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News Article
Minister brushes off DNA threat to constituency

By TANEKA THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter

tthompson@tribunemedia.net

STATE Minister of Environment Phenton Neymour brushed off a possible threat to his constituency from political newcomer and third-party candidate Sammy Poitier.

The MP for South Beach said the newly-formed Democratic National Alliance (DNA) will soon come to the same realisation he did as a member of the now defunct Coalition for Democratic Reform (CDR) - that Bahamians want experienced representatives from one of the two major political parties.

"They are going where I have already been. I was in the CDR ... I was their chairman basically, I was a candidate and reality eventually will set in, in my opinion,...

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News Article
Letter: Is the time ripe for change

EDITOR, The Tribune.

"I'm taking my talents to South Beach!"

These are the famous words uttered by Lebron James last summer when he left the Cleveland Cavaliers and joined the Miami Heat. Lebron's announcement shook up the basketball world; and for good reason. You see Lebron James is arguably one of the best basketball players in the world. He has proven himself by becoming a perennial All Star Player and by being a fixture on the All NBA Team. The hype that Lebron created speaks to his superior talent as a basketball player.

During the past four weeks, Dr Andre Rollins and Mr Renward Wells took their talents to the PLP. Additionally, Mr Cassius Stuart took his ta ...

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News Article
Ingranomics Part 2

Last week we noted that although the Ingraham administration steered us through a treacherous period in world economic history it has not completely come up smelling like roses.  There have been some unpleasant consequences to the administration's choices and there were, in my view, many missed opportunities.

CULTURE AND INDUSTRY
The FNM's investments in tourism infrastructure (the harbor dredging, the port move and the new airport terminal), are largely making way for anticipated tourism growth in the medium to long-term. That's not necessarily a foolish or irresponsible choice to make.
The problem is such investments won't yield the desired results unless you seriously address some of the reasons The Bahamas is no longer a hot ticket.
We are facing ever diminishing returns in tourism.  Despite the millions who come here on cruise ships, what we really need are stopover visitors and this is where we've been dead in the water.  We have had more cruise ship visitors than stopover visitors since the mid 80s.
We are a far more expensive destination than many competitors south of us and that's not about to change.  But where we are also losing is that we are culturally far less interesting.  Not enough of an investment has been made to actually make The Bahamas a more distinct and attractive destination.  Beaches, casinos and sunshine can be found all over the globe and for a lot less than in Nassau.  Are we going to be offering "1 flies-1 flies free" deals and cruise ship tax rebates for the rest of the decade?
Many of us believe that the answer lies in the marriage of tourism and cultural and artistic expression.  Yet the government of The Bahamas refuses or is unable to act in a manner that encourages wider cultural entrepreneurship - entrepreneurship that can maximize local and tourist markets.  And to be fair, the private sector is even less interested in investing than the government.
Fortunately or unfortunately, depending on your perspective, Junkanoo is a Christmas festival not a spring festival like Mardi Gras or Trinidad or Rio Carnival.  The western world is just not going to travel heavily to be in another country on Christmas night or New Year's Day.  So what does that leave here in the capital?
The Fry (Arawak Cay) is the best attraction in Nassau, outside of Atlantis' casino, restaurants, clubs and water attractions.  It features local food, live music and atmosphere (at affordable prices, prices which no hotel can match).
How can we expand or duplicate what's best about the Fry?  What would it cost to do so?
Let's look at the FNM's track record. They rejected Carifesta twice.  They show contempt (like the PLP before them) for the run-down shell of a National Performing Arts Centre (which could be the year round home of the National Dance Company, Children's Choir, Youth Choir, Youth Orchestra, Police and Defence Force bands and a National Theatre Company).
They have made a ghost out of the Junkanoo Museum.  They don't seem to know what to do with Shakespeare in Paradise.  And they generally refuse to facilitate cultural workers in a sustained and comprehensive way in the tourist zones.
As a result, Nassau remains a dull, run-down, expensive place to visit.  We absorb all sorts of tax breaks for resort development.
In this period why couldn't we have been bold and taken some risks in an effort to improve The Bahamas as a cultural destination?  Hotels aren't destinations.  Cities, towns and countries are, but we settle for a country where the only thing people come for is to walk around in Atlantis.  And soon Baha Mar, I suppose.
But outside of the jobs these enclaves create, aren't we losing out on opportunities to truly maximize the tourist dollars spent on the island?
NUMBERS
Ingraham also flirted with legalizing numbers and then backed off, promising a referendum if he is re-elected.  This is leading from behind, which is not his style.
The Bahamian government is broke and the numbers business is a quarter to half a billion dollar enterprise that goes untaxed and unregulated.
The government has a right and a responsibility to tax the daylights out of this business, to bring it into the light of public scrutiny and to use the money it gains to help build the country and strengthen the social fabric.
Ingraham should have used this recession to regulate numbers.
Instead, a magistrate has confiscated nearly $1 million and fined businessman Craig Flowers $10,000.
By now Ingraham could have collected as much in taxes for numbers as he got in the BTC sale.  He should also have taxed alcohol more heavily as well.
 
TAXATION
I said earlier that if you are going to risk being voted out over something unpopular, you better make sure that the change you're introducing is worth it all.
I'm sorry but Ingraham could have left the roads bumpy, focused exclusively on fixing the eastern district water problem, and tackled a real problem instead of going through all this madness with the roads all at once.
What he should have done, again under the cover of the economic crisis, is address our regressive and unethical system of taxation that burdens the poor and middle class and lets the rich and their companies get away with all their cash.
Ingraham should have been the man to introduce income tax.  It's the perfect time to do so.  The pressure from the U.S. is leading us in that direction anyway.  Would he lose this election if he did so?  He may lose it over unfinished roads.
 

What I guarantee you though, is that the PLP would not have repealed it afterward.  The government needs revenue.  We have thousands of people on pension in the civil service who have contributed nothing to it but feel entitled.
The bubble will burst eventually.  NIB is already automatically removing a percentage of my salary before it hits my bank account.
I may never make a claim at NIB but I accept that my contribution helps those who need support more than I do.  Income tax is doable.
And thereby we can reduce these ridiculous customs duties that hamper the growth of Bahamian businesses because you are being taxed before you sell anything.  I reject the argument that the government can't handle income tax.  It can and so can our people.
 
DOWNSIZING?
I could talk about the fact that after downsizing ZNS, it is still operating at the same quality level as before, or about the FNM's refusal to touch Bahamasair despite the fact there are homegrown airlines who can pick up the slack.
But instead I wish to raise the question of right sizing the civil service.  I don't think this has to mean sending hundreds of people home and creating a social and economic crisis.  I mean actually moving people from posts where they are under-performing or are really redundant and re-training them to help plug holes elsewhere in the system.  I'll give just a few examples.
I once interviewed Loretta Butler-Turner, Minister of State for Social Development, and she told me that the nation could use another 150 social workers.  As you might imagine the social worker does crucial work that is essential to public health, public safety, crime prevention and the overall wellbeing of the society.  Why not re-deploy and re-train some of your civil servants to fill this need?
Our schools are overcrowded.  Every classroom could use a teacher's aid.  And what about the problem of truancy?  Or the need for environmental health inspectors to check homes and businesses, particularly given the occurrences of dengue.
There were creative options available to the government that would allow it to shift the public service work force to meet the greatest needs.  We need park wardens and after school mentors for our teenagers; we need these in every community.
The FNM just lacked a holistic, creative social vision and they failed to see how their economic choices and challenges could actually work for them not against them in the effort to build a stronger, better country.
They took the unemployed and had them cleaning the streets.  And sure, that met a need, because New Providence is filthy.  But in the same way, there were other serious needs that could have been met, not just with new hires but by properly utilizing the people you already have employed.
So overall, I'll describe Ingranomics as an orthodox approach, lacking in innovation or experimentation.  Ingraham played it safe, which can be a comfort in these unstable times.  But sometimes you can play it so safe that you get fired by the people anyway, because the times demand more daring.  We'll see what happens.
 

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News Article
Speed Week cars to zip through New Providence tomorrow

For seven hours throughout the day on Thursday, about 40 rare and exotic race cars will roar through New Providence at speeds of over 100 miles per hour, with thousands of spectators expected to pour out of schools, offices, homes and hotels to watch the parade of power, beauty and prowess.
The event, dubbed the 007 Island Tour, is the first opportunity for Bahamians to see local and foreign cars gathered for Bahamas Speed Week 2012, at top performance speeds. The series of events kicks off Wednesday with an official opening, complete with Le Mans start - each driver jumping into his or her car for the start - and the Governor General and event patron Sir Stirling Moss leading the ceremonial lap. The opening is set for 11 a.m. at Arawak Cay.
On Thursday, the parade of power begins at Arawak Cay with multimillions of dollars worth of exotic cars streaming, heading south through Chippingham and the Grove to stop first at the Oakes Monument. The route then takes them to Thompson Boulevard where the next stop is at the Shell Service Station, north again on Nassau Street to the waterfront and east along Bay Street all the way past Montagu, continuing along Eastern Road to Eastern Point, turning west at McPherson's Bend by Winton Highway, continuing west along Prince Charles with a stop at the intersection of Fox Hill Road. From there the tour continues west passing East West Highway, going on to Independence Drive, Tonique Williams-Darling Highway and turning south onto Milo Butler Highway for a long, fast stretch of open road, a slight north turn at Rock Plant Road, past Albany and on to Lyford Cay where the cars will be judged in the Concours d'Elegance, one of the highlights of the series of Speed Week events.
Following a luncheon for drivers and sponsors hosted by a driver who is also a club member, the cars will hit the road for the return trip, taking West Bay Street past Old Fort Bay, Love Beach, Sandyport, turning south onto Prospect Ridge, stopping at Premier Cru, Bristol Cellars, top of the hill at the intersection of Gladstone Road and heading back north to Saunders Beach to finish at the car paddock, Arawak Cay by 4:30 p.m.
"We know that from years past when the original Speed Weeks were held in Nassau from 1954-1966, teachers looked the other way as students poured out of schools and every boss who wanted happy staff allowed them to take a break and watch the cars whiz by," said David McLaughlin, Bahamas Speed Week Director. "The cars we have this year are even more extraordinary, partly because they are becoming more and more rare so we hope that the spectator crowd will be large. We know they will be thrilled."
Cars will compete on Saturday and Sunday with a Fort Charlotte hill climb and time trials on Saturday and side-by-side racing Sunday, with four cars at a time along widened roads at Arawak Cay and out to the northwest point where Arawak Port Development container port is based, allowing for a 1.6 mile circuit, a third longer than Speed Week 2011. Bleacher seats are available at BahamasSpeedWeekShop.com and Paddock Club or special event tickets through 394-0677. Local karters will interact with the 18-member Formula Kart Stars team from the UK throughout the weekend as the Kart Stars put on demonstrations to help revive karting in The Bahamas. The first world championship of karting was held in Nassau in 1959 and this week's visit by the UK team with school visits by the young drivers has reawakened interest throughout the island.

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News Article
Man bitten by shark

A man was airlifted to a South Florida hospital yesterday after being bitten by a shark off West End, Grand Bahama.
The United States Coast Guard said Jim Abernethy, 55, was on a diving excursion with the commercial diving vessel ‘Shear Water’ when he was bitten on the arm. The incident occurred 18 miles north of West End, the Coast Guard said.
Abernethy’s family-owned business (Jim Abernethy's Scuba Adventures) operates scuba dive charters from West Palm Beach, Florida, according to the company’s website.
A Coast Guard MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew from Air Station Clearwater, Florida, deployed in support of Operation Bahamas Turks and Caicos (OPBAT) locate ...

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News Article
Remembrance Day Service and Parade, November 14th

Freeport, Bahamas -

Mary, Star of the Sea Parish will host its

48th Annual Remembrance Day

Service on Sunday, November 14th, 2010 at 5:30 p.m.

 

The
parade will begin at 4:30 pm from the parking lot of the Government Complex
on The Mall and proceeds east on Adventurer's Way to Poinciana Drive;
west on Poinciana Drive to East Beach Drive; south on East Beach Drive
to Sunrise Highway; west on Sunrise Highway to Mary, Star of the Sea
Church.  All uniform branches are expected to be in place by 4:00 pm...

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News Article
FNM concerned over small home repairs program

Free National Movement (FNM) Chairman Darron Cash yesterday expressed concern over the Urban Renewal small home repairs program.
The program, which targets inner-city homes in need of small scale renovations, was launched last week. The government has allocated $10 million for that program in the current budget.
Cash said while the FNM supports the program, it is concerned about how the money will be distributed.
"This is not a new program, as it existed under the Free National Movement government," Cash said in a statement.
"It is important to note that the FNM regards this as a worthy public policy initiative that goes to the heart of meeting real needs of persons -- mainly the poor and elderly -- who have literally struggled to keep roofs over their heads.
"What is new is the announcement that the Christie administration will operate this program under the banner of Urban Renewal and in the process substantially increase the amount of funds assigned to the initiative.
"The FNM has cause for great concern. The last time this approach was taken, the Prime Minister and Minister of Finance, Rt. Hon. Perry Christie used portions of a $15 million slush fund to pay for certain elements of the government's 2012/2013 political agenda -- including urban renewal.
"To date, the Bahamian people have still not received a proper accounting of how the $15 million was spent, and we are almost half way through a second budget year."
In the 2012/13 budget, the government allocated $15 million to introduce initiatives like Urban Renewal 2.0 and facilitate home repairs and community improvement in the inner-city.
The FNM has repeatedly called for an accounting of how that money was spent.
"We have every reason to expect that even with the first cloud of suspicion over the heads of Christie administration officials about how the previous slush fund was used, and as yet another set of no-accountability bid contracts is issued, there is little reason for high confidence that this new process will be fair," he said.
"This administration's record thus far has been way too abysmal and far too many contractors marginalized to inspire confidence."
Cash said another "critical gap" in the program is that it fails to recognize the significant needs of working families in non-urban communities where the need for home repairs is prevalent.
He said many residents in areas like Carmichael, South Beach and Garden Hills among other areas are in desperate need of similar assistance.
"A key test will be the Christie administration's ability to identify needs in constituencies that their members do not represent," he said.
"The FNM will be watching closely to see if the sidelining of contractors believed to be supporters of the FNM will continue to be standard operating procedure in the Ministry of Works and Urban Development."
Urban Renewal also launched its foundation, which seeks donations to carry out additional home repairs.
At the launch of the Urban Renewal Foundation earlier this month, Deputy Prime Minister Philip Brave Davis assured that the small home repairs program will be transparent.
He noted that the co-chairs of the Urban Renewal Commission, former Deputy Prime Minister Cynthia 'Mother' Pratt, and former Member of Parliament Algernon Allen will oversee activities and approve expenditure of funds.
Davis said while the government has allocated a significant amount, the money is not sufficient to address the many programs that Urban Renewal is seeking to carry out.

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Event
Bambu's Kiss of Death Halloween Party
Bambu's "Kiss of Death" Halloween Party

Saturday 29th October 2011  9:00 PM

"Kiss of Death" Halloween Party Saturday, October 29 2011, at 9:00pm at Bambu. Free admission for Bambu members and ladies before 11:00 p.m. Drink Specials before 11:00 p.m. $1000.00 in Prizes for Best Costumes Bambu Music Bar & Lounge Newly Refurbished is now OPEN... Over looking Nassau's Harbor, Bambu's open air Music-bar brings European beach bar vibes to the Caribbean. Music at this club varies from Top 20 Pop to the Caribbean's only sexy Euro House session in tune with top house scene's like South Beach, Ibiza and Mykonos etc.


News Article
Shooting Incident in South Beach - Nassau Police Make Homicide Arrest - Investigate Discovery of a Male Found Dead

Nassau, Bahamas -

Police Make Homicide Arrest:

Two (2) juvenile males aged 17 and 16 years
are in police custody after officers from the Selective Enforcement Team
arrested them around 4:20pm on Wednesday 30th January 2013 for the
murder that occurred early that same day on Kingston Street off Kemp
Road...

Police Request Public's Help in Solving Shooting Incident: Police is requesting the public's assistance in solving a shooting incident that has left a 45-year old man detained in hospital...

 

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News Article
PLP South Beach branch executives may resign

Some of the executives in the Progressive Liberal Party (PLP) South Beach branch threatened to resign last night, after a meeting with the party to resolve the candidate nomination dispute in the area, The Nassau Guardian has learned.
The PLP appointed a 10-member committee to help bring resolution to the dispute.
In December, the PLP announced Bahamas Nurses Union President Cleola Hamilton as its South Beach candidate.
However, the South Beach branch recommended attorney Myles Laroda. The PLP’s constitution calls for the appointment of a committee when there are discrepancies between who the party selects as a candidate and who the branch recommends.
A source told The Guardian last night t ...

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News Article
Using Columbus to make money

Dear Editor,
I suspect that it has been going on for decades, but it has only come to my attention in recent years that France and Haiti are rival claimants to the historical fame that Alexandre Dumas represents.
The Dominican Republic and Spain are both claiming that Christopher Columbus is buried in their respective countries. Both countries, I suspect, earn revenue from tourists touring the rival burial sites. I know for sure that the Dominican Republic does.
And here we are, the only country in the world that can make the unrivaled claim of being the landfall of Europeans in the New World. But what are we earning from that fact? I suspect nothing, or nothing much.
I'll bet that the people of the Dominican Republic are also earning revenue from the existence, the possible existence, or the non-existence of La Navidad, even though in recent years I have heard the claim that such colony may have been in the part of Hispaniola now known as Haiti.
What is wrong with us? Where are our entrepreneurial instincts?
After one of the recent hurricanes in Freeport, safe drinking water was scarce and at a premium. So one of the foodstores was selling a gallon bottle of water for a dollar and people were lining up in the store to buy it. I am told that a Haitian man went into the store, bought every gallon bottle of water the store had to sell and went right outside in the store's own parking lot and sold every bottle at two dollars each. The idea would not have occurred to most Bahamians - to a few, no doubt - but most of us Bahamians would not have thought of that very intelligent business possibility.
The Ministry of Tourism employs many, many persons - too many, I'm sure - and has been doing so for many years. But nobody appears to have thought up the possibility of marketing the very important historical event of The Bahamas being the landfall of Columbus in the New World.
Let me tell them a secret: Columbus sells. There are some, shall we say, unwise persons who are campaigning to do away with Columbus and the holiday by which he is remembered, not only in this country but in the wider world.
Such persons are so, shall we say, unwise. You cannot do away with history. Columbus came. He first landed in our country. That is a historical fact. And we ought to market that historical fact. As I said, Columbus sells. And we ought to market him to the hilt. Cuss him, if you like, but market him.
Recently, I believe I heard that the government wants to market Mardi Gras and Carnival in this country. Why? Because other people have already thought it up and are marketing it? The idea is a low-hanging fruit; that is why its gaping existence has finally come to the notice of our tourism managers, our tourism "thinkers" sitting there all those years unable to come up with an original idea, even when it is right there staring at us from the pages of our history.
We must bring Columbus into our tourism product. Do so annually with related activities, over a week, say, that will include Discovery Day.
Do I correctly understand that our government has decided to do something else with Discovery Day? My God, how, shall we say, short-sighted and unwise.
We should build ourselves three ships of the period and name them the Pinta, the Nina and the Santa Maria, have a world-class celebrity come every year to play the role of Columbus and land on the beach near Arawak Cay, while the governor general (the cacique) shall be assembled at Haynes Oval to welcome him.
Now, you tourism "thinkers" can take it from there. Let your imaginations go wild.
It should be a spectacle rivaling the Carnivals at Trinidad, Rio and New Orleans, but not competing with them. If we try to do the Carnival thing, we will fail. You cannot compete with those festivals; certainly not in the short term.
I can imagine "Columbus" coming ashore and making his way with his "Spanish" entourage, dressed as the Spaniards of the day would have done, to meet the cacique (governor general), with appropriate ceremony. Of course, the cacique would be surrounded by "Arawaks" in appropriate dress. I can almost hear the Remy sellers salivating at the suggestion. There should be Arawak music in the background. Then the music genres would develop to evolve into Bahamian music through the years and up to now.
Inspired by the spectacle, we can harvest "a new crop" of Bahamian songs each year and poetry and plays and artwork and many other cultural expressions.
The stalls can sell Arawak food and drinks and Bahamian food and drinks and food and drinks of yesteryear and up to date.
I can think of fufu and coocoo, pepperpot, mauby, coconut jimmy, etc.
Arawaks still live in Guyana, for sure, and in other areas of South America as well. There are Caribs in Dominica, too; and, I believe, in some other places in the region. If we go for the Carnival idea, we'd have to compete with Rio, Trinidad and New Orleans. But we would have no rivals for our landfall festival which ought to incorporate the Discovery Day holiday. As I said, let imaginations run wild.
- Norris R. Carroll

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News Article
Olympic VP Cornish highlights sports issue

The Bahamas Olympic Committee (BOC) has an obligation to drive important sports initiatives despite its jurisdictional constraints. There is no doubt that although the jury is still out in an overall sense on the capacity of the present administration, there have been some refreshing signs that contrast sharply with the previous leadership.
For instance, it was significant for BOC Vice President Don Cornish to frankly express personal views from his present delegation position as Chef de Mission at the Pan American Games in Guadalajara, Mexico, about the dilemma our team sports face.
He made the point that I have emphasized often in this space, regarding the uphill struggle that confronts federations of team sports in particular, being unable to get national squads together so that they can mesh and find consistency with each other before going into regional and international competition to represent their country.
This is good leadership on the part of a BOC representative. Another voice on the issue is important and the view here is that the rest of the BOC should adopt the approach to be forward on matters that would definitely make a difference on our sporting landscape.
The key for the national sports program would be for the central administration to elevate the budget status of sports. The maximum single fiscal grant for core sports federations is $80,000. While the gesture ought not be frowned upon, indeed it is just a pittance in terms of the requirements, especially for team sports federations.
One excursion into regional or international competition could cost that much and more when you are dealing with a score plus of athletes and officials. I believe that a $200,000 grant would be a modest amount to provide the core federations annually. I spent a few business days in Cuba at the start of the Pan American Games. Cuban television followed the games fully and I got the opportunity to watch a good bit of the basketball, baseball, softball and volleyball (beach and court) matches.
I concluded that as far back as 40 years ago we had teams in all of those disciplines that would have competed very favorably with the best the region has to offer these days.
Back then there was not much of a proximity problem with the athletes. Most of our elite athletes were based here so they practiced together often. The percentage of athletes that was away in college and universities melted very easily into the various preparation programs.
Now the climate is different. A great number of our elite athletes are based abroad, really all over the world, Europe, Asia, Africa, North and South America. Thus, it's a serious financial challenge for the federations to get them all in place for camps to appropriately fortify the athletes for competition with their regional and world peers.
We have not been able to qualify in recent years for the major world competitions in team sports. This is sad, given our history. Cornish helps to put the problem on the table, but more has to be done. There should be collective lobbying to the political powers for a national sports budget allocation adjustment.
That's the answer. Unless sufficient funds become available to the federations the team sports situation will never change.
(To respond to this column, kindly contact Fred Sturrup at fredericksturrup@gmail.com)

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Event
Awareness Walk (Fund Raiser)

Saturday 15th September 2012  6:00 AM

Awareness Walk (Fund Raiser) September 15th – Goodman’s Bay via new Baha Mar Drive to Cable Beach Post Office Round-a-bout and Return PROSTATE CANCER AWARENESS History: - Established in the Bahamas on 20th April, 2001 under the auspices of the Head Office in Downers Grove Illinois. Objectives: - Give Support to Men afflicted with the disease; Educate the population on the effects of the Disease and Advocate Men to take action about Screening and early Detection of Prostate-related illness. Procedure: - Make Presentations at Health Fairs, Men Groups, Corporate Institutions and Religious and other Organizations on the Details and effects of the Prostate and the illness associated with it. Activities: - Organize an Annual Walk to create Awareness and Advocacy, entitled ‘1,000 Man-Walk’ and Four Annual Clinics in the Month of September, Screening Men of the Bahamas for signals, signs of Prostate Cancer. The screenings (PSA & DRE)* are held at the Government Poly-technical Clinics of Elizabeth Estates, Flamingo Gardens, South Beach and Fleming Street all in the Month of September. Additional screenings for General Health ailments mainly Blood Pressure, Glucose and Cholesterol in particular are conducted simultaneously. The General Health Screenings and the PSA and DRE are conducted by Volunteer Doctors, Phlebotomists and Other Caregivers and volunteer Coordinators, together with the Members of Us TOO Bahamas Chapter. Chapters: -Us TOO Bahamas has successfully established new “Chapters” in Freeport, Exuma and Cat Island and are progressively organizing several other new Chapters in the Archipelago, particularly Andros, and Eleuthera. Support: -Small tokens of appreciation are appropriate to the Volunteers and Care-givers and any ‘much needed’ Assistance (technical and financial) and/or new Volunteers would be welcomed and appreciated. Financial Assistance: -Contact and Donations to “Us TOO Bahamas” may be made through the Cancer Society of the Bahamas at our ‘Fixed Address’ attention Prostate Cancer or addressed individually as follows: Chapter Leader - Valentine Maura P.O. Box CB 11915 Telephone (393-4060; 636-9023) Secretary - Wendell Barry – P.O. Box N4671 Telephone (325-0823; 465-2235) Treasurer – Charles Sands - P.O. Box N 1503 Telephone (393-2439; 436-5117) Members – any of the active known-Personnel Meetings are held on the Third (3rd) Thursday of each Month at the Cancer Society of the Bahamas Complex, South of the ZNS Building, off Collins Avenue. PSA - Blood Extraction and Lab-Testing (prostate influenced) DRE – Digital Examination of the Prostate (finger & texture) Both save many lives as “Early Detection” of Cancer may be treated successfully before it progresses. On average, One (1) out of every Six (6) Men will get Prostate Cancer or at least an “Enlarged Prostate”. If appropriate, further testing – a Biopsy - will be made to confirm existence of the Cancer and determine the Stage – One to Four – of the Cancer and the Pace or Speed of its progress by the “Gleason Score” Grading. Consultation with a certified Medical Specialist – the Urologist should then be made to understand the Cancer, the Treatment available and the Method preferable and suitable, considering the Health of the Patient and other considerations, such as finance and age. An Oncologist after examination with evidence of Cancer treats the Patient with Chemotherapy and/or Radiation. A high number of the PSA reading (above) may not indicate Prostate Cancer and may conflict with the condition of the DRE. Likewise, an effected Prostate, resulting from the DRE (exam) may not show a high PSA Reading. Both are necessary for a clear indication on Prostate Examination.


Event
Prostate Cancer The why, who and how
Prostate Cancer The why, who and how

Thursday 13th September 2012  7:00 PM

Prostate Cancer The why, who and how? In recognition of prostate cancer awareness month us too (Nassau) Chapter will be holding a symposium Thursday, September 13th 2012 at 7:00pm Venue: Cancer Society of the Bahamas Headquarters East Terrace, Centreville (2 doors south of ZNS) Lecturer: Dr. Robin Roberts Topic: Testing for Prostate Cancer in 2012 Why, Who and How Prostate Screening Clinics will be held: 18th September-Elizabeth Estates Clinic 22nd September-Flamingo Gardens Clinic 25th September-South Beach Clinic 27th September-Fleming street clinic Registration begins at 4:00pm Clinics Times: 6:00pm-9:00pm Cost: $20:00 All men-40 years and older


News Article
Tourism minister's efforts paying off

Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace deserves high marks for his successes since assuming these portfolios.  He has made strides in both areas despite the worldwide economic downturn which reduced tourism receipts and numbers.  He has also had to contend with turmoil in the airline industry and a tourism bureaucracy in need of new thinking.
From his days as director general of the Department of Tourism he has long pressed for and has now been greatly assisted in his efforts by the current and ambitious program to modernize and transform the tourism infrastructure, the rationale and scope of which the prime minister outlined in a national address some months ago.
These infrastructural upgrades, long in coming, include the development of a new international airport for New Providence, the Gateway Road Project, the beginning of the revitalization of downtown Nassau, a new straw market and other upgrades on our capital island.
At the other islands of The Bahamas, which the minister and his team are now branding with more individual flavor, other infrastructural projects are in train for the benefit of Bahamians and visitors.
Marsh Harbour, the second busiest air gateway in terms of tourism numbers, is set to get a new airport and become one of the finest small airports in the region.  It should not be forgotten the greater number of international airports The Bahamas has to upgrade and maintain in comparison to other Caribbean countries.
From Glass Window Bridge in Eleuthera to proposed new health care facilities in Exuma and road works in Acklins, "It's getting better in The Bahamas" has taken on a new currency.  Our archipelagic nature, though presenting various challenges to national development is an extraordinary strategic advantage.
Minister Vanderpool-Wallace has often articulated his vision of tourism as a critical element of national development and as a force multiplier for ongoing diversification within the tourism industry and across industries.
Towards this end he has, as a matter of necessity, relentlessly focused on air links to and within the archipelago, as well as sea links connecting the islands in the chain and the chain to the world.   He has also done so in recognition of the entrepreneurial and job opportunities for Bahamians.
The difference between what cruise and air passengers spend is obvious and clear.  Not as clear to some are the differences in the economics of Bahamian tourism as compared to other Caribbean destinations.  The tourism chief has had to focus on the benefits of both to the economy in general and to the overall tourism product.
In his dogged effort to increase airlift, the Minister has had to contend with consumer confidence in the U.S. as well as some observers who have conveniently ignored his efforts as well as facts on the ground.  He has taken his less honest critics in stride.  But airline and hotel executives as well as his staff have no doubts about his feverish efforts to increase the number of air passengers and hotel occupancy.
The aviation minister employed his renowned energy and creativity to expand airlift, including new services such as Air Canada and other global players to Exuma.  JetBlue has now announced another nonstop flight to Nassau from the greater New York area (Westchester) beginning in November.  It will mark the first regularly scheduled flight from that airport to anywhere in the region.
It is easy to forget that the declines the country felt in terms of stop-over-visitors and air arrivals were a result of the loss of the most lucrative part of the tourism business to The Bahamas namely the corporate group and incentive business from the U.S. market.  It appears that the upturn in group business will be seen as early as this fall continuing into 2012.
It also appears that the July, August and September quarter is forecasted to be much stronger than last year as evidenced by both Atlantis and Baha Mar keeping all of their current inventory open as opposed to the closures of the Beach Tower and Wyndham, respectively, last year.  There are also forecasted increases in room revenues in this quarter.
One of the greater game changers for tourism and the economy envisioned by the Minister of Tourism and Aviation is the expansion of business and tourism travel from Latin America to The Bahamas
With his successful negotiation of the new air link between Panama and Nassau that dream is being fulfilled through Copa Airlines.  It is already exceeding forecasts from Latin America already having had more than six flights with aircraft that were larger than originally committed to the new route.
If sustained, the initiative will be one of the more groundbreaking efforts ever by a Tourism chief.  It would provide regular service from Latin America to The Bahamas especially for potentially lucrative markets in Brazil, Chile, Argentina and other countries.  It may serve the greatly valued market of high-end tourists, business travellers particularly in financial services, and other high net worth individuals.
It bodes well for our tourism industry that when it is summer in our traditional markets in North America and Europe that it is winter in some of the South American countries from which we will be seeking visitors.  The burgeoning middle class in the Brazilian cities of Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo are potentially lucrative markets.
In partnership with others, the Minister has ensured the removal of the visa barrier for a host of countries as well as worked to market the Bahama Isles to Latin Americans who may want a different vacation, one more similar to European tourists who prefer a more leisurely and culturally rich experience.
This may include marketing Grand Bahama in a different fashion for Latin Americans visitors and the rebranding of Freeport itself and Our Lucaya within this context, both of which are in their embryonic stages.
Already connected by history and trade through the Panama Canal, The Panamanian-Bahamian connection is about to get a boost in terms of two-way flows between the two countries made easier by nonstop and efficient air service.  Bahamians will in all likelihood visit Panama in droves especially The Colón Free Trade Zone.
The Zone is at the Atlantic gateway to the Panama Canal and is "dedicated to [the] re-export [of] an enormous variety of merchandise to Latin America and the Caribbean.  It is also the largest free zone in the Americas and second largest in the world."
Even as economic storm clouds continue to appear on the horizon, the Tourism Minister has sought to expand the country's options, which has included a greater effort in Canada.  His efforts in Latin America promise to boost our overall market presence and provide Bahamians with additional business, touristic, educational and cultural opportunities in that region.
Mr. Vanderpool Wallace has demonstrated that he will continue to focus on the critical American market including air passengers and stop-over-visitors.  The challenge that he and we continue to face is the ongoing improvement of the visitor experience and product.
This includes what we do in our homes and schools, businesses and civil society and heritage and cultural organizations to ameliorate the underlying sociological challenges which will enable more of us including our young men to take advantage of the world's premier industry, one that has proven sustainable for an ever diversifying Bahamian economy.
Despite the critics, the armchair pundits with grand but unworkable schemes and the self-serving and uninformed statements by some politicians who proved to be failures in tourism and aviation, the Tourism Minister has significant accomplishments.
There is probably no one who wishes that even more can and should be done in our primary industry than Vanderpool Wallace whom some are content to blame for much of the country's challenges in tourism while rarely giving him credit for successes in the same.
In difficult times the Minister of Tourism and Aviation has posted an impressive record.  In better times, the country will be able to build on that record.

frontporchguardian@gmail.com
www.bahamapundit.com

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Movie
The Last Song
  • Genre : Drama
  • Rating : B - Under 18yrs must be accompanied by an adult.

A drama centered on a rebellious girl who is sent to a Southern beach town for the summer to stay with her father. Through their mutual love of music, the estranged duo learn to reconnect....


News Article
Less than 14 days until The OffshoreAlert Conference!

We're less than 14 days away from

The OffshoreAlert Conference that is being held at The Ritz-Carlton, South Beach. If you haven't registered, NOW is the time to do it.

On
the one side, we will look at Fraud, Tax Evasion, Corruption,

Money
Laundering, Compliance, Intelligence-Gathering, Investigations

and
Asset Recovery. On the other, we will look at the business advantages of

Trusts,

Foundations, Hedge Funds, Special Purpose Vehicles, Tax
Planning

Strategies and Business-Friendly Legislation.

Check out a few of the 

topics

at this year's conference...

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News Article
Florida councilwoman seeking more Bahamian tourists

A Florida councilwoman is touting greater Bahamian tourist numbers as a boost to her city’s economy in her bid for re-election.
According to the Palm Beach Post, incumbent councilwoman Billie Brooks is one of eight candidates pursuing three city council seats in Riviera Beach, located on South Florida’s eastern coast in Palm Beach County. The councilwoman’s campaign rhetoric is advocating more Bahamian tourists as an avenue to increase economic development and grow jobs.
Considering the benefits tourism brings to any economy, and the amount of funds Bahamians leave in South Florida every year, it may be no surprise that the entrepreneur/politician is after increased ...

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News Article
Police identify body of man found bound and shot

The man who was found shot multiple times with his feet and hands bound Saturday morning was yesterday identified as Jamal Leonard Edgecombe.
Edgecombe, 23, of Palm Beach Street, was the second man to be found dead and on a dirt road in the past week.
Police said the body was found around 11:35 a.m. Saturday off Western Road. Edgecombe was found wearing a black T-shirt with gray sweat pants, police said.

The identity of the man who was shot multiple times about the body and left dead on dirt road Wednesday was also released yesterday by police.
Omar Rashad, 23, of Bamboo Town was discovered on a dirt road east of Bacardi Road.
When officers attached to the Southwestern Division arri ...

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Event
Prostate Screenings

Thursday 27th September 2012  6:00 PM

Prostate Screenings September 27th – Fleming Street Clinic PROSTATE CANCER AWARENESS History: - Established in the Bahamas on 20th April, 2001 under the auspices of the Head Office in Downers Grove Illinois. Objectives: - Give Support to Men afflicted with the disease; Educate the population on the effects of the Disease and Advocate Men to take action about Screening and early Detection of Prostate-related illness. Procedure: - Make Presentations at Health Fairs, Men Groups, Corporate Institutions and Religious and other Organizations on the Details and effects of the Prostate and the illness associated with it. Activities: - Organize an Annual Walk to create Awareness and Advocacy, entitled ‘1,000 Man-Walk’ and Four Annual Clinics in the Month of September, Screening Men of the Bahamas for signals, signs of Prostate Cancer. The screenings (PSA & DRE)* are held at the Government Poly-technical Clinics of Elizabeth Estates, Flamingo Gardens, South Beach and Fleming Street all in the Month of September. Additional screenings for General Health ailments mainly Blood Pressure, Glucose and Cholesterol in particular are conducted simultaneously. The General Health Screenings and the PSA and DRE are conducted by Volunteer Doctors, Phlebotomists and Other Caregivers and volunteer Coordinators, together with the Members of Us TOO Bahamas Chapter. Chapters: -Us TOO Bahamas has successfully established new “Chapters” in Freeport, Exuma and Cat Island and are progressively organizing several other new Chapters in the Archipelago, particularly Andros, and Eleuthera. Support: -Small tokens of appreciation are appropriate to the Volunteers and Care-givers and any ‘much needed’ Assistance (technical and financial) and/or new Volunteers would be welcomed and appreciated. Financial Assistance: -Contact and Donations to “Us TOO Bahamas” may be made through the Cancer Society of the Bahamas at our ‘Fixed Address’ attention Prostate Cancer or addressed individually as follows: Chapter Leader - Valentine Maura P.O. Box CB 11915 Telephone (393-4060; 636-9023) Secretary - Wendell Barry – P.O. Box N4671 Telephone (325-0823; 465-2235) Treasurer – Charles Sands - P.O. Box N 1503 Telephone (393-2439; 436-5117) Members – any of the active known-Personnel Meetings are held on the Third (3rd) Thursday of each Month at the Cancer Society of the Bahamas Complex, South of the ZNS Building, off Collins Avenue. PSA - Blood Extraction and Lab-Testing (prostate influenced) DRE – Digital Examination of the Prostate (finger & texture) Both save many lives as “Early Detection” of Cancer may be treated successfully before it progresses. On average, One (1) out of every Six (6) Men will get Prostate Cancer or at least an “Enlarged Prostate”. If appropriate, further testing – a Biopsy - will be made to confirm existence of the Cancer and determine the Stage – One to Four – of the Cancer and the Pace or Speed of its progress by the “Gleason Score” Grading. Consultation with a certified Medical Specialist – the Urologist should then be made to understand the Cancer, the Treatment available and the Method preferable and suitable, considering the Health of the Patient and other considerations, such as finance and age. An Oncologist after examination with evidence of Cancer treats the Patient with Chemotherapy and/or Radiation. A high number of the PSA reading (above) may not indicate Prostate Cancer and may conflict with the condition of the DRE. Likewise, an effected Prostate, resulting from the DRE (exam) may not show a high PSA Reading. Both are necessary for a clear indication on Prostate Examination. Us Too Bahamas Chapter Prostate Cancer Support, Education & Awareness