Search results for : bahama mama

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News Article

December 16, 2010
Mamadoos Restaurant offers you Lunch, Dinner and Sunday Brunch

Freeport, Grand Bahama Island - In
May 2010, the proprietors of  Island Java located in Port Lucaya, began
operations of a new restaurant in the Port Lucaya Marketplace on Grand
Bahama Island. The restaurant is known as Mamadoo's Restaurant, or
simply

Mamadoo's where local cuisine meets Bahamian creativity.

The Restaurant features a signature line of innovative Bahamian
inspired seafood and barbeque dishes, with gourmet pizzas/flat
bread along with fruit infused vodka like sappa dilly, love vine, guava,
mango and tamarind...

read more »


News Article

June 29, 2013
Review: Lelawattee Manoo-Rahming's 'Imortelle and Bhandaaraa Poems'

"Immortelle and Bhandaaraa Poems" is Trinidadian-born artist and building services engineer Lelawattee Manoo-Rahming's second volume of poetry, published by Proverse Hong Kong in March 2011.
This collection, which was the finalist for the inaugural Proverse Prize, consists of over 50 poems, a concise glossary of terms and an array of mixed media images.
In fact, one of the first things to captivate the reader is the front cover, an image created by Manoo-Rahming herself. This is indeed a perfect point of departure, so let's start there.
The cover-page is made up of seemingly torn up pieces of paper fused together to create the distinctive image of the Immortelle, which as the writer explains in her glossary, is a type of tree that "used to be planted as shade trees in coco plantations of Trinidad and Tobago".
The fiery red flowers are set against a watery background, a brilliant blue sky and whispers of cotton-wool like clouds. Visible are the many tears in the paper, strategically pieced together by Manoo-Rahming, creating a coherent whole and in this case, a picture that tells a story of a thousand words. As highlighted in the volume's introductory comments, the brilliant color of the Immortelle's flowers is reminiscent of the flames in Hindu cremation ceremonies, which draws directly on the writer's Indian descent. The cover then becomes a symbol of Manoo-Rahming's Indo-Caribbean experience and in turn, acts as a precursor for the entire collection.
This syncretism is expressed in more ways than one in the collection. Not only does Manoo-Rahming combine aspects of her Trinidadian birth place, her Bahamian home, with that of India, especially evident in the use of vernacular, she also combines the visual with the poetic - a sure indication of her skill set.
The visuals are not to be treated in isolation (though one can appreciate them independent of the verse), but rather should be considered as working in conjunction with the poems, adding a visual dimension to a particularly intimate set of words.
The seven images contained in the volume each correspond to a poem in "Immortelle and Bhandaaraa". The cover page image, for example, corresponds to a poem in memory of Ras Shorty, or Lord Shorty, who combined African rhythms with Indian instruments to create Soca. Cleverly then, there is a dual-narrative at work here and indeed in the entire collection, where the visual interacts with the text (and vice versa), which as Sandra Pouchet Paquet argues, generates a tension as well as transforming the reading experience.
Integrating visuals into a poetry collection is proving particularly popular of late with Caribbean writers, and in turn really does serve to represent two dominant forms of artistic expression in the region. Though a wonderful addition to Manoo-Rahming's volume, and indeed necessary for its overall purpose, I believe the positioning of the images has lessened their function, if only very slightly: the images are all placed together at the beginning of the collection and not, as I would expect, next to their related poems. As such, there is a little less ease to the reading experience than there might be if the images were next to their corresponding poems. That way one could experience the image in even closer proximity to its poetic counterpart so that the tension between the two forms would be heightened even further.
Nevertheless, had the publisher positioned these visual additions differently then the reader would not be bombarded with the sensory wonderfulness and psychedelic magic of "Mandala", which is the first thing that hits the reader when they open the collection.
The color in this opening image mirrors the explosion of sentiment in the poems that follow. And just like the branches of the Immortelle on the cover page, these poems reach outward, as a means of dealing with the heavy emotions addressed in the subject matter.
The collection, divided into five sections, each named after goddesses (Bhavani, Durga, Coatrischie, Hecate and Shakti), has a strong female voice. The poet grapples with a whole host of themes including life, death and even rape.
In a poem called "The Colour of Rape", for example, Manoo-Rahming skilfully poeticizes the sheer brutality of this act in such a way as to create a series of questions that interrogate the subject. In doing so, Manoo-Rahming asks what colors can effectively represent the physical, emotional and mental effects of rape: "Can a charcoal pencil / Draw grey obscure shape/ Of battered self-esteem?" The fiery provocation of "The Colour of Rape" is contrasted by earlier poems about the loss of loved ones, and as Pouchet Paquet rightly points out, "This is the work of mourning."
In fact, most of the poems in the opening sections are dedicated to people who have passed away. This part of the collection is representative of the poet's ability to move seamlessly between different memories, portraying sentiment, gratitude and grief in carefully constructed, effortless verse. And the poems do appear to be effortless as if the poet is recalling moments, not as a stream of consciousness because these are cleverly crafted words but there is certainly an ease, where the words roll off the tongue.
"Mirror Glimpses", for example, is about the loss of the poet's mother and sister. The opening verse reads: "Mama your face followed/ me to this place. It hopped/ a ride in my genes/ like a scorpion/ that smuggled itself/ from Long Island to Nassau/ in my bag of cookies. I took it as a sign: Sally will die". This poem has such immediacy and the poet's matter-of-fact tone, stating the impending death of her sister makes the verse even more hard hitting. But there's also a sweet vulnerability here, which gets to the reader, effervesces, slowly but surely.
Other poems in the collection reach out to Caribbean spaces and the region's fauna for inspiration, while others take a more inward look. See, for example, "The Poet" towards the end of the collection where Manoo-Rahming uses metaphor to poeticise the poet's role:
A poet is one who finds the rents
The ruptures in our quiltlike cores
Unravels the broken threads
Collects them into balls of fibers
Spins them into rainbow-colored yarn
Weaves an unpatterned fabric
With which she mends by hand
Gently ever so gently
Crevices in quilted psyches
Just like the poet who spins multi-colored yarn, Manoo-Rahming's "Immortelle and Bhandaaraa Poems" is a vibrant collection, which fuses the visual and the poetic. The volume covers a range of themes; some more harrowing than others but does so in such a way as to soothe, interrogate and stimulate the human psyche.

Biography
Manoo-Rahming was born in Trinidad in 1960. She is married to a Bahamian, and lives in Nassau, Bahamas. Lelawattee is a poet, fiction and creative non-fiction writer and essayist. She further expresses her creativity and seeks enlightenment through sculpture and drawing. She has won essay and art awards in The Bahamas. Internationally, she has won the David Hough Literary Prize (2001) and the Canute A. Brodhurst Prize (2009) for Short Fiction and was overall winner of the Commonwealth Broadcasting Association (CBA) Short Story Competition (2001). Her first book of poetry, "Curry Flavour", was published in 2001 in England. Lelawattee is a practicing mechanical/building services engineer and is president and co-owner, with her husband, of a consulting engineering firm in Nassau, Bahamas. Her poetry and short stories have appeared in many publications in the Caribbean, the UK, U.S. and Holland.
Leanne Haynes recently finished a PhD at the University of Essex, which was funded by the Arts and Humanities Research. Her thesis focused on St. Lucian literature and mapped out the island's rich literary landscape. She also completed her MA (postcolonial studies) and BA (literature) at the University of Essex. Haynes has presented material at conferences in the UK and Europe. She is a keen creative writer and amateur photographer, with publications in the UK and U.S.

o Reprinted with the permission of arcthemagazine.com.

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News Article

July 02, 2011
Simmer down and stirring it up

Chef Devan McPhee remembers vividly the day he went to church and was asked by his pastor what he wanted to be in life. The youngster, seven or eight at the time, thought back to the fact that he had been watching the Food Network before he left out of the house that Sunday morning, having just gotten cable installed, and said he wanted to be a chef because he'd just seen them on television.  His pastor prophesied that young McPhee would be one of the best chefs The Bahamas would see and at a very young age at that.
That pastor's prophecy seems to be coming true as Chef McPhee, now 25, owns his own restaurant and bar.  It was just in May that he signed on the dotted line to lease the Simmer Down Restaurant and Stir It Up Bar at the Marley Resort on Cable Beach where he's certainly simmering some amazing pots and stirring up delicious libations.
Simmer Down Restaurant showcases a fusion of Bahamian and Jamaican food with an international flair as he complements the cuisine with French and European touches and relies on lots of spices and herbs to his foods making him one of the hottest young chefs in the country.
"Our theme in the kitchen is we always cook with love and we serve food prepared with love, and translating that over to the bar, we provide drinks to complement the food," he says.
Even though he's new to the restaurant ownership business, Chef McPhee is not new to the kitchen and definitely not new to the Simmer Down Restaurant kitchen as he was the executive chef prior to the resort closing for 10 months. Upon its reopening, he gladly took charge of his own fate, switching up the menu to reflect his cooking style and his Bahamian heritage, and he's kept some of the old favorites that were hits.
While the menu is exciting all around and offers something for everyone -- including vegetarians, the chef says there are a few menu items that are chef's choice and a must try -- items he considers his signature items.
From the soups, the Lobster and Pumpkin Bisque (infused with ginger and curry, topped with a cinnamon cream dollop) he gives two thumbs up.

"It's a burst of flavors and not what you expect with the fresh ginger, curry and cinnamon cream dollop.  Lobster bisque is standard on restaurant menus, but when you taste the pumpkin in there with the ginger ... the pimentos, the fresh thyme, it's a burst of flavor and then the cinnamon cream dollop mellows it out."
While he says all salads are good, he's most pleased with his Caribbean lobster and mango salad that he says he came up with off the fly.  "I was poaching some lobster for the lobster bisque one day and there was some mango on the table, and I saw the yellow and the white and some cherry tomatoes and I said let's try something.  I marinated it in a passion fruit dressing with fresh basil, ginger ...  I played around with it and I tried it as a chef's special that night with a blueberry balsamic drizzle to go with it to bring out the color, topped it off with fresh greens and toasted coconut and it was a hit."  From that night it made the menu.
If he's sitting down to dine, he opts for a callaloo and spinach vegetable empanada, just to add a different touch to the courses if you're having a three-course meal.  It's also a dish he says vegetarians would appreciate as well as it's healthy.  The baked empanada is a puff pastry stuffed with Jamaican cheddar cheese which he says balances out the flavors of the callaloo and bitterness of the spinach.
The Down Home Roasted Organic Duck (marinated in pineapple and Bacardi rum with island gratin potatoes, broccoli rabe and cinnamon glazed carrots) makes this restaurant owner proud.  It's presented with a sweet potato gratin, garnished with fried plantain and they make a pineapple and coconut rum sauce to go with it.
The Bahamian lobster duo (coconut cracked conch and broiled with a Jamaican vegetable run down, homemade mango chutney and drizzled with a lobster essence) is another menu favorite.  
And you should not leave the Simmer Down Restaurant without trying dessert.  The must have item is the Mama Lur's apples 'n cream (a warm crumble with fresh apples, and fresh guavas with ginger vanilla ice cream and apple cider reduction).
Chef McPhee says he gets his guavas from the islands and freezes them for this dessert, because he says there's nothing like the taste of real guava.  They also make their own ice cream and the dish is topped off with caramelized pecans, crème caramel and finished with toasted coconut.
With a number of other options on the menu, Chef McPhee prefers to keep his menu small and personalized.  But he intends to change the menu with the seasons.  As we are in the summer months, the menu reflects a lot of fruits, colorful sauces and dressings.  In the fall and winter he intends to pull out ingredients like star anise and cinnamon to warm things up, and offer heartier options like rib eye and tenderloin and a lot more soups to go with the cooler temperatures.
With a kitchen staff he handpicked because they had the same vision that he had for the restaurant and bar that he now owns.  "I picked them because I wanted to share my knowledge with tem and I didn't want anyone who would be complacent because they'd been working here prior to the resort closing," said Chef McPhee.  "I wanted to start fresh.  I wanted it to be like night and day and the first thing I did was to reduced menu prices drastically, because people loved the place, but they talked about the prices, and I try to work with the locals pocket," he says.  The chef even offers a daily three-course prix fixe meal special that changes weekly.  For $55 you get a soup or salad and usually it's the lobster bisque or shrimp appetizer; you get a choice of the jerk chicken medallion or the chef's special which is the fish of the day, and a dessert -- either the Mama Lur's Apples and Cream or the Caribbean Chocolate Vibes.
"Going into this I knew I had to do something different, because the place had already existed and try to get that same market, but make it my market," says Chef McPhee.

To make your Simmer Down Restaurant experience unique, he offers a different experience nightly.   He came up with "Taxi Nights" on Monday and Tuesdays to catch the tourist market; Wine Down Wednesdays for people who like wine and free tapas; and Thursday and Fridays are corporate happy hour when he does exotic martinis and specials and Saturdays are known as stirred up and sizzlin'.   A five member jazz band On Cue performs from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays as well.
At 25, Chef McPhee's future is in his own hands as a restaurant owner, but he says as an apprentice chef while he trained under many great chefs in the hotels, he realized he didn't want that to be him -- working in the same kitchen year after year, becoming programmed.  He wanted to make a name for himself

"Even though it's a risk, the good thing about it is that I took this venture because it's a smaller operation where I could start out small and gradually grow to the level that I want to be at ... and I was already familiar with the place [Simmer Down Restaurant] and it was just a matter of polishing up some stuff, getting the menu together and choosing the right staff."
Chef McPhee credits Chef Addiemae Farrington of the Culinary Hospitality Management Institute, the late Chef Jasmine Clarke-Young, Chef Paul Haywood of Altantis, Chef Wayne Moncur of the Ocean Club and Chef Tracey Sweeting (his former executive chef at the Marley Resort) with giving him the training that has given him so much confidence to do what he's now doing.
"They trained me so well in all areas that I'm able to be creative and do what I'm doing, with hot food because I'm a trained pastry chef," said Chef McPhee.  "They really gave me a good school bag to carry.  I can pull out things and be versatile.  Plus, it's in my heart, and you have to cook with love.  You can have the fancy name, and your food can look pretty, but that passion and soul has to be in it."
Chef McPhee even keeps his kitchen open a little longer than most restaurants, taking his last order at 10:30 p.m. after opening at 6 p.m.
For the chef, the new venture is fun, but scary as he knows he has the livelihood of his staff in his hands.
At Stir It Up Bar he says you have to have the Blue Razzberry Martini and the Jamaica Me Crazy. It just sounds crazy and it's fun and people enjoy them.  I wanted to add my flair to the menu and these are my signature ones.  They're new to the menu, because coming into the restaurant and bar business, I had to bring something new to the table.  I reduced the drink prices too and kept it straight across the board.
It's new, it's scary but fun, because you have the livelihood of staff in your hands and they have to be paid.  "I realize what it is to be an employee and now an employer, even though I'm at a young age.  It's like you have an additional pair of eyes -- you watch everything, things you didn't care about before you now care about -- even on the service aspect. "

CARIBBEAN SPICY SHRIMP APPETIZER WITH POTATO AND SWEET CORN PUREE

6 - 16/20 shrimp
½ oz Jerk seasoning
2 oz homemade ginger and garlic chili sauce
½ oz herb marinade
For the potato and sweet corn puree
½ lb Yukon potato, cooked
4 oz sweet corn puree
3 oz heavy cream
1 oz butter
Sugar, to taste
Salt and pepper, to taste
For the tropical fruit salsa:
4 oz fresh mango diced
4 oz fresh ripe pineapple diced
1 oz bell pepper fine diced
1 oz  red onion diced
1 oz distilled white vinegar
1 tsp fresh cilantro
Juice of 1 orange
2 oz fresh banana mashed
Salt and pepper, to taste
Honey as needed

Method:
Combine ingredients in a stainless steel bowl and mix together, season to taste with alt and pepper and let stand 30 minutes before serving.

For the shrimp: Season the shrimp with salt and jerk seasoning and herb marinade, let stand 30 minutes. Grill to desired doneness and top with chili sauce, Finish shrimp in the oven and serve.
For the potato and sweet corn puree: Puree ingredient together to desired taste and consistency, season and serve. Garnish with herb oil and chips. Combine all ingredients together and blend thoroughly.
For the tropical fruit salsa: Combine ingredients in a stainless steel bowl and mix together, season to taste with alt and pepper and let stand 30 minutes before serving.

CARIBBEAN MANGO AND LOBSTER SALAD

1 lb spiny lobster meat cooked and sliced
1 oz Spanish onion fine diced
2 oz fresh cherry tomatoes chopped
Juice of 2 lemons
2 large mangoes
1 oz ginger chopped
1 tsp salt
Salt and fresh goat pepper

1 oz chopped cilantro
1 tsp sugar
4 oz passion fruit dressing

Combine ingredients in a mixing bowl; add enough dressing to bind ingredients. Be sure to season with salt and pepper. Mix, chill and serve. Garnish with micro greens chilled asparagus and a lemon vinaigrette.

MAMA LURR'S APPLES 'N CREAM

4 Granny smith apples
1 can uava shells
1 tsp cinnamon
½ cup sugar
1 tsp salt
1 star anise
1 tsp lemon juice
¼ tbs butter
½ oz flour
3 oz home made vanilla ice cream
Toasted coconut
Crumble:
½ cup butter
1 ¼ cup flour
2 tbs sugar
2 tbs raisins
2 tbs crushed almonds/ walnuts

Peel and slice apples. In sauce pan melt butter, sugar, cinnamon, lemon juice and star anise. Add guavas and sliced apples. Let simmer for about two minutes. Thicken slightly with flour.  Place in bowl and allow to set.

For crumble: Fold in at room temperature butter with the flour into small pieces. Add sugar, raisins, and almonds.  Place on top of apple and guava mixture and bake for 4-8 minutes. Serve with ice cream and add toasted coconut.

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News Article

September 14, 2011
'Bahama Mama' inaugural art exhibition at Public Treasury

Nassau, Bahamas - The walls of five floors of
the Public Treasury Department, East Street are to be turned into a
veritable art gallery in honour of Bahamian women.

 

Entitled 'Bahama Mama',
the exhibition will feature aspiring young Bahamian women artists some
of whom have already made significant impact internationally.

 

It officially opens to the
public September 26 at 5:30 p.m. This session will last for five months
and can be viewed at normal office hours.

..

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News Article

January 18, 2011
Mamadoos Restaurant offers you Lunch, Dinner and Sunday Brunch

Freeport, Grand Bahama Island - In
May 2010, the proprietors of  Island Java located in Port Lucaya, began
operations of a new restaurant in the Port Lucaya Marketplace on Grand
Bahama Island. The restaurant is known as Mamadoo's Restaurant, or
simply

Mamadoo's where local cuisine meets Bahamian creativity.

The Restaurant features a signature line of innovative Bahamian
inspired seafood and barbeque dishes, with gourmet pizzas/flat
bread along with fruit infused vodka like sappa dilly, love vine, guava,
mango and tamarind...

read more »


News Article

January 12, 2011
What to drink

When enjoying a bite to eat and a game or two on the flat screen televisions at the Prop Club Sports Bar &?Grill at the Our Lucaya Beach &?Golf Resort in Freeport, Grand Bahama, bartender, Michael Glinton’s advice is that you wash down the delicious food with either their signature drink — The Propeller — or the property’s namesake drink — Our Lucaya Delight.
But they also have an assortment of mixed drinks, and tropical and frozen drinks on the menu like the Bahama Mama (Castillo Rum, Coconut rum, Orange Juice, Pineapple Juice, Grenadine and Angostura), Goombay Smash (Coconut rum, Castillo Rum, Pineapple juice, lemon juice and simple syrup), M ...

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News Article

July 06, 2011
DIRadioCast to Host the Celebration of the 38th Anniversary of The Bahamas Independence in Atlanta

Atlanta, GEORGIA -  Bahama Mamas,
Ann Marie Turner  and Gaylene Francis in association with MIX MASTER
DAVID present The Celebration of The 38th Anniversary of The Bahamas
Independence under the theme "United in Love and Service" hosted by
Bahamian national and international media personality AFRICA-ALLAH of diradiocast.com.  Special Guest appearances by Bahamian Rap Artists
RAPPQuelle and Sosa Man Major  courtesy of DIRadioCast.

2011 has been a celebratory year for Bahamians residing in Georgia.
After an outstanding Peachtree Carnival turnout, Memorial Day Weekend
and a well attended Caribbean heritage display at The Capital in June,
Bahamian promoters have been inspired to reach out to the Bahamian
community...

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News Article

July 04, 2011
DIRadioCast to Host the Celebration of the 38th Anniversary of The Bahamas Independence in Atlanta

Atlanta, GEORGIA -  Bahama Mamas, Ann Marie Turner  and Gaylene Francis in association with MIX MASTER DAVID present The Celebration of The 38th Anniversary of The Bahamas Independence under the theme "United in Love and Service" hosted by Bahamian national and international media personality AFRICA-ALLAH of diradiocast.com.  Special Guest appearances by Bahamian Rap Artists RAPPQuelle and Sosa Man Major  courtesy of DIRadioCast.

2011 has been a celebratory year for Bahamians residing in Georgia. After an outstanding Peachtree Carnival turnout, Memorial Day Weekend and a well attended Caribbean heritage display at The Capital in June, Bahamian promoters have been inspired to reach out to the Bahamian community...

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News Article

December 16, 2010
7 Course Tasting at Mamadoo's, December 17th

Freeport, Grand Bahama - Join us for a special evening of tasting at

Mamadoo's!

On

Friday, December 17th we will present a

7 Course Tasting Meal paired with an Italian Wine just for
you. Seats are limited, so make your reservations today!

Dinner starts at 7pm. Enclosed is our

7 Course Menu and more details...

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News Article

September 24, 2011
Bahama Mama

An old woman's face weathered by time gazes into the distance; a pregnant woman's glowing moment is captured in equally vivid colors; ceramics evoking our very bone and blood touches upon the dual forces of beauty and grotesque; language is generated into instant poetry or delivered as fast as bullets, as intently as a sermon, as sweetly as music.
All are funnelled into one gallery, and all have something to say about the complex theme of "Bahama Mama", chosen by the Public Treasury Art Program for their inaugural exhibition shortly after moving into their new building on East Street at the beginning of this year.
"Instead of investing in artwork they decided to establish a program which would allow for rotating exhibitions in the space," explains Keisha Oliver, the exhibition coordinator and also a participating artist.
They could not have chosen a better theme--or a better way to address it. That's because the participating artists--17 visual artists and 5 writers--are all female Bahamian artists.
"We wanted to start off with a celebratory theme that focused on a specific aspect of Bahamian culture," says Oliver. "We thought looking at female artists would be something very unique and timely."
If that sounds like we've been here before, it's because earlier this year, The D'Aguilar Art Foundation launched the exhibition "The F-Factor: Female Artists of The Bahamas", curated by Holly Parotti, which is still ongoing.
While "The F-Factor" more examines the historical contribution female artists have made to the Bahamian art scene, "Bahama Mama" shifts the focus to the present and provides a space for female artists--especially contemporary ones--to examine complex notions of feminity.
Nevertheless, the fact that The Bahamas has been the site of two major and equally excellent and thought-provoking exhibitions celebrating the female presence, perspective and history in its art world is both encouraging and exciting. It acknowledges the contribution female artists have made to the cultural consciousness and holds the promise of more to come.
"I think it is important just to have the female perspective, if only because our concept was to have an exhibition for Bahamian women by Bahamian women," says Oliver.
"I think most of the art that was submitted maintains a common thread of the Bahamian woman and motherhood," she continues. "We do also have artists who have touched on different aspects of femininity and Bahamian culture and struggle so there are a few that have gone out of the expected or traditional concepts."
It's even more encouraging that the exhibition by the Public Treasury Art Program--like the exhibition at The D'Aguilar Art Foundation--strove to include artists practicing in different mediums, even writing, to give viewers an idea of modern Bahamian art by female artists.
"The Public Treasury Art Program is about exposing art and culture in its entirety--so not just looking at visual arts but looking at other forms too," says Oliver.
"I think diversity is very important and its very evident in modern art that you have so many different things going on, so many different interpretations of one starting point," she continues. "It's so nice to be able to see that here, whether it's in photography, whether it's in tapestry, whether it's in painting or poetry."
In that same vein, the Public Treasury Art Program also aims to include artists living in the family islands and living or studying beyond our shores--including Anina Banks, Lillian Blades, Leanne Russell and Mardia and Ashely Powell. It all ties into their all-inclusive aim as an artistic venue in the country to educate Bahamians about modern art.
"Modern day art includes all things. Promoting artists that live abroad is just as important as promoting artists in Nassau because we're all part of this archipelago," says Oliver.
"Even now with the artwork being put up in the office space, you can see the people engaging more with the artwork and that's what it's about--starting conversations, starting interests," she continues.
"I think for the general public what we hope is that we can encourage Bahamian people to gain a degree of appreciation for modern art by giving them a hint of what's out there with such a diverse range of artists."
"Bahama Mama" opens this Monday September 26th, 2011 and is on display at the Public Treasury building on East Street until February 2012. They plan to hold a call for submissions for another themed exhibition early next year in what will be an annual or biannual schedule for the new venue.
"We'd like the general public to attend, students who are studying art in school or in college," says Oliver. "We also want parents to encourage their children to come out and see what are and culture is like in modern day Bahamas."
 

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