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News Article

January 07, 2012
AML Foods Limited Partners with CKE Restaurants Inc. To Bring The Carl's Jr. Brand To The Bahamas

Nassau, Bahamas -  AML
Foods Limited is proud to announce that it has entered into a definitive
development agreement with CKE Restaurants, Inc. to bring the Carl's
Jr. franchise to The Bahamas. Under the agreement the Company will
develop a number of restaurants over the next five years, the first of
which is expected to open later in 2012.

"Carl's Jr. is a well established
west coast favorite providing premium food and customer service for more
than 70 years," says Gavin Watchorn, President and CEO of AML Foods
Limited. "Carl's Jr. offers a premium positioning and best in class
products, services and facilities which were very appealing to us. We
know the brand will resonate with Bahamians,

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News Article

September 19, 2014
Baha Mar 85 percent complete

The Baha Mar resort is 85 percent complete, with major work picking up pace, Baha Mar Senior Vice President of Administration and External Affairs Robert "Sandy" Sands said yesterday.
"We are going to be working towards previews for December," said Sands at Hole 16 of the resort's Royal Blue Golf Course.
"That in itself should tell you how far advanced we are. We are making significant progress on a daily basis."
Resort officials announced in August that the hotel's opening will be delayed from December 2014 to Spring 2015.
"Our booking engine went live on September 15, so we are now actually taking reservations as of June 1," he said.
"That date can change and be advanced at any time.
"So we are taking real bookings for paid guests at this point in time."
During the tour, Sands pointed to a significant increase in the number of Bahamians who work at the resort.
He said nearly 1,500 Bahamians work at the site in various posts, including construction, the highest number
since work began on the $3.5 billion resort.
"You wouldn't want to see this place in a few months," Sands added.
Speaking of the 18-hole, par-72 Jack Nicklaus Signature Golf Course.
"It's breathtaking and what it also does is it captures the beauty of The Bahamas," he said.
"It also captures the natural environment. It shows the elevation of the golf course and it adds that intensity and challenge to the players once they get to this location.
"This is indeed an iconic location for Baha Mar and we are extremely proud of it."
Sands said there has been significant interest from professional golfing organizations in the course, which will open simultaneously with the resort.
The course is expected to be an attraction in and of itself, he pointed out.

Coexisting

But Sands said Baha Mar is more focused on coexisting with Atlantis.
"We will work to complement each other," he said.
"Together we will continue to raise the profile of The Bahamas.
"Our combined marketing dollars in the market place will also give exposure and equity to The Bahamas brand as well as our individual brand.
"So we have to stop thinking about competition and start thinking about complementarity and the development, holistically, of The Bahamas."
The resort has hired Bahamian artist John Cox as its creative arts director and aims to put local art at the forefront of its design.
Baha Mar's local art alliances include The D'Aguilar Art Foundation, The Dawn Davies Collection and the National Art Gallery of The Bahamas.
The resort's amenities will include a 100,000 square-foot casino, the Jack Nicklaus Signature Golf Course, the ESPA at Baha Mar spa and more than a dozen pools.
Other attractions will include 50,000 square feet of high-end retail and shopping, and over 30 restaurants, bars and lounges.
The resort will also include 200,000 square feet of combined state-of-the-art convention facilities, including a 2,000-seat performing arts center and an art gallery with the largest curated collection of Bahamian art; a beachfront sanctuary with native Bahamian flora and fauna, and a private island.

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News Article

June 26, 2014
Distillery drawing up to 300 a day

Tourism continues to increase on a monthly basis at the John Watling's Distillery (JWD) as the company gradually expands.
General Manager Pepin Argamasilla of JWD praised the distillery's progress, stating, "Tourism at the estate is increasing month to month. We're seeing 250-300 visitors per day."
While the figures fall slightly short of JWD's target, Argamasilla remained optimistic, pointing to steady growth and an increase in the amount spent per visitor at the distillery.
The rum distillery, located at the renovated Buena Vista Estate, opened for public tours in April 2013.
Plans to open an authentic Bahamian restaurant at the distillery are still in the works, as the second floor of the estate and several cottages surrounding it remain undeveloped. According to Argamasilla, the distillery is still waiting for the right partner to "take Bahamian cuisine to the next level".
Although JWD's rum continues to perform well throughout The Bahamas, the company is not yet ready to export its product.
"Our message is 'The spirit of The Bahamas'. We don't want to export until we've developed in the country," said Argamasilla, listing Abaco and Eleuthera as the distillery's next areas of focus.
On the subject of value-added tax (VAT), Argamasilla commented, "It is what it is. At the end of the day, the country needs to pay its bills".
Argamasilla added that JWD, "needed to wait and see what the government does", regarding proposed excise stamps on alcohol products mentioned during Minister of State for Finance Michael Halkitis' recent budget contributions.
When asked what hurdles still faced JWD, Argamasilla claimed that crime remained a serious problem not only for the distillery, but also for the surrounding area. However, Argamasilla noted that the situation had improved considerably since highly publicized crimes against U.S. officials last year.
"The Royal Bahamas Police Force has done nothing but an outstanding job clearing up crime in the area," stated Argamasilla.
Argamasilla applauded the group efforts of the Historic Charles Town Association (HCTA) and the police force in promoting and protecting the area. The HCTA, which, "aims to promote the authentic and historic heart of Nassau", includes representatives from JWD, Graycliff, the National Art Gallery of The Bahamas and other businesses and cultural centers in the area.
"We're working closely with police," said Argamasilla. "Everybody's banding together to get rid of the crime in our area."

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News Article

November 03, 2011
Bahamas Waste banks on bio-diesel

Bahamas Waste has made considerable strides in their bio-diesel department, Guardian Business can reveal, as the managing director predicts his entire fleet will be powered through this method by sometime next year.
If accomplished, the move could mean higher profits for shareholders and indeed spark a revolution for other industries depended on oil and gas.
"We're hoping that next year, every truck will be on bio-diesel and we will have balanced the economy of scale," Francisco de Cardenas told Guardian Business.
"This means higher profits for shareholders. We will know our costs and not have to buy oil and gas according to fluctuating prices worldwide."
The bio-diesel program, first conceived five years ago, has made an increasingly large impact on company operations, according to Cardenas.
With at least $1 million already invested in the project, approximately 20 Bahamas Waste trucks are currently running on varying degrees of bio-diesel. However, as the company continues to hone the production process, it has yet to make a substantial financial impact on revenue.
Frederick Donathan, a manager at the facility, agreed that the goal in the near future is to "flat-line" the company's fuel costs.
"Beyond Bahamas Waste, there are huge implications for the technology," he explained during a tour of the facility.
"For example, it could have an impact on the fishing industry and bring down the cost of food. At the moment, our problem is finding enough oil and telling companies about the importance of conservation."
The quality of the used cooking oil, which provides the basis of bio-diesel fuel, is also essential.
Research and development are progressing rapidly, the company reports, and more companies are coming on board as suppliers.
Lamar Cancino, a Bahamian chemist employed at Bahamas Waste, is one of the leading minds behind the development of effective bio-fuel.
He told Guardian Business the company has 25 major suppliers of cooking oil.
Atlantis and the Disney Cruise Line, he said, provide the most resources, along with a list of restaurants and fast-food stores. The establishments provide the cooking oil free of charge, as Bahamas Waste gets rid of the precious liquid for free.
Pointing to a delivery truck and a series of processing tanks, he explained the filtering system, purchased from a firm in the U.S., has adequate capacity -- capable of producing up to 1 million gallons every year.
The challenge is honing the process and expanding their infrastructure to include more storage facilities to house the bio-diesel.
"We tend to collect the oil on a weekly basis, sometimes [every] two weeks depending on the company's production," he said.
"The idea is we have to bring down the free fatty acids in the oil to between 0 and 2 percent. It's blended, heated and undergoes a chemical reaction."
With the technology there, Donathan felt the key was to source quality oil from as many suppliers as possible to meet the future demand. He pointed out that Bahamas Waste has some competition for the used cooking oil. Haitian ship owners, he said, are now in the habit of paying 1 cent per gallon for the oil.
"But I think a lot of companies are increasingly getting on board with what we are trying to do," he said. "They might end off being the end users of this product."
In the meantime, Cardenas said Bahamas Waste will continue pushing forward with the program with high hopes for the near future.
"We are taking a used product historically placed in the landfill," he added.
"As time goes on it will become a serious hedge to our fuel costs and the spill-off effects of that will be tremendous."

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News Article

February 24, 2011
New Bahamian restaurant creates up to ten jobs

New Providence welcomes a new fast food eatery to the Bahamian market on Saturday, February 26. About ten jobs will be created.

The name - "Muddoes, Wings 'N' Tings" is a play on a popular Bahamian expression of surprise and amazement.

The restaurant is on the corner of Jerome and Edward Avenues, just north of Scotiabank. The location is planned as the first of several for the island.

"We plan to make "Muddoes" a household name, known for our commitment to a consistently delicious product with quality service at reasonable prices." says one of the company's executives.

Muddoes' signature dishes include cooked-to-order chicken wings with specialty sauc ...

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News Article

May 26, 2014
Q.C.: It should be 'very difficult' for developer to lift injunction

An attorney for the Bimini Blue Coalition (BBC) said Friday that Resorts World Bimini (RWB) should struggle to persuade the Bahamian courts that it should be allowed to "rely" on the new permit which it provided to the Privy Council as the correct and appropriately obtained evidence of its ability to dredge.
In the wake of a decision by the Privy Council in London to grant an injunction halting the dredging off Bimini, Fred Smith, Queen's Counsel (Q.C.), said that the developers will now be in the position of trying to persuade a Bahamian court that the permit they showed in court for the first time on Friday morning, before the Privy Council in London, was issued properly and provides the legal basis for them to move ahead.
RWB had previously argued in a lower court that the permit, which was granted a week after the dredging started, was unnecessary, as the process is governed by another law.
In an interview with Guardian Business on Friday, following the Privy Council's decision to grant the injunction until such time as RWB and the government can prove that their approvals were properly obtained, Smith said: "Now it is going to be very difficult for either of them to go back to the Court of Appeal with a straight face and say that they did not mislead the Court of Appeal when they said they didn't need a permit under the Conservation and Protection of the Physical Landscape of The Bahamas Act (CPPLB Act), when as counsel for the Bimini Blue Coalition I was on my feet arguing at the Privy Council they sought to get around such a challenge by producing such (a permit obtained under the CPPLB act).
"They convinced the Court of Appeal 2-1 that the (CPPLB) act had no application to marine variance, and yet in the Privy Council they completely reversed their position and sought to avoid the injunction by producing the permit.
He added: "They cannot be allowed to say one thing to one court and another thing to another court. It is completely unprincipled on their part, and quite frankly I am shocked that they would pull such a ruse at the hearing."
After two short hearings on Thursday and Friday last week, three days after the Court of Appeal in Nassau rejected the BBC's application for an injunction of the Bimini dredging, judges at the Privy Council approved the injunction.
In a statement, Resorts World Bimini said it would "temporarily" halt the dredging activity, which is part of its North Bimini Ferry Terminal project, set to make way for the docking of the company's cruise ship bringing passengers from Miami to Bimini for the day.
However, a spokesperson, Heather Krasnow, said the company is of the view that it has all that is necessary to be able to lift the injunction "expeditiously". A hearing on lifting the injunction is anticipated to take place in court today.
In an interview on Friday, Larry Glinton, President of the Bahamas National Trust, welcomed the injunction ruling.
"What it does is it provides a pause to the madness that's been going on this week, and it really is madness. It causes everybody to stop and assess the situation properly and thoroughly," said Glinton.
Eric Carey, Executive Director of the BNT, said that it appeared that Resorts World Bimini's "rush" to complete the project had seen environmental management efforts suffer.
"They're so rushed to go ahead that obviously they didn't put in place proper environmental protocols, and so in their rush to get things started, siltation started pouring out," he said.
Neal Watson, president of the Bahamas Diving Association and operator of the Bimini Scuba Center at the Bimini Sands Resort on the island, said he was "over-the-moon thrilled" by the decision.
"When I heard the news, I just absolutely couldn't believe it. It's just wonderful, wonderful news for Bimini and for the environment."
Watson said that it appears that with the ferry project and its potential to damage the world famous reefs for which Bimini is known, the island may trade high-value diving visitors, who spend "anywhere between $1,500 and $2,500 a week" to dive in Bimini, spread among a variety of businesses - hotels, dive centers, restaurants and more - for "$69 day trippers, who will come and buy a couple of beers and a conch salad."
The dive expert said he has already seen the downside of the dredging on the marine environment since it began a week and a half ago.
"I'm not a marine engineer. I'm not a marine biologist. I'm a diver that's been diving in Bimini for 40 years, and I know when I take a group of 15 or 20 to dive in these spectacular pristine waters that Bimini is known for and I take them to one of my favorite spots and I can't see the bottom there is a problem. This is already what is happening."
Smith called the injunction decision a "watershed moment for The Bahamas. It is a signal to the government that you must respect the local people."
"The Bimini Blue Coalition is ecstatic that the rule of law has prevailed."
Smith reiterated that the Bimini Blue Coalition is not against development.
"It is simply about demanding a place at the table to discuss development and the future of Bimini's community."
Last week, amidst heightened concern over plumes of siltation spreading from the dredging site toward Bimini's reefs, it was confirmed that Earl Deveaux is the environmental compliance manager for Resorts World Bimini and the ferry terminal project.
Contacted on Friday for a response to concerns raised about possible "breaches" of environmental best practices at the site by the Bahamas National Trust and the Bimini Blue Coalition, among others, Deveaux said "no comment."
Attorney for Resorts World Bimini in The Bahamas, John Wilson of McKinney Bancroft and Hughes, also declined to comment at this time when contacted by Guardian Business about the injunction decision on Friday.

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News Article

February 22, 2014
A meeting of the minds and knives

New Providence is set to become a culinary mecca when the inaugural Minority Chef Summit rolls into town.
The four-day event, May 1-4 will showcase the talents and creativity of some of the leading minority professionals in the food and beverage industry worldwide.
Taking place at The College of The Bahamas, the summit will include an array of seminars, hands-on classes and competitions, as well as a culinary market. The conference will allow culinarians to come together to network, educate and to support the minority culinary community.
The Minority Chef Summit was founded by chef and chocolatier, Erika Davis, who formerly served as creative director for Graycliff Chocolatier in Nassau, and who is a highly-celebrated chef within the culinary field. Chef Erika has been in the chocolate-making industry for over 22 years, and recognized as one of the United States' top chefs. She has received many note-worthy commendations, among which include: Competing Chef 'Top Chef Just Desserts' inaugural show by Bravo; First Black female chef to receive Detroit's Chef of the Month; Showcased in several culinary magazines and invitational culinary events; Featured chef of 'Sunday Dinner' promotion with Publix Grocery Stores and Chocolatier Ambassador of Cocoa Barry Chocolates.
Chef Erika's time spent in New Providence working with and teaching aspiring Bahamian chefs lies at the heart of her inspiration for creating the Minority Chef Summit.
"This is a unique opportunity to come together, recognizing not only our individual craft, but the true excellence of our culinary community," she said.
The 2014 Minority Chef Summit keynote speaker will be Chef Jeff Henderson, an award-winning chef, public speaker and author of the New York Times best seller 'Cooked'.
Additional featured culinary artists include:
Chef Asha Gomez, owner/chef of Cardamom Hill Restaurant and Third Space in Atlanta, GA. Cardamom Hill was a 2013 James Beard nominee for Best New Restaurant.
Chef Jerome Brown, a celebrity private chef whose clientele include Shaquille O'Neal, Colin Powell and Priscilla Presley, to name a few. Chef Brown also has his own TV show, 'Cooking with Rome'.
Chef Guy Wong, owner/chef of Miso Izakaya, who was recently named one of Atlanta's 2012 Rising Stars.
Chef Ron Duprat, a fierce competitor on season six of Bravo's 'Top Chef.' Chef Duprat is author of "My Journey of Cooking" and is affiliated with organizations that contribute and give back to the community and people around the world, including United States First Lady Michelle Obama's Let's Move initiative.
Chef Keith Rhodes, voted Wilmington, NC's Best Chef for three consecutive years.
Chef Hugh Sinclair, executive chef and owner of Irie Spice personal catering in South Florida.
Chef Bryant Terry, eco-chef, food justice activist, and author. Terry was a 2008-2010 Food and Society Policy Fellow, a national Program of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.
Chef Dana Herbert, owner of Desserts by Dana and winner of TLC's 'Cake Boss Next Great Baker'.
Chef Kenny Gilbert, executive chef of Plainfield Country Club and contestant on season seven of Bravo's 'Top Chef'.
Chef Nedal Mardini, chef de cuisine of Matthews Restaurant in Jacksonville.
Chef Thierry Delourneaux, executive pastry chef at Fairmont Singapore and Swissotel The Stamford in Singapore.
Chef farmer, Matthew Raiford, a sixth generation farmer behind Gilliard Farms and executive chef of Little St. Simons Island a private resort located off the coast of Georgia.
Chef Dwight Evans, who was recently awarded Chef of the Year by the American Culinary Federation.
Chef Duane Nutter, chef at One Flew South, voted one of the best airport restaurants; as well as mixologists, Tiffanie Barriere and Tokiwa Sears, from One Flew South.

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News Article

March 06, 2014
Baha Mar 80 percent complete

Just nine months away from its planned December 8 opening, the Baha Mar resort is on target with "75 percent to 80 percent" of the construction work complete and a ramp up of marketing planned for the third quarter of this year.
The government has hinged part of its hopes for an economic recovery, and a dip in unemployment, on the resort's opening.
Robert Sands, the resort's senior vice president of administration and external affairs, said while Baha Mar is not the only economic driver in town, he is sure the property will be able to live up to these expectations by pulling in arrivals and putting thousands of Bahamians to work.
"There is an expectation for Baha Mar in this particular area," he told Guardian Business. "We are satisfied that we are going to do our part.
"We're not the only economic driver in the country, but we are satisfied that the jobs that we are going to create will make a significant dent in the unemployment in this country, and we will also be a major stimulus to economic growth in the country going forward."
Sands said the property has more than 10,000 applications for operational jobs. Baha Mar's recruitment team has started reviewing these applications to forward to the property's brands for consideration.
To date, the property has created more than 2,800 job opportunities for Bahamians and put out more than $615 million worth of contracts out to bid for Bahamian contractors.
There are more than 350 Bahamians currently working on the construction site, including construction workers. The resort's core team consists of 150 Bahamians.
There are nearly 3,000 foreign workers on the site and the bulk of this figure is made up of Chinese laborers.
"We have more than lived up to our commitment outlined in our heads of agreement with the government of The Bahamas," Sands said.
The Leadership Development Institute, one of the resort's recruitment programs, has had more than 3,500 participants and received more than 2,900 applications to date.
The resort plans to hire 4,000 hotel workers this year. Sands said he is confident that the property will be able to fill this void with Bahamian talent.
"The challenge will always remain in the middle to upper management categories, but we are satisfied that we will have the training in place that will be able to match the skill sets of the individuals we retain to the goals, the policies and also to the expectations that we have in the jobs that we will be matching them with."
Once open, Baha Mar will have to contend with competition from the Atlantis resort on Paradise Island. Principals from the Albany development last month signed an amended heads of agreement with the government for a $140 million expansion, which is expected to transform the property into the Monaco of the Caribbean.
Sands said Baha Mar will be able to coexist with these properties and will offer something unique to visitors, particularly its casino.
He added that the resort's gaming partner, Global Gaming Access Management, is "world class" and responsible for some of the world's most successful casinos.
"We are satisfied that we are an adult destination and that we are in fact a gaming resort," Sands said, when asked about fears of competition. "Our niche is pretty much focused, we welcome Albany in their effort to help to raise the profile of tourism in The Bahamas, but we are very satisfied that the direction that we are going [in], we will be very successful in those market niches.
"In addition to gaming, we are going to have some emphasis on meetings and conventions and our luxury market as well. So we are very satisfied that Baha Mar will be able to generate the numbers of business, bodies that will be required to make us a very successful gaming resort on day one."
A key focus of the property is incorporating Bahamian culture and art into its concept.
"The whole ethos about Baha Mar is about things Bahamian," said Sands. "Our visionary leader says it all the time, we're not called the golden horse rising from the sea. We're called Baha Mar, which means beautiful blue waters. So even from our name, everything that we do characterizes authenticity and things Bahamian."
The resort has hired Bahamian artist John Cox as its creative arts director and aims to put local art at the forefront of its design. Baha Mar's local art alliances include The D'Aguilar Art Foundation, The Dawn Davies Collection and the National Art Gallery of The Bahamas.
The resort's amenities will include a 100,000-square-foot casino, an 18-hole, 72-par Jack Nicklaus Signature Golf Course, the ESPA at Baha Mar spa and more than a dozen pools.
Other attractions will include 50,000 square feet of high-end retail and shopping, and over 30 restaurants, bars and lounges.
The resort will also include 200,000 square feet of combined state-of-the-art convention facilities, including a 2,000-seat performing arts center and an art gallery with the largest curated collection of Bahamian art; a beachfront sanctuary with native Bahamian flora and fauna, and a private island.
Baha Mar officials are expected to take the media on a tour of its golf course today, which is set for completion by the second quarter of this year.

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News Article

May 18, 2011
Quality'critical'to offsetfood priceincreases

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

Producing higher quality dishes infused with a Bahamian flavour will enable this nation's hotel and restaurant industry to offset the impact of rising global food prices, organisers of a major food and beverage seminar said yesterday, enabling chefs to maintain their margins.

Frank Comito, executive vice-president of the Bahamas Hotel Association (BHA), one of the organisations sponsoring next month's 2011 Food, Flavour and Beverage Trends: Growing revenue and increasing customer traffic seminar, described as "very critical" the need to offset rising food prices by staying in touch with global consumer trends.

Speaking on behalf of BHA pre ...

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News Article

January 29, 2013
Bastian blames loss on 'flawed process'

Island Luck CEO Sebas Bastian last night blamed a "flawed process" and the politicization of the referendum for the crushing defeat of the Vote Yes campaign in yesterday's historic poll, adding that thousands of jobs are now in limbo.
"If you factor in what we have seen so far, low voter turnout and the support of the no vote, it clearly shows that... Bahamians are probably disgusted with the process," Bastian said to The Nassau Guardian last night at Foxies Restaurant and Bar after it became clear that Bahamians overwhelmingly voted against the regularization of web shops and a national lottery.
"We were not happy with the process for obvious reasons but we couldn't come out and say because we can't bash our own campaign. We were always at a disadvantage because if you notice we ran a clean campaign. We never spoke out and bashed anyone. The church was our biggest opponent and I would never say anything about a man of God regardless of how I may feel internally."
Supporters of the Vote Yes campaign hosted a viewing party last night at Foxies. Supporters shut down the party shortly before 8 p.m. when it became clear that they lost the race.
Bastian said he's not sure what will happen today.
"We have not made a decision on that," he said when asked if web shops will open.
"We will respect the decision of the Government of The Bahamas. At the end of the day, I'm worried about the jobs. The staff do not know what to expect [in the coming days]. They may work [today] but they don't know if they are going to be employed Wednesday, Thursday or Friday. So they don't know how they are going to meet their financial obligations."
Prime Minister Perry Christie said previously that if there is a no vote, police will shut down web shops.
Island Luck employs just under 500 people. But it has been reported that more than 3,000 people are employed directly and indirectly through web shops.
Bastian said politics also played a part in the outcome.
"It's unfortunate when politicians play politics for political gain and use that influence to interfere with the minds of Bahamians," he said when asked about former Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham's endorsement of the no vote.
"And at the end of the day, only Bahamians lose. I'm hoping one day Bahamians can get out of the political fantasy and start making decisions for themselves."
As for his future, Bastian said he will survive even if he is called on to shut down his web shops.
"My business is diverse. There are two sides. There's the physical web shop side and the Internet side. So how it affects it, it all depends on whatever the government says. But I'm not just in the numbers business."
The Island Luck CEO added that he is about to venture into the construction industry. He expects to employ nearly 180 people in March. However, Bastian said many of his current employees will not qualify for those types of jobs.
Some Vote Yes supporters cried in the streets last night while others begged the web shop owner to find a way to keep his doors open.
Arlington Rolle, a Vote Yes supporter, said it seems as if the Bahamian people don't want to move forward.
"I hope that we will have another chance to vote and I hope that they vote yes the next go around," he said.
"I want the Bahamian people to move forward. I don't gamble. I wanted them to win because I saw the benefits. I saw where Bahamian people could achieve something. The web shops help the country. So it upsets me to know that the Bahamian people did not stick to their word."
Another Vote Yes supporter, who identified herself only as Marge, said the results left her depressed.
"I am hurt that it's a no vote," she said. "I'm hurt for the girls who will lose their jobs."
She hoped the web shops would find a way to remain.
"I hope they go underground and open up," she said.
"That helps me to pay my bills. If I win, I give the landlord something. I give Freeport Power something. The clothes store gets something and the hair dresser gets something. But if I can't play in The Bahamas, I'll go to the United States. I take my money in the United States and I spend it there. But if I could gamble home I could spend my money and it will spread around."

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