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News Article

May 24, 2012
Dorene Ester-Mae Rolle, 51

Funeral Service for the Late Dorene Ester-Mae Rolle, 51 years of Claridge Dale Gardens, will be held on Saturday May 26th, 1:30 p.m. at New Bethlehem Baptist Church, Independence Drive. Rev'd. Dr. Everett Brown, Rev'd. Helen McPhee and Rev'd. Dr. Marina P. Sands will officiate. Interment will follow in Woodlawn Memorial Gardens, Soldier Road.
She is survived by her Mother: Minister Irene King; Tw0 Daughters: Shantell Steed, Benkisha Rolle; Two Sons: Emmanuel Rolle, Edward Braithwaite; One Brother: Dr. Rudolph King; Two Aunts: Gracie King, Gwendolyn King; Cousins: Naomi Roberts, Granville, Perry, Terry And Rochelle King, Whitney, Terrance, Orson, And Brian Mortimer, Min. Dorian Cox, Dr. Lina Mortimer-Rayes; Kenneth King ,Apell King, Adrian King, Keysha King-Doziere Of Miami Florida, Otive Brice-King, Shervin King, James And Hiram Dawkins, Deloris Fernander, Hartman Dawkins, Rev'd. Christopher King, Joseph King, Harry King, Ezra King, Huey King, Samuel Hunter, Cordell King-Hunter, Redell King-Hubbard, Idel  King- Burrows, Christine King- Seymour, Elouise King, Maxine King, Minister Charlotte Brown, Michelle Sands, Sheila Sands , Rev'd. Michael, Charles and Sidney Sands, Derek Mackey, Jestina Rolle, David Rolle, Rev'd. Helen McPhee, Kim Hanna, Jackie Smith-McPhee, Shannon McPhee, Shantice McPhee, Ronnie Pratt, Sherry Pratt, Deidre Pratt, Rev'd. Garnet King, Ruth King-Outten, Dora King-Bethel, Paul King, Firstina King-Hepburn, Thelma Rolle, Derek Bowleg, Coral Bonamy, Leslie Bowleg, and Rev'd. Etienne Bowleg, Stephanie Bowleg-McKenzie, Vanria King-Davis, Paulette King-Nairn, Dorothy King-Miller, Ernestine King, Sandra King-Storr, Arthur King Jr. Bradley King , Nora King-Newbold, Etherly King-Gibson, Pearl King-Adderley, Alberta King- Hall, Cynthia King-Stubbs, John King, Rose King, Alverne King, Carol King- Ingraham, Celeste King, Rev'd Percy King, Alton McKenzie, Stephan McKenzie, Emily King-Osadebay , Jackie King-Micklewhite, Delores King-Saunders, Ingrid King, Eleanor King- Conliffe, Clement King, Lowell King, Kerlin King, Octavia King-Johnson, Gladys  King-Sands, David Seymour, Hartman Moncur And Family, Alice, Moncur; And a Host Of Other Relatives & Friends Including: Charles  Braithwaite Jr., Charles Braithwaite Jr., Laniccina Adderley, Christopher Adderley, Edwin Rolle, Percina Rolle, Beverley Rolle, Sharon Rolle, Esthermae Rolle, Princess Smith,  And  Vandmae Rolle-Albury, The King Foundation  Family, Salute To Greatness Awards Family, The King, Seymour Moncur Family, Bahamas Inflight Catering Staff, Ministry Of Education Faculty, Ministry Of Sports Faculty, Staff, Deep Creek Bar & Lounge (Fish Fry), Tims Air- Conditioning Staff, Yellow Strawberry Beauty Salon & Spa Staff, Ferg's Beauty Parlor (Bettyanne); and Many More Family And Friend's  Too Numerous To Me Mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday at the church from 12:00 noon until service time.

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News Article

April 30, 2012
Architects to kick off Islands of the World Fashion Showcase with wearable art

NASSAU, Bahamas - Fashion designers won't be the only ones in the
spotlight at the much anticipated

Islands of the World Fashion Showcase
(IWFS) on

May 11th and 12th.

Four artisans from very different design fields have accepted the
challenge of taking materials they would traditionally use to build and
accessorize homes, offices and other buildings and make them fit on a
new kind of canvas - the human body.

Val Pintard, Apryl Burrows and the team of Reuno Pratt and Elizabeth
Clarke are the first official class of the newly created category of
IWFS, the

Jackson

L. Burnside Fashion and Design Presentation. The
division highlights one...

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News Article

May 21, 2012
Telcine Turner Rolle: Poet, playwright and teacher

"Don't let anyone persuade you against something you believe in your writing." - Telcine Turner Rolle

This past week saw the loss of a great Bahamian cultural icon as poet, playwright and teacher Telcine Turner Rolle succumbed to illness. She was 67.
Of Cat Island heritage, Telcine Turner was born December 3, 1944 on Milton Street and grew up in the "Babylon" vicinity of the Market Street area.
Telcine's contribution to The Bahamas is immeasurable.
Following a life-changing period of studies in English and education at the University of the West Indies, Mona campus, in the 1970s, she taught in several Bahamian high schools before taking up a post in English language and literature at the Bahamas Teachers Training College.
She married James O. Rolle in 1974 and in 1975 birthed her only child, Arien Rolle. Being an artist and cultural pioneer in his own right, James Rolle was Telcine's soul mate and best friend. They could often be seen taking in the latest cultural offerings, always in good spirits.
In 1976, she joined the staff of The College of The Bahamas in its infancy in the division of humanities, which she would eventually chair. Admired as much as she was feared, Telcine was instrumental in molding the sensibilities of many talented Bahamian writers today as an educator. Many would be surprised to hear which now-established and great Bahamian writers she had once given mediocre or even failing grades to. Yet this only served to push their talent to the limits - for Telcine, there was always room for improvement, an opportunity to set the bar one notch higher.
Telcine defined an era in Bahamian literature, publishing a book of poems for children, "Song of the Surreys" (illustrated by her husband); and editing two collections of work from students in her creative writing classes, "Once Below a Time" and "Climbing Clouds". Since 2009, she had been working on a third collection of student work, "Jah Knows! and Other One-Act plays by College of The Bahamas Students", which is still forthcoming.
Her most well known-work, "Woman Take Two" is a vital component of the foundation of Bahamian literature. The play marked a discernable focus in early post-colonial years on all things Bahamian with its three-dimensional Bahamian characters negotiating their identities. It is still used in the English Literature BGCSE today.
Telcine was also vey active in theater in The Bahamas, becoming part of the Bahama Drama Circle in the 1970s and helping to stage several summer productions at the theater auditorium of the Bahamas Teachers Training College, as well as receiving dramatic awards from The Bahamas Arts Festival.
After winning the Playwriting Prize in the University of West Indies 25th Anniversary Literary Competition in 1975 for "Woman Take Two", it took years until the play would hit the stage under the directorial eye of David Burrows in 1995 - partly because Telcine brought the same uncompromising standards to her creative work as she did in the classroom.
In fact, Telcine took these standards to every person she came across in her life - she was known to offer her constructive criticisms where she felt they were necessary, and those who knew her knew they'd be better off if they took it with thanks.
Though this quality often evoked backlash in those who were unfamiliar with her perfectionist ways, Telcine's standards were born out of love and a desire to see her beloved country improve and grow.
In everything she did, Telcine exuded the same excellence she demanded from others as she molded every person she touched into better Bahamian citizens. We owe it to her to set our standards higher and to meet them.

This Land I Celebrate
Telcine Turner Rolle

This land I celebrate not for its zeal
Of democratic rights, its affluent
New halls of residence, its confident
And forced-ripe millionaires, but for the feel
That people power can make paradise real.
We are not free when we turn reticent
because of fear, think man omnipotent
Instead of God and for the dollar kneel.
I see our people common as the sand
And just as precious - holding back the flood
When tide is high; encircling the land;
Together valorous, together good.
Although the fingers differ on a hand
Each helps the hand to function as it should.

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News Article

September 01, 2011
Marjorie Lucille O'Brien McKinney, 89

Memorial Service for the Late Marjorie Lucille O'Brien McKinney, 89 years of Eastwood Estates and formerly of San Salvador, will be held on Friday September 2nd, 7:00 p.m. at Epiphany Anglican Church, Prince Charles Drive.

Funeral Service for the Late Marjorie Lucille O'Brien McKinney, 89 years of Eastwood Estates and formerly of San Salvador, will be held on Sunday September 4th, 2:30 p.m. at Christ the King Anglican Church, Ridgeland Park, West. Fr. Rodney Burrows will officiate. Interment will follow in Woodlawn Memorial Gardens, Soldier Road.

She is survived by her Children: Winifred Thompson (Michael), Andrew McKinney, Janet Davis (Derek), Anthony McKinney (Keva). Adopted Children, Barry McKinney, Floyd Pennington, Castell Rolle; Son-in-law: Fr. Rodney A. Burrows; Step-Daughter-in-law: Eulease Johnson; Grandchildren: Gregory ( Estella) Thompson, Michelle ( Clarence) McCow, Tanya ( Mark) Bell, Angela Thompson, Nicoyas ( Skilenthius) Hilbert, Valarie ( Leonard) Wallace, Samantha( Lenneth) Bannister, Jamal ( Angela) Davis, Alexis(Cameron) Wells, Krishelle McKinney, Primrose, Charles Jr., Sanchez & Krisjan Johnson; Great Grandchildren: Donovan  (Lindsley) Thompson, Shakara & Ajariah Thompson, Jamil Bell, Davanna & D'Angelo Collie, Jamal Davis II, Hillary & Tyler Wallace, Schamal Forbes, Lennique Bannister, Caden Wells; Great- Great Grandchildren: Ashire & Angelisa Thompson, Kiah Thompson; Brother-in-Law: Charles & Juanita McKinney; Nieces: Margaret (Levi) Laramore , Marina (John) Young , Sybilene (Ronald) Taylor, Georgina(Walter) Curtis, Mildred Young, Yvonne Bethel, Janet (Fr. Leopold) Cox, Carol (ER) Hanna, Fearlese Knowles, Sherry Gibson, Patrona Kemp, Judith Williams, Stephanie Rolle, Essie Ferguson, Lillian Rahming, and Families; Nephews: John White, George Young, Ronald(Ernestine) Young, Basil, Hugh, Kenneth, Neil, & Edmond O'Brien, Harry McKinney, Patty McKinney, Rudolph, Willard & Roosevelt (Quella) Williams, Andy & Walter Gibson, and families; Cousins: Rev. Ivan Butler Sr., Amy Gay, Harrison Butler, Lavina (Joel) Rolle, Rev. Mavis Major, Pamiricka(Charles ) Rodgers, Carrimae Hunt, Hendrick & Dilith Nairn, Alvera Storr, Winifred Campbell,  Maxine Burrows and Families; Priests: Archdeacon I Ranfurly & Mrs. Olga Brown, Canon Delano & Mrs. Archer, Canon Samuel & Mrs. Anne. Sturrup. Cannon Curtis & Mrs. Myrtle Robinson, Fr. Rodney & Mrs. Barbara Burrows, Fr. Atma & Mrs. Luciana Badhu, Fr. Bradley & Vernalee Miller, & Christ The King & Epiphany Anglican Church Family.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44 Nassau Street on Friday from 1:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., and on Sunday from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. *There will be no viewing at the Church.
 

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News Article

May 10, 2012
Linda Glendina Burrows-Newbold, 43

Funeral service for Linda Glendina Burrows-Newbold, 43 yrs., a resident of Joan's Height, South Beach & formerly of Fritz Lane, who died on 3rd May, 2012, will be held at Metropolitan Baptist Church, Hay Street West, on Saturday at 11:00 a.m. Officiating will be Rev. Dr. George Kelly, assisted by Rev. Gregory Major & Rev. Shirley Evans. Interment follows in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.
Her fond memories will forever be in the hearts of her:
Husband: Kermit Newbold
Daughters: Glendina and Kimberly Newbold
6 Sisters: Alice Chipman-Dames, Louise Smith, Naomi Chipman, Ruth Chipman-Brown, Maria Woods and Ismae Cadiz
3 Brothers: ASP Kingsley Burrows Sr., of the Royal Bahamas Police Force, Rudolph "Billy" Burrows and Donald Burrows
Mother-In-Law: Raphelitta Bowles
Sisters-In-Law: Sandra Bowles, Coreane Bowles-Newbold, Michelle Burrows, Alanna Burrows, Patricia Bowles-Darville, Dorothy Bowles, Yvette Dorsetta and Geneva Newbold
Brothers-In-Law: Henry Dames Sr., Wayne Darville, Reubin Cadiz Sr., and Raymond Newbold
Aunt: Florence Thompson
Grand Uncle: Abraham Rolle
Uncles-In-Law: Loxlly and Charles Thompson
Nieces: Sophia Dames, Kendera Delaney, Zanadete Cadiz, Shiann Burrows, Lakeisha Burrows, Megan Darville, Jessica-Nicole Darville, Lashanta Knowles, Alexis Hepburn, Sharine Weir, Chante Burrows, Veronica Bonimy, Kia Bonimy, Ormanique Nottage, Randira Lewis, Alexandra Newbold, Angie Dames, Chantel Dames, Shafena Brown and Terisa Burrows, Nasha Newbold
Nephews: Ryan Dames Sr., Henry Dames Jr., Cpl. 2489 Montgomery Brown Jr., Angelo Dean, D/C 2768 Donald Adderley, PC 2991 Concencion Burrows Sr., Shaquille Newbold, Randy Lewis, Mario Thompson, Kingsley Burrows Jr., Dion Burrows Carlton "CJ" Rolle, Montgomery Wayne Daeville, Anthony, Osborn Newbold and Joey Newbold 
Grand Nieces: Annalisa King, Jayla Knowles, Breanna Nottage, Regime Dames, Devona Dean, Ryanne and Raven Dames, Talleanna Brown, Keann Dean, Chrissy, Nelly and Alliah Dean, Jameisha and Henrietta Feaster, Johntashia and Tasharra Dames, Judeah Rolle, Chasity Adderley, Deidre Thompson, Kiara Newbold
Grand Nephews: Kerlin "Ching" King II, Anthony Dames, Kevin Butler Jr., Onnasis Johnson, Haillee Williams, Jamaal and Miquel Feaster, Leonardo and Samuel Brown, Ryan Dames Jr., John Dames Jr., Concencion Burrows Jr.,
Great Grand Niece: Keiara King
Great Grand Nephew: Kerlin King III
Cousins: Vincent King & Family, Dareth Russell & Family, Deleno Williams, Maurice Conliffe & Family, Kerlin "Cobra" King Sr., & Family, Emmanuel & Emily Osadebay & Family, Clement King & Family, Denise Deveaux-Bain, Sherman Rolle, Leonardo Rolle, Anthony Dawkins, Harrison Deveaux, Freeland Deveaux, Ingrid King & Family, Eleanor King & Family, Jackie Micklewhite & Family, Courtney, Keith, Don, Kennedy Thompson, Gladys Dawkins & Family, Fanny, James, Leroy & Henry Rolle, Anthoney Miller, Jeaery Thompson, Marilyn Thompson, Donnamae, Perline and Emily Rolle, Kathleen Green, Tetrese Hendfield, Loretta, Stenqet Hendfield, Louise Peterson of Belle Glade Florida, Devon, Deangelo, Rashad, Dendre, Natasha Deveaux, Margo, Sharon, Bernard, Nicole, Lakeisha, Charmine, Randy, Nicole, Emmanuel and Anastasia Deveaux, 
Other Family & Friends Include: Allando "Lance" Johnson, Rolling Lamor & Family, Rev. Julian Johnson & Family, Ava Johnson and Family, Derick Coby & Family, Shervin and Family, Jason "T. Jackson" Mckenzie, Ms. Dean & Family, Mrs. Albury & Family, Mildred Pratt & Family, Ruby Rolle & Family, Papa Ket and Family, Jackie and Family, Geneva Dorsetta & Family, Phillip & Baren Coby, Linda Brown & Family, Munroes & Family, George Basetin & Family, Agatha Pratt & Family, Indy and Family, Reynaldo Baillou, Mario Anderson, Ms. Faye, Alma Molly, Louise, Shonel Rodgers, Hepburn, Deon Nabbie, Smalls, Shelton Curtis, Dwight Rolle & Family, Dwayne Fisher, Rose Forbes & Family, Andrew "Ricky" Davis, Sis. Ann Taylor & Family, Rev. Gregory Major & Family, Cynthia Bastian & Family, Dexter Sands & Family, Sybil Butler & Family, Loretta & Henry Cartwright & Family, ASP Andrews & Family, Sgt. 973 Theodore Forbes & Family, Sgt. 185 Moss & Family, Sgt. 65 Demeritte & Family, Sgt. 843 Dean & Family, Sgt. 2101 Seifert, Hemrick Rolle & Family, Hetty Goodman & Family, Rosalie Neymour & Family, Troy Marshall, Garvin Butler, Demetruis Mckenzie & Family, Marcia Henricks, Rocky & Diane Fernander, Sanchez Brooks & Family, Dennis Albury & Family, Dennis Saunders, Wissy, Joanne Brown & Family, Paul Gray & Family, Serethea Clark & Family, Edric Clark & Family, Montgomery Brown Sr. & Family, Stevie Johnson & Family, Jeffrey & Sharon Rahming, Kenny Saunders & Family, Lawrence, Gomez, Shandia Ramsey & Family, Mark Bastian & Family, Stafford Turnquest & Family, Kenneth Hutchinson & Family, Tony Symonette & Family, Opral, Ms. Marina, Lloyd "Smokey" Smith, Dorsett Smith, Patches, Tura Cooper, Metropolitan Baptist Church Family, Pastor Robert McKinney and Worldwide Church of God Family, Dr. Lloyd, Dr. Bowleg, Doctors & Nurses of the P.M.H. Female Medical 1 and the P.M.H. Dialysis Center, South Beach Family, The Fritz Lane Family and The Golden Fire Crew-Valley Boys.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

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News Article

January 28, 2013
The protest vote

Dear Editor,
I have not conducted a scientific study but I can tell you, our dear prime minister and the rest of our country, that just by listening to the beat of the people's conversations in public, in private, on Facebook, Twitter, etc., those who will vote no will not be doing so because they are necessarily opposed to gambling or the legalization of it.
But, like me, they will vote no in protest, because they are grossly insulted by the fact that Bahamians are being taken for idiots with no ability to think for themselves or to see that the entire referendum on "numbers racketeering" has been presented to achieve one goal: To fulfill a political promise to the illegal numbers house boss(es), who provided funding for the political campaigns of the governing party in the general election of 2012.
All of us voting no are disgusted that our government would ride us like donkeys to satisfy its political agenda(s). We are annoyed that we have to be bothered with this when there are so many other issues of greater importance to be addressed. A real government would have taken a firmer stance and more decisive action if it meant to effect real change. And, ultimately, we are mostly annoyed by the process - or the lack thereof - that has taken (is taking) place to bring us to the point where we are at.
I anticipate that those voting no will also include the many persons who voted PLP instead of FNM/ DNA/independent, who, for a moment, saw or wanted to see a glimmer of hope in the likes of Bozo and his clowns, but were instead fooled by the rhetoric and empty promises they are so famous for crafting and distributing. And with government institutions already hemorrhaging money, owing to the "powerful" people stealing it, is a national lottery really a viable or sensible option? Who is trustworthy enough to administer it?
In a conversation about the future of our country, 20 years ago, one of my professors at COB expressed that The Bahamas has never really had to fight for its overall independence or its daily, basic freedoms as other countries have done for theirs, and until the time comes when there is a real revolution, Bahamians will not understand the responsibilities of true freedom nor benefit from its entitlements.
- Nicole Burrows

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News Article

May 17, 2012
Flora Brunell Demeritte Pratt, 92

Funeral service for Flora Brunell Demeritte Pratt, 92 yrs., a resident of West Street & formerly of Governor's Harbour, Eleuthera, who died on 8th May, 2012, will be held at St. Francis Xavier Cathedral, West Street, on Saturday at 10:00 a.m. Officiating will be Father Glen C. Nixon. Interment follows in Catholic Cemetery, Tyler Street.

Flora's survivors include one sister-in-law, Helen McQuay-Demeritte; her nieces Sybil Butler, Yvonne Maura, Blanche Moss-Allen, Hazel, Sandra and Angela Demeritte, Althea Cleare, Dolores Styles, Barbara (Barrie) Shepherd (Freeport, G.B.I.), Janet Dorsett, Rosemond Kemp, Vanvalor Parsard (Brooklyn, New York), Barbara Demeritte, Augusta Taylor, Joan and DeAnn Demeritte, Agnes Walkine and Relinda Arnett; nephews, Gladstone, Kirkwood, Franklyn, Alfred, Kenneth and Sgt. 65 Roland Demeritte of the Royal Bahamas Police Force, Donald and Elwood Shepherd (Freeport, G.B.I.), Wilton Keenan (Brooklyn, New York), Hesley Keenan (California), Edwin, Leo, Christopher and Albert Demeritte. Numerous grandnieces and grandnephews including Alsada Butler, Alana Burrows, Cora Butler, Loretta Cartwright, Anastasia and Cecile Maura, Jovita Chea, Earla Moss, Camille Armbrister, Albertha Lightbourne, Vanessa Spence, Marva Moss, Portia Glinton, Natasha Demeritte, Anita and Akara Cleare, Kendia Demeritte, Symone Clarke (Atlanta, Georgia), Racquel Chea, Simona Fawkes, Monique Shepherd, Nicole Pierre, Antoinette Dorsett, Leonette Kemp (Tennessee), Racquel Smith, Anissa Shepherd (Freeport, G.B.I.), Desiree Shepherd (Florida), Marcia Fernander-Bannister, Leisa Fernander-Moxey, Sonja Fernander-Brown, Rolanda Taylor, Jadon and Jolean Demeritte, Charles and Andrew Butler; Hubert, R. Matt and Marichael Maura, Mark and Desmond Armbrister, Marvin, Delano, Gladstone, Jr., Devon, Jamaal, Aaron and Ian Demeritte, Chesney, Julian, Whitney and Craig (Houston, Texas) Fernander, Devane Evans, Adrian Styles, Virgil, Demetrius (Texas), Desilini, Therron, Anthony and Jermaine Shepherd, Ronaldo Taylor, Darwin, Darron and RajauKai Demeritte. Other family and friends including Dr. & Mrs. Kendal Capron and the Good Samaritan Senior Citizen's Home, Yellow Elder Gardens, Gloria Miller, Una Miller, Derecka Higgs and Family, The Salvation Army, Grants Town Corp., Mary Sweetnam, Vera Perpall, Henrietta Major, Nurse Eloise Nichols and Family, the entire Demeritte Family, the communities of West Street, Scott Street, South Street and McQuay Street.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.

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News Article

September 13, 2011
Jury selected in murder trial after 40 challenges

A jury was finally selected yesterday in the trial of three men accused of the murder of Jason Smith and the attempted murder of his wife, Tamara.
Defense attorneys for Edney Burrows, of Deveaux Street; Daryl Rolle, of Palm Avenue; and Andre Dieujuste, of Windsor Lane, exhausted the jury pool after making 40 peremptory challenges.
Court bailiffs had to randomly select people off the streets to make up the pool.
Prosecutors allege that the offenses were committed at Cordeaux Avenue on September 13, 2008.
Jillian Williams is the prosecutor.  Elliot Lockhart and Terrel Butler represent the defendants.
Senior Justice Jon Isaacs is presiding.
Burrows is the only defendant who is on bail.
Meanwhile, the murder trial of Prince Edward Charlton opened before Supreme Court Justice Bernard Turner.
Charlton is accused of murdering 39-year-old James Carney at Inagua on November 10, 2010.
Carney's body was found in a ditch.
Charlton is on remand at Her Majesty's Prison.
Eucal Bonaby and Vanda Mackey-Williams are the prosecutors.

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News Article

May 17, 2012
Bernard Patrick Burrows, 45

Bernard Patrick Burrows
1963-2008

Don't grieve for me now I'm free, I am following the path God laid for me,I took his hand when I heard him call, I turned my back and left it all,
I could not stay another day to laugh, to love , to work or play.
Tasks left undone must stay that way.
 
If my parting has left a void, fill it with remembered joy,
A friendship shared, a laugh, my life's been full I savoured much,
Good friends, good times a loved one's touch,
Perhaps my times here seemed all too brief, don't lengthen it now with undue grief,
Light up your hearts and share with me, God wants me now, he set me free

On September 8th a lovely baby boy was born to the late Sybil and Leorard Burrows .  He was given the name Bernard Patrick Burrows. He began his formal education at Sandiland Primary School and later went on to L.W.Young Junior & Senior high School.

After leaving high School he picked up the trade as a Carpenter at Treco  Construction Company. Later he went to work as a mate on a boat for Ted Knowles, where he developed his love for the sea.  At that time he knew that was his calling, so he went back to Scholl to obtain his Captain's license. He worked as a mate for many years before becoming a boat Captain. After a number of years Bernard purchased his own boat were he became a successful fishing boat Charter operator until his untimely demise.

Left to cherished his memories are his loving and devoted wife Arnetter Burrows and two daughters Aderia and Antiniqua Burrows. Two sisters-in-law Derry Ferguson and Dellarese Mcphee, two brothers-in-law Cavalle Ferguson and Junior Mcphee., and a host of other relative and friends too numerous to mention.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Words are not enough to express our sincere thanks and appreciation for the love and support that you all have given us over they past three and half years. For whatever you did to console us during this time of our bereavement when we so desperately needed your understanding, we THANK YOU.  Our sorrow and grief are easier to bear with help from God and compassionate family and friends like you.

MAY GOD'S RICHEST BLESSING BE UPON YOU ALL.
THE FAMILY

MEMORIAL SERVICE

Memorial Service for the late Bernard Burrows age 45 years of Eastwood Estate will be held on Saturday May 19 2012 at St. Anselm Catholic Church, Bernard Road at 4:00 p.m. Officiating will be Monsignor Preston Moss. Interment will follow in the church cemetery.

Left to cherished his memories are his loving and devoted wife Arnetter Burrows and two daughters Aderia and Antiniqua Burrows. Two sisters-in-law Derry Ferguson and Dellarese Mcphee, two brothers-in-law Cavalle Ferguson and Junior Mcphee., and a host of other relative and friends too numerous to mention.

The book of condolences may be signed at the church on Saturday from 3:00p.m. until service time.

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News Article

May 15, 2012
Living one day at a time

Rashan Williams had big dreams. She wanted to teach. She dreamt about getting married, and starting a family. She also wanted to make a difference in her community. But the one thing she never dreamed of was a life riddled with pain.
Seven years ago, at age 16, Williams was diagnosed with lupus, a chronic autoimmune disease in which the body's antibodies cannot differentiate between good cells and foreign threats and therefore attack healthy cells within the body.
The most affected parts of the body include the brain, kidneys, joints and skin. But the most defining mark in Lupus is usually the butterfly rash that spreads across the patient's nose.
It started out with unexplained joint pain. The teenager simply assumed she was worn out from schoolwork and just needed to rest.
"I was in grade 10 when the pain began. It was near the end of the school year and since I was a very studious and active student I felt maybe I was pushing myself too much and my body was just telling me that I needed to rest," said a now 24-year-old Williams. "Summer came and I felt better. No pain or problems at all. It was only when school started again that the pain returned. But instead of going away as I went about my day, it got worse over time. At first I was just waking up with an ache in my joints but as the months went by it started to stay with me throughout the day and then even through the night."
The intensity of it made her realize that it was something more than just fatigue. And the pain spread to her shoulders, neck, fingers and feet. It was so painful at times she could barely button her blouses -- and fixing her hair was nearly impossible. As the year ended and the pain got worse despite constantly popping pain killers, her family began to get worried that something was really wrong with her.
Her initial visits to clinics and physicians saw little results. At one point she was told she had rheumatoid arthritis or even growing pains. And although she hoped what was happening to her was as simple as that, Williams knew that the amount of pain she was in could indicate that it was something more.
"I didn't know what to do for a long time. The pain was so intense and pain killers only made it worse. They would help the pain to subside but when they wore off, the pain came back 10-fold. It was excruciating."
She and her mom, Elaine Burrows, sought medical assistance in the United States. During the visit her blood pressure soared, and she was admitted into hospital where she underwent a series of blood tests. In February 2004 she was officially diagnosed with Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

Treatment
Williams initially was given steroids to treat her lupus. Once stable she was sent home. A few weeks after her return, her ankles started to swell and she started gaining weight. Medical officials told her that her kidneys had begun to fail. She was given a chemotherapy drug to reverse the kidney failure, but that failed. She began dialysis treatment. But rather than deal with the double dose of facing the daily struggles with lupus and kidney failure, Williams opted out of traditional dialysis treatment (Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis), which would mean she would have to be hooked up to a machine for three hours, four times a week. Instead she chose Peritoneal dialysis, a treatment she can perform herself three to four times a day with little hassle.
"I like that the dialysis treatment I use isn't disruptive to my life as much as the regular dialysis treatment would be. It's 100 percent better to me and it was easy to deal with when I was working. I just attach my bag of Peritoneal fluid to my stomach and the fluid goes in. After about 15 minutes the fluid comes back out with toxins and other bad chemicals from my body that diffused into the liquid. I do this four times a day. Once in the morning, another time at work when I was working and twice in the evening. I can do this without missing a beat in my life. So although the pain of lupus and my kidney failure are a permanent part of my life they don't have to slow me down."
Williams said the two conditions can be challenging but she tries to not to let it get the best of her. And she is now looking to pursue studies in primary education. And she has a more positive outlook on life in comparison to when she had to adjust to her disease and was depressed all the time.
"The hardest part about having lupus for me was that at the very beginning, it was a very stressful thing to deal with... My mother had three other younger children to deal with, so she had to manage time between me and my healthcare and my smaller siblings. But everything went well because I had support on every front - family, friends and church. Even at school everyone even pitched in, but even though everyone was so good, I couldn't help but be angry when I wasn't able to do things."
Inspiration
Surprisingly for the teenaged Williams, her inspiration to fight and not let lupus get the best of her, came from someone younger (a 13-year-old who also suffered with lupus) and not someone who was older and wiser.
The girl died within six months of her diagnosis. It terrified the then 18-year-old Williams to watch the teenager deteriorate to the point where she could not even speak or move.
"I watched her die and I thought to myself that it could've just as easily have been me. I knew from then that my life had a purpose and I wanted to be an inspiration," she said. "Me having lupus wasn't about me I realized. I knew from then on I had to keep on doing the best I could and inspire others. I can't give up and neither should anyone else."
Even though she's a seven-year-survivor, Williams knows she's not out of the woods, but she is glad that everything is going well and she is feeling better daily. She is not plagued with pain as much anymore. She sometimes can even forget she has lupus until she overworks herself. (When she does that her body gets extremely tired and she can suffer a flare up like joint pain, joint swelling and fatigue).

Who it affects
The illness occurs more commonly in females than in males with a ratio of 11 females to one male, according to Dr. Patrick Whitfield who works out of the Oxford Medical Center. He said the disease affects women in their childbearing years normally in their 20s and 30s. In the United States, statistics show 52 cases per 100,000 are diagnosed with lupus. With this in mind the physician says if the Bahamian population follows a similar trend it is likely that with a population of about 400,000 that over 200 people are diagnosed with the illness.
Like many chronic diseases, lupus sometimes takes a while to be recognized and properly treated according to Dr. Whitfield. He said this is because the symptoms can be mistaken for other illnesses and as a result sometimes people underestimate their problem. He said the constitutional symptoms of lupus include fatigue, fever, joint pain, weight changes, muscular and skeletal pain (joints of the hands, wrists), skin changes, photo sensitivity and hair loss.
"Even though you may have these symptoms, they may very well not be lupus, which is why to be sure you have to get a doctor's diagnosis," he said.

Survival rate
Dr. Whitfield said that although Lupus can seem depressing and is very painful, the mortality rate for this disease is relatively low. There is an 80 percent chance that patients will make it to at least 15 years after diagnosis. Also with regular care and treatment, mortality is also greatly reduced. However, there is a 50 percent chance that people with lupus will suffer from kidney disease, which is difficult and if it leads to kidney failure it can decrease their life expectancy. He also said that reports show that about a third of all lupus patients in the U.S. died below the age of 45, but even so chances were still good for people with the disease to live a relatively normal life if they are on the right medication and are vigilant about their health.
If lupus is left unmanaged people run the risk of developing symptoms that affect the kidneys and lead to failure with each new relapse, said the medical practitioner. Neuro-psychiatric features like seizures, psychosis with hallucination, delirium and meningitis can also occur. Sometimes antibodies can attack the spine so patients can develop a weakness in their lower body making it difficult to walk. Strokes can also happen as well as a cognitive disorder similar to Alzheimer's. Untreated patients or those who are lax in their follow-ups, even with a relapse can eventually get lung and heart diseases like pleurisy or pericarditis respectively which are illness where the linings of the organs are inflamed.
Dr. Whitfield said early treatment can decrease the damage that the disease can cause and allow a person diagnosed with lupus to live a normal life. He said it's a disease that should be taken seriously.

Lupus Awareness Month
On Sunday, May 20, the local lupus support group will also host a Purple Hat Tea Party Affair at St. Matthew's Anglican Parish Hall to raise funds for research.
Lupus Bahamas 242 was officially launched last month with the goal of increasing information and providing for people living with lupus in The Bahamas.
Despite it all, when it comes to dealing with lupus and other chronic illnesses, Williams' advice to young people is not to give up.
"You may be dealing with something that is unfamiliar to you. It's hard no matter how you look at it, but with the right management, proper healthcare, positive attitude and the will to live, you can lead a normal life whether you have lupus or any other chronic disease. And family and friends need to support, encourage and know that any small gesture or words mean a lot. Don't withhold them. They can help the person to see that they can lead a long life and be positive in their outlook. Stay strong. It's not a life sentence. You can make it. You don't have to lay there and die. Encourage yourself and take it one day at a time. With God's help life can still be beautiful."

o For more information on the group and for information on upcoming events, visit the Lupus Bahamas 242 page on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Lupus-Bahamas-242-Information-Support/161404860604123 or email lupus-bahamas@hotmail.com.

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News Article

July 23, 2012
GBABA is winding down as it prepares for the Big Clash - GBABA vs. NPABL

Freeport, Grand Bahama July 27th through 29th, 2012

The Clash of Two Era's:

Grand Bahama will be led by:

Raymond Grant / Desmond Russell / Aneko Knowles & NBC MVP Leon Cooper Jr.

New Providence will be led by:

Greg Burrows Jr. / Geron Sands / Lionel Ferguson Jr / Richard Bain & Dale Davis

Full League/Team Rosters will be released Next Week...

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News Article

December 16, 2010
Arianna falls short in 100 free semifinals

By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

After a Bahamas record-breaking performance in the heats of the 100m freestyle, Arianna Vanderpool-Wallace fell short of duplicating the time in the semifinal that could have secured her berth in the final.

The Auburn University junior led a three-member delegation at the 10th FINA World Swimming Short Course Championships in Dubai yesterday.

The other two Bahamians are Auburn University graduate Alana Dillette and University of Kentucky graduate Elvis Burrows, who both saw action in the morning session.

In Thursday's morning session, Vanderpool-Wallace swam a personal best and Bahamas record in the 100 free in 52.85 s ...

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News Article

May 10, 2012
Linda Louise Veronica Willis, 51

Funeral Service for the Late Linda Louise Veronica Willis, 51 years of #20 Warren Street, Oakes Field, will be held on Friday May 11th, 2:00 p.m. at St. Joseph's Church, Boyd Road. Msgr. Alfred Culmer will officiate. Interment will follow in St. Joseph's cemetery, Tyler Street.
She is survived by her mother: Irene Louise Willis; sisters: Miriam T. Willis and Patricia Willis-Coleby; brothers: Leslie, Anthony and Christopher Willis; aunts: Dyllis Ingraham, Mildred McKinney, Verdell Esther and Annis McPhee Sylvia Willis, Patsy Frater, Toni Thomas of Jamaica; grand aunts: Mary Sweetnum and Kathleen Demeritte,  uncles: Troy McPhee, Lawrence, Ernest, Gettis and Newton Willis; grand uncle: Robert McPhee; Brother-in-law: Carlton Coleby; and a host of other relatives and friends including: Brenda nad Bert McKinney and family, Margaret and Lawrence Thurston, Sheralyn and James McCartney and family, Annette and Michael Allen and family, Stephen, and Shervin Seymour and their families, Valarie and Roger Carpenter and family, Margaret Russell and family, Deborah Bassett and family, Stephanie Mackey and family, Gregory Ingraham, Julian Ingraham and family, Donald Grey and family, Diana Sands and family, Santina Smith and family, Carlton Grey and family, Sheilamae Adderley and family, Carolee Grey and family, Almarie Reid and family, Robert Arthur and family, Danette Arthur, Belfield Arthur, Veldira Arthur-Diop and family, Pam Adderley and family, Cheryl Collie and family, Garfield McPhee and family, Bertha, Garnell McPhee and family, Brantis Adderley and family, The children of the late Priscilla Carey and their respective families, The Demerittes; James, Donna, Michael, Karlas, Kayla, Virginia and Edward and their respective families, Luther McDonald and family, Donna Smith and family, The children or Verdell,Esther and Annis McPhee and their respective families, Alfred Sears and family, Mrs. Olive McKenzie and family, Mrs. Meta Bethell and family, Mrs. Una Elliot and family, The Francis family, Mrs. Keva Nethersole and family, Mrs. Joyce Bain and family, Mrs. Geneva Thorton and family, Mrs. Trudy Miller and family, Mrs. Constance Mackey and family, Ivan and Nancy Conliffe, The Seymour family, Mrs. Florinda Bastian and family, The McCartneys, The Stuart family, The Moncurs, Douglas Major and family, Derek Roach, Mrs. Marie Cash, Mrs. Flora Davis, Mrs. Laurel Lundy, Ms. Joann Savin, Mrs. Angela Smith, The Braithwaites, Mrs. Marcia Bannister, Hermean Thompson, The University of Warren Street, The Warren Street family, Mrs. Una Burrows, all the health care providers especially Nurse Forbes, Nurse Hutchinson, Doctors Kemp, McDowell, Roper, Richardson and Taylor, the nurses of the chest pain unit, female medical two and accident and emergency, especially Nurse Wood and Sister Rolle.
There will be no public viewing

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News Article

May 10, 2012
Aldean Alex Gibson Jr., 25

DEATH NOTICE
 Aldean Alex Gibson Jr. age 25 years of Cowpen Road and formerly of Nassau Village died at the Princess Margaret Hospital on Thursday May 3rd, 2012.
He is survived by his mother: Yvette Dorsett; father: Aldean Gibson Sr.; daughter: Amore' Gibson; sisters: Tyra Duncombe, Randia Rolle, Dekhantea Gibson; brothers: Travon Gibson, Ken Mackey Jr., Renard Farrington, Jamal Gibson; grandparents: Inez Gibson, Mavis Burrows, Hayward Dorsett I; and a host of other relatives and friends too numerous to mention.

Funeral Announcements will be announced at a later date.

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News Article

June 25, 2014
Why consumers should care about trade and the WTO

Everyone is a consumer at some point, even businesses, even government. So everyone should be concerned about the impact of wide-open trade on consumers, particularly in a small nation.
Any discussion on the pros and cons of open trade should be about more than just the option of having many more foreign products to choose from in your local market. Open trade discussions should be about more than having a bigger external market for products you don't or can't yet produce. Open trade discussions should be about more than the quality of products that enter the local market or the quality standards of the products that are exported.
All of these things are important, but consumers are affected by trade and the absolute free trade of the World Trade Organization (WTO) in much more profound and long-lasting ways than these, because of the inescapable general effects of trade on an economy.
One formula that explains the components of gross domestic product (GDP), which is the benchmark statistic for productivity in any nation, is referred to as the expenditure model. Though not perfect and under considerable review as the yardstick measurement of choice, especially for small countries, GDP prevails as the chosen statistic for evaluating the productivity of an economy.
The expenditure model, in particular, assumes that whatever a country makes is more or less equivalent to what that country spends, or rather what each constituent part of the equation spends. The rationale for this is that whatever is produced has to be bought by someone somewhere in the national economy, however long that process takes.
The economics behind productivity
The expenditure model for GDP in macroeconomics is defined as Y = C + I + G + (X-M), where 'Y' is GDP, or everything produced by a country.
'C' represents consumption by individuals in an economy, and the GDP equation accounts for all the salaries those individuals earn as being equivalent to the money they spend. The spending by average consumers in the economy accounts for roughly two-thirds of all economic activity. That is how important everyday people are in the success or failure of their economy.
"I" refers to spending by businesses, as opposed to individuals, and it includes (new) capital expenditures to start or grow a business.
"G" represents government spending, which includes spending on defense and other new or additional infrastructure or investment spending by the government. G does not include transfer payments, which is spending on social welfare, as such payments are simply a redirection of money already in the economy or already accounted for in another component of the GDP equation.
"X-M", or "NX", refers to net exports, if a country is engaged in trade. A negative number is a trade deficit, and a positive number is a trade surplus.
Now, anything done to the right side of this GDP equation, which assumes a state of equilibrium, ceteris paribus, increases or decreases the left side of the equation, overall GDP, i.e., the national measure of productivity.
To keep it very simple, with respect to trade and net exports (the balance of trade), if X = 700 and M = 400, then our trade surplus is 300, and overall trade, Y, GDP, is higher than if the export/import numbers were reversed, all other things being equal.
If X = 200, and M = 600, then our trade deficit is 400. And overall trade and overall GDP, are lower than if the export/import numbers were reversed, all other things being equal.
If X falls from 200, by 100, and M remains at 600, then our trade deficit grows by 100 to a total of 500, and overall GDP falls more, all other things being equal.
If X and M stay the same, and all other things are equal, there is no change in overall GDP, and productivity is relatively unchanged, which is not a likely occurrence.
If M increases to 800, while X is still just 200, and all other things are equal, then our trade deficit grows even more.
Now this example is oversimplified to emphasize the effect of trade, and there are other things to be considered in trade, for example the fact that trade also occurs in services. But to study the impact of each part of the GDP equation, we have to isolate them one at a time and assume that in the moment nothing else changes. Depending on how much time has passed or how extreme other conditions become, other factors in the equation can either offset the negative impact of a trade deficit, or they can worsen it. But, for the sake of emphasis, we keep our equation, our factors and our example very simple.
The point of this explanation is that without a productive domestic sector, which provides goods (not only or primarily services) for trade, our ability to trade freely with many countries is almost irrelevant.
The necessity of domestic goods
If we produce little to export, in comparison to larger countries, what is our bargaining power really going to be based upon in any trade agreement? And in trading wide-open on the level that larger member countries enjoy in the WTO, how are we really benefiting if we can't provide goods to trade?
We have little in the way of goods to export, because we have not sought investment in local industry to the extent that could fully maximize our output.
One of the things we can expect by acceding to the WTO is that imports (M in our equation) will increase to a much higher rate, in quantity and frequency, than exists at present.
Our exports value, X, will remain the same or fall, because competition with foreign imports, at least in the beginning, will be too fierce for local producers/exporters to manage adequate or competitive production.
The hope for wide-open trade is that, eventually, the cost of manufacturing will decrease and our exports can rebound, but systems must be in place (product standards, consumer protection regulations, etc.) in order to facilitate this. Moreover, considerable investments in property and equipment, which together produce goods for export, will need to take place, but with current limitations on business capital expansion, there is a very narrow window of time in which to do this.
And how do you grow exports in the middle of fierce competition, especially without a proper framework, plan or government subsidies, which are, in fact, counter to the purpose and expected benefits of free trade as provided for in the WTO?
This is why many believe that WTO-type trade agreements really only give larger countries a place to dump their inferior goods while still making money off of them. And it is why many believe the possibility of domestic production of almost anything that would be imported for little or nothing under such a free trade arrangement will disappear or even cause domestic production to implode. Essentially, wide-open trade is combative against a small domestic market that is chronically undeveloped or underdeveloped.
But there is even greater cause for concern painted by the bigger picture of our GDP equation.
If the value of M increases and the value of X can't increase, that translates into a falloff in I, where there is less investment in local business, less in available salaries to be paid and less people being hired, such that consumers lose jobs and job opportunities, or their salaries are reduced in order for businesses to remain open, which ultimately reduces the buying power and consumption of individuals.
If C, consumers, are responsible for two-thirds of the active economy, the problem is an even bigger one, because consumers can't spend what they don't have. With less spending, the economy then becomes (more) stagnant, or depressed, and it stays the same with respect to growth or it begins to regress into a recession, which, with the implementation of a value-added tax (VAT), will further slow the economy.
Government salvation
In this horrible situation, the only other part of the productivity/GDP equation that can be manipulated in an effort to resurrect the economy is government spending. The more depressed the economy becomes, the more dependent the people will be on the government to restore it, especially in a country where the people rely on the government as a savior and sponsor for all things. But this is a prospect that does not bode well for a country already neck-deep in debt.
Present economic conditions and anticipated economic conditions post-VAT, require the government to inject money into the economy, either through increasing the money supply by printing more money to keep the economy going, or by lowering the prime interest rate charged to banks to allow consumers to be able to afford bank loans and, more importantly, for businesses to be able to afford bank loans for the capital they require to run or grow their businesses which keep people employed and earning income.
Because printing more money, a path the government already seems to be traveling, is inflationary, the preferred method of recovery is to lower the prime interest rate. Too much money, like too much of anything else in the economy, creates a glut; too much money in circulation lowers its value over time.
And with a fixed exchange rate regime, the question of devaluation, forced or otherwise, is raised. The Bahamian dollar value continues to be pegged to the U.S. dollar value in order to facilitate trade, with reliably-valued currencies.
But the very trade agreement we seek to be a part of, in the long run, can become a reason we have to devalue our currency, as trade partners and foreign investors can spot a weakened dollar value inherent in all of our problems in banking, government spending and domestic production.
And all of the deficiencies outlined herein - revenue, taxation, spending and trade - point back to the failure of successive governments to plan an economy that could survive, with strength, into the future.
These deficiencies are both a result of and a cause for the weak condition of our economy which, without extreme overhaul on the most basic level, will only degenerate further.
Where the answer lies
For all the reasons given, the only real answer to all of our most challenging economic concerns is to allow the foreign direct investment our governments are so hell-bent on to occur within and only within partnerships between foreign enterprise and local enterprise in industries that are fundamental to building and sustaining the economy and therefore the country.
This unique and very specific type of foreign direct investment through joint local partnerships only in vital, productive industries will help to increase domestic investment (I), which encourages consumer spending (C) increases, and increases exports (X) by the domestic production sector, which in turn reduces the need for government interjection and intervention (G) in what should be a free market.
The joint foreign-domestic partnership model in key industries also helps support the pegged exchange rate/value of the Bahamian dollar with respect to the U.S. dollar and prevents the likelihood of devaluation because you now have real trade of real exports produced by a real domestic sector, which engages in real productivity. And all of this is better in every way for all consumers.
o Nicole Burrows in an academically trained economist. She can be contacted at: nicole.burrows@outlook.com.

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News Article

August 24, 2011
Thousands scramble ahead of hurricane

Marcus Stuart, a father of seven, stood in line at Chelsea's Choice for over an hour yesterday, desperate to get drinking water for his family as he prepared for Hurricane Irene.
Stuart arrived shortly after 1 p.m. and met more than 70 people already waiting on the outside of the gate, braving the heat.
"I have to get water because I have my kids," Stuart said.
"I need water.  Right now there's no water at home.  And right now down in Carmichael Road where I'm living there's hardly any water at the pumps.  The rain comes harder than that.  It'll take me the better part of 20 minutes to fill up one bottle.  I tried this morning.  That's why I'm trying to get the water now."
When The Nassau Guardian visited a government pump yesterday afternoon, the water pressure was extremely low. One woman who filled up six one gallon bottles and was attempting to fill the seventh estimated that it took her about 30 minutes.
Stuart said he also planned to go to a grocery store to stock up on canned goods. "I want to get as much canned food goods as I can," he said.
"I already have my hurricane shutters.  I hope I have enough [flash lights] and batteries and basic things that we need." Stuart was one of many people stocking up on hurricane supplies yesterday.
Charlton Burrows, the produce manager at Solomon's Supercenter, told The Nassau Guardian that food items were flying off the shelves.
Store clerks were forced to restock items including water, tuna, corned beef, bread, noodles and fruits throughout the day.
Burrows said the store could run out of tuna and water by today if sales continue as they did yesterday.
Grocery stores, hardware stores, water depots and gas stations across New Providence were all crowded, with people hoping to get the bare essentials before the arrival of Hurricane Irene.
According to the Department of Meteorology, the storm will arrive in New Providence sometime tonight or early tomorrow.
Myrtle Rolle, whose cart was filled with groceries as she browsed through Solomon's Supercenter, said she was also shopping for her family. Among the items in her cart were canned goods, juices, crackers and water. She said her husband was at home getting the house ready.
By yesterday afternoon, many businesses already had hurricane shutters on windows and doors. Many businesses also plan to close shop early today to allow their employees to prepare for the storm.
Manager of JBR Hardware Adrian Burrows said the store was busy all day yesterday. He said while the circumstances surrounding the rush were not ideal, the store welcomed the business, as it had been sitting on some goods for a long time.
Burrows said the store was stocked with many hurricane supplies; however, he said it may run out of batteries by today.
Kenya Sherman, 40, of Pinewood, used her lunch break yesterday to shop.  She said it was the only time she had to prepare for the storm. Yesterday she bought five five-gallon bottles of water, and bags of canned good.  She said her home was already prepared.
Marcha Smith, 32, said her only concern was filling up her car with gasoline.
"I'm filling both my car and my husband's car," she said, while waiting in line at Esso Service Station on Bernard Road.
"If the storm comes and the gas shipments are delayed I'll have some gas in my car," Smith said.
"I already got my food and drinks.  I bought a generator.  My husband is putting the plywood on the windows, so this is the last thing on the list."
The storm is expected to remain over New Providence until Friday morning.

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News Article

May 02, 2012
Architects to kick off Islands of the World Fashion Showcase with wearable art

NASSAU, Bahamas - Fashion designers won't be the only ones in the
spotlight at the much anticipated

Islands of the World Fashion Showcase
(IWFS) on

May 11th and 12th.

Four artisans from very different design fields have accepted the
challenge of taking materials they would traditionally use to build and
accessorize homes, offices and other buildings and make them fit on a
new kind of canvas - the human body.

Val Pintard, Apryl Burrows and the team of Reuno Pratt and Elizabeth
Clarke are the first official class of the newly created category of
IWFS, the

Jackson

L. Burnside Fashion and Design Presentation. The
division highlights one...

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News Article

June 06, 2012
Sen the Hon. Gregory Burrows Contribution to thank the Governor General for the Speech from The Throne - June 4th

Nassau, Bahamas - Sen. the
Hon. Gregory C. Burrows Speech for the Senate delivered at First Sitting of the Upper House on Monday 4th June 2012:

Madam President, Honorable members of the senate,
I would

like to take this opportunity to congratulate
Madam President and the Deputy President on their recent election to President
and Deputy in this senate.

I am
honored to stand here today and I want to thank Almighty God for leading me to
this point in my life. I would also like
to thank The Rt. Hon. Prime Minister Christie for the opportunity to serve my
country in this honorable place.

I want
to thank my wife, Beth, my sons, Greg and Adam for standing by me as I made this
journey.

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News Article

November 15, 2014
BFM announces events to honour Dr Myles Munroe

BAHAMAS Faith Ministries (BFM) Senior Pastor and Board of Governors chairman Dave Burrows announced yesterday a series of events in honour of Dr Myles Munroe, who perished along with eight others, including his wife Ruth, in Sunday's plane crash in Grand Bahama.

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News Article

July 03, 2012
PLP mourns the passing of Mrs Trixie Hanna (nee Burrows)

The
progressive Liberal Party mourns the passing of Mrs. Trixie Hanna (nee
Burrows), mother-in-law of Prime Minister the Rt. Hon. Perry G. Christie
and mother of First Lady Bernadette Christie. Mrs. Hanna was 81 years
old.

 

Mrs. Hanna passed away early this morning at the Princess Margaret Hospital.

She was born on March 1

st

, 1931 in Deadman's Cay Long Island and Mrs. Hanna was predeceased by her husband the Rev

Howard Hanna

and her Parents Capt. Lorenzo and Ellen Burrows and leaves behind two...

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