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News Article

February 21, 2012
Religious leaders concerned about high birth rate among unwed mothers

Several religious leaders expressed concern yesterday about the high rate of births to unwed mothers, which has doubled since 1970, according to information in the Birth Report 1970-2010, compiled by the Department of Statistics.
"It is not a good thing to have this high rate of children born out of wedlock," said Bishop John Humes, national overseer of the Church of God.
According to the report, which details birth rates from 1970 to 2010, births to unwed mothers remain "the largest annual natural increase to the Bahamian population".
"Births to unwed mothers in The Bahamas escalated in the past 40 years, from 29 percent in 1970 to a high of 62 percent in 2009.  For the period 1990 to 2005, the annual birth trend, though high, leveled at 57 percent," the report said.
"Four years later, births to single mothers advanced by five percentage points and declined to 59 percent of the national total in 2010."
While Bishop Humes said he is not happy about the high rate, it is an imperative of the church to offer support to those young mothers.
He also encouraged young people, especially women, to be more careful when dealing with men.
"We also try to encourage our young men to get married because it is a healthier relationship for children to be born in a home both parents are in," he said.
"That is the pattern that God designed for the preservation of mankind."
Former President of the Bahamas Christian Council (BCC) Bishop Ros Davis said the country is reaping the effects of "what liberalization and modernization brings".
"We are seeing the effects all the time, every day," Davis said yesterday.
"Much of what we are experiencing now is the fringe of undisciplined lives, and so when a person thinks it's ok to ignore what teachers say and do exactly what he thinks, this is what happens."
Others like Bishop Victor Cooper Jr., vice president of the BCC agreed, saying it "speaks to people moving away from the traditional values of the church".
Cooper said it is incumbent upon the church to hold forums with people so as to expose them to the values that Christians prescribe to.
"We believe that the family is an ordained institution by God; so there is a prescribed way that children ought to come into the world, not in a single parent home, but with both parents present."

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News Article

November 02, 2013
Is Peter Nygard on a quest to be like Peter Pan

Dear Editor,
Peter Nygard, according to the October 30 edition of The Nassau Guardian, said that he wants to live forever or to die trying. The Canadian fashion designer is obviously familiar with the music of American rapper 50 Cent. Seems as if Nygard is on a quest to be like Peter Pan, Scottish playwright J.M. Barrie's childhood character who possesses immortality and never ages and lives in the magical world of Neverland.
Nygard's quest for immortality is a futile attempt to duck the Grim Reaper. His odd desire is very similar to that of the late king of pop, Michael Jackson's, who was known to be a Peter Pan junkie and who, coincidentally, lived on a ranch named Neverland between 1988 and 2005. The property is located in Santa Barbara County, California. In his obsession with the concept of obtaining immortality, Jacko, as he was affectionately called by millions of his adoring fans, underwent hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of plastic surgeries in order to stave off old age.
Despite the breathtaking advance in medical science in the past 100 years, the Grim Reaper still has a batting average of 1,000. While wealthy people such as Nygard are at times able to delay death due to their ability to access the best healthcare available, there is still no getting around Hebrew 9:27, which says that it is appointed unto men once to die. If he owns a Bible, Nygard should know this.
But then again, he doesn't strike me as one who is devoutly religious. Nygard's attempt to evade the inevitable can explain why he vigorously pushed for the passing of stem cell legislation in The Bahamas. The Nassau Guardian noted that the Canadian fashion designer initiated and co-wrote the stem cell legislation, despite saying that he had no personal interest in the government passing it into law some months back, and despite denials by Prime Minister Perry Christie. If Nygard is telling the truth, I find it incredible that a foreigner, notwithstanding his immigration status, can exert so much influence on Bahamian domestic policy that he can influence a government to adopt into law a legislation that he co-wrote. This begs the question: How much clout does Nygard have in this country and in this Progressive Liberal Party government? By Nygard's own admission, he spoke to Christie about stem cells while the latter was in the opposition. We have yet to reach the two-year mark of the current administration, yet the Stem Cell Therapy Bill has already been passed into law. Whether or not cell stem research is an ethical issue, Nygard's admission is deeply troubling, to say the least. But nothing surprises me anymore in this country. At the rate we are on, it wouldn't surprise me if he obtains Bahamian citizenship and runs for the Progressive Liberal Party. Nygard is the most politically outspoken foreigner I have ever seen in this country. In the October 31 edition of The Nassau Guardian, he took a swipe at the Free National Movement for its stance against stem cell research. This issue is obviously near and dear to Nygard's heart. After all, it is his quest for immortality; it is his quest, I believe, to be like Peter Pan.
- Kevin Evans

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News Article

March 05, 2014
Bahamian chosen in first class of HBCU All-Stars

Bahamian Shantel Braynen has been chosen by the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (WHIHBCU) to join its first class of HBCU All-Stars, recognizing 75 undergraduate, graduate and professional students for their accomplishments in academics, leadership and civic engagement.
Currently enrolled at 62 HBCU's, Braynen, a senior at Bethune-Cookman University in Daytona, Florida, and the other All-Stars were selected from 445 students who submitted applications that included a transcript, resume, essay and recommendation.
An accounting major, Braynen was shocked when she was contacted by the White House.
"I knew it was a competitive process, but I prayed that I would be chosen. I am grateful to have an opportunity to represent Bethune-Cookman and all HBCU students nationally. And I look forward to serving the community more fully," she said.
Over the course of the next year, the HBCU (Historically Black Colleges and Universities) All-Stars will serve as ambassadors of the White House Initiative by providing outreach and communication to their fellow students about the value of education and the Initiative as a networking resource. Through social media and their relationships with community-based organizations, the All-Stars will share promising and proven practices that support opportunities for all young people to achieve their educational and career potential.
Braynen, 21, who makes up one of the 45 female strong cohort and the 30 males, will participate in regional events and web chats with Ivory Toldson, deputy director of the WHIHBCUs, other initiative staff and professionals from a wide range of disciplines. They will also have opportunities to engage with other scholars to showcase individual and collective talent across the HBCE community.
"It means a lot to me to have been chosen. I give all the glory to God for the opportunity to be chosen," she told The Nassau Guardian. "It means a lot to be chosen as an ambassador of the White House Initiative to promote education, and because I'm from The Bahamas and I'm at a small HBCU it means a lot to represent all those places and also my family."
She was recommended for the initiative by a professor at Texas A&M University who she met when she visited the school two years ago. Her academics, accomplishments and leadership ability got her accepted.
She is the daughter of Stephen and Rochelle Rolle.
Braynen, who lived in Bahama Sound, Exuma, and attended L.N. Coakley School for two years before departing for university, is a perfect 4.00 grade point average student -- an average she hopes will hold true to form through her graduation in May. She has turned in a perfect record since her freshman year.
"I really value education because I believe knowledge is power, so coming into college I had my goal to stay focused and keep the grades up," she said.
Getting to that point was a process for Braynen. She recalls being a C-average student for most of her formative years until she decided to turn things around.
"In primary school I was the student who just barely got by. In high school I was just a so-so student. The turning point for me was when I had two sisters graduate from high school and I saw how well they did -- one was even a valedictorian, so it was then I decided to take my education a little more seriously." Braynen was a 10th grade student at the time. And when she decided to make that switch, she just did it. She applied herself and saw her grade point average rise to 3.5 and above that easily.
Academically, she is a testament to all children who are struggling and who may not be applying themselves that they can struggle, but that they can make the turnaround as well.
She said it helped that when she went through those years when she did not apply herself to learning that she had parents that drilled into her and her siblings that they wanted them to do well, and that they had sacrificed so their children could receive a good education. Braynen said she knew from a child that she would attend college because her parents always pushed for it. She's just glad she made the turnaround when she did.
Braynen is also a believer in that education comes outside of the books as well. "Education is not just about book knowledge -- and this goes right back to this White House initiative -- if I hadn't gone out to Texas and met other people, then I probably wouldn't have been nominated for this Initiative, so education is much more than just studying a book," she said. "We learn from other people and through talking with others."
Her advise to high school students is to put God first in what they do. She said he would direct their path.
"I didn't see myself in primary school being here [college], but it was all in God's plan so I think first of all if they put God first he'll direct their steps in everything. They should also always have a good attitude, and by that I mean don't complain when they get a lot of work in class, but just have a good attitude, and stay focused. If they want to be a chef go out there and be the best chef they can be. If they want to be a doctor, go and be the best doctor they can be, but just stay focused and do well at what they choose to do."
With weeks to her graduation, Braynen says her immediate goals are to find a job for a few years before applying to graduate school. In 10 years she would like to have her own business and she has dream of one day starting her own mentoring initiative.
"With God all things are possible and it doesn't matter where you come from, but it matters where you end up," she says.
Nelson Mandela's quote "After climbing a great hill, one only finds that there are many more hills to climb," is another favorite of hers and one that she says she hopes Bahamian students would live by as well in their approach to their academics.
"When I graduated from high school I was celebrating that I was over this big hill called high school, but I'm climbing this next hill called college and when I'm finished, there's a next hill called real life, so students should ensure that they have determination when they're climbing the hills throughout life and make sure to have God in their life and be focused to get over those hills. But while climbing the hills to also make sure to help other people up which I try to do now in college by being a role model for other students," she said.

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News Article

March 06, 2014
Dr. Myles Munroe's uncharitable arrogance and bigotry

In response to comments made by Pope Francis last August concerning judgmentalism towards gays and lesbians, and recent remarks by Foreign Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell in Trinidad and Tobago on LGBT rights, Bahamas Faith Ministries (BFM) Pastor Dr. Myles Munroe has appeared bigoted, ignorant and prejudiced. And, arrogant.
In contrast to Pope Francis, Anglican Bishop Laish Boyd and other Christian leaders, Munroe appears uncharitable, not disposed to mercy, unwilling to support efforts to stem discrimination and violence against gays and lesbians.
While many church leaders do not support state-recognized same-sex marriages, they are challenging the dehumanization and demonization of gays and lesbians. Munroe's remarks may give comfort to the demonizers.
For the sake of Christian love and charity Munroe must state whether he sides with those who would do violence towards his gay brothers and sisters in the name of God or whether he stands with the likes of former Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, U.S. President Barack Obama, Pope Francis, Mitchell and countless others who are seeking to confront violence against those of God's children who happen to be gay.
In his various remarks, Munroe has also displayed a curious ignorance, in two senses: He seems uninformed of certain facts and information, and lacking in a basic understanding of whatever information he may have reviewed.
Either he is intellectually unable to grasp certain matters or he is being purposefully misleading, or some combination of these, none of which suggests acuity and credibility on these issues.
In criticizing Pope Francis, Munroe demonstrated stunning ignorance of and a poor ability to grasp basic elements of theology and ecclesiology in the Roman Catholic tradition.
He was factually wrong in the assertion that the pope was expressing his own opinion. He was also factually wrong in his assertion that the pope was contradicting his predecessor and the position of the Catholic Church.
Doctorate
Roman Catholic Archbishop Patrick Pinder, who has an earned doctorate in theology from the prestigious Catholic University of America, but who chooses not to be referred to as Dr. Pinder, noted in a Guardian story that those who asserted that Pope Francis was breaking with Roman Catholic teachings in his remarks about gays and lesbians were incorrect in their assertion.
Munroe's criticism of Mitchell's Trinidad and Tobago remarks was curious and baffling, as the minister's remarks in question were limited and generally measured. Mitchell broke no new substantive ground in terms of the policies of successive Bahamian governments.
Essentially, the foreign minister was calling for protection of gays and lesbians from discrimination. Sadly, in the minds of some, efforts to stem discrimination and violence against gays and lesbians, providing them with the security of basic human rights, are unacceptable and egregious. The name for this is bigotry.
Munroe stands in a succession of religious leaders who, over the millennia, seem more seized by the strictures of the Hebrew Scriptures than they are by the example, ministry and teachings of Jesus Christ as exemplified in the Gospels.
There are no warrants for racism, sexism or homophobia in the New Testament. But bigots have for centuries engaged in all manner of proof-texting of the Hebrew Scriptures to bolster and promote their ancient prejudices and hatreds.
White racist pastors used the Hebrew texts for centuries as a basis for slavery, colonialism and the degradation of black people. Gracefully, abolitionists religious leaders found in the ministry of Jesus the moral power to confront slavery and the slave trade.
For millennia and still, many found in the Hebrew Scriptures a warrant for their misogyny and bigotry towards women. The respect for the dignity of women by Jesus in the Gospels was in various ways a radical break from the culture into which he was born. His was a liberating message of equality.
In the Sermon on the Mount Jesus speaks of mercy, of not judging others, of eschewing revenge, of giving to the needy. He also speaks of adultery. Sadly, for contemporary bigots, there is no mention of homosexuality.
According to a recent Nassau Guardian story Munroe noted: "'He [Mitchell] seems to have an agenda that may disqualify him from serving in the position as minister of foreign affairs, because there is a great possibility that he may be more inclined to present his own views than those of the people of The Bahamas.
"'Therefore, I am recommending that the prime minister reconsider him from being minister of foreign affairs because his personal opinions may interfere with his objectivity in the carrying out of his duties.'"
There is an agenda and a lack of objectivity. But it is by Munroe.
Resolution
Mitchell's remarks on non-discrimination against gays and lesbians were in keeping with the views of successive governments, including the Ingraham administration which supported "a U.N. Human Rights Council resolution promoting equal rights for all, regardless of sexual orientation".
Is Munroe wilfully ignorant or being purposefully misleading? Prejudice and bigotry tend to induce jaundiced thinking.
The Guardian story quoted Munroe as saying: "'I have nothing personal against Minister Mitchell.
"'I think he is an excellent politician and man, like I am. It is nothing personal. It is more of a deep concern of his representation of our country in his position as minister...'"
The story continued: "Let me state for the record publically, [sic] Mr. Foreign Minister, I have no interest in your private life," said Munroe in the sermon.
"Personally, I really don't care about your private life. But when you step in our house that we are paying you to represent us in, you keep your private life in your closet and you deal with our public business in our interest."
There is a well-known rhetorical device and political trick of suggesting no interest in a certain matter. But by raising the matter whether obliquely or not one is clearly seeking to make a point.
By employing the language he did, Munroe used his position to hurl an innuendo against another. It was unbecoming of him as a Christian and as a fellow-citizen. It was mean-spirited and uncharitable. It is a low moment in his ministry. If he has policy disagreements with the minister, fine. But to reference another's personal life is contemptuous.
Munroe's views on gambling are well-known. Tourism Minister Obie Wilchcombe has spoken at home and abroad of making The Bahamas a gambling mecca. Wilchcombe continues to press the idea of regulating the numbers houses, something Munroe opposes.
Unacceptable
But in opposing Wilchcombe's policy views Munroe would not stoop so low as to raise his private life. Indeed, he would not likely to do so of any minister. What Munroe said in reference to Mitchell is unacceptable and unworthy of anyone who purports to have moral authority.
Recall that Munroe labelled Pope Francis as "reckless" pertaining to his comments on being judgmental toward gays and lesbians. Francis was reckless with love. Munroe was reckless in the manner in which he contemptuously referenced Mitchell, while feigning respect.
Munroe also impugned Pope Francis' motives as a bid to revive Roman Catholicism. The suggestion was that the pope was engaging in marketing and public relations, rather than motivated by love. One imagines that Munroe knows quite a bit about marketing and public relations.
The Guardian story noted Munroe as stating that, "He [Fred Mitchell] began to intellectually try to [discombobulate us]' ..." As suggested previously, Munroe seems easily intellectually discombobulated, as Mitchell's comments were clear and easily understandable.
The story further noted that, "Munroe said he has travelled to 138 countries, something he said Mitchell has not done.
"'So I've been to more countries representing this country than anyone else in this government,' he said."
What was his point in making such as statement, which came across to many as arrogant and self-aggrandizing?
No matter how many countries Munroe has travelled to he is not the moral ambassador of The Bahamas. Indeed in his bigotry toward gays and lesbians he does not represent many Bahamians or the future, nor does he seem to be able to represent clearly our laws regarding non-discrimination.
We have a foreign minister. Though he will rightly be criticized for various policies, he has represented clearly, articulately and intelligently, the policies of successive administrations in terms of non-discrimination toward gays and lesbians. It is more than can be said for Munroe.
o frontporchguardian@gmail.com, www.bahamapundit.com.

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News Article

February 21, 2012
Rejecting the gay marriage agenda

Dear Editor,
 
Recently there has been an orchestrated effort on the part of homosexual activists like Dr. Stephen Moreton to legalize homosexuality and homosexual marriage throughout the Caribbean.  Most of these people are not from the Caribbean but are trying to impose their lifestyle on the Christian Caribbean islands.
People should be made aware of the fact that there is no 'gay gene' and no scientific proof that homosexuality is innate.  Homosexuality is, in fact, an abnormal behavior.  Ironically, the homosexual lobby often tries to project their own disorder on heterosexuals by prejudicially labeling them "homophobes".
Dr. Francis Collins, who received the Presidential Medal of Freedom for his work sequencing the human genetic code, has stated that homosexuality is not genetically "hardwired".  Homosexuality, like contraception, is contrary to natural law because it thwarts the natural generation of life.
Marriage is an institution that predates civilization, ordained by God, and exclusive to one man and one woman who are given the responsibility to procreate the human race, and to nurture, educate, and pass on shared values and mores to their offspring.  To redefine marriage to include same-sex couples is to strip marriage of an essential component, namely the ability and obligation to procreate.  This would render marriage meaningless and open it up to endless revision and redefinition.
Gay marriage is a threat to religious freedom and conscience rights.  There are already incidents in Canada and the U.S. of religious adoption and foster care agencies being pushed out of work, and small business owners being fined or sued for not accommodating same-sex couples.  Town clerks and other officials with objections to participating in same-sex union ceremonies or to the granting of same-sex marriage licenses have been told to find other jobs.
Once a state recognizes same-sex partnerships as marriages or the equivalent, then naturally the argument is made that in family life classes in schools this has to be taught to be a valid partnership. Religious parents who do not want their children to be indoctrinated with beliefs contrary to theirs will be out of luck.  They will be branded and labeled as bigots.  This is already happening in Canada.
Christians and other people from traditional faith communities are being called in a new way to have courage.  The problem today is not homophobia but theophobia - a hatred by some of God, faith, religion and the church.  The public affirmation of this prejudice is the hallmark of ideological totalitarianism.
 
- Paul Kokoski

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News Article

February 23, 2012
Along life's road

Who then is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven? Jesus put a child in the midst and said, "Whoever then humbles himself as this child, he is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven." -- Matthew 18:1,4.
Mostly when I am out of town, it is customary for me to call and find out how everything is going. I was on the phone with my sister, Bertha, when she got a call from my sister-in-law, Sharon, saying that Reuben was in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). On asking which Reuben it was, I found out that it was my little seven-year-old nephew, the son of my brother, Pastor Reuben. I was standing, but my faith stabilized me.
That day on Thursday, February 16, I was already in a very reflective mood since it was my late mother's birthday, and precious memories were flowing. Reuben's death happened so suddenly and without notice. It seemed to be the flu, but it took him immediately to the ICU with a grave prognosis. In three short days, little Reuben went to be with the Lord. My sister, Carmella, told me that on his first day in ICU, he removed the mask from his face and said "Psalm 17" and please do read it.
As I look over my nephew's life, I cannot but conclude that angels are not for the long haul, but for the expressed purpose of a mission to be accomplished. He was highly intelligent, technologically savvy, musically endowed with the most crystal clear voice I have ever heard. I attended Marjorie Knowles' music recital at St. Matthew's during the Christmas and he performed "The First Noel" flawlessly. I was extra excited because my first music recital given by Meta Cumberbatch at age eight was held in St. Matthew's schoolroom.
Reuben was meek, gentle and well-spoken. He was as Christian as his faith was strong. His seven-year-old life could have been measured symbolically in the life of one who had fulfilled all the requirements needed for entrance to the pearly city. Now I know that the days of our life are three score years and 10, but it does not necessarily mean that it is out of God's will if one dies before 70, but any part or parcel of the 70 must be lived in the will of God.
It is amazing that the late Whitney Houston was not even buried, yet that the tongues of some of the religious order were criticizing Reverend Marvin Winans about his sermon. "He ain't do this and he shudda do that and he the next." These are the Christian preachers. Yet, on the other hand, high level media personalities were giving the entire service along with the sermon, high marks.
Such was the case in Jesus' day as recorded in our text. Rather than rescuing the perishing, caring for the dying and witnessing to lost men about the salvific gospel of Jesus Christ, they were trying to find out among them, who was numero uno in the kingdom of God. Who among us could preach the best, has the biggest church with the most members? Who is popular in every nook and cranny? Who is wearing the latest and longest suit and the most expensive shoes? Whose robe is the grandest of them all?
Jesus had just come down from the mountain where His Transfiguration took place in the presence of Peter, James and John, and the multitude were waiting for him. A certain man among them begged Jesus to heal his lunatic son, as the many attacks were beginning to take a toll on the health of both he and his wife. Jesus rebuked the demon and the child was restored to good health.
Thereafter the disciples came to Jesus to find out who was the greatest in the kingdom of heaven. And Jesus called a little child unto Him, and set him in the midst of them, and said, "Verily I say unto you, Except ye be converted, and become as little children, ye shall not enter into the kingdom of heaven. Whosoever therefore shall humble himself as this little child, the same is greatest in the kingdom of heaven. And who so shall receive one such little child in my name receiveth me. But who so shall offend one of these little ones which believe in me, it were better for him that a millstone were hanged about his neck, and that he were drowned in the depth of the sea."
For me, through the death of little Reuben, the word of God has become more clear as to how we should live our lives and our daily behavior each to the other. Children are innocent, pure and chaste and never harbor jealousy or sow seeds of ill wind. They are just pure children who though spanked, will still share a smile. They do not support grudges and will speak the truth even though it may be to the detriment of others. While some may wait for the later years to train children, the wise ones know that from the moment a child comes into this world, serious training must begin. By the time a child reaches the age of seven, the life pattern of that child is already defined.
Once a man and twice a child to me has nothing to do with the physical condition of an individual, but all the graces and virtues of what it is to be a child. Our lives must begin as virtue-packed as that of an innocent child, and in our adult years must possess and show all the love, peace and kindness as if we are still children at play in an open playground. Thank you Father for your word, and thank you God for little Reuben of seven - fit for heaven.
 
oE-mail rubyanndarling@yahoo.com; write to P.O. Box SS 19725, Nassau, Bahamas with your prayer requests, concerns and comments. God's Blessings!

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News Article

November 01, 2013
The case for a social democracy

Dear Editor,
Socialism is a dirty word in most Western-styled democracies, as it tends to evoke images of individuals living on the economic fat of the state, at taxpayers' expense, while electing not to work or otherwise make themselves productive members of society.
From the early days of the 1970s, most European nations structured a social net whereby the ordinary citizen would be able to access basic healthcare, college level education and access to other common expectations. This worked well when population levels were relatively small and they were culturally cohesive.
With the advent of the European Common Market and relaxation of cross-border travel and migration, huge numbers of foreign nationals moved from one jurisdiction to the other, especially where the economic benefits were more attractive. They settled in and eventually had children and grand children.
Today, in most of these European countries we are now witnessing the bankruptcy of the system and challenges to maintaining the social net in the face of apparent and real resentment from the indigenous people. This is now the case in France, Germany and the United Kingdom. Political parties and individuals who argue for expulsion and the closing of borders are on the rise.
Socialism is now, once again, a dirty word in many of these countries and we are seeing massive immigration round-ups of foreign nationals and their progeny. Closer to home, in the Dominican Republic, we saw where the Constitutional Court of that nation has ruled that people of Haitian descent who were born after 1929 are not, automatically, eligible to Dominican citizenship and all of the benefits that would accrue there from.
In our own country of The Bahamas, the unknown number of illegal nationals, the bulk of whom are of Haitian extraction, is causing angst and societal discomfort. It is commonly accepted that our educational facilities are maxed out due to the large number of children of Haitian parentage who are in the system.
Our healthcare institutions are also challenged due to the massive demands made by foreign-born people. Last year, according to statistics, more than 60 percent of the live births at Princess Margaret Hospital were to Haitian mothers. On any given day, the vast majority of patients at our clinics are of foreign antecedents.
We pride ourselves on being a democracy, and as self-professed Christians we say that we have a social conscience. The status quo, however, has now become almost unbearable. How do we, as an indigenous people, provide the expected social amenities for Bahamians while excluding others who are foreigners? Do we go the route of the Dominican Republic or do we bite the bullet?
Our democracy is being challenged in that during the last electoral cycle it is a known fact that thousands of individuals actually voted even though they were not born in this country. The majority of them were made citizens by paper fiats during the course of the last five or so years.
At one point, the Haitian president visited New Providence and at a very public forum he urged his compatriots to vote for the party which had their best interests at heart. Many believed that he was advocating political support for the PLP. The rest is, of course, history.
Recently that same Haitian president was a guest of honor at the 70th birthday bash for our own home-grown prime minister. During brief remarks, Michel Martelly, urged Perry Christie to create jobs for the millions of economically dispossessed Haitians. Christie did not bat an eye and promised to see what he could do.
Indigenous Bahamians are being relegated to the back of the bus when it comes to employment on the most mundane construction site, especially over at Bimini and down at Baha Mar. Unemployment rose by almost two percent but our politicians say that they are encouraged by the figures which show that more individuals are now actually seeking jobs. Mind you, it does not seem to have dawned on them that there are, in fact, no real jobs out there for them to seek.
We should not be surprised, however, when we consider that one of our erstwhile political figures, who has now, mercifully, been consigned to the dust bin, crowed that 49 percent was equal to 51 percent.
Just recently, the minister of national security boldly declared that $5 million was spent on the failed and badly executed so-called referendum on gambling. A few days later he was correcting that figure by saying that only $1.2 million was spent. Is it any wonder that our national debt and recurrent expenses are not known with any degree of certainty by anyone?
A social democracy is possible in The Bahamas, however. The problem with its implementation is that none of our current crop of politicians has any vision or plan for the same. Their archaic methods of governance and the way they wield power do not lend themselves to socially empowering individuals.
They will all die the death of a thousand cuts before we see the introduction of universal healthcare, economic incentives for ordinary Bahamians and access to a real Freedom of Information Act.
Here it is that we all know that we need to generate more revenue. We have the spectacle of the web shop industry raking in hundreds of millions of dollars, tax free, each year. Instead of the government (anyone of them) simply bringing legislation to Parliament to regulate and tax this industry, it talks stupidity about a value added tax regime.
Most of us are already taxed to the max yet the politicians are going to wring out the last red cent from our pockets or die trying. Why not introduce a sales tax? Why not introduce a flat income tax, across the board, of 10%?
Social Democracy is possible but until then, in all things, to God be the glory.
- Ortland H. Bodie Jr.

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News Article

February 23, 2012
West End Eco-Fishing Camp readies for fun-filled 2012 season

Grand Bahama Island,
Bahamas - The West End Eco-Fishing Camp is pleased to announce the
fourth year of their program designed for local kids who are immersed
into a number of activities to get them thinking about their role as
"caretakers of the earth and living seas". The camp is held in
partnership with the Royal Bahamas Police Force who saw the need to
initiate signature community programs to encourage the children to learn
about basic first aid, water safety, and swimming, introduction to
boating, ecology, kayaking, hand line fishing, and fly fishing. Led by a
group of adult volunteers from the local community and officers from
the West End police station the kids are kept busy learning about
"Esprit de Corps" or group...

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News Article

February 29, 2012
Anglican bishop: Country needs independent Boundaries Commission

There is a 'pressing need' for an independent Boundaries Commission to ensure that constituency cuts are not subject to the 'whim and will' of the government, said Anglican Bishop Laish Boyd in a pastoral letter to members of the Anglican church.
Boyd, bishop of the diocese of The Bahamas and Turks and Caicos, said successive governments have been guilty of using the commission to suit its needs.
"[An independent commission] would ensure that political constituencies are determined by a non-partisan, scientific, transparent method that can withstand objective scrutiny and that is not controlled by the whim and will of the government of the day," said Boyd in a five-page letter written on February 22 and released to the media yesterday .
The creation of an independent Boundaries Commission was one of six proposals in the failed 2002 referendum. The majority of the electorate voted against an independent body to oversee constituency cuts ahead of an election; 57,815 people voted 'no' while 30,418 voted 'yes.'
Boyd also criticized the policy some leaders pursue to dismantle the work of their predecessor in office instead of building on the foundation that was left behind.
"At some times and in some areas, successive governments of this country have seen themselves and have styled themselves as 'undoing' what their predecessors have done rather than collaborating on a sustained, broader and seamless vision for the real well-being and advancement of this country," he wrote.
"It takes immense political will and political maturity on the part of all concerned to rise above 'party' and to think 'country'."
 
ISSUES

Boyd also advised voters to take a non-partisan look at national issues such as the economy, crime, education, health care and the judicial system when they go to the polls this year instead of focusing on the personalities of the candidates.
"Crime remains a concern, as it should be. The police have a job to do and must always be equipped, challenged and given the authority to do it without undue interference or obstruction from government, politicians or citizens," the bishop said.
Boyd said while successive governments have worked to speed up the judicial process more work must be done to accelerate the movement of criminal matters through the courts.
"It will take the government, the judiciary, the police and the legal profession to continue this process. Justice delayed is justice denied. No one of the above groups should be able to stall inordinately or unreasonably the resolution of a case before the court," he wrote.
Boyd also applauded the government for its drug prescription plan but said he looks forward to the day when the uninsured are covered under a national health insurance scheme.
He said voters should consider problems of traffic congestion and the lack of a structured public transport system in New Providence when they go to polls.
He added that the poor and vulnerable are the ones who suffer most because of the country's unreliable jitney system.
"Poor people, children, the elderly and citizens in general suffer inconvenience, limitation and danger because of this.  We cannot have a situation where the persons who need our protection most are left unprotected. This is a matter that must be addressed," Boyd wrote.

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News Article

February 27, 2012
'Great need' for autism awareness in The Bahamas

By ALESHA CADET

Tribune Features Reporter

A LOCAL doctor is encouraging people to unite and work together in an effort to raise awareness about autism in The Bahamas.

Dr Michelle Major, who began her career in the field of autism as an inclusion teacher and a verbal behaviour therapist for children with autism, said awareness of the neurological disorder in The Bahamas, and indeed the Caribbean, is limited.

The Bahamas, she said, is in need of early intervention, early identification and adult training programmes, just to name a few initiatives.

With her experience of speaking on autism at international forums, Dr Major said in her view government support is essential in helping children ...

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News Article

February 29, 2012
A teaching moment about 'our' sports

I just don't get it. Our political leaders (all of them) continue to miss the boat when it comes to recognizing the true importance of sports to this country and act accordingly.
It is so obvious that the only way the criminal element in this country will be pushed back is if the national sports program is expanded to gobble up the vast majority of the young boys and girls who go astray because of having no positive sense of direction. The national sports program is a great option for our little boys and girls and the older ones as well.
The Thomas A. Robinson National Stadium was bursting at the seams with people on Saturday past. There was the big question bandied around about whether the stadium would ever be seated to capacity. Well, we got our answer.
Let's be clear about the situation. On Saturday, the overwhelming support was not about politics. The politicians were neutralized on Saturday even though they came out in big numbers. The response from the crowd to the names of Hubert Ingraham and Perry Christie was subdued and similar. No, it was not about them.
Yet, the ongoing comments from that arena prove that the politicizing never stops. The real teaching moment from the event was about sports. Only sports can get all Bahamians, from every persuasion together. Hypocrisy appears to be a constant among our politicians when dealing with sports in particular.
They soak up the opportunities to grandstand on forums created by the awesome collective ability within the Bahamian sports fraternity. They boast and praise the athletes, administrators, coaches and trainers to the highest. Still, against that backdrop, just the financial crumbs from the National Budget table fall off to the national sports program. I invite readers to compare the allocations for health, education and tourism to that of sports. By no means do I wish to dilute the significance and importance of prime health care, high-level educational opportunities and tourism vibrancy to the stable existence of our people. It's been proven over and over again though that the national sports program deserves to be right up there in that top category of budget allocations.
Young boys and girls are dying by way of crime. The lives of others are been snuffed out almost daily, by the young among us. The role models of more and more of our young are not Tommy Robinson, Andre Rodgers, Sir Durward Knowles, Cynthia Moxey-Pratt, Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie, Chris Brown, Mark Knowles, Arianna Vanderpool-Wallace, Devard Darling, Mychal Thompson, Gomeo Brennan, Glen Griffin, Carl Minns or the many others of that ilk.
Today, the role models who too many of our young seek to emulate, are the crime merchants. It is because the system has changed to enable those who promote crime to be in closer contact with our young. The burden on the sporting administrators, coaches, trainers and other mentors is too great because of the numbers that need attention and the meager funds to go around. Many sports mentors spend personal funds, just to provide meaningful opportunities for sporting growth.
I have personal knowledge of this. The biggest reason for my resignation as president of the Amateur Boxing Federation of The Bahamas (ABFB) way back in 1976 was because my children were getting bigger and more expensive. I no longer was able to afford helping to pay some of the costs for those monthly trips to the Florida Golden Gloves, and other friendly competitions against Bermuda and Canada.
Grants for federations and the National Subvention Program were decades beyond the horizon then. Now, thanks to the central administration, grants and subventions are commonplace. The funding for the subvention program is fine. The grants must be adjusted greatly. The core sports group needs $300,000 at least per year and the smaller sports programs around $200,000.
An essential body like the Bahamas Anti-Doping Commission (BADC) should be given $500,000 yearly, because of the huge area mandated by the law. If this happens, crime would not be eliminated but there will be a huge dent in the activities of the criminally inclined. The sporting programs would then be in position to inculcate our wayward youth and those who are apt to be directed to the wrong paths in life.
It was indeed a teaching moment about sports on Saturday, February 25 at the Thomas A. Robinson National Stadium. I wonder just how many learned the lesson taught. I'm sure the man whose name the national stadium bears, got the message. He's been a part of the message for many years. Maybe in his own way now, he will be able, somehow, to educate the politicians about the true value of sports.
Thomas Augustus Robinson no doubt was aware of the teaching moment. Congratulations Tommy for the honor bestowed upon you.
(To respond to this column, kindly contact Fred Sturrup at fredericksturrup@gmail.com)

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News Article

March 01, 2012
Leroy Stanley Johnson, 69

Memorial service for Leroy Stanley Johnson, 69, of Flint and Taylor Streets will be held on Saturday, March 3rd, 2012 at Amazing Grace Missionary Baptist Church, Wilson Tract Officiating will be Sr. Pastor, Rev. Elva Johnson J.P., assisted by Rev. Merion. E. Roberts J.P., Rev. Dr. George Barry and other Ministers of the Gospel.
Left to cherish his precious memories are: his three(3): daughters Naurae and Michelle Johnson and Natasha Ferguson six(6) sisters: Naomi Carey, Rosemary Lowe, Sherry Lowe, Donnamae Lowe, Garnelle Lowe-Holmes and Sharon Lowe - Byrd; two (2) brothers: Anthony and Bradley Lowe; twelve (12) grand-children: Nerissa Johnson, George Willie, Delya Ferguson, Natricia Wainwright, Berget ...

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News Article

March 03, 2012
Illegitimacy in The Bahamas

The Department of Statistics has released its Births Report for the period 1970 to 2010.  An interesting section of the report relates to illegitimacy - that is, children born to unmarried mothers.
According to the report, births to unwed mothers in The Bahamas escalated during the past 40 years from 29 percent in 1970, to a high of 62 percent in 2009.  Births to unwed mothers dropped slightly in 2010 to 59 percent.
"Births to unwed mothers remained the largest annual natural increase to the Bahamian population," said the Department of Statistics in the report.
The traditional home in which married parents shared the responsibility of child rearing has been eclipsed by a new Bahamas in which mothers primarily carry the burden of bringing up children.  Some men who father children to women they are not married to make an effort.  Many do not, however.
There are several disadvantages to a society growing via this model.  The combined income and attention of two well-intentioned parents in a home far surpass what a well-intentioned mother, burdened by being both a father and mother, can provide to a child.
Beyond resources, children need examples to use to model behavior.  When no father is present in the home, a boy is robbed of an example of how to be, or not to be, a man.  Similarly, girls are denied the example of observing masculinity up close when their fathers are missing.
One of the few measures the state can take to influence the reproductive patterns of its citizens is to ensure aggressively that child maintenance laws are tough and enforced.  When men refuse to financially help take care of their children, they can be taken to court by mothers and made to pay.  And they should be made to pay.  People are the most important natural resource of any society.  Every investment must be made in the next generation to ensure it is as capable as possible to meet the challenges of the times.
The church has a role to play in this issue too.  The message must again be aggressively and consistently sent to Bahamians that two-parent homes with focused and dedicated parents are more ideal than homes in which mothers struggle to do it all alone.  And when children are born to unwed mothers it must be emphasized from our pulpits that it is morally reprehensible for a man not to take care of his children.
A positive trend in the report is that the number of teenage pregnancy remains significantly under the highs of a few decades ago.  According to the report, in 1980 there were 1,107 births recorded to teenage mothers; 763 in 1990; 580 in 2000; and 533 in 2010.
Girls who have not even finished their secondary education are not well-equipped to be mothers.  The public education initiatives in place in schools and via the media seem to have had some positive effect on this problem.
Additionally, the state must continue to ensure that men who commit statutory rape and impregnate girls are prosecuted.  The aggressive prosecution of these men should help deter others from engaging in this destructive behavior.
 
 

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Event
Christmas Capers
Christmas Capers

Friday 21st December 2012  9:00 AM

Christmas Capers Mini Day Camps 2012 December, 20th and 21st Ages 5-12 9.00am – 12.00pm Children learn the basics of animal care and humane treatment. Through educational books & DVD’s, Kitty Cuddles, Puppy Baths, Dog Walks, Pony Grooming and interaction with the Bahamas Humane Society Adoption Animals and Staff Limited space so register early! Fees are payable in advance. Daily $30 2 Day Mini Camp $55 *Children should bring a snack and drink* A dog leash and old towel would be helpful. The dogs appreciate the kids bringing them dog bones, and the donkey,ponies, goats and rabbits love treats of vegetables, fruits and bread.


Event
BHS Animal Fun Day
BHS Animal Fun Day

Sunday 24th February 2013  6:00 PM

Event Has Been postponed to Sunday April 21st Sunday, February 24th is the BHS Animal Fun Day, to be held once again at the Botanical Gardens. This enjoyable day out is perfect for both children and animals and great for the entire family. Bring your dog, bring your loved ones and join us for an afternoon of family fun. Gates open at noon and the festivities continue till 6 p.m. Enter your dog in the dog/owner lookalike contest, find out who has the waggiest tail, and have your photo taken at the Kissing Booth. There will be food, booths, and games. If you're able to volunteer for the day, please contact Laura Kimble @ (kimblelaura@gmail.com). Founded in 1924, the Bahamas Humane Society is the oldest charity in the Bahamas and was originally called the Dumb Friends League. It is affiliated to numerous international organisations, including the World Society for the Protection of Animals (WSPA). It is the only humane organisation in the Caribbean to hold membership of the Standards of Excellence Program sponsored by the American Humane Association of which it has been a member since 1989. The BHS employs two full time veterinarians. It offers a 24 hour emergency ambulance service and provides care for sick, injured and abandoned animals.


Event
In The Spirit Exhibition – New Work by Chantal Bethel

Friday 8th February 2013  6:00 PM

“In The Spirit” Exhibition – New Work by Chantal Bethel Friday, February 8, 2013 at 6pm Hillside House Gallery, Cumberland Street, North of Govt House The Bahamas has a reputation that seems indisputable: endless blue sky, bright sun, hot balmy days, turquoise crystal ocean, soft pale sand, palm trees and flamingos—as an artist to address any of these ubiquitous stereotypes demands a vision beyond typical. Chantal Bethel has developed a reputation for painting and creating from her soul. She is impassioned to express whatever moves her. Thus her art works carry a certain ineffable emotion. Whether she is addressing the subject of woman, mother and child, or in more recent works, an installation—Poto Mitan: Hopes & Prayers for Haiti—a response to the earthquake tragedy of her birthland, she brings a silent, indomitable emotional intelligence to her works. There is a swinging shift between themes in Bethel’s work: At one moment she is dealing with love, a sultry breeze across the canvas, other times she deals in horror and death. In a recent conversation with the artist in her studio, she explains that after working in the dark subject matter of the Haitian tragedy for a couple of years, she is ready to embrace beauty again—to “exhale from the soul”. This collection, In the Spirit, which will be exhibited at Hillside House Gallery on Friday, February 8, 2013, addresses the surprising and very Bahamian theme of flamingos. After Poto Mitan, this is her movement back into light; the works are bright and airy. Soft colour palettes sing. Pieces are diverse, ranging from paintings on canvas to paintings on wood, and amusing, or tense, sculptures. But don’t be too beguiled by these entrancing colours and familiar theme of The Caribbean. At first, the light colours, simple composition, and the well-known form of the flamingo, makes the work seem to be familiar Bahamian paintings, but something about the intriguing textures and almost obsessive use of crackle paint, hints at more. A second clue is her use of quotes from Rumi, (a Sufi mystic who, through poetry, offers insights into a spiritual life beyond this mundane reality). The quotes are not titles per se, but suggest at a relationship between his writings and Bethels paintings; a hint of something beyond the surface. The work is incredibly charming and it is easy to be distracted by their aesthetic appeal. The surfaces seem to crack open to light and they successfully convey the essence of The Bahamas in their shimmering colour range. Rich textured surfaces defy gravity and become about light. Coupled with the images of flamingos are flamingo eggs; whole egg forms covered thickly in gesso; large carefully cracked open ‘eggs’ with inner Mandalas or sun designs; eggs neatly opened to expose personal myths. I am intrigued by the sturdy nature of the eggs. “Eggs are fragile and yet represent hope”, says Bethel. However her eggs are unyielding. This produces an interesting tension between the highly crackled paintings that look incredibly similar to broken eggshells created into a collage. As if recognizing the fragile nature of the egg, Bethel inadvertently wants to protect it, and hold it. Yet in intensified contrast, here are the flamingos: beautiful and insidiously broken. We talk about life and the symbolism of eggs as part of the life cycle; I sense that Bethel is using her art to process her deeper fears and thoughts about existence. In recognizing the metaphor of the flamingo and egg, I have a suspicion that the new depth of layers in Bethel’s work is more than merely technical. It is a compelling balance. The beautiful fluid images of flamingos which are corrupted by a coruscated shattering and their eggs which are toughened to protect, gives the viewer a glimpse at hidden layers of life, as complicated, paradoxical, and profound as it can get. Image 2 seems to hold the balance of the conflicting surfaces. The body and feathers of the flamingos eyeing each other are created by the crackle effect paint, contrasting with a lightness and sensitive handling of paint to express the flamingos’ neck and head, all this is held in a background of deeper paint textures: resulting in a mesmerizing piece. The viewer is captured by a silent complexity, a tenderness and brokenness delicately held in a kind embrace. One of the final pieces created for this show are real broken eggs, and following an inner compulsion by Bethel “...then I cracked one and the thought of light came to me, they needed light”, she brings a completion to the works by allowing the true nature of the eggs to reveal a deeper metaphorical purpose by allowing the cracking, or as Bethel concurs “…like your children, you always want to protect them but if you give them wings, they should be ok on their own”. The circle of broken eggs then becomes a necessary movement in the cycle of life. Fledglings leave the nest and things have to be broken in order for life to break free. And a complex story of being human with many paradoxical truths; brokenness and beauty; fragility and strength; profound and shallow, seem to be expressed in the hidden narrative of Bethel’s art. Beyond surfaces, beyond superficiality, is a world as multifarious and singular as Rumi’s, if you are willing to look into the depths beyond the charismatic images, you will find the divine multiplicity of human soul in Bethel’s new works. Alternatively, just enjoy the sublime and captivating beauty of Chantal Bethel’s art, “In the Spirit”. Written by Susan Moir Mackay


News Article
Youth in Puerto Rico to gain from technology access and training
March 27, 2010
Youth in Puerto Rico to gain from technology access and training

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico -- Microsoft has donated US$60,000 to the Trust for the Americas, a nonprofit organization affiliated with the Organization of American States (OAS), to establish its program, Partnership in Opportunities for Employment through Technology in the Americas (POETA), in Puerto Rico to engage youth from low income communities in jobs and provide them with skills that will allow them to have a better life.

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Event
Bahamas Circus-The Best Show in The Bahamas
Bahamas Circus-The Best Show in The Bahamas

Friday 15th March 2013  10:00 AM

SOFT TOUCH PRODUCTIONS Presents Bahamas Circus-The Best Show in The Bahamas Dates- March 15th Day showing-10am Evening showing-8pm March 16th Evening showing-8pm Tickets depots: Seventeen shop, Collins avenue Original Swiss shop, Cable beach Carey's Deparment store, Mackey st Conliffe Bakery, Carmichael Rd Ticket Prices 5 and over-$15 2- 4years- $10 Free Under 2 years School Information School Matinees in Nassau will be held Monday – Thursday, 4th-8th, March, 2013 at 9:30am & 1:00pm. School Matinees in Grand Bahama will be held Monday – Thursday,11th-15th, March, 2013 at 9:30am & 1:00pm. Tickets are $10 for Pre-School $12 for Primary $15 for High School Students. We would like to confirm our offer to you of retaining for a school project, the following on each child who attends Pre-Schoolers $2, and Primary & High School students $3. Any participating school will retain 50% of all their ticket sales. Raffle Tickets are available now for distribution. The raffle will be drawn on Saturday, 27th April, 2013 and prizes are as follows:- Samsung Galaxy S2 4G Cell Phone 42” Flat Screen Television Blackberry Playbook Apple iPad II iPod Touch Xbox 360 Kinect Round-trip ticket for 2 on “Bahamas Celebrations” from Freeport Round-trip ticket for 2 on “The Bohengy” from Nassau Kindly advise at your earliest a day, date and time we can address your school’s as BahamasCircus.com


News Article

January 31, 2012
The skin -- the largest organ of the human body

The skin that God blessed us with comes in various colors, shapes and sizes and a lot of times, the proper care and maintenance of it is misunderstood. Many people are of the opinion that anything, or any product can be used to wash or moisturize the skin with and it will be okay. People assume that the skin is resilient and nothing will affect it, however, this is not so because what you do with your skin today will affect your skin tomorrow.
The skin is the largest organ of the human body. It has various functions and needs and functions in such a way as to provide an overall protection for us as we go about our day-to-day activities. It acts as a barrier that protects us against environmental pollutants, infections and irritants by alarming our immune system to attack anything that it does not recognize. By doing so, some potential bacterial infections, pollutants that can cause skin allergies and irritants are sometimes eliminated before we recognize what actually happened.
It also acts as a regulator of body temperature by decreasing the size of the blood vessels to allow for either the retaining of heat when we are cold or the release of heat when our bodies are hot by way of sweating. As a result of this skin function we are protected from extremes of increase or decrease in our body temperature. The skin also acts as a sensor by way of tiny hairs found all over the body. These fine hairs act like the whiskers of a cat that alert us to things in contact with our skin -- like knowing when an ant is crawling on your hand or the brush of a blade of grass on your bare feet. This sensory function also causes us to be aware of pain from the stick of a needle or the pleasure of a welcoming hug. Additionally, it communicates with our surroundings to either attract or repel people based on additional things that are added by nature such as moles, discolorations or dryness or that we add such as tattoos and piercings.
The skin has quite a bit to do every minute of every day and it is up to us to help maintain it so that it can perform at its best to protect us from the rest. In this column I will address all issues about skin conditions that can change the way the skin functions for children and adults, in addition to things that can be done to maintain a healthy, rejuvenated glowing skin.

oDr. Rokeisha Clare-Kleinbussink studied at Cosmetology Cosmetic Training for Dermal Filler in London, UK and attended the Academy of Beauty Training for Laser and Microdermabrasion in Nottinghamshire, UK. She is also an associate lecturer of dermatology at the University of The West Indies. She has a private practice at Roseona House of General and Cosmetic Dermatology and can be reached at 422-0202.

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News Article

February 07, 2012
Mending hearts and saving lives

Minister of Health Dr. Hubert Minnis has indicated that non-communicable diseases account for 45 percent of deaths in The Bahamas, and that heart disease, a non-communicable disease, is the number one killer of persons in The Bahamas.
The Bahamas Heart Association, the educational arm of The Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamas) Heart Foundation and The Bahamas Heart Association are comprised of volunteers who provide their time and services to assist children in need with the cost of heart investigations and surgery. They advise the public on all aspects of heart disease, risk factors and preventative care, and provide speakers and educational material to schools, youth groups, service clubs and other public meetings.
As February is Heart Month, the Bahamas Heart Association has scheduled several events to create awareness about heart disease and to help persons live heart healthy lifestyles.
Saturday, February 11: Free CPR Classes at S.C. McPherson School from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Thursday, February 16: - Doctors Hospital lecture at 6 p.m., with blood pressure checks from 5 pm.
Friday, February 17: Go Red for Women Day.
Saturday, February 18 : The 48th Annual Heart Ball
Thursday, February 23: Annual Health Fair at Town Centre Mall from 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Thursday, February 23: Bahamas Surgical Associates Center/Cleveland Clinic's Free Heart Health Seminar at the British Colonial Hilton. Reception at 6:30 p.m. Seminar starts at 7 p.m.
Saturday, February 25: Annual Fun/Run Walk
The public is encouraged to purchase "Go Red" pins for a minimum donation of $3, to be worn during Heart Month and especially on Go Red day. The pins symbolize women's heart health. The proceeds help to repair hearts.
Thelma Johnson, president of the Bahamas Heart Association, encourages people and corporations to become members of the Bahamas Heart Association, which has as its motto "Mending Hearts, Savings Lives". In that regard, it is calling on all schools to encourage their students to wear red on February in exchange for a gift donation of $1 per child.

oFor details about Heart Month and the Bahamas Heart Association, contact the Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamas) Heart Foundation at 327-0806 or email at sassoonheart@gmail.com.

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Event
Medical Association of The Bahamas 41st Annual Scientific Conference
Medical Association of The Bahamas 41st Annual Scientific Conference

Thursday 7th March 2013  2:00 PM

Medical Association of The Bahamas 41st Annual Scientific Conference March 6 – 8, 2013 British Colonial Hilton Hotel Thursday March 7, 2013 2:00pm – 2:30pm The C.R. Walker Memorial Lecture “A JOURNEY THROUGH CHILDHOOD” Dr. Percival McNeil Paediatrician Nassau, Bahamas Session IV 2:30pm - 5:20pm TOPIC: THE COST OF MEDICAL CARE IN THE BAHAMAS IS TOO HIGH AND PHYSICIANS ARE THE CAUSE Moderator - Dr. Sheena Antonio-Collie Panel debate: 2 teams (4 speakers) PRO: Dr. Robin Roberts Director UWI.SCMR (Presenter- 10 min) Dr. Glen Beneby Medical Advisor PHA (Rebutter- 5 min) CON: Dr. Paul Ward Chief of Staff, Rand Hospital (Presenter- 10 min) Dr. Duane Sands Cardiothoracic Surgeon (Rebutter- 5 min) 3:00pm Questions for debate panel 3:10pm BREAK/ VIEW EXHIBITS TOPIC: CHRONIC NON-COMMUNICABLE DISEASES: STEMMING THE UPSURGE IN OUR SOCIETY 3:20pm Updates In Stroke Management in The Bahamas Dr. Charles Rahming MBBS, Neurologist and internist PMH Nassau, Bahamas 3:40pm Treating To Targets Dr. Winston Forbes MD, Cardiologist, The Rand Memorial Hospital, Freeport, Bahamas 4:00pm The Medical Management of Obesity and It’s Effectiveness in Our Society Dr. Nikkiah Forbes MBBS, DM Internal Medicine, Nassau, Bahamas 4:20pm Questions to the above panel of speakers 4:30pm Keynote Speaker: Local Experience With Weight Loss Surgery; Effect of Weight Reduction and Control of Co-morbid Conditions Dr. Charles Diggis, MBBS, FRCS(GLAG),Med Net 5:00pm Questions for keynote speaker 5:10PM ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING - MAB 5:00pm-7:00pm LIGHT COCKTAILS 7:00pm-9:00pm SATELLITE DINNER SYMPOSIUM - By invitation


Event
BHS Summer Camp
BHS Summer Camp

Monday 24th June 2013  9:00 AM

BHS Summer Camp The Bahamas Humane Society, Chippingham The BHS Summer Camp dates have been set! Camp runs weekly from June 24th to July 12th and then July 22nd to July 26th. The cost is $125.00 per week. It's open for children ages 6 to 13 and runs from 9 a.m. to noon each day. Children will learn about caring for animals and have the opportunity to interact with the BHS adoption animals. Bring a snack and drink, an old leash, an old towel, and some goodies for the animals. See also the attached information page. Register at the Shelter. Children learn the basics of animal care and humane treatment. They read educational books and watch educational DVD’s and do some fun worksheets. They interact with the Bahamas Humane Society adoption animals and have question and answer sessions with the Humane Society staff. Limited space so register early! Fees are payable in advance. Weekly $125 (Includes a t-shirt) *Children should bring a snack and drink* A dog leash and old towel would be helpful. The dogs appreciate the kids bringing them dog bones, and the donkeys, goats, chickens, ducks, rabbits and horses love treats of vegetables, fruits and bread. Register early as space is limited and fills up quickly! Founded in 1924, the Bahamas Humane Society is the oldest charity in the Bahamas and was originally called the Dumb Friends League. It is affiliated to numerous international organisations, including the World Society for the Protection of Animals (WSPA). It is the only humane organisation in the Caribbean to hold membership of the Standards of Excellence Program sponsored by the American Humane Association of which it has been a member since 1989. The BHS employs two full time veterinarians. It offers a 24 hour emergency ambulance service and provides care for sick, injured and abandoned animals.


News Article

January 17, 2012
Foot pain putting a kink in your exercise program

Beginning a new exercise program is very rewarding but can also have some setbacks. Foot pain is one of the most common setbacks to any exercise program. A survey by the American Podiatric Medical Association found foot problems are a major deterrent to exercise, contributing to alarming rates of overweight and obesity. In the study, as much as 72 percent of persons surveyed admitted they did not exercise because foot pain prevented them from doing so. The feet were listed as the number one body part to experience pain.
Foot pain can put a serious kink in your new exercise routine and contribute to negative health consequences. It is important to know that foot pain is not normal and people should seek the care of a podiatrist immediately if foot pain arises - especially after starting an exercise program. Often times this can happen because the body is adjusting to the new exercise routine and use of muscles and joints that had previously been sedentary.
There are many other causes of foot pain. Wearing shoes that don't fit properly is one of the most common reasons why people (especially women) get foot pain. Other common causes of foot pain may include heel pain, foot deformities such as bunions and hammertoes, arthritis, trauma, ligament strain, tendinitis, stress fracture or other injuries.
Any pain in the foot or ankle of a walker or runner is an indication that it is time to stop, rest and evaluate the situation. Foot problems or pain that comes on shortly after starting an exercise program can be minor or a sign of a more serious foot conditions. One must reevaluate all aspects of the exercise routine - speed, distance and equipment, including shoes. It is generally best to wait until all foot pains are gone before restarting your exercise. If foot pains persist in spite of resting, you should see your podiatrist for an evaluation.
It is critical that people pay attention to their feet and seek treatment for any foot problems. Before starting an exercise program, see your primary care physician for a complete physical exam and your podiatrist to have a foot check up. Wearing well-fitting, good quality footwear can support the foot during exercise to minimize any chance of injury. Stretching before and after exercising along with warming up and cooling down can also help to prevent injury. Foot exercises will increase flexibility and also prevent injury.
Adult and childhood obesity is a major concern for all Bahamians. Exercise is a major strategy to help combat this epidemic. If adults and children have foot pain they will not exercise or will not do so regularly. Proper foot health and pain-free feet play a vital role in keeping everyone healthy and exercising consistently. Visiting a podiatrist to evaluate and fix the cause of any foot pain is critically important. The take home message here is that foot pain is not normal and if you are having foot pain, pause your workout and consult your local podiatrist.

oFor more information visit www. apma.org or if you have foot pain, visit a local podiatrist at Bahamas Foot Centre, Rosetta Street, telephone 325-2996 or Bahamas Surgical Associates, Albury Lane, telephone 394-5924.

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News Article

January 17, 2012
Predatory behavior in dogs and cats

Dogs were originally domesticated to take advantage of their hunting abilities. Our ancestors redirected the natural instinct of the dog's ability to hunt in packs benefiting from the dog's tracking skill and speed in pursuit of common prey. Thousands of years of selected breeding have produced a lot of different breeds.
The Bloodhound was developed for its sense of smell, and the Saluki and Borzoi for their keen eyesight. Labradors for hunting birds, Coonhounds for hunting raccoons and Rodesian Ridgebacks for hunting lions.
Dog breeds were developed to hunt certain animals, like the Irish wolfhound and the foxhound which were developed to hunt wolves and foxes. Some breeds were developed to protect other animals. The Border collie and Elkhound were developed to protect small ruminants. Daschunds and Terrier breeds were bred to pursue ground prey. The English bulldog and American Pitbull Terrier were originally bred for uninhibited predatory and dominant social aggression for their owner's entertainment such as dogfights. The Saint Bernard and the German shepherd were both developed for more humanitarian applications, such as the search and rescue talents that we see today.
Undesirable predatory behavior is relatively common in dogs. Most pets are genetically predisposed towards some form of predatory behavior. This type of behavior is a problem because the dog can cause injury, be self-injured, or be exposed to contagious diseases.
The most obvious disadvantage of predatory behavior by dogs is the unnecessary injury or death of other animals, including wildlife and other pets that appear to be offensive and unnecessary. It can also take a more sinister form when directed against family members, particularly if they are children and infants. Predatory instincts are most likely to be redirected towards children when infants begin to crawl and walk. The dog may not display any interest in an immobile newborn, but may show some interest in the same newborn when it begins crawling around your home. So never leave a child (toddler) unattended around even the most trusted pet.
With the exception of lions, most cats hunt alone and primarily at night. Predatory behavior in cats is both instinctual and learned. Kittens in the form of play, practice hunting techniques. Some house cats without prior experience instinctively react to prey animals that cross their path.
Owners may be horrified when their cat presents them with a half-eaten mouse or bird. This is not a gift to the owner for its gratitude for the owner's care and hospitality, but a maternal instinct when the cat brings back prey to its home for their young ones. The mother will normally bring dead prey - even regurgitating half-digested food for her newborn litter. As the kittens grow, she will return with live prey to teach the kittens how to prey. A cat's instinct may be to carry its prey to a sheltered area, but not to consume it. Some cat owners proclaim that it's cruel to restrict a cat's natural instinct to hunt.
Prevent predatory behavior in dogs and cats.
In dogs, deny your dog the opportunity to hunt. Prevent opportunities for them to roam unsupervised outdoors. Insure that your home is fenced or walled in if hunting occurs beyond your property.
Minimize your dog's desire to roam and hunt by providing other activities. Discourage wild and undisciplined behavior. Walk your dog on a leash and practice obedience skills daily.
In cats, the only practical way to resolve undesirable predatory behavior is to prevent it. The instinct to hunt can be so strong that it lasts a lifetime. The clinic cat, Sneaky, hunts everyday and will bring a dead mouse to us most times. Of course, we like this because it is a means of rodent control. Hunting is a part of a cat's outdoor activities, regardless of how he is fed. It may help to attach bells to a collar to warn unsuspecting targets. Remember that your pet can be injured in its attempt to capture prey and is susceptible to the health risks associated with roaming outdoors.

o Dr. Basil Sands can be contacted at the Central Animal Hospital at 325-1288.

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Event
BHS Summer Camp
BHS Summer Camp

Thursday 27th June 2013  9:00 AM

BHS Summer Camp The Bahamas Humane Society, Chippingham The BHS Summer Camp dates have been set! Camp runs weekly from June 24th to July 12th and then July 22nd to July 26th. The cost is $125.00 per week. It's open for children ages 6 to 13 and runs from 9 a.m. to noon each day. Children will learn about caring for animals and have the opportunity to interact with the BHS adoption animals. Bring a snack and drink, an old leash, an old towel, and some goodies for the animals. See also the attached information page. Register at the Shelter. Children learn the basics of animal care and humane treatment. They read educational books and watch educational DVD’s and do some fun worksheets. They interact with the Bahamas Humane Society adoption animals and have question and answer sessions with the Humane Society staff. Limited space so register early! Fees are payable in advance. Weekly $125 (Includes a t-shirt) *Children should bring a snack and drink* A dog leash and old towel would be helpful. The dogs appreciate the kids bringing them dog bones, and the donkeys, goats, chickens, ducks, rabbits and horses love treats of vegetables, fruits and bread. Register early as space is limited and fills up quickly! Founded in 1924, the Bahamas Humane Society is the oldest charity in the Bahamas and was originally called the Dumb Friends League. It is affiliated to numerous international organisations, including the World Society for the Protection of Animals (WSPA). It is the only humane organisation in the Caribbean to hold membership of the Standards of Excellence Program sponsored by the American Humane Association of which it has been a member since 1989. The BHS employs two full time veterinarians. It offers a 24 hour emergency ambulance service and provides care for sick, injured and abandoned animals.


News Article

December 27, 2011
Medical Pavilion staff spread holiday cheer to children

Christmas is a time for giving and sharing. This year, instead of sharing and exchanging gifts amongst themselves, the staff at The Medical Pavilion Bahamas decided to give gifts to those less fortunate instead.
Over 100 gifts were given to the boys and girls of the Bahamas Children's Emergency Hostel, the young ladies at the Willie Mae Pratt Centre for Girls, and the young men at the Simpson Penn Centre for Boys.
Each center was contacted beforehand, and gifts were centered on the needs and specific requests of the organizations.
The Medical Pavilion staff hoped the gifts helped to meet the needs of the children at each of the centers during the Yuletide season and the New Year, while helping to bring a smile of happiness to their faces.
Dr. Conville Brown, founder, president and CEO of the Bahamas Heart Center and the Medical Pavilion Bahamas, congratulated his staff for their selfless idea of giving gifts to the less fortunate in the community, and truly sharing the Christmas spirit.
The Medical Pavilion Bahamas is home to the Bahamas Heart Center, the Bahamas Chest Centre, the Cancer Centre, the Imaging Centre, the Breast Centre and now the Dialysis Centre. Located at 72-74 Collins Avenue, the Medical Pavilion provides state-of-the-art medical care while seeking to ensure affordable access to all through its partnered care model.

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News Article

March 06, 2012
Help to save a life

Cardiovascular disease, commonly referred to as heart disease, is the number one killer of people in The Bahamas and around the world. As heart month came to a close, the fight against it still continued because more people die from heart disease than from any other cause. Heart disease does not discriminate. It affects people who are rich and poor, young and old. It does not prejudice based on race, religion, educational attainment or ethnicity. It affects everyone. Oftentimes, people are not sensitized to illnesses unless the illness affects them or their immediate family.
While there are many preventative measures to be taken by adults, such as exercise, eating right, not smoking, lowering cholesterol and taking medications correctly, in the case of babies and children, they rely on others for care and treatment against heart disease. And heart care is not cheap in cases where heart disease is discovered, regardless of age. Heart care can cost up to $1 million. What is even more unfortunate, is that many children when born, may not be privileged to have medical insurance or parents who can afford heart care. As such, when their parents discover that their new born babies have congenital heart disease, they are in a state of emotional and financial frustration, and fear. One such family currently facing such a challenge is that of Rah'nae De'ajah Burrows.
In October 2011, Antoine and Jessica Burrows welcomed their daughter into their family. Tests were carried out to ensure that she was healthy. It was discovered that Rah'nae had characteristics of Down syndrome - news that is not often readily accepted by many new parents - but the couple loved their baby nonetheless and saw her as a special gift from God.
Because of the existence of those characteristics, concerns arose to the possibility that Rah'nae may also have heart disease. After a week in the hospital it was discovered by an echocardiogram that she had a large atrial septal defect (ASD), which was a hole in her heart. The parents were referred to Dr. Jerome Lightbourne at the Pediatric Heart Clinic, at Princess Margaret Hospital. Additionally, genetic testing was done and the tests confirmed that she had Down syndrome.
Consequently, the parents were told to take Rah'nae to the Neurodevelopment Center for therapy, the Neurology clinic, and the Neonatology clinic. The entire process was emotionally and mentally taxing and challenging for the new parents.
With therapy over the past year, Rah'nae's health has been great and the family has seen progress, but Rah'nae is having problems with weight gain because of the heart condition and needs heart surgery desperately.
The Burrows' cannot afford the cost of heart surgery for their baby girl which could run them around $55,000 - and their daughter does not have insurance. Jessica is a school teacher and her husband, a transport operator.
Sadly, this family, like many, is only trying to survive in tough economic times and ensure that there is food, clothing and shelter for the family. As such, they need help to save their baby.
Dr. Lightbourne referred the Burrows' to The Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamas) Heart Foundation for possible assistance with Rah'nae's surgery. The heart foundation seeks to provide heart care assistance to people, particularly children, who can not ordinarily afford heart care. The nonprofit entity relies heavily upon the generosity of others to help repair the hearts of children. Today, Rah'nae is on a wait list among 11 patients awaiting heart surgery.These patients and their families are prayerful and hopeful that the public will heed the appeals made and make a donation to the heart foundation to help save their lives. Sadly, without such surgeries, patients like Rah'nae, may not live full productive lives and can possibly die.
"The cost of heart surgery is very costly and it does not come with color, face or creed. We don't know when it will affect our loved ones; so I am asking that you please make a donation to the heart foundation to help those who are in need at this time," said Rah'nae's mother. "The heart foundation has been so generous over the years by helping to assist parents with the funds for surgery, and at this time there are 11 children waiting for assistance to have surgery. We need everyone's help at this time, even if it's only one dollar. It counts and can go a long way. By doing this you are donating to a worthy cause - you are saving lives and mending broken hearts," she said.
Burrows thanked the people that have supported her to date in raising funds so that her daughter could receive heart surgery.
To join the fight against heart disease and help children like Rah'nae, the public is encouraged to make a donation to The Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamas) Heart Foundation. No amount is ever too small. Donations are encouraged year round. General donations, tributes, memorial donations and trusts are encouraged. Additionally, Americans can make tax deductible donations to aid the fight against heart disease. Sponsorship and hosting of fundraising events are also encouraged. The public is encouraged to support the two major fundraisers of The Heart Ball Committee - the Annual Heart Ball and The Annual Tea Party and Fashion Show. The public can also join the Bahamas Heart Association. The proceeds from the membership dues are used in the fight against heart disease.
While you may have missed the Heart Ball for 2012, you can still make a difference in a child's life today, said ball committee public relations officer, Ingrid Sears.
"It's more about the cause of helping to repair a heart than anything else. At present there are 11 plus children awaiting surgery. As the year progresses it is expected that more children will join this list, so the public's assistance is needed and encouraged in this fight against heart disease in children," she said.
To join the fight against heart disease in children and to help save a life, telephone 327-0806/10. You can also send a check to The Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamas) Heart Foundation, P.O. Box N-8189, Nassau, The Bahamas, or telephone 327-0806 for deposit instructions.
You can learn more about the Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamas) Heart Foundation by visiting www.sassoonheartfoundation.org.

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News Article

February 10, 2012
Celebrate life and love

It's hot!
It's chic!
It's elegant!
It's sophistication at its best, but it's still an evening filled with love, laughter, dancing and in general a good time. The 48th annual Heart Ball allows patrons to celebrate life and love while helping to preserve a heart and give a gift of life, in a fun, party atmosphere affair.
This year, patrons will get dressed in their "Sunday go to meeting best" and get down to the sounds of the Ed Brice Orchestra, the Soulful Groovers Band, the Royal Bahamas Defence Force Dance Band and to selections from Gary Johnson at the deejay booth. The ball will be held in the Independence Ballroom at the Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort on Saturday, February 18, under the theme "Repairing a broken heart: What a gift".
Tickets are $250 per person, and each person's attendance will help to repair the heart of a child and give a gift of life. Cocktails are served at 7:15 p.m., dinner is at 8:30 p.m.
"The Heart Ball Committee is working arduously to ensure that this ball is better than any before," said public relations officer Ingrid Sears. "Last year the Heart Foundation celebrated its 50th anniversary. At the start of the year 2012, we move forward with greater financial need and thus greater challenges, as we seek to help the Heart Foundation repair hearts. The Heart Ball Committee is working with a renewed determination to ensure that we maintain the legacy of the founder and also the foundation. Additionally, we wish to ensure that patrons are encouraged to attend future Heart Balls and continue to help to repair broken hearts".
The Heart Ball is one of two major fundraisers for the Heart Foundation. It is always held on the Saturday closest to Valentine's Day. Funds raised go towards assisting children to receive heart surgeries which aren't cheap, and which many parents cannot afford. One child's heart surgery can cost over $50,000.
Even though patrons attend the annual ball to have fun, they do so knowing that the cost of their ticket is helping to reduce the financial burden to parents who cannot afford the cost of the life-saving surgery for their children.
"At present there are 11 patients in need of heart surgeries," said Sears. "It is anticipated that more children will need heart care during the year, and many of their parents will not be able to afford it. The funds raised from this event, will help the Heart Foundation to repair the hearts of children."
One of the highlights of the ball is always the naming of the person that will be given The Lady Sassoon Golden Heart award, who will be selected from of pool of people nominated for their humanitarian and heart touching acts to improve the lives of others.
Additionally, fabulous prizes will be up for grabs on the evening via raffles, and auctioned items. Roundtrip tickets for on British Airways to London; roundtrip tickets for two on Air Canada; hotel accommodations in Canada; an emerald and diamond ring; spa treatments and dinners are among the most coveted prizes that will be given away on the night. There will also be paintings and prints from the likes of the late Chan Pratt, Clifford Fernander, Nettica Symonette, and many more artists.
But in the midst of all the glitz, glamour and fun, Sears says she wants patrons to remember and recognize the cause for the annual Heart Ball, which is to raise funds for the Heart Ball Committee, the fundraising arm of The Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamas) Heart Foundation. The foundation's main goal is to assist primarily children, with heart care. Additionally, the foundation in conjunction with the Bahamas Heart Association aims to proactively educate and inform people residing in The Bahamas about heart care and how to lead heart healthy lifestyles.
The Heart Foundation is a non-profit organization established in 1961 by Lady Evelyn Sassoon to assist people in need of heart care. The foundation runs primarily on a volunteer basis and relies heavily upon the generosity of others. Over 97 percent of the funds received go directly to heart care. The remaining three percent or less goes to unavoidable administrative costs.
The Heart Foundation gives support and understanding to parents and families for heart care, whether in hospitals in The Bahamas or in Florida. Since its inception, the Heart Foundation has helped over 4,000 patients to obtain heart care. Despite the Heart Foundation's best efforts and the increase in number of local cardiologist, technology and equipment, there is still a need to raise funds to assist children of The Bahamas receive heart care locally and at hospitals abroad.
For information on ticket purchases or donations please contact The Heart Foundation at telephone number 327-0806.

REPAIR A BROKEN HEART
What: 48th Annual Heart Ball
When: Saturday, February 18
Where: Independence Ballroom at the Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort
Time: Cocktails 7:15 p.m., dinner 8:30 p.m.
Tickets: $250 per person

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Event
BHS Summer Camp
BHS Summer Camp

Wednesday 3rd July 2013  9:00 AM

BHS Summer Camp The Bahamas Humane Society, Chippingham The BHS Summer Camp dates have been set! Camp runs weekly from June 24th to July 12th and then July 22nd to July 26th. The cost is $125.00 per week. It's open for children ages 6 to 13 and runs from 9 a.m. to noon each day. Children will learn about caring for animals and have the opportunity to interact with the BHS adoption animals. Bring a snack and drink, an old leash, an old towel, and some goodies for the animals. See also the attached information page. Register at the Shelter. Children learn the basics of animal care and humane treatment. They read educational books and watch educational DVD’s and do some fun worksheets. They interact with the Bahamas Humane Society adoption animals and have question and answer sessions with the Humane Society staff. Limited space so register early! Fees are payable in advance. Weekly $125 (Includes a t-shirt) *Children should bring a snack and drink* A dog leash and old towel would be helpful. The dogs appreciate the kids bringing them dog bones, and the donkeys, goats, chickens, ducks, rabbits and horses love treats of vegetables, fruits and bread. Register early as space is limited and fills up quickly! Founded in 1924, the Bahamas Humane Society is the oldest charity in the Bahamas and was originally called the Dumb Friends League. It is affiliated to numerous international organisations, including the World Society for the Protection of Animals (WSPA). It is the only humane organisation in the Caribbean to hold membership of the Standards of Excellence Program sponsored by the American Humane Association of which it has been a member since 1989. The BHS employs two full time veterinarians. It offers a 24 hour emergency ambulance service and provides care for sick, injured and abandoned animals.


News Article

March 07, 2012
Cultural Violence and the Rights of Women and Children

Back in 1996 I came
across a Reader's Digest magazine article on the Taliban and their
drastic and tragic dominance over the women of Afghanistan. As a woman
and new young mother, it was heart-wrenching to read how the sudden
oppressive actions of this group were dominating and changing the lives
of women in that country, women who previously had 'normal' lives. They
were forced to cover themselves completely with burqas and were stripped
of their freedoms, careers, but mostly their dignity.  I was so
horror-struck by this article, that I tore out the pages, photocopied it
50 times and snail mailed it to most of my family and friends. I simply
wanted people to know what was going on.

We rally for the rights of animals, we rally for the rights of those of
different colours of skin or race, but do we rally for the basic rights
of human beings? How long do women and children have to be treated like
dogs, or worse, 'rabid dogs'...

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