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News Article

September 14, 2010
BBF's 'Summer of Thunder' deemed a success

By RENALDO DORSETT

Sports Reporter

rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

WITH the Bahamas Basketball Federation (BBF) completing its series of exhibition games against a series of NCAA universities, federation heads deemed the event a success.

The "Summer of Thunder", hosted by the BBF, concluded Monday night at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium with a Bahamian team ending the event with their first win of the series.

The Bahamas All-Star team scored a 93-90 win over the Portland State Vikings to close out the competition.

Jeremy Hutchinson led the Bahamas with 21 points, Gamaliel Rose finished with 15, while Michael Bain and Lasario Burrows each finished with 14.

Chris Harriel led the Vikings ...

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News Article

May 10, 2012
Aldean Alex Gibson Jr., 25

DEATH NOTICE
 Aldean Alex Gibson Jr. age 25 years of Cowpen Road and formerly of Nassau Village died at the Princess Margaret Hospital on Thursday May 3rd, 2012.
He is survived by his mother: Yvette Dorsett; father: Aldean Gibson Sr.; daughter: Amore' Gibson; sisters: Tyra Duncombe, Randia Rolle, Dekhantea Gibson; brothers: Travon Gibson, Ken Mackey Jr., Renard Farrington, Jamal Gibson; grandparents: Inez Gibson, Mavis Burrows, Hayward Dorsett I; and a host of other relatives and friends too numerous to mention.

Funeral Announcements will be announced at a later date.

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News Article

May 17, 2012
Berenus Loretta Cargill, 76

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENT

Funeral Service for the late Mother Berenus Loretta Cargill affectionately called "Titta and T.D" age 76 years of Mastic Point, Andros will be held on Sunday May 20th, 2012 at 10:30am at Cathedral of Olive, Morgan Bluff Drive, Andros. Officiating will be Bishop Philemon Wilson D.D. J.P. assisted by Bishop John Humes, Bishop Lewis Adderley, Elder Breacham Brennen and other ministers. Interment will follow in South Mastic Point Cemetery, Mastic Point, Andros.
Cherished memories will forever and always linger in the hearts of those she left behind, namely her devoted husband:  Pastor Prince Cargill; daughter:  Evang.  Valderine Burrows; sons: Tommy, Danny, Pastor Lynden Cargill and Pastor Manix Cargill; Son-in-law: Wilfred Burrows; Daughter-in-law: Min. Bernadette Cargill; Adopted daughters: Vernamae Knowles; Phyllis Bain; Lavern Moxey; Cathy Martin; Helen Smith; Gwen Penigan; Loretta Farrington, Marie Adderley; Adopted Sons: Bishop Mark Knowles; Lorenzo Harris, Steve Hanna; Grand children: Sinatra, Lenthius, Valdez, Cordero, Laval, Lenora and Amanda Burrows, Cornelius and Carrington Thompson, Nickoya, Torry, Toran, Lynden Jr., Tameiko, and Jeremiah Cargill; Great grand children: Jada Burrows, Kyle Thompson; Sisters: Idell Reckley, Marionetta Smith, Doretta Jackson (California), and Ruthmae Francis; Brothers: Cardinal, Jonathan, Charlie and Bradley Fowler; Sister-in- laws: Karen, Linda, Bridgette, Beulahmae Fowler, Julia Hanna, Perlene Russell, Catherine Minnus, Gina Newton, Esther Cargill; Brother-in-laws: Edwin Francis, John Cargill; Aunt: Maria Martin; Numerous nieces and nephews including Derek Oliver, Angela Bowen, Dennis Smith, Meredith Miller, Lisa Bonaby, Vander Williams, Bridgette Beneby, Leading Seaman Dwayne McGregor, Edwin Jr. Stacy , Odesa Francis, Robertha Stuart, Paula Josey, Diann, Stacy Hanna, Michelle McGregor, Nadia and Marlin Turner, Sharmaine Evans, Darilyn Grant, Mevatta Cox, Carla, Lashanta and Berkley Fowler, Sophia Russell, Samantha Smith, Delareese Smith-Styles; Other relatives and friends including: Althea Sands, Isolene Rolle, Vernita Russell and family, Edgburt Tinker, Melsine Dorsett and family, Mary Rolle and family, Leanza Hanna, Ivy Ferguson and family, Diana Beneby and family, Ellen Bowleg and family, Pastor Max Roberts and family, Bishop Lewis Adderley and family, Pastor Samuel Fowler and family, Pastor Carl Oliver and family, Pastor Reginald Ferguson and family, Pastor Phillip Campbell and family, Carlton Bowleg and family, Lenard Newton and family, Agatha Cleare and family, Bertha Burrows and family, Uris Dames and family, Sis. Bodie and family, Ms. Turnquest and family, Micheal Finley and family, the Bodie family, Dorrell Higgs and family, Basil Martin and family, Deacon Alvin Burrows and family, Pastor Catherine Burrows and the Outreach Evangelic Church family, Pastor Romer and Ebenezar Church family, Roselda Woodside and family, Pastor Harold Mackey and family, Ms. McDonald and family, Derek & Iguline Oliver and family, Maude Romer and family, Mavis Gaitor and family, Pastor George Colebrooke and family, Deliverance Tabernacle family, the Prayer Band family, the Church of God family, the Colebrooke family, Bowleg family, Dr. Philip Campbell and family, Joyce Fowler and family, Bishop Charles Dean and family, Pastor Dorinda Dean and M.R.I Church family, Pearlene Simmons and family, the Ministry of Works family  and many more too numerous to mention.

Viewing will be held in the Halcyon Suite at Restview Memorial Mortuary and Crematorium Ltd., Robinson and Soldier Roads, on Thursday from 10:00am to 6:00pm and again on Friday at Small Hope Church of God, Central Andros from 6:00pm to 12:00am, Saturday at Mastic Point Church of God, North Andros from 12noon to 12:00am and Sunday at 8:30am at Cathedral of Olive, Morgan Bluff Drive, Andros until service time.

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News Article

June 06, 2012
Sen the Hon. Gregory Burrows Contribution to thank the Governor General for the Speech from The Throne

Nassau, Bahamas - Sen. the
Hon. Gregory C. Burrows Speech for the Senate delivered at First Sitting of the Upper House on Monday 4th June 2012:

Madam President, Honorable members of the senate,
I would

like to take this opportunity to congratulate
Madam President and the Deputy President on their recent election to President
and Deputy in this senate.

I am
honored to stand here today and I want to thank Almighty God for leading me to
this point in my life. I would also like
to thank The Rt. Hon. Prime Minister Christie for the opportunity to serve my
country in this honorable place.

I want
to thank my wife, Beth, my sons, Greg and Adam for standing by me as I made this
journey.

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News Article

September 13, 2010
National championships may be forced to move from GB

By RENALDO DORSETT

Sports Reporter

rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas' second city is in jeopardy of losing its opportunity to host the annual year-end event to the 2010 Bahamas Softball Federation (BSF) season.

Sources within the BSF indicate the 2010 National Round Robin Championships may be forced to move from Grand Bahama to an alternate location due to conflicts between Ministry of Sports representatives and the governing body for softball in Grand Bahama.

Reports have surfaced that assistant director for the Ministry of Sports, Steve Burrows, and the Grand Bahama Amateur Softball Association have failed to reach an accord on the terms of use of the new softball facilities in ...

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News Article

May 19, 2012
CAB lifts curtain with video on demand

Break out the popcorn. Bahamians now have the option of going to the movies like never before, without even leaving their homes.
Cable Bahamas Limited (CAB) officially launched its highly anticipated video on demand platform yesterday, completing its "triple play" suite of REVTV products.
"We're continuing to create new, convenient ways for our customers to experience entertainment and 500 REVTV on Demand does just that. Now, our subscribers have the ability to watch what they want, when they want, on demand," according to David Burrows, Cable Bahamas' marketing director.
Subscribers in New Providence, Grand Bahama, Abaco and Eleuthera that possess a digital set-top box will now have access to 500 REVTV on Demand.
"Using their TV remote, customers can navigate an easy-to-use menu and choose programs, and view at their leisure. Not only will movies be available in both standard and high definition but also concerts, over 300 karaoke titles, kids and local programming will also be available on demand," he explained. "We are very excited about the inclusion of our local content. Now film makers like Maria Govan, Kareem Mortimer and other filmmakers will have far greater reach into the Bahamian community with this platform."
Burrows revealed to Guardian Business during yesterday's launch that new titles are expected to be launched on a monthly basis and made available to REVTV subscribers. Broadband and television are now considered mature markets, according to CAB executives. Exploring new markets by enhancing its video product has been a priority for the BISX-listed company.
While NetFlix might be a competitor, CAB executives told Guardian Business that their offering should be far leaner.
More competition within the Bahamian marketplace is expected, although CAB now has a big head start.
Paramount, DreamWorks, Magnolia Pictures, Starz Cinemas, and Warner Brother's titles, along with HBO on demand, are all presently being featured on 500 REVTV on Demand.
Burrows noted that contracts have just been completed with Disney, Fox and Sony. These entities should be offering movies by the end of summer.
By year's end, Burrow estimates that at least another 100 titles will be added to the movie library.
"We are always striving to ensure Bahamians have the latest and greatest advancements in television entertainment and technology, and we're proud to announce the availability of 500 REVTV on Demand to our subscribers," according to Anthony Butler, Cable Bahamas' CEO.
"We also encourage parents to take advantage of the many parental control options our advanced digital boxes afford parents in both controlling purchases with their own access pin, and also helping them to ensure their children are viewing only what they want them to."
This announcement comes seven months after CAB launched REVOICE, a fixed-line service.
Mark Cabrelli, CAB's vice president in charge of sales and marketing, called the service a "big step in the company's evolution", as it seeks to present itself as an overall communications provider.

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News Article

May 24, 2012
Alfred Jarrett, 69

Funeral Service for the Late Alfred Jarrett, 69 years of Seaview Drive and West Bay Street, will be held on Tuesday May 29th, 11:00 a.m. at Ebenezer Methodist Church, East Shirley Street.  Rev'd. Carla Culmer assisted by other Ministers of the Gospel will officiate. Interment will follow in Woodlawn Memorial Gardens, Soldier Road.
Wife: Linda Jarrett

Sons: Dr. Marco, Lamont and Mario Jarrett (deceased)
Daughter in Law:  Marcie Jarrett
Grandchildren: Jedidiah, Justus and Jahmai Jarrett
Sisters: Lorelda Burrows and Sandra Baird (England)
Brothers: Frederick Laing and Basil Neymour
Sisters-in-Law: Karen Laing, Paula Neymour, Faye Smith, Crystal Carey
Brothers-In-Law: Eric Burrows, Grant Baird (England), Dr. Baldwin Carey (Annette), Philip Carey (Ingrid) and Terrance Carey (Gayle) Allan Carey -deceased (Cora)
Nieces: Renee Burrows, Dr. Kimberley Richardson, Erica Laing, Carla and Lisa Baird, Dr. Sarah Pajaro (Giovani), Charlotte Smith, Racquel Carey-Bowe (Francis), Sonja Gibson (Raymond), Nicole Carey, Krysta Wilson (Kirk) and Martine Carey
Nephews: Tyrone Burrows, Dr. Osmond Richardson, Marvin, Dominic, Andree, Simon Smith (Marsha), Dr. Gregory Carey (Karen), Vaughn Carey, Garrett Carey, William and Keith Carey-deceased (Michelle) and Chanarve McBride
Grand Nephews:  Adriel Burrows, Travis Burrows, Matthew and Jonathan Richardson, Wayne Munnings, Andrew Smith, Michael and Marco Carey, Penton, Donovan, Bradley and Brian Neymour, Erin Laing
Grand Nieces: Makhaila Richardson, Guilia and Alys Pajero, Gabrielle Carey, Simone Smith, Keishel, Keira and Keva Carey, Phillipa Carey
Other Relatives & friends: The Rt. Hon Prime Minister Perry G. Christie & Family, Christie Family , Mabel Stubbs & Family, Terry, Kevin, Trevor Kemp, Mary Smith & Family (U.S.A) Kingsley Williams &Family (U.S.A) Joan Williams (U.S.A) Wesley Neymour (U.S. A)Donna Paulding & Family (U.S.A) Daphne Taylor & Family (U.S.A) Violet Cannonila (Switzerland) Vangy Penn & Family, Cynthia Conyers & Family, Dwain, Sidney, Vernon and Danny Wilkerson & Family, Oswald and Coral Sawyer & Family, Ted, Fred, Rose and Marie Charlton, Monsignor Preston A. Moss, Bobby Glinton & Family, , McCartney Family, Marie Collie & Family, Juanita Carey, Dave Allen & Family, Carey Family,  Bank of the Bahamas , BEC, Finco and Royal Bank Family, Bernard Miller & Family, Luder Petit Frere, Merbarine Bascoe, Fred Murray & Family, Wesley Bastian & & Family, Rawson McDonald, Calvin Knowles, Wendell Jones, Algernon Allen, Bradley Roberts, Frankie Wilson, Lester Turnquest, Godfrey Eneas, Jeffrey Lloyd, George Bethell, Olga Culmer and the PLP Family.
Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, Nassau Street on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Tuesday at the Church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

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News Article

September 13, 2011
Row over parking 'ended in murder'

By LAMECH JOHNSON

ljohnson@tribunemedia.net

AN ARGUMENT over parking led to the stabbing death of a father in September 2008, according to a witness' testimony in the Supreme Court yesterday.

Two minors testified that 28-year-old Jason Smith was intoxicated when he got into an argument with the three men accused of his murder.

The key witnesses for prosecutor Jillian Williams, told Senior Justice Jon Isaacs and a twelve member jury, that Smith had told a driver of a vehicle that he could not park in front of his property.

Edney Burrows, 26, of Deveaux Street; Daryl Rolle, 35, of Palm Avenue; and Andre Dieujuste, 27, of Windsor Lane are accused of stabbing Smith, who died of his inj ...

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News Article

May 22, 2012
Senate appointments complete

Ten senators received their instruments of appointment at a ceremony at Government House yesterday, marking the completion of the formation of the Upper Chamber.
Prime Minister Perry Christie told the group that he was happy that they answered the call to public service but warned them that there is a lot of work ahead for parliamentarians.
The Cabinet Office announced the appointments of the final three senators on Sunday. They are: Sharon Wilson, a former Senate president and magistrate; Joseph Curry, a business consultant and
former diplomat and Cheryl Bazard, an attorney.
They join defeated Progressive Liberal Party candidates Frank Smith, Gregory Burrows, Jerome Gomez, Julian Russell, Gary Sawyer, Alex Storr and Tanisha Tynes, who were appointed to the Senate last week.
Several of the PLP senators are newcomers to politics who will serve in Parliament for the first time.
Christie said the mix of new and seasoned politicians augurs well for the future of the country's political system.
He added that his planned mid-term adjustments and natural attrition will allow PLP members who were not elected to the House of Assembly or appointed to the Senate a chance to take part in Parliament or take up other posts.
Christie also suggested that Wilson will once again be elected to head the Upper Chamber.
After the ceremony, Wilson, who last served in the Senate from 2002 through 2007, said in whatever capacity she serves, she will seek to ensure that there is bipartisanship and high standards in Parliament.
"Whatever role I play it is my intent to ensure that in our Senate there is a standard of decorum and an advancement of something that is positive," she said.
"The Upper Chamber is a place where we ought to try to show that we can work together for a common goal."
Wilson said her selection to the Senate this time around is more poignant considering the social and economic issues facing the nation.
"To be able to serve in our country at a time like this, I deem it to be a real special privilege," she said. "In so many ways we are at a crossroads. In so many ways there is a need to lift not just the spirits of people [but] to lift the economic standards, to lift moral standards, to lift standards generally in our country."
The opposition Free National Movement appointed four people to the Upper Chamber last week. They are: Zhivargo Laing, Desmond Bannister, Kwasi Thompson and Heather Hunt.
Parliament opens on Wednesday.

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News Article

May 21, 2012
Telcine Turner Rolle: Poet, playwright and teacher

"Don't let anyone persuade you against something you believe in your writing." - Telcine Turner Rolle

This past week saw the loss of a great Bahamian cultural icon as poet, playwright and teacher Telcine Turner Rolle succumbed to illness. She was 67.
Of Cat Island heritage, Telcine Turner was born December 3, 1944 on Milton Street and grew up in the "Babylon" vicinity of the Market Street area.
Telcine's contribution to The Bahamas is immeasurable.
Following a life-changing period of studies in English and education at the University of the West Indies, Mona campus, in the 1970s, she taught in several Bahamian high schools before taking up a post in English language and literature at the Bahamas Teachers Training College.
She married James O. Rolle in 1974 and in 1975 birthed her only child, Arien Rolle. Being an artist and cultural pioneer in his own right, James Rolle was Telcine's soul mate and best friend. They could often be seen taking in the latest cultural offerings, always in good spirits.
In 1976, she joined the staff of The College of The Bahamas in its infancy in the division of humanities, which she would eventually chair. Admired as much as she was feared, Telcine was instrumental in molding the sensibilities of many talented Bahamian writers today as an educator. Many would be surprised to hear which now-established and great Bahamian writers she had once given mediocre or even failing grades to. Yet this only served to push their talent to the limits - for Telcine, there was always room for improvement, an opportunity to set the bar one notch higher.
Telcine defined an era in Bahamian literature, publishing a book of poems for children, "Song of the Surreys" (illustrated by her husband); and editing two collections of work from students in her creative writing classes, "Once Below a Time" and "Climbing Clouds". Since 2009, she had been working on a third collection of student work, "Jah Knows! and Other One-Act plays by College of The Bahamas Students", which is still forthcoming.
Her most well known-work, "Woman Take Two" is a vital component of the foundation of Bahamian literature. The play marked a discernable focus in early post-colonial years on all things Bahamian with its three-dimensional Bahamian characters negotiating their identities. It is still used in the English Literature BGCSE today.
Telcine was also vey active in theater in The Bahamas, becoming part of the Bahama Drama Circle in the 1970s and helping to stage several summer productions at the theater auditorium of the Bahamas Teachers Training College, as well as receiving dramatic awards from The Bahamas Arts Festival.
After winning the Playwriting Prize in the University of West Indies 25th Anniversary Literary Competition in 1975 for "Woman Take Two", it took years until the play would hit the stage under the directorial eye of David Burrows in 1995 - partly because Telcine brought the same uncompromising standards to her creative work as she did in the classroom.
In fact, Telcine took these standards to every person she came across in her life - she was known to offer her constructive criticisms where she felt they were necessary, and those who knew her knew they'd be better off if they took it with thanks.
Though this quality often evoked backlash in those who were unfamiliar with her perfectionist ways, Telcine's standards were born out of love and a desire to see her beloved country improve and grow.
In everything she did, Telcine exuded the same excellence she demanded from others as she molded every person she touched into better Bahamian citizens. We owe it to her to set our standards higher and to meet them.

This Land I Celebrate
Telcine Turner Rolle

This land I celebrate not for its zeal
Of democratic rights, its affluent
New halls of residence, its confident
And forced-ripe millionaires, but for the feel
That people power can make paradise real.
We are not free when we turn reticent
because of fear, think man omnipotent
Instead of God and for the dollar kneel.
I see our people common as the sand
And just as precious - holding back the flood
When tide is high; encircling the land;
Together valorous, together good.
Although the fingers differ on a hand
Each helps the hand to function as it should.

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News Article

December 20, 2010
Swimmers visit Atlantis, The Palm

DURING their recent trip to Dubai to compete in the 10th FINA World Short Course Swimming Championships, Arianna Vanderpool-Wallace, Elvis Burrows and Alana Dillette took time to visit Atlantis, The Palm where they were special guests.

Above, the trio are entertained by a dolphin during their visit.

At the championships, Vanderpool-Wallace led the team's performance with her historic bronze medal in the women's 50 metre freestyle. It was the first medal ever won by the Bahamas and the first time that a Bahamian made it to the final in the event.

Both Burrows and Dillette failed to advance out of their respective events.

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News Article

September 17, 2010
Marrietta Adderley, 66

Ms. Marrietta Adderley, 66, of Daisy Road, died at The Princess Margaret Hospital on Sunday, September 12th, 2010.

She is survived by her son: Kevin Adderley; daughter: Joanne Rahming; sister: Lagura Rahming; brothers: James Johnson, Charles Johnson, Gerard Burrows, Ezra Johnson; grand daughter: Sheniqua Adderley; grand sons: Wellington Christopher Rahming, JonahTimothy Rahming and a host of other relatives and friends too numerous to mention.

Funeral Announcements will be announced at a later date.

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News Article

May 18, 2012
7 defeated PLP candidates appointed to Senate

The government has named seven more senators.
According to a statement from the Cabinet Office, Prime Minister Perry Christie advised the governor general to appoint defeated Progressive Liberal Party (PLP) candidates Frank Smith, Gregory Burrows, Jerome Gomez, Julian Russell, Gary Sawyer, Alex Storr and Tanisha Tynes.
They will be sworn in at Government House at 4 p.m. today.
The senators will add to the previous government appointments of Senator Allyson Maynard-Gibson and Senator Keith Bell.
"Regarding the appointment of the new senators, the prime minister remarked that they collectively represent the youngest group of government senators ever appointed in the history of The Bahamas," said the statement.
"This, he said, was yet another early demonstration of his determination to prepare the country for a new generation of leadership.
"The prime minister added that it was a matter of personal regret that he could not also have appointed Mr. Clay Sweeting as a senator, but that as Mr. Sweeting is still in his 20s he is not constitutionally eligible to serve in the Senate at this time."
However, according to the statement, Sweeting will be appointed to another "important position" where he is expected to play a role in national governance. The statement did not specify where Sweeting would be placed.
A person must be 30 or older to be appointed to the Senate.
Christie also advised that defeated PLP candidate for North Abaco Renardo Curry declined his Senate appointment to ensure that he is ready for the anticipated by-election in that constituency.
Former Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham has announced that he will resign his North Abaco seat on July 19, which means that another representative will have to be elected.
The Cabinet Office said Christie will advise the governor general to appoint three additional senators following consultation with Leader of the Opposition Dr. Hubert Minnis.
The Bahamas Constitution requires consultation with the opposition on some Senate appointments.
Four Free National Movement Senators were sworn in on Wednesday.
They are former Education Minister Desmond Bannister; former Minister of State for Finance Zhivargo Laing; former Pineridge MP Kwasi Thompson and defeated FNM Marathon candidate Heather Hunt.

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News Article

May 18, 2012
Seven More Government Senators Appointed

Nassau, Bahamas -

The cabinet office announced May 17, 2012 that Prime Minister,
The Rt. Hon. Perry G. Christie, has advised his excellency the governor
general to appoint the following persons as senators under article 39
(2) of the constitution :

Frank Smith; Gregory Burrows, Jerome Gomez, Julian Russell, Gary Sawyer, Alex Storr and Tanisha Tynes...

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News Article

June 25, 2014
Why consumers should care about trade and the WTO

Everyone is a consumer at some point, even businesses, even government. So everyone should be concerned about the impact of wide-open trade on consumers, particularly in a small nation.
Any discussion on the pros and cons of open trade should be about more than just the option of having many more foreign products to choose from in your local market. Open trade discussions should be about more than having a bigger external market for products you don't or can't yet produce. Open trade discussions should be about more than the quality of products that enter the local market or the quality standards of the products that are exported.
All of these things are important, but consumers are affected by trade and the absolute free trade of the World Trade Organization (WTO) in much more profound and long-lasting ways than these, because of the inescapable general effects of trade on an economy.
One formula that explains the components of gross domestic product (GDP), which is the benchmark statistic for productivity in any nation, is referred to as the expenditure model. Though not perfect and under considerable review as the yardstick measurement of choice, especially for small countries, GDP prevails as the chosen statistic for evaluating the productivity of an economy.
The expenditure model, in particular, assumes that whatever a country makes is more or less equivalent to what that country spends, or rather what each constituent part of the equation spends. The rationale for this is that whatever is produced has to be bought by someone somewhere in the national economy, however long that process takes.
The economics behind productivity
The expenditure model for GDP in macroeconomics is defined as Y = C + I + G + (X-M), where 'Y' is GDP, or everything produced by a country.
'C' represents consumption by individuals in an economy, and the GDP equation accounts for all the salaries those individuals earn as being equivalent to the money they spend. The spending by average consumers in the economy accounts for roughly two-thirds of all economic activity. That is how important everyday people are in the success or failure of their economy.
"I" refers to spending by businesses, as opposed to individuals, and it includes (new) capital expenditures to start or grow a business.
"G" represents government spending, which includes spending on defense and other new or additional infrastructure or investment spending by the government. G does not include transfer payments, which is spending on social welfare, as such payments are simply a redirection of money already in the economy or already accounted for in another component of the GDP equation.
"X-M", or "NX", refers to net exports, if a country is engaged in trade. A negative number is a trade deficit, and a positive number is a trade surplus.
Now, anything done to the right side of this GDP equation, which assumes a state of equilibrium, ceteris paribus, increases or decreases the left side of the equation, overall GDP, i.e., the national measure of productivity.
To keep it very simple, with respect to trade and net exports (the balance of trade), if X = 700 and M = 400, then our trade surplus is 300, and overall trade, Y, GDP, is higher than if the export/import numbers were reversed, all other things being equal.
If X = 200, and M = 600, then our trade deficit is 400. And overall trade and overall GDP, are lower than if the export/import numbers were reversed, all other things being equal.
If X falls from 200, by 100, and M remains at 600, then our trade deficit grows by 100 to a total of 500, and overall GDP falls more, all other things being equal.
If X and M stay the same, and all other things are equal, there is no change in overall GDP, and productivity is relatively unchanged, which is not a likely occurrence.
If M increases to 800, while X is still just 200, and all other things are equal, then our trade deficit grows even more.
Now this example is oversimplified to emphasize the effect of trade, and there are other things to be considered in trade, for example the fact that trade also occurs in services. But to study the impact of each part of the GDP equation, we have to isolate them one at a time and assume that in the moment nothing else changes. Depending on how much time has passed or how extreme other conditions become, other factors in the equation can either offset the negative impact of a trade deficit, or they can worsen it. But, for the sake of emphasis, we keep our equation, our factors and our example very simple.
The point of this explanation is that without a productive domestic sector, which provides goods (not only or primarily services) for trade, our ability to trade freely with many countries is almost irrelevant.
The necessity of domestic goods
If we produce little to export, in comparison to larger countries, what is our bargaining power really going to be based upon in any trade agreement? And in trading wide-open on the level that larger member countries enjoy in the WTO, how are we really benefiting if we can't provide goods to trade?
We have little in the way of goods to export, because we have not sought investment in local industry to the extent that could fully maximize our output.
One of the things we can expect by acceding to the WTO is that imports (M in our equation) will increase to a much higher rate, in quantity and frequency, than exists at present.
Our exports value, X, will remain the same or fall, because competition with foreign imports, at least in the beginning, will be too fierce for local producers/exporters to manage adequate or competitive production.
The hope for wide-open trade is that, eventually, the cost of manufacturing will decrease and our exports can rebound, but systems must be in place (product standards, consumer protection regulations, etc.) in order to facilitate this. Moreover, considerable investments in property and equipment, which together produce goods for export, will need to take place, but with current limitations on business capital expansion, there is a very narrow window of time in which to do this.
And how do you grow exports in the middle of fierce competition, especially without a proper framework, plan or government subsidies, which are, in fact, counter to the purpose and expected benefits of free trade as provided for in the WTO?
This is why many believe that WTO-type trade agreements really only give larger countries a place to dump their inferior goods while still making money off of them. And it is why many believe the possibility of domestic production of almost anything that would be imported for little or nothing under such a free trade arrangement will disappear or even cause domestic production to implode. Essentially, wide-open trade is combative against a small domestic market that is chronically undeveloped or underdeveloped.
But there is even greater cause for concern painted by the bigger picture of our GDP equation.
If the value of M increases and the value of X can't increase, that translates into a falloff in I, where there is less investment in local business, less in available salaries to be paid and less people being hired, such that consumers lose jobs and job opportunities, or their salaries are reduced in order for businesses to remain open, which ultimately reduces the buying power and consumption of individuals.
If C, consumers, are responsible for two-thirds of the active economy, the problem is an even bigger one, because consumers can't spend what they don't have. With less spending, the economy then becomes (more) stagnant, or depressed, and it stays the same with respect to growth or it begins to regress into a recession, which, with the implementation of a value-added tax (VAT), will further slow the economy.
Government salvation
In this horrible situation, the only other part of the productivity/GDP equation that can be manipulated in an effort to resurrect the economy is government spending. The more depressed the economy becomes, the more dependent the people will be on the government to restore it, especially in a country where the people rely on the government as a savior and sponsor for all things. But this is a prospect that does not bode well for a country already neck-deep in debt.
Present economic conditions and anticipated economic conditions post-VAT, require the government to inject money into the economy, either through increasing the money supply by printing more money to keep the economy going, or by lowering the prime interest rate charged to banks to allow consumers to be able to afford bank loans and, more importantly, for businesses to be able to afford bank loans for the capital they require to run or grow their businesses which keep people employed and earning income.
Because printing more money, a path the government already seems to be traveling, is inflationary, the preferred method of recovery is to lower the prime interest rate. Too much money, like too much of anything else in the economy, creates a glut; too much money in circulation lowers its value over time.
And with a fixed exchange rate regime, the question of devaluation, forced or otherwise, is raised. The Bahamian dollar value continues to be pegged to the U.S. dollar value in order to facilitate trade, with reliably-valued currencies.
But the very trade agreement we seek to be a part of, in the long run, can become a reason we have to devalue our currency, as trade partners and foreign investors can spot a weakened dollar value inherent in all of our problems in banking, government spending and domestic production.
And all of the deficiencies outlined herein - revenue, taxation, spending and trade - point back to the failure of successive governments to plan an economy that could survive, with strength, into the future.
These deficiencies are both a result of and a cause for the weak condition of our economy which, without extreme overhaul on the most basic level, will only degenerate further.
Where the answer lies
For all the reasons given, the only real answer to all of our most challenging economic concerns is to allow the foreign direct investment our governments are so hell-bent on to occur within and only within partnerships between foreign enterprise and local enterprise in industries that are fundamental to building and sustaining the economy and therefore the country.
This unique and very specific type of foreign direct investment through joint local partnerships only in vital, productive industries will help to increase domestic investment (I), which encourages consumer spending (C) increases, and increases exports (X) by the domestic production sector, which in turn reduces the need for government interjection and intervention (G) in what should be a free market.
The joint foreign-domestic partnership model in key industries also helps support the pegged exchange rate/value of the Bahamian dollar with respect to the U.S. dollar and prevents the likelihood of devaluation because you now have real trade of real exports produced by a real domestic sector, which engages in real productivity. And all of this is better in every way for all consumers.
o Nicole Burrows in an academically trained economist. She can be contacted at: nicole.burrows@outlook.com.

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News Article

May 17, 2012
Bernard Patrick Burrows, 45

Bernard Patrick Burrows
1963-2008

Don't grieve for me now I'm free, I am following the path God laid for me,I took his hand when I heard him call, I turned my back and left it all,
I could not stay another day to laugh, to love , to work or play.
Tasks left undone must stay that way.
 
If my parting has left a void, fill it with remembered joy,
A friendship shared, a laugh, my life's been full I savoured much,
Good friends, good times a loved one's touch,
Perhaps my times here seemed all too brief, don't lengthen it now with undue grief,
Light up your hearts and share with me, God wants me now, he set me free

On September 8th a lovely baby boy was born to the late Sybil and Leorard Burrows .  He was given the name Bernard Patrick Burrows. He began his formal education at Sandiland Primary School and later went on to L.W.Young Junior & Senior high School.

After leaving high School he picked up the trade as a Carpenter at Treco  Construction Company. Later he went to work as a mate on a boat for Ted Knowles, where he developed his love for the sea.  At that time he knew that was his calling, so he went back to Scholl to obtain his Captain's license. He worked as a mate for many years before becoming a boat Captain. After a number of years Bernard purchased his own boat were he became a successful fishing boat Charter operator until his untimely demise.

Left to cherished his memories are his loving and devoted wife Arnetter Burrows and two daughters Aderia and Antiniqua Burrows. Two sisters-in-law Derry Ferguson and Dellarese Mcphee, two brothers-in-law Cavalle Ferguson and Junior Mcphee., and a host of other relative and friends too numerous to mention.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Words are not enough to express our sincere thanks and appreciation for the love and support that you all have given us over they past three and half years. For whatever you did to console us during this time of our bereavement when we so desperately needed your understanding, we THANK YOU.  Our sorrow and grief are easier to bear with help from God and compassionate family and friends like you.

MAY GOD'S RICHEST BLESSING BE UPON YOU ALL.
THE FAMILY

MEMORIAL SERVICE

Memorial Service for the late Bernard Burrows age 45 years of Eastwood Estate will be held on Saturday May 19 2012 at St. Anselm Catholic Church, Bernard Road at 4:00 p.m. Officiating will be Monsignor Preston Moss. Interment will follow in the church cemetery.

Left to cherished his memories are his loving and devoted wife Arnetter Burrows and two daughters Aderia and Antiniqua Burrows. Two sisters-in-law Derry Ferguson and Dellarese Mcphee, two brothers-in-law Cavalle Ferguson and Junior Mcphee., and a host of other relative and friends too numerous to mention.

The book of condolences may be signed at the church on Saturday from 3:00p.m. until service time.

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News Article

May 17, 2012
John Kelly, 76

Funeral service for John Kelly, 76 yrs., a resident of Twynam Heights & formerly of Long Bay, Andros, who died on 6 May, 2012, will be held at Metropolitan Baptist Church, Hay Street, on Saturday at 11:00 a.m. Officiating will be Rev. Dr. George Kelly, assisted by other Ministers of the Gospel. Interment follows in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, JFK Drive.

Left to cherish his memories are his 6 children: Nurse Bettymae Kelly-Sawyer, Leverne, John Jr. & Edison Kelly, Brian & Darlene Kelly; 3 brothers: Rev. George Kelly, Richard & Vincent Kelly; 2 sisters: Rebecca & Patricia Kelly Brown; 30 grandchildren: Stacy, Edward Sr., Lotoya, Indira, Thecula, Jasmine, Brittany, Torshekia, Rishea, Jason, Lathera, Edison Jr., Eltora, Emmeron, Lavenia, LaQuisha, Tyeshia, Cashe, Jonae, Triston, Clydra, Clydecia, Cordero, Moesha, Brian Jr., Ashley, Tyiesha, Peron, Briesha & Darlnae; 23 great grand children: Christon, Kevineek, Estafon, Kevin Jr., Quentinique, Saniyah, Edward Jr., Demetrius, Edrico, Edwardnique, Latovia, Lahsantae, Kahli, Kahanta, Antonique, Cionne, Alexandria, Logan, LaQuan, Destiny, Ciara, Reniyah & Rodnae; 2 uncles: Irvin & James Kelly; 2 sons-in-law: Walter Sawyer & James Grant; daughter-in-law: Gwendolyn Kelly; 3 brothers-in-law: Cedric Duvaulier, James Pratt & Arthur Brown; 5 sisters-in-law: Martha & Silvia Duvaulier, Mildred Burrows, Dr. Coralee & Mildred Kelly; numerous nieces & nephews, grand nieces & nephews, other relatives & friends including: the Nottage family, the McKenzie family, the Forbes family, Percy Knowles, Ezeliel Prince, Beatrice, Stella, Qyentin & the entire Long Bay Community.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

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News Article

June 28, 2012
Time for the youth to come alive

To combat a society where the youth are settling for mediocre existences and idolizing criminal lifestyles the Bahamas Faith Ministries (BFM) Youth Ministry will host its annual Youth Alive series of events.
The week-long event which will be held Monday, July 2 to Sunday, July 8 at the Diplomat Center on Carmichael Road and will help to refocus the youth to find value in excellence and learn to pursue greatness in their undertakings.
This year's theme "Steps to Greatness," it is hoped will encourage the youth to aspire to greatness and tell them how to do it.
A Youth Alive Summer Camp, which will engage the younger children, between the ages of seven and 18 will kick-off the event. The children will hear from to speakers who will talk to them about aspiring to greatness and how to make the small changes they will have to in their everyday lives in order to achieve their goals.
Pastor Dave Burrows and BFM senior pastor Myles Munroe will speak.
For the Youth Alive Conference which starts on Wednesday, July 4, a host of dynamic speakers will speak on various aspects of acquiring greatness.
Pastor Mike Hill, a youth ministry specialist from St. Louis, Missouri, will speak on making greatness a choice.
Much like he made a choice to stop being a secular recording artist and follow more closely the traditions of Christ, he will encourage young people to turn away from what is wrong and instead reach for better and more spiritual means to express themselves.
Pastor Dave will address steps to greatness, and break it down into mini themes like courage, character and vision.
Pastor Munroe will speak to the youth on how to be leaders despite their age. He will use his own life story as a way to inspire them.
Eric Fox, director of the youth focused organization for troubled young men, Teen Challenge, will also speak to the youth. The former drug addict will address overcoming obstacles and staying focused despite peer pressure to do otherwise.
Raymond Eneas, a young man who lived on the streets but was determined to do better than people expected of him will also speak about pursuing greatness with a passion. He will encourage the youth to keep on striving to be better than they even dream.
Youth director of Church of God of Prophecy, Pastor Timothy Johnson will speak on determining to be great and staying focused. His message to the youth will be that they can be all they want to be if they keep their eye on the prize.
For the Thursday ladies night, Pastor Angie Burrows from BFM will speak about inner beauty and greatness as it is important for her to help young people understand that it is what is in their head and heart and not what's on it that is the most vital part of life.
Brooke Eneas, a former Miss Florida Panhandle will also speak from a woman's perspective on the topic of making choices on the road to greatness. She will discuss how she acquired her master's degree and owned her own home before she had attained her 25th birthday. She will speak to the choices she made in her life to achieve her goals. She hopes the young people will take heed so they too can get where they want to go in life.
On Saturday, July 7, the annual Youth Alive concert will take place featuring gospel artists Trinidad's Sherwin Gardner, Millyon from Georgia and local artists Landlord, DJ Counsellor, Lyrically Blessed, Manifest, Ruben Heights and Najie Dunn.
The Youth Alive boat cruise closes out the week of activities on Sunday, July 8.
"At the end of the day after all the talking, singing, drama and praising I hope young people walk away feeling encouraged and inspired to pursue greatness and not settle for mediocrity," said Pastor Dave. "I want them to set goals and make plans spiritually, professionally and in other aspects of their lives. I want them to see they have the power within them to help make The Bahamas a better place. They are great and we believe in them. And with this event we as the current generation and church leaders hope to show them what we see. They all have so much potential but sometimes they just need a little boost in the right direction," he said.

Youth Alive Camp
When: Monday, July 2 - Friday, July 6
Where: Diplomatic Center, Carmichael Road
Time: 9 a.m.-1 p.m. daily
Cost: $35

Youth Alive Conference
When: Wednesday, July 4 - Friday, July 6
Where: Diplomat Center, Carmichael Road
Time: 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the daytime, 7:30 p.m. until for evening sessions.
Cost: $35 optional (conference materials and tickets to concert and boat cruise)

Youth Alive Concert
When: Saturday, July 7
Where: Diplomat Center, Carmichael Road
Time: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: $10

Youth Alive Boat Cruise When: Sunday, July 8
Departure: Prince George Wharf
Time: 7 p.m.
Cost: $15

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News Article

November 15, 2014
BFM announces events to honour Dr Myles Munroe

BAHAMAS Faith Ministries (BFM) Senior Pastor and Board of Governors chairman Dave Burrows announced yesterday a series of events in honour of Dr Myles Munroe, who perished along with eight others, including his wife Ruth, in Sunday's plane crash in Grand Bahama.

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News Article

August 25, 2012
A look at the adaptation of Shakespeare's 'Merchant of Venice'

In its fourth year, Shakespeare in Paradise presents its version of another classic by William Shakespeare. As in previous years, with "The Tempest" being set on a local cay and "A Midsummer Night's Dream" set in Cat Island 1910, this year's adaptation of "Merchant of Venice" promises not to be your grandfather's Shakespeare.
"Merchant" director Gordon Mills recalled, "There was a synchronous moment earlier this year when I mentioned to [SiP Artistic Director] Philip Burrows that I thought 'Merchant of Venice' would be a great vehicle for the feature Shakespeare production this year. Philip replied that he had been thinking along the same lines."
"After we talked about the possibilities of Bahamianizing Shakespeare's script setting the play in Nassau, changing Shylock from a Jew to a Haitian Philip asked me to go ahead and adapt it and then asked me if I would like to direct it too. At that moment, 'Merchant' was set in motion."
As Mills points out, the two main plot lines remain the same, but the adaptation brings the story into a 21st century Bahamian setting.
"Merchant" follows Bassanio, a young man from Nassau, who has no money, but wishes to go to Acklins to win the heart of the fair Portia. He asks his friend Antonio to lend him some money, but Antonio's cash is tied up in his shipping business. However, he agrees to be the guarantor if Bassanio can arrange a deal with one of the loan sharks on Bay Street.
Bassanio strikes a deal with Shylock, a Haitian moneylender, made wealthy by his Cash for Gold establishments and numbers houses. Shylock, who is no friend of Antonio's, wants only revenge for Antonio's mistreatment and prejudice against him, asking for a pound of his flesh if he cannot pay.
Inspired by the Bahamian adaptation of "Othello", brought to audiences this year in Nassau and London by Yellowtale Theatre Company, Mills managed to pare down the scenes and characters in order to bring a cast of 20 or more down to 12.
This year, "Merchant" will be the main production offered to junior and senior high school students as part of the festival's student outreach program.
"I have long believed," said Mills, "that careful reworking and adapting of Shakespeare's texts is absolutely vital to bringing more young people to a greater appreciation of the richness not only of the poetry and the words, but also of the stories and the twists and turns of plot that Shakespeare so expertly weaves."
According to Burrows, "The most rewarding aspect of the festival for me has been the introduction of theatre to thousands of students over the past three years. And this year with the production of 'Merchant' we actually get to let the students see a work that they are presently studying on the syllabus."
As the festival draws near, Shakespeare in Paradise is also elated to confirm its Caribbean offerings.
Out of Jamaica and in celebration of Jamaica's 50th anniversary of independence, the University Players presents "Not About Eve". Written by Karl O. Williams and directed by Brian Heap, this award-winning play explores the role of women in society, especially with regards to gender identity, feminism and sexuality.
In celebration of Trinidad and Tobago's 50th anniversary of independence, Shakespeare in Paradise presents "Lion City Live", featuring Freetown. This duo seeks to awaken a social consciousness, especially within the Caribbean, through poetry and music. Freetown is currently developing its first album, which will be featured in a Blue Cinamon Group film, called "God Loves the Fighter" to be released this year.
The fourth annual Shakespeare in Paradise Theatre Festival will take place October 5-13, 2012.

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