva whose self-destructive habits overshadowed a distinctive musical talent, was found dead Saturday in her London home, police said. She was 27.

Winehouse shot to fame in 2006 with the album "Back to Black," whose blend of jazz, soul, rock and classic pop was a global hit. It won five Grammys and made Winehouse - with her black beehive hairdo and old-fashioned sailor tattoos - one of music's most recognizable stars. But her personal life, with its drug and alcohol abuse, eating disorders and destructive relationships, soon took over her career.

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Event
Career Achievement Tribute to Heather Graham
Career Achievement Tribute to Heather Graham

Friday 2nd December 2011  8:00 PM

Heather Graham (Boogie Nights, Drugstore Cowboy, Austin Powers) will be honored with the prestigious Career Achievement Award at this year’s Festival. The Career Achievement Tribute ceremony will take place at the Atlantis Theater on Friday, December 2nd. Jeffrey Lyons, host of the TV show “Lyons Den”, will be moderating the evening’s conversation. Heather Graham discovered her passion for acting at an early age and caught the attention of filmmakers with her breakout role in Gus Van Sant's Drugstore Cowboy , for which she received an Independent Spirit Award nomination. Graham went on to score unforgettable roles in the 1997 classic Boogie Nights , for which she received the MTV Movie Award for Best Breakthrough Performance, and 1999's Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me. Also in 1999, Graham was named ShoWest Female Star of Tomorrow. Up next, Graham will star in Cherry opposite James Franco and Heartland opposite Dennis Quaid and Zac Efron. Most recently, she starred in Judy Moody and the Not Bummer Summer, 5 Days of War, Scream4 (2011) and opposite Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms and Zach Galifinakis in The Hangover (2010). She also starred with a stellar ensemble in Emilio Estevez's Bobby, about the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy, which premiered at the 2006 AFI Film Festival. Throughout her career, Graham has worked with some of the industry's most respected actors and directors. Her performances include that of a doe-eyed girl in Swingers, with Jon Favreau and Vince Vaughn; an ambitious young actress in Frank Oz's Bowfinger with Steve Martin and Eddie Murphy; and the tragic Mary Kelly in Albert and Allen Hughes' From Hell opposite Johnny Depp, as well as roles in The Guru with Marisa Tomei; Hope Springs opposite Colin Firth; Committed with Luke Wilson; Ed Burns' ensemble Sidewalks of New York; James Toback's Two Girls and a Guy with Robert Downey Jr.; Lost in Space with Gary Oldman and William Hurt; and Six Degrees of Separation starring Will Smith. Her upcoming film projects include Baby on Board opposite Jerry O'Connell and John Corbett, and Boogie Woogie alongside Stellan Skarsgard and Gillian Anderson (for director Duncan Ward). Graham executive produced and starred in the feature film Cake, a romantic comedy also starring Sandra Oh and Cheryl Hines. In 2004-2005, she received rave reviews for her guest starring stint on NBC’s critically acclaimed series “Scrubs.” On stage, Graham made her theatrical debut off-Broadway in Playwrights Horizons' “Recent Tragic Events.” BIFF’s Career Achievement Tribute honors an actor or actress whose work has had a major impact and advanced the frontiers of cinematic artistry around the world. Past recipients include Academy Award® winner Alan Arkin, multiple Academy Award® nominee Johnny Depp, Academy Award® winner Nicolas Cage, Academy Award® nominee Laurence Fishburne, critically acclaimed actress Daryl Hannah and the esteemed Roger Corman. Friday, December 2 / 8:00pm Atlantis Theatre


News Article
China executes Japanese drug smuggler

China has executed a Japanese man convicted of drug smuggling, China's official Xinhua news agency reported.

He is the first Japanese citizen to be put to death in China since diplomatic ties between the two countries were re-established in 1972.

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Event
Judgement in Paradise
Judgement in Paradise

Friday 25th May 2012  7:00 PM

Judgement in Paradise A live stage play by Adrian WildGoose "Is the end near?" find out... May 25th & 26th, 2012 @ & 7:30pm The College Of The Bahamas performing arts centre $20 in advance. $25 at door (seats are limited) contacts: (242) 522-6820 Email: awildgoose@gmail.com Synopsis Set in a fictional Bahamas, “Judgment in Paradise” tells the story of a families experience leading up to the Mayan predicted end of The Bahamas on December 21, 2012. Although the main plot focuses on the Willshine family, the audience is given a peak into the desperate sphere of Bahamian politics, religion as salvation, and the perceived ethos of the average Bahamian. Life and existence as Bahamians know it hangs in the balance as foreign investment, familial ties and social constructs clash to provide a thrilling experience that interrogates Bahamian lived experience. 24 year old Destiny Willshine competes with every other citizen for her father’s attention and consideration. Visually impaired from a very young age she proves that having physical sight does not translate into wisdom and reasoning. Destiny’s father, Christian Willshine is one of the leading protagonists as he establishes the corrupting and blinding influence of power and selfish desire. Representative of the moral and value system of times past, Grandpa Willshine, who is also the Reverend at End Times Ministries, portray the changed Bahamian lived experience through his interaction with Destiny, Christian and Chance. The youth living in ‘Paradise’, Chance and Shanice, critique the traditional Bahamian roles of young men and women operating in a world of partying and drugs, they seem detached from the reality. The title of the play spells doom, not for the world, but The Bahamas. Priorities are questioned, relationships destroyed, countries are sold and The Bahamas is sinking. ‘Judgement’ is abounding. A critical play that forces an analysis of the realities Bahamians live daily. NOTE: This play is something that you do not want to miss. Mark the date May 25 & 26, 2012 on your calendar. The play will be staged at the College of the Bahamas’ Performing Arts Center. Stay tuned for ticket and other information. COMING SOON, if the end doesn’t happen before then!


News Article
Minister says interpreters not a problem for police

The Royal Bahamas Police Force has the capacity to interview all non-English-speaking suspects, according National Security Minister Tommy Turnquest.
Turnquest was responding to a question about a manslaughter conviction that was overturned because police interviewed the suspect in English, instead of his native Haitian-Creole. Last month, the Court of Appeal decided that Johnsy Luc did not have a fair trial because of the investigator's failure to interview him in a language that he understood.
A recently released International Narcotic Control Strategy Report said that investigations into Haitian and Haitian-Bahamian drug gangs "are hindered by an enduring lack of Creole speakers in DEU".
Yet, Turnquest still maintains that this is not a problem for police.
He said yesterday, "I am satisfied we are able to properly interview all persons taken into custody, whether they are Creole-speaking, French-speaking, Italian-speaking, German-speaking or any other nationality.
"I am satisfied we have the capacity to do that in The Bahamas. I am not at all disturbed that we are not able to properly interview and investigate matters that come before the police."
The only evidence that linked Luc to the crime was the statement that he gave during the interview. However, the appellate court noted that there was no evidence that the interview was explained to him in Creole.
The Court said, "Where an accused does not speak the official Bahamian language, a statement from him by the police should be in the language that he understands and the nature of any charge explained to him in that language.
"In this instance, (i) the statement should have been taken in Creole and signed by the appellant (who was the accused); (ii) the statement must be read back to the accused in Creole; (iii) then translated into English and signed by the investigating officer; (iv) the translation must be by an independent translator; and (v) the resulting translation must be signed by the translator.
"For some reason, not clear to us, this procedure was not followed. It is not sufficient to say that the investigating officer had some facility with Creole and that he explained to the appellant, who was then a suspect, the nature of the offense or the charge against him.
"In the circumstances, therefore, we are unable to uphold the conviction and sentence. The unfairness of the investigating procedure and charging of the accused resulted in an unfair trial which, perhaps, robbed him of the opportunity of a clear verdict on the offense originally charged, which was murder."

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Event
Judgement in Paradise
Judgement in Paradise

Saturday 26th May 2012  7:00 PM

Judgement in Paradise A live stage play by Adrian WildGoose "Is the end near?" find out... May 25th & 26th, 2012 @ & 7:30pm The College Of The Bahamas performing arts centre $20 in advance. $25 at door (seats are limited) contacts: (242) 522-6820 Email: awildgoose@gmail.com Synopsis Set in a fictional Bahamas, “Judgment in Paradise” tells the story of a families experience leading up to the Mayan predicted end of The Bahamas on December 21, 2012. Although the main plot focuses on the Willshine family, the audience is given a peak into the desperate sphere of Bahamian politics, religion as salvation, and the perceived ethos of the average Bahamian. Life and existence as Bahamians know it hangs in the balance as foreign investment, familial ties and social constructs clash to provide a thrilling experience that interrogates Bahamian lived experience. 24 year old Destiny Willshine competes with every other citizen for her father’s attention and consideration. Visually impaired from a very young age she proves that having physical sight does not translate into wisdom and reasoning. Destiny’s father, Christian Willshine is one of the leading protagonists as he establishes the corrupting and blinding influence of power and selfish desire. Representative of the moral and value system of times past, Grandpa Willshine, who is also the Reverend at End Times Ministries, portray the changed Bahamian lived experience through his interaction with Destiny, Christian and Chance. The youth living in ‘Paradise’, Chance and Shanice, critique the traditional Bahamian roles of young men and women operating in a world of partying and drugs, they seem detached from the reality. The title of the play spells doom, not for the world, but The Bahamas. Priorities are questioned, relationships destroyed, countries are sold and The Bahamas is sinking. ‘Judgement’ is abounding. A critical play that forces an analysis of the realities Bahamians live daily. NOTE: This play is something that you do not want to miss. Mark the date May 25 & 26, 2012 on your calendar. The play will be staged at the College of the Bahamas’ Performing Arts Center. Stay tuned for ticket and other information. COMING SOON, if the end doesn’t happen before then!


News Article
Why stop the crime

Why stop the crime when aforetime our parents were sold to please the greed of some?
Why stop the crime when shipwreck looting blessed our island homes?
Why stop the crime when bootlegging enriched stores and banks?
Why stop the crime when drug smuggling bought pools and tanks?

Why stop the crime when slapping a wife proves the status of manhood?
Why stop the crime when neglecting a child brings no shame to the neighborhood?
Why stop the crime when getting pregnant in school strengthens the status of youth?
Why stop the crime when aborting a baby is proof of womanhood?

Why think of values, companionship, and family?
These are not necessary in a land where people are lonely?

Why st ...

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