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Event
Bel Canto Singers: Music for All Times V

Saturday 19th May 2012  8:00 PM

Bel Canto Singers: Music for All Times V This Saturday and Sunday May 19 & 20, 2012 St. Andrew's Kirk, Nassau Under the patronage of His Excellency Sir Arthur Foulkes, Governor-General of The Bahamas, and Lady Joan Foulkes, The Bel Canto Singers presents "Music for All Times V". Directed by Eldridge McPhee, this concert offers the audience a consortium of exciting music which will feature arrangements by modern composers such as Bahamian K. Quincy Parker with his original composition "Gloria" and Morten Lauriden's "Lux Aeterna". Opera buffs will be delighted by Bel Canto's renditions of "The Easter Hymn" from Pietro Mascagni as well as the beautiful six- and eight-part arrangements of well known anthems and spirituals that express the rich and robust singing style that this 16-member vocal ensemble is well known for.

Guest Singer Kristina Lewis The Bel Canto Singers is pleased to present American mezzo soprano, Kristina Lewis, and a string ensemble and percussion. Both Ms Lewis and the string ensemble are from the Peabody Conservatory of Music – Johns Hopkins University in Maryland and the percussionist is from the RBDF. Tickets are $25 and available at Custom Computers in Cable Beach and Harbour Bay as well as Logos Bookstore at Harbour Bay. Click HERE to view the Bel Canto Singers website.


News Article

January 24, 2011
IS IT OKAY TO SNOOP

By JEFFARAH GIBSON

Tribune Features Writer

LEON Walker thought he was only validating his suspicions of his wife's affair when he went through her e-mails. But little did he know the possibility of facing five years in prison for snooping existed.

In this potential precedent-setting case which broke late last year, the Michigan man who is also a computer technician is being charged with felony misuse of a computer. Prosecutors in the case argue that Walker illegally hacked into his wife's computer after she filed for divorce.

However, he claims it was relatively easy to get the password to her account because she kept it in book next to her computer. His attorney said claims made b ...

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Event
Summer Camp, Summer Classes
Summer Camp, Summer Classes

Wednesday 4th July 2012  7:30 AM

Summer Camp June 25th to July 27th Five Week Program Ages: 2yrs old- 10yrs old Hours: 7:30am-4:00PM $300 Includes Breakfast and Lunch Weekly Fee-$50 Breakfast & Lunch $20 Summer Classes Language, Maths, Reading Bible Stories, Music, Computers, Crafts, Painting, Outdoor Play, Exercise, Games, Field Trips Movies June 25th - July 27th, 2012 Ages 2-10 years Periwinkles Early Childhood Learning Centre is licensed and registered with the Ministry of Education, Pre school Division and is headed by Mrs Carol L Bullard. Register your child today! Periwinkles Early Childhood Learning Center Foxhill Rd, Nassau (5 doors from St Annes) Tel: 364. 4393 Email: periwinkleseclc@coralwave.com Meet our qualified & trained members of Staff


News Article

December 16, 2010
Leaving the Island Sale, Grand Bahama - December 18th

Freeport, Grand Bahama Island -

Leaving the Island, so Everything must go! 

Saturday, December 18th from 9am to 3pm; and

Sunday, December 19th from 9am to 12noon

Furniture, computer equipment, printers, hundreds
of movies, books, kitchen equipment, linens, storage, shelving,
decorative items, etc.

No. 3 Bentley Drive, Bahama Terrace off of Lunar Drive (near Stop and Shop)... 

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News Article

December 15, 2010
Leaving the Island Sale, Grand Bahama - December 18th

Freeport, Grand Bahama Island -

Leaving the Island, so Everything must go! 

Saturday, December 18th from 9am to 3pm; and

Sunday, December 19th from 9am to 12noon

Furniture, computer equipment, printers, hundreds
of movies, books, kitchen equipment, linens, storage, shelving,
decorative items, etc.

No. 3 Bentley Drive, Bahama Terrace off of Lunar Drive (near Stop and Shop)... 

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News Article

September 25, 2014
Thinking parents

When it comes to punishing their children, far too many parents act before they think. Many parents do not think carefully when they perceive their children are rebelling. They have been conditioned to act like communist dictators to all perceived disobedient behaviors. I use the word "perceived" because most times, if the parents ignore the child's tone of voice or mannerism and seek to understand what the child is saying, they would discover that the child is not rebelling but willing to cooperate. Too many parents forget that children are human beings also with feelings, emotions and intelligence. Parents who often respond to their children's perceived defiant behavior negatively are creating rebellious children. They are not teaching children to think for themselves.
Several years ago, I shared with you that the three most important responsibilities in parenting are all about thinking. They are:
1. To teach their children to think critically. Parents want their children to think from cause to effect and be able to analyze and synthesize. This is done by asking questions, listening and allowing the children to have an opinion.
2. To teach their children to think independently. This is done by respecting their children's views (not necessarily agreeing with them), avoiding too much television and other electronic devices, asking for their opinions, etc.
3. To provide an environment for original thought. Far too many children do not have the ability to be creative and spontaneous in their thinking. Too much television and lack of interest in reading has crippled their minds and robbed them of creating their own ideas. Often, they would regurgitate what they have seen on television.
Parents, if you think your first responsibilities are to make sure your child does not do stupid things and to drive our stubbornness, you are making a big mistake. I have often shared that "in a nutshell, responsible parenting provides children the freedom to choose, think and act on your own". Parents can accomplish this successfully if they are willing to listen to their children. Psychologist, Dr. Myrna B. Shure says in her book "Thinking Parent, Thinking Child" that "just as you want your child to listen to you, you'll find yourself asking, 'Am I really listening to him?'" She says you want your child to have "the tools to become less aggressive, inhibited and fearful, and more cooperative, empathic and better able to handle life's frustrations and disappointments."
Avoid coming to conclusions
When a parent asks a child to "take a bath and get ready for church" and the child responds by say "I don't want to go", what is the parent hearing from the child? Is it disrespect, defiance or cooperation? Many parents immediately think that the child is being defiant and disobedient. Many parents negatively interpret the children's "aggressive" behavior or language. Many times the child is simply stating an opinion the best way he or she can. Thus, a non-thinking parent responds verbally violent by saying "get your dirty skin in the tub before I hit your head in the wall". The parent has forgotten that just the position of being a parent is, in itself authority, and thus should be able respond calmly with understanding and respect. If the parent perceives defiance, the parent will respond violently. If the parent respects the child's right to have an opinion and thus asks appropriate questions, the parent will quickly learn that the child is willing to do whatever he/she says.
When a parent responds negatively to perceived defiance of the child, the child will "fight back". As the child gets older and stronger, the parent will lose the fight, respect and authority.
Critical thinking at home
In the 2006 article written by psychologist Elizabeth Shauness entitled "Enhancing critical thinking skills in children: Tips for parents" it is suggested that "parents should foster critical thinking at home. Ask questions that lack a single correct answer, and ask them casually, rather than quizzing your child."

Here is an example the author gives: "If your child is a chess aficionado and likes to play it on a chessboard or a computer, you may want to make the following inquiries: Why do you think you are more successful in face-to-face chess matches than in electronic chess games? (Analysis). If you could develop a new format for chess that would appeal to those who haven't yet discovered its allure, what would it look like? Why would you pick those design features? How would they intrigue novices? (Synthesis)"
As a parent with now two adult children and three grandchildren, I've made it my practice to avoid just giving instructions to my children to do something. I know that since I am older and wiser, I can assume they are to simply obey. However, I discovered early in my parenting that, that was not wise. I would always have a follow-up question like "Do you know why I am asking you do that?" I would let them share their understanding and I would patiently explain the rationale for my request. This fosters critical thinking.
If a parent asks a child to turn off the television and does not following through with the request, the parent would be losing a teaching moment. If a parent gives a request, the parent is to stand by and make sure the request is done. For example, when the parent asks for the child to turn on the television, the parent must know that asking the child to do it is a learning experience and an opportunity to teach critical and independent thinking. It is not for the connivance of the parent since he or she is too busy. After the request is given, the parent is to stand by and make sure the request it done immediately. Then the parent can ask, "Do you know why I asked you to turn on the television?" If the parent cannot give a good answer, then they should not ask the question. The parent can share that "I do not want you to watch more than 30 minutes each time because it is not good for your brain." Or "It is important that you get to bed early so you can be strong and vibrant for tomorrow. Sleeping all night allows the body to properly restore itself each night. That makes you strong in the morning."
Dr. Shauness states that "parents can demonstrate critical thinking by pondering aloud the most efficient way to do household chores, considering the most economical purchase to make at the grocery store, monitoring your progress toward your personal goals or approaching social issues in your community. Describing how you think and solve problems is the best way for you to instill similar thinking patterns in your children."
Parents, start thinking so your children can also think. I am confident that if parents would teach their children to think critically and avoid negative interpretations, we would have better children in our society. Violence would decrease. Productivity will increase. Our nation would be healthier.
o Barrington H. Brennen is a marriage and family therapist and board certified clinical psychotherapist, U.S.A. Send your questions or comments to barringtonbrennen@gmail.com; or write to P.O. Box CB-13019, Nassau, The Bahamas; or visit www.soencouragement.org; or call (242) 327-1980, or (242) 477-4002.

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News Article

January 25, 2012
Best of the best recognized

Excellence does not come on a whim.  It is not grown on trees or captured in a bottle.  It is through toil and labor that it is sown and at the end of a strenuous season the rich fruit it produces is the best reward.  The reward for 100-plus students from around the country was recognition at the Ministry of Education Examination and Assessment Division's 19th Annual national awards presentations.
Students from public and private schools were celebrated for their achievements in the Bahamas Junior Certificate (BJC) and the Bahamas General Certificate of Secondary Education (BGCSE) exams.
Best of the best honors went to Sarah Jagessar, a graduate of Temple Christian High School.  She achieved nine A grades and one B grade in the BGCSEs.
Mikell Butler, a graduate of C.V. Bethel High School, had the best overall performance in the BGCSE examinations in regards to public schools, with her achievement of seven A grades and two B grades.
Brennan Williams of North Eleuthera High was named best male performer and overall performer from the public schools for his BJC results.  He achieved seven A grades and one B grade in the BJCs.
Kathie-Lee Petsch, a student of N.G.M. Major High School on Long Island, attained seven A grades and one B grade, and was awarded co-winner of the best BJC results from the public schools.
Selandia Toote, a 10th grade student at Queen's College, received the best overall performance in the BJCs from the independent school sector.
Toote said being recognized for her academic achievements was a wonderful feeling, but she was surprised she got the best exam results nationwide.  She knew she had gotten the best results in her school.
"I knew I got the best results for the BJCs in my school, but I did not expect that I would win for the entire country," said Toote.  "It was a marvelous feeling and I really worked hard so I am glad it did pay off."
In addition to her plaques and trophies Toote also was the recipient of a new laptop, which she couldn't stop smiling about.  She said it was her first personal computer. She was speechless when she was awarded with it.
Jagessar, Butler, Brennen, Petsch and Toote were among more than 100 over-achievers recognized for achieving five A's and above in their national examinations.
The event also put the spotlight on individual schools and their achievements in raising their overall grade point averages and preparing students better across the board, so they do even better in national examinations.
T.A. Thompson ninth-grade student Jewel Sturrup, who attended the event, says she was inspired to aim even higher when she sits her BJCs in another few months, because she too wanted to be recognized nationally.  Seeing her school win third place in career and technical education studies, and friends from other schools shine, really made her want to study harder so that she can have her chance to walk across the stage with her head held high.
"I am so proud of my friends who did so well and could be a part of the ceremony. I am looking forward to doing just as well when my time comes because I want to be one of the honorees too.  I intend to work harder and finish my schoolwork even better.  Just being here inspires me," said the student.
It was with the hope of shedding new light on the achievements and good work of students that the award ceremony was established almost two decades ago, said Pamela Moultrie, Language Arts subject officer in the assessment and evaluation team at the Ministry of Education.  She said it is important to highlight students who work hard and achieve, because too often the youth are painted with the same brush of negativity when the majority are still on the right track.
"We hope to inspire students to excel not only academically, but in other areas as well. We hope with this kind of impetus we are assisting students in working harder so they can be prepared for tertiary and other forms of higher education. It is also hoped that the awards will motivate those students who are struggling or who are too lax in their efforts to work harder. With these award ceremonies we are saying to all students who didn't do as well that they too can excel," she says.
The students were also encouraged by Minister of Education Desmond Bannister not to settle for the achievements they made, but to continue to work hard.  He told them it was not only important to be a leader academically but socially as well, and that they should be caring citizens and strive to use their talents to uplift everyone.  He applauded individual scholars like Brennan Williams of North Eleuthera High for his passion to prevent animal cruelty, Mikell Butler of C.V. Bethel Senior School for her dream of starting a mentoring program for senior school students, and James Boyce of Forest Heights Academy for his environmental spirit.

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News Article

November 24, 2010
Teens accused of series of robberies

Two teenagers accused of a series of robberies across New Providence were arraigned before a magistrate yesterday.
Raymond Pratt Jr, 18, of Fourth Street, Coconut Grove, and Roderick Strachan, 19, are accused of the attempted robbery of?Super Wash, Robinson Road on November 17.
They are also accused of the attempted robbery of Eugene Coakley and the robbery of Charles Sweeting. Sweeting's wallet, containing $50, was stolen. Pratt is accused of receiving Sweeting's property.
Pratt alone is accused of robbing Sabrina Heastie on September 9 of $2,500, three cell phones, sneakers and a laptop computer that belonged to the Sport House.
Pratt is further accused of robbing Dorcell McKinney of his ...

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Event
Entrepreneurism and the Creative Class
Entrepreneurism and the Creative Class

Thursday 19th July 2012  6:30 PM

Entrepreneurism and the Creative Class Custom Computers, Harbour Bay July 19th, 6:30PM – 8:30PM tmg* talks is the Bahamas’ only panel conversation on design, business and the creative economy. The big idea behind tmg* talks is to make Nassau a more liveable city by encouraging diverse thinking and openness. It’s an experiment that should continue. Click HERE to visit tmg website Last year, we started tmg* talks, a 3-series panel discussion on architecture, design, the Bahamian narrative and the creative economy. This year we’re focussing on sustain+ability, but not just in the green sense. The ability to sustain involves a strategic design process. We’re talking about the built environment, the economy and well, about people. That’s why we’ve put together an amazing group of panellists who are changing business paradigms and creative ecosystems. The three sessions will occur monthly from June to August . Contact Information e: tmgtalks@tmginnovates.com Royann Dean - voice: 676.7282 or 424.0085


News Article

June 11, 2014
Advancing trends in technology

The Bahamas government has teamed up with Microsoft in a partnership agreement to advance trends in technology that will result in changes in the way students and teachers work, learn and live. Minister of Education, Science and Technology Jerome Fitzgerald said the Microsoft Partners in Learning Education Transformation Agreement was a significant milestone in the development of education, in that it would allow the ministry to forge ahead with its goal of ensuring that teachers and students in The Bahamas are immersed in technology-enriched learning environments.
"[The agreement will ensure that] teachers are equipped to effectively integrate technology into teaching and learning, thus fostering innovation and ingenuity in our students," said Fitzgerald.
Benefits of the partnership included assisting the education ministry to increase digital inclusion of all students and schools in The Bahamas; provide technical assistance to refine the ministry's strategy that guides information and communication technology (ICT) initiatives; create a Microsoft 365 platform that is free to education and extends teaching and learning within and beyond the classroom.
Other benefits, he said, would include the provision of an email platform for all teachers and students in the public education system to have access to an education email address that they could have for their lifetime. The Microsoft Innovative Educator Programme will ensure that educators have 21st Century ICT skills; and will allow 1,500 teachers and 22,000 students to have the ability to download Microsoft Suite programs on up to five devices.
Fitzgerald said the government took the mandate to create an educational system that is technologically sound and competitive.
"Our commitment is demonstrated by the nearly $5 million in ICT initiative undertaken by my ministry since 2012. It is by far the largest and most successful technology initiative undertaken to date by the Government of The Bahamas under the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MOEST) IDB INSPIRE Project Management Unit," he said.
According to Fitzgerald, since 2012 the government has invested in educational technologies in 76 primary and secondary public schools and in upgrading all school computer labs in the 14 districts throughout The Bahamas. He said that national libraries had been upgraded with computers and educational technologies and support had also been given to the Learning Resources Section, the Curriculum Section, resource centers in the Family Islands and programs including PACE and the Simpson Penn Centre for Boys.
The education technologies included desktop computers, laptops, interactive white boards, multimedia projectors, multimedia printers, document cameras, equipment to facilitate distance education and other technologies. Fitzgerald said the government had invested in assistive technology to facilitate learning for students with special needs and continued to upgrade the ICT infrastructure in schools. "We have implemented a very aggressive and diverse professional development framework to ensure that teachers are able to teach effectively in an increasingly ICT-enriched environment. To date, nearly 2,000 teachers have been trained in a multiplicity of ICT skills," he said. The investment of nearly $5 million on ICT was guided by the ICT in Education Strategy (e-Strategy) that was crafted after wide sector consultation and had the embedded vision, "To make accessible to the students of The Bahamas the technology required to make them globally competitive".
The education minister said that the ultimate aim was to create an e-culture in education that strengthened the system, and equipped the youth for the world of work and result in an improved Bahamas.
Minister Fitzgerald also congratulated Sharell Armaly-Edwards, an art and design teacher and subject coordinator at A.F. Adderley Junior School, who submitted a winning entry in the 10th Annual Microsoft in Education Global Forum and won an all-expense paid trip to Barcelona, Spain in March of this year. The forum recognizes the world's most innovative school leaders and educators who effectively use ICT in the classroom to transform education for the 21st Century. Armaly-Edwards submitted a lesson showing her students' versatility with using the Internet and the interactive white board for research, and to design their course work for the Bahamas Junior Certificate (BJC) Exams. The Bahamas joined Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica and Haiti in the agreement with Microsoft.

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