Search results for : Post Offices

Showing 1 to 10 of 171 results


News Article

May 22, 2011
Chainmen return to work at Lands and Surveys

Six chainmen who were supposed to be transferred from the Department of Lands and Surveys to the Ministries of Works and Housing this week will remain in their positions for now, according to Bahamas Public Services Union Vice President Stephen Douglas.
The chainmen — who assist surveyors — protested outside the department’s East Bay Street offices on Tuesday, the day before they were supposed to report to their new posts.
They said they had only been given a letter a week prior indicating where they should report on May 18.
Department of Lands and Surveys Director Alexander Flowers said on Tuesday that the men were being transferred because they were not being fully util ...

read more »


News Article

August 27, 2014
Did Andre Rollins hijack the Bahamian Parliament

There's a lot of talk lately on radio shows, in social media, in grocery stores, in line at the chicken shacks, on bank lines and in private and government offices around Nassau about what Dr. Andre Rollins did or didn't do, said or shouldn't have said, during recent debates in Parliament and in the time that preceded his election to the House of Assembly as a PLP member of Parliament.
So many people have so much to say about Rollins' handling of political/government affairs in the House and in the media.
But all this talk about "Rollins should have known all along what the PLP was about" and chosen not to be a part of it, if he was in such great opposition to the PLP's methods and (unspoken) philosophies from the beginning, a sentiment being uttered by PLPs, FNMs, and DNAs alike, is really just amounting to spitting in the wind.
First of all, if Rollins didn't know what he was really and truly getting into, which may be a lesser possibility but a possibility nonetheless, then he also would not have known that the actions of the governing party could or would aggrieve him to the extent that they have, or that he would have become so impassioned about them that he would pitch a fit (or three) in the parliamentary debates and sessions.
It's also possible that Dr. Rollins knew very well what he was getting into, but sincerely thought he could make a real difference and that the PLP, as a unified group, would have been more attendant to his concerns.
But, what if neither of those possibilities was the reality?
What if Dr. Rollins knew about and considered - when he entered into politics and when he decided to cross over to the larger PLP that was ready and willing to embrace new blood to satisfy the party's own political agenda - all the possible ramifications and obstacles that would meet him along his walk with the PLP, but still decided to join them anyway?
What if, in fact, Dr. Rollins knew exactly what he was or could be getting into and foresaw the dissension between himself and his party, but chose to move forward anyway, in order to position himself strategically to create an unprecedented level of disruption within the party?
The changing landscape
Most young people were and, some are still, being taught to get a job, fit in, demonstrate ability and work their way up, doing whatever they have or need to do, in whatever capacity, until they can do differently.
But young people, nowadays, don't sit still for too long; the average time spent on one job is about two years. In a constantly evolving world driven by constantly evolving technologies and communications, and ferocious competition, it is almost problematic for an individual to believe he or she can get comfortable in one place for a long time; tomorrow's picture could easily be very different from today's.
By the same token, employers know that they have to remain modern; their company mandates and visions have to be focused on things that younger people find imperative: making improvements in their world, and not just making money for money sake.
Employers have to embrace new or restored ideologies and make concerted and consistent efforts to evolve with the universal mentality of the people they (now) hire.
Young professionals are primarily concerned today about growing by challenging the prevailing norms, preserving sustainable environments, committing to charitable causes and changing the world. And they're actually doing it.
For the PLP or FNM, as the two primary and longstanding political parties in this country, it must be obvious now, if it wasn't already, that the same old mechanisms and the tired old political claptrap is not what young politicians or young people are interested in.
And if the time comes for them to behave differently, in opposition to the norms, they will. When they have an opportunity to change the world, or in this case the political landscape, they will change it. And they will do whatever it takes to change it. They have new ideas, sharper tools, and they have more energy. This is not to say that they don't need certain wisdoms of the people who went before them, but young people and young politicians have something unlike most who did go before them; they are willing to take incredible risks. They will take whatever chances necessary to make the grandest statement and evoke the greatest change.
No mistake?
All that said, what if Rollins knew precisely what he was up against and chose to go against it anyway?
What if Rollins saw the PLP as a point of entry, to get the proverbial elder-advised 'foot in the door', and then create the beginning of a general uprising against the establishment? What if it was his intention all along to gain that access and to play by the rules until he could change them, or at least bring about the movement needed to change them, by using himself as the guinea pig?
Many are asking why he did not resign from his post as Gaming Board chairman, as he resigned from his position as party whip. But, given all of the above, and anything you could think to add to it, really, why would he resign?
Look back at history. Look back at Bahamian sociopolitical history. Do you remember clearly who resigned and why? Maybe not so much.
Do you remember more clearly who was fired and why?
It is far more memorable to be fired in politics or by specific politicians, than to resign. If you are fired, the impact is far-reaching and long-lasting among the citizenry. The fact that you were fired from such a position as the one Dr. Rollins held, and under such conditions, resonates among the people for many years to come.
It is regarded as a greater injustice in the hearts and minds of the people. They will see the person doing the firing as the wrongdoer and the person being fired as the wronged, and they will sympathize with the latter, especially when he is standing on principle.
Will you ever forget what was done to Edmund Moxey?
Take a look at the people who are supporting Rollins in his recent acts and words of defiance; they are mostly young(er) people. Compare that to the majority who condemn him for it; they are the not-so-young. This is not to say that older people have exceeded their 'use-by' dates, but, which grouping will matter most significantly, as an electorate, in the next 15 to 20, or 40 more years?
Current and staunch party members, PLP or FNM, must not regard Rollins' or any other young political candidate's actions as random or label her or him a firebrand. There is more at play than meets the eye.
o Facebook.com/politiCole.

read more »


News Article

August 01, 2014
Two woman company 'upstaging' homes

A softer side to construction is emerging thanks to a two-woman company that is transforming newly-built condos and townhomes into inviting, move-in-ready homes.
It's the post-construction final touch, the luxurious-looking, highly affordable fully-furnished option that is easing buyer stress and boosting developer sales.
The company is UpStage Bahamas Ltd. Launched just over a year ago, UpStage has created and provided furniture packages for more than two dozen properties. It has furnished sophisticated offices in Nassau, five high-end condominiums, including one at Ocean Club Estates, 19 mid-prized and starter home condos and a large private residence at The Balmoral.
This week, UpStage revealed its latest work - two show homes at Venetian West, a 211-unit gated community complete with pool, tennis court, clubhouse and other amenities just south of the Old Fort Bay Town Centre on Windsor Field Road.
Company co-directors Ashley Brown and Brooke Phillips, both licensed BREA real estate agents, founded Upstage to fill a gap in the residential sales market. They realized that in new construction and in sales of older homes, sellers often fail to dress the property properly.
"Ashley and I would go into a house that had just been listed and there were family photos, trophies, all sorts of personal effects. We'd look at each other and think, 'imagine if we could just get in here, move all this clutter, paint it neutral colors and show off the bones of this great place, its high ceilings or natural light or an interesting angle," said Phillips.
Brown and Phillips tossed around the idea of forming a company that would focus on the temporary interior display, the job known as staging. They both took courses and earned certification.
"Staging a property to show it off to its best advantage was in its early stages in The Bahamas and largely reserved for the well-to-do," said Phillips. "What we wanted to create was affordable staging. People get so used to living with what they have around them they don't see the potential. Our fresh eyes, I think, helped give us a new perspective in preparing a property for viewing. You wouldn't go to a party without dressing up, so wouldn't you want your home to be dressed up for company, especially when that company was a potential buyer?"
As they staged a few older homes, UpStage Bahamas founders Brown and Phillips realized there was an even greater need in an emerging market - the dozens, if not hundreds, of new condos and townhomes coming on stream. A deal to furnish a model unit at one of those, a development called Venito, led to success for both developer and staging company.
Buyers could see themselves living with the furniture exactly as they saw it, said Brown. That translated into sales for the developer and propelled UpStage to focus on a new direction, creating furniture packages that looked like luxury but were affordable and enabled buyers to move in with little more than a toothbrush and clothing.
"Buyers love that we are offering furniture packages because it alleviates the stress and hassle of the move-in process," said Brown, who holds a bachelors' degree in architecture, while her partner is an honors business graduate. "The service we provide paired with the option to finance the furniture is attractive. Buyers do not need to come up with extra cash to buy brand new furniture."
While freedom from furniture stress and the availability of financing are attractive incentives for buyers, the benefits for the developer may be even greater.
Brown continued: "It is important that developers understand the value in show homes and how a well-designed space is directly related to sales. It is difficult for buyers to envision themselves living in a home when they walk into an empty space. We really tried to compliment the developer's overall lifestyle vision by putting together two show homes that, although different in style, still encompass a contemporary way of living."
Prepping the space is not easy. With massive excel sheets in front of them to stick to budget, Brown and Phillips juggle everything from linens to mattress prices. They wrestle furniture, iron and hang curtains, design lighting, work with electricians, provide custom artwork of their own creation and it all becomes part of a financed package.
Hundreds saw the result of UpStage's work when they toured the two- and three-bedroom homes at Venetian West during a well-publicized open house last weekend.
"Condominium and multi-family developments are still relatively new in the grand scope of things to the Bahamian real estate market and a lot of buyers are latching on to this new trend," explained Brown. "What we are helping the buyer see and the developer sell is not just a furnished condo but a lifestyle people can see and feel," said the pair.

read more »


News Article

July 31, 2014
Small, two-woman company making waves with ready-to-move-in furniture packages for new construction

NASSAU, Bahamas -- Mention construction and instant images of concrete blocks, cement and hard-scrapple men in hard hats come to mind.
But in The Bahamas, a softer side of construction is emerging, thanks to a two-woman company that is transforming newly-built condos and townhomes into inviting, move-in-ready homes. It's the post-construction final touch, the luxurious-looking, highly affordable fully-furnished option that is easing buyer stress and boosting developer sales.
The company is UpStage Bahamas Ltd. Launched just over a year ago, UpStage has created and provided furniture packages for more than two dozen properties. They've furnished sophisticated offices in Nassau, five high-end condominiums, including one at Ocean Club Estates, 19 mid-prized and starter home condos and a large private residence at Balmoral. This week, UpStage revealed its latest work -- two show homes at Venetian West, a 211-unit gated community complete with pool, tennis court, clubhouse and other amenities just south of the Old Fort Bay Town Centre on Windsor Field Road.
Company co-directors Ashley Brown and Brooke Phillips founded Upstage to fill a gap in the residential sales market. Both licensed BREA real estate agents, they realized that in new construction and in sales of older homes, sellers often failed to dress the property properly.
"Ashley and I would go into a house that had just been listed and there were family photos, trophies, all sorts of personal effects. We'd look at each other and think, 'Imagine if we could just get in here, move all this clutter, paint it neutral colours and show off the bones of this great place, its high ceilings or natural light or an interesting angle."

read more »


News Article

September 18, 2014
Company awaiting permits for North Abaco port facility

The Chinese company contracted to build a domestic and international port facility in North Abaco broke ground in June, and is still awaiting government permits prior to the start of major operations, according to the top executive in charge of the project.
The $46 million port facility is expected to be completed by summer 2015, according to Felix Q. Chang, country manager at China Harbour Engineering Company (CHEC) Ltd., who said the company has so far had a "positive experience" in The Bahamas.
"We are still reviewing all the drawings, but temporary site offices have already been done. We are waiting for the permits now," Chang said.
Appearing as a guest on "Bahamas at Sunrise", Chang gave a brief history of the project. He is one of a number of high-powered members of the business community who will speak at the Abaco Business Outlook in North Abaco next week. The conference is part of a series of business-focused gatherings organized by The Counsellors Ltd., beginning with the Bahamas Business Outlook and continuing throughout the year with conferences on an expanding number of Family Islands.
He said in 2011, The Bahamas government entered discussions with CHEC to construct a domestic and an international port facility in North Abaco. Funding was secured in 2012, with the Export-Import (EXIM) Bank of China and the government of The Bahamas jointly covering the majority of the cost.
Questioned about the potential environmental impacts of the project, Chang pointed out that CHEC has done a number of projects around the world, and the expertise gained through those projects would be brought into play here.
"We have done a series of studies and modelings, in terms of environmental protection," he said. "We are going to make sure that when we are doing the construction, we will follow all the laws and regulations in The Bahamas, and respect the local community for sure."
CHEC broke ground on the facility in June, and is expected to soon begin construction work on a Little Abaco bridge which will link North Abaco and Little Abaco.
The 45.4-acre, state-of-the-art port facility is expected to generate dozens of jobs during construction and create new business opportunities post construction in the North Abaco community.

read more »


News Article

October 02, 2014
Richard Coulson's fascinating memoir released, first book signing set for October 8

NASSAU, Bahamas -- For most Bahamians, the name Richard Coulson conjures images of a man whose highly regarded and occasional columns in The Tribune are literary gems. Thought-provoking, free of political bias, Coulson's comments are packed with practical solutions to what seem like overwhelming decisions - what to do about direct foreign investment vs. domestic, how to handle privatization, what happens when education doesn't educate the masses.
But far beyond being the Nassau-born, world-travelled pundit whose observations generate cocktail party conversations and political round-table debates, Coulson is a man with a fascinating professional and social past that has taken him from the offices and living rooms of the top financiers of Europe to the deepest recesses of Iraq and Malaysia, with the beauty and the contrasts of Mexico a constant thread both in his work and his private life.
In his just-released memoir, A Corkscrew Life, Coulson is the consummate storyteller, recalling details that no one of ordinary memory could remember - the abruptness of a sea-change from Ivy Leaguer to Army life digging bunkers and fighting bureaucratic battles in post-war Korea, followed by a career starting as the young lawyer, married with first child on the way, told to leave New York City and go to Mexico and do whatever had to be done to restore that country's international reputation in financial markets after its former governments had gobbled up privately held properties and bank accounts.
Coulson's stories of Mexico lay bare a country of two sets of ruins: ancient ruins he would treasure, newly-minted, manmade ruins he would be partially responsible for repairing. Long hours and longer documents helped heal the wounds of a government and establish Coulson as the financier with an eye and the patience for detail that could turn the barely possible into the readily desirable. It was a skill that would serve him well in putting together documents and offerings for private placement and initial public offerings time and again in a career that spanned five decades.

read more »


News Article

June 02, 2014
Callenders names new Grand Bahama partner

Callenders & Co. has announced the appointment of its newest partner, civil litigator Jacqueline Banona.
"We are pleased to announce the appointment of Jackie Banona who becomes the third partner in our Freeport office," said Fred Smith, Queen's Counsel (QC) and managing partner, Grand Bahama.
"From the moment she joined Callenders, Jackie was an instant fit and as we got to know her better, her dedication, the depth of her intellect, her thoroughness and her ability to grasp the details of the most complex case impressed everyone. As a litigator, she is a tiger, a very tough opponent and in this profession, that's the highest compliment you can bestow on someone."
Banona was born in Uganda, East Africa. She obtained her Bachelor of Laws degree at Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda, where she completed her postgraduate bar course at the Law Development Centre.
Banona was admitted to practice in the High Court of Uganda in 2005 and is certified by the Supreme Court of The Bahamas to practice in The Bahamas.
This was the second time in as many years Callenders bolstered its roster of partners. In January, 2013, Callenders announced the appointments of Llewellyn Boyer-Cartwright, Courtney Pearce and Simone Morgan-Gomez to its Nassau office.
Founded more than 110 years ago, Callenders has twice been recognized as the country's best corporate law firm by Corporate INTL.
In 2011, Nassau managing partner, Colin Callender, QC, a descendant of the firm's founding attorney, became the first and only attorney in The Bahamas and one of only five worldwide outside the United States to be elected a director of the International Academy of Trial Lawyers.
Callenders maintains offices in downtown Nassau, at Lyford Cay and in Grand Bahama.

read more »


News Article

August 19, 2014
Constitutional referendum: Correcting an historical error pt. 3

The best rationale why sex should be added to Article 26 of the constitution as a prohibited category of discrimination by any law, as the fourth bill provides, is offered by Justice Brennan of the United States Supreme Court in the case Frontiero vs. Richardson, 411 U.S. 677 (1973): "[Our] nation has had a long and unfortunate history of sex discrimination. Traditionally, such discrimination was rationalized by an attitude of "romantic paternalism" which, in practical effect, put women, not on a pedestal, but in a cage... It is true, of course, that the position of women in America has improved markedly in recent decades. Nevertheless, it can hardly be doubted that, in part because of the high visibility of the sex characteristic, women still face pervasive, although at times more subtle, discrimination in our educational instructions, in the job market and, perhaps most conspicuously, in the political arena. Moreover, since sex, like race and national origin, is an immutable characteristic, the imposition of special disabilities upon the members of a particular sex because of their sex would seem to violate 'the basic concept of our system that legal burdens should bear some relationship to individual responsibility'."Since sex, like race, is an immutable characteristic, Article 26 of the constitution should be amended to prohibit the making of any law that discriminates against any person either of itself or in its effect on the basis of sex. That is what the fourth bill is about. It is not about sexual preference, which is an entirely different ground, as demonstrated by the Privy Council in the case Nadine Rodriguez vs. Minister of Housing et al (2009) UKPC 51. As a matter of constitutional practice, discrimination on the basis of sex, meaning treating a woman more or less favorably than a man, is treated differently than the ground of sexual preference. In fact, bill three removes the discrimination against unwed Bahamian men who are prohibited from passing their citizenship to a child born to a foreign woman. Therefore, the issue of sexual preference, or sexual orientation, should not be imported into the fourth bill before the House of Assembly, as it is neither a ground proposed by the Constitutional Commission nor a part of the fourth bill before the Parliament. As we approach the referendum on November 6, we should learn some lessons from the relentless efforts of the United States to remake its constitution to correct omissions of the past and to reflect changing circumstances, contemporary expectations of its citizens and evolving international obligations. The constitution of the United States, adopted in 1789, is the oldest written constitution in our hemisphere. As a living document, the United States constitution is given new meaning and vitality under ever-changing conditions through Supreme Court decisions and formal amendments. It extends its protection to all persons in the territory of the United States, citizens rich and poor as well as aliens. In establishing a national government, the United States constitution sets up three branches and provides mechanisms for them to check and balance each other. It balances central federal authority with dispersed state reserved power. It protects the citizenry from the government and gives the power of judicial review to the judicial branch of government.The imperfect nature of the original United States constitution is very apparent from a brief historical review. In 1789 when the constitution was founded, African-Americans were still in slavery and, as legally defined property, were not considered as full citizens. However, there has been a continuous process of correction and remediation, through constitutional amendments, judicial decisions, legislation and executive measures to create a more perfect democracy in the United States, as the society moved from an agrarian to an industrialized nation and assumed international obligations under international humanitarian law. The first 10 amendments of the United States constitution were passed in 1791. The 13th Amendment, adopted in 1865 immediately after the Civil War, abolished slavery. The 14th Amendment, adopted in 1868, gives citizenship to all persons born or naturalized in the United States and guarantees due process and equal protection of the laws to all persons in the United States. Bahamians who have children in the United States, such as the parents of Sir Sidney Poitier, were and are the beneficiaries of this provision. The 15th Amendment, adopted in 1870, guarantees the right to vote irrespective of race, color or previous condition of servitude. Up until 1971, the United States constitution had been amended 26 times.Similarly, our sister Caribbean countries have also been trying to bring their constitutions in line with the shared expectations and aspirations of their contemporary societies. Constitutional reviews have been undertaken and amendments proposed or effected, for example, in Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago. Guyana and Trinidad and Tobago have totally replaced their independence constitutions. Two week ago, the Parliament of Trinidad and Tobago passed the Constitution (Amendment) Bill 2014 to limit the prime minister to two terms, to recall parliamentary representatives outside scheduled national elections and for a run-off poll in any constituency where contestants fail to secure more than 50 percent of votes cast.After 40 years of constitutional practice in The Bahamas, it is now time that we correct the discrimination against women in our constitution and to ensure that the constitution conforms to the demands and expectations of contemporary Bahamian society and the evolving humanitarian norm of non-discrimination. Further, one way of avoiding the recurrence of such historical errors in the future, as occurred in 1972, is to adopt recommendation 28 of the CEDAW Committee which requires that, "The state party [The Bahamas] adopt temporary special measures, such as quotas... to increase the number of women in political office and public life and decision-making positions."Beyond the referendum, I recommend that we implement affirmative measures to remediate the lack of female representation in the top public offices in The Bahamas. It was the lack of consultation with women and the absence of female representation at the Constitutional Conference that allowed subject discriminatory provisions to be inserted into the constitution in 1972. Therefore, we need to ensure that more women are represented, commensurate with the Bahamian population, in the Parliament and Cabinet so that we have the benefit of the collective wisdom of all of the Bahamian people inform the making of public policy in the future.The removal of these remaining vestiges of discrimination against women, contained in our constitution, is not only the responsibility of Bahamian women. I assume that no Bahamian man would want his mother, wife, sisters or daughters to be disadvantaged in a democratic Bahamas. Therefore, all Bahamian men have a duty to safeguard the human rights of every person in The Bahamas, including the right of women to equality of treatment, by voting in favor of the four bills, as amended in the legislative process, on November 6.The template of the Bahamian suffragettes should inform us during the upcoming referendum. The powerful lesson of that template was summed up brilliantly by Janet Bostwick when she said that, "Women suffragettes showed us that, in order to bring about significant change, we must accept sometimes that the cause is bigger than the individual, than a party, than any of the things which divide and separate us and that much can be accomplished when we unite."o Alfred Sears is a noted attorney, scholar and political figure who served in several Cabinet posts between 2002 and 2007. He currently serves as the chairman of The College of The Bahamas Council.

read more »


News Article

April 04, 2014
Union uproar at Gaming Board

Bahamas Public Services Union (BPSU) President John Pinder yesterday demanded that Prime Minister Perry Christie remove Gaming Board Chairman Dr. Andre Rollins from his post, claiming that Rollins is micro-managing the board and wrongfully terminating staff.
Pinder said three employees were recently fired and another suspended for 10 days without pay.
However, Rollins shot back at Pinder's accusations and said he is working in the best interests of the Gaming Board.
The Fort Charlotte MP told The Nassau Guardian the recent firings were not personal attacks but based on "serious matters that warranted action".
"I think it would behoove John Pinder to do as much as he can to research the facts about each particular case before he seeks to spout off at the mouth creating unnecessary controversy," Rollins said.
He added: "Mr. Pinder is wrong to try and portray me as someone who has an agenda of hurting persons.
"I am offended if he is suggesting that we are in some way targeting individuals. We are not doing that. Would he wish for us to allow the place to run amuck so he can remain in his place as union leader?"
Rollins said Pinder has previously sought to "selfishly" protect the interests of union members.
"John Pinder has intervened directly in matters of dismissal with the Gaming Board in the past," Rollins said.
Pinder warned the government that if it does not remove Rollins, and other heads of government agencies that are not labor friendly, he may campaign against the Progressive Liberal Party (PLP).
He said the union would do whatever it can to change the management style of the Gaming Board.
"If we have to disrupt the casinos so that the government can understand we are not playing with them...then so be it," he said outside the Gaming Board's offices on Collins Avenue.
"We can't wait for election to get rid of him [Rollins]. We need him to be moved forthwith, now. If the government doesn't follow suit they will feel the pinch come next election."
He added: "The trade union movement, when we run up against governments who are not acting labor friendly and who [are] destroying the labor workforce in our country, we will do what we have to do to get them removed. We did it before and we will do it again."
When asked about this, Rollins questioned if Pinder was attacking him to drum up support for a potential political career.
Pinder also said he would immediately file a trade dispute on the grounds of wrongful dismissal for two employees of the Gaming Board.
Pinder said one was let go from the board and another was suspended for 10 days without pay. The union chief is also upset over the termination of two other Gaming Board employees who are not members of the BPSU.
Pinder said one of these employees, the Gaming Board's deputy secretary, was fired because she and another employee switched shifts.
The deputy secretary took court action on April 1 and was granted an order by Supreme Court Justice Ian Winder on Wednesday to return to work.
However, Pinder said when the employee, who has worked with the Gaming Board for eight years, showed up for work yesterday, she was told to leave the premises.
Pinder said the firings were not in accordance with the BPSU's industrial agreement.
Rollins admitted that the deputy secretary was not allowed to return to work yesterday.
However, he said the Gaming Board was not trying to subvert the court order but had a meeting with Prime Minister Perry Christie and Minister of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe to verify the document.
Last June, Pinder called for Rollins' removal, alleging he used "union busting" tactics.
At the time, Pinder said the union received reports that Rollins told union executives and shop stewards to distance themselves from the bargaining unit.
In June, Rollins said the accusations were not true.

read more »


News Article

April 08, 2014
General Post Office to close due to structural problems

The government is again preparing to relocate staff in the General Post Office building which will be closed today due to structural problems, Minister of Transport and Aviation Glenys Hanna-Martin said yesterday.
Postal services will also been suspended today. It is unclear when those services will resume.
In a statement, Hanna-Martin said postal services are "subject to further notification".
However, counter services will be available at each sub-post office location, including Shirley Street, Elizabeth Estates, Cable Beach, South Beach, Fox Hill and Grants Town.
Hanna-Martin said employees found debris in one of the offices in the building on East Hill Street when they arrived at work yesterday morning.
"As a result of this latest incident the ministry has determined to immediately put in place interim measures for the relocation of postal staff and protocols for the collection and distribution of mails while arrangements for finalizing a permanent location is completed," read the statement.
"That process of relocation to permanent premises is in train and premises have been identified with the collaboration of the Ministry of Public Service, which has responsibility for accommodations.
"...The terms of the acquisition of the new location are now being settled."
Hanna-Martin added, "The ministry wishes to give assurance of its fullest concern for the safety of the staff at the post office."
The building has had several challenges over the years.
In August 2013, the government said it was preparing to relocate staff after air condition challenges led to severe flooding in the building.
In February of that year, post office employees claimed that a large concrete slab fell from the ceiling and nearly hit a worker.
At the time, Bahamas Public Service Union (BPSU) Secretary General S. J. Miller said the building posed "serious health and safety problems" for employees.
Hanna-Martin has acknowledged that the building has fallen into a state of disrepair over the years.
There have also been air conditioning issues at the Elizabeth Estates, South Beach and Grants Town post offices.

read more »