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News Article

October 29, 2013
Wake up Bahamas

Dear Editor,
Recently, I was appalled to hear that a young person claimed that in the 60s all Bahamians lived in the "ghetto". What absolute nonsense. That ignorant young lady and whoever fed her that nonsense need to be enlightened.
This is the sad legacy of not making Bahamian history mandatory in all schools, both public and private. Wherever you go in other parts of the world, that country's history is taught in its schools. When I was growing up I was taught all about the Boer War, India and other places that meant absolutely nothing to me. In many ways we are still working in that same antiquated mode and the school curriculum needs to be revised. I spoke to a COB history class recently and when asked if they had been taught Bahamian history in high school those who said they had been noted it was not in depth.
We also need to stop trying to plug square pegs into round holes by forcing children who are not academically inclined to take BGCSE examinations, which is yet another big disaster that ought to be done away with. Those students who are not academically gifted must be taught other subjects that will help them to earn a living and function in the real world when they leave school. We are backward in so many ways. I often shudder when driving around after school hours to see and hear the manner in which so many of our children conduct themselves, including foul language from both boys and girls.
While on this topic I extend congratulations to T. Edward Clarke for what he is doing to rescue some of our at-risk boys through his L.E.A.D. Institute, and also to Ricardo Deveaux for the tremendous work he is doing through the Bahamas Primary School organization which recognizes excellence in primary school students. This is the level at which our children need to be taught about the rich historical heritage of The Bahamas.
Around the time that Paul Adderley died, ZNS TV played a number of his speeches and I was particularly struck by one in which Adderley stated that when he was in charge of the Ministry of Education and tried to introduce certain aspects of Bahamian culture into the curriculum, he encountered obstructionist senior civil servants within the ministry and among some school principals. I also recall attending Marion Bethel's showing of her documentary "Womanish Ways" and the following panel discussion. Among the panelists were the direct descendents of the women who were at the vanguard of the women's suffrage movement in The Bahamas - namely, Alice Ingraham Rolle (daughter of Mary Ingraham who was the founder of the movement); Wallace Lockhart-Carey (daughter of Eugenie Lockhart); Andrew 'Dud' Maynard (son of Georgina Symonette), and Shirley Sands-Johnson (sister of Dame Dr. Doris Johnson). During that discussion Maynard cried when he related how when they tried to get the information concerning the movement introduced into the school curriculum, they were told by a senior Ministry of Education official, although not called by name (a reverend gentleman who is still alive today), that they were trying to indoctrinate the children. What a shame.
My book "Pictorial History and Memories of Nassau's Over-the-Hill" came about precisely because of my disgust at the rot and decay in that and many other areas all over the Island of New Providence. It's important for the uninformed to know that many of the nation builders and others upon whose shoulders we all stand came from Over-the-Hill: Grant's Town, Bain Town, Mason's Addition, Anderson Street, Lewis Street, McCullough Corner, Market Street, Vesey Street, Hay Street, McPherson Street, East Street, Fort Fincastle, Nassau Street, Chippingham, Meadow Street, King Street, Ross Corner and other areas, and they were not the "ghetto". These were the areas where our nation builders were born and lived. We never knew the word "ghetto", which has been imported from elsewhere in more recent times, and everyone took pride and kept their surroundings clean.
Sir Lynden Pindling was born in Mason's Addition and grew up on East Street. Civil servants such as Marina Greaves, Ivor Donald Archer, former Financial Secretary Ruth Millar and her brother Alfred Maycock came from Mason's Addition; so did Rose Hall-King and her son, former Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall, outstanding educators Dame Dr. Doris Johnson, Rev. Carlton Francis, Donald W. Davis and a number of Poitiers, as well as the current Director of Archives Elaine Toote and her siblings Dr. Vanria Rolle and Lewis Colebrooke. Mason's Addition also produced Rev. Earle Francis and medical and academic doctors Baldwin Carey, Eugene Newry, Manny Francis, Pandora Johnson, Junkanoo leader Percy 'Vola' Francis, international movie star Calvin Lockhart and Ambassador Basil O'Brien, as well as successful business persons like the Wallaces, Thompsons and others.
Ross Corner produced Franklyn Wilson and his siblings, Dr. Kenneth Alleyne, Kayla Alleyne-Burrows and Kalfani (Lisle Alleyne, Jr.). I'm happy to see that Dr. Alleyne is now refurbishing the family homestead. Hopefully others will follow his example and that of Dr. Roger Weir who has done a beautiful job with the Weir homestead on West Street. The Coakley house on Lewis Street has also been beautifully restored by its new owner Mr. Gibson (formerly of Vesey and Market Streets).
Gaol Alley and Anderson Street produced Monsignor Preston Moss, Mildred Johnson-Bowe, Verna Elcock, Leslie Johnson, the Sweetings, Gibsons, Bostwicks, Bowes, Adderleys, Allan, Ivan, Perce, Paul and Dr. Andree G. Hanna, Velma Archer-Allen, Annette Knowles, Durward Archer, the Pinders, Seymours, Mitchells, Beryl Barnett, Leslie Hanna, his brother the renowned artist Kendal Hanna and Michael 'Sarge' Hanna. On Lewis Street there were the McCartneys, Coakleys, including Sylvia, Matthew, Hyacinth Saunders, Alma Cartwright, Marina Thompson-Sands, John, Wyatt Johnson, Stephen and Ellen Serville, the Tinkers, Johnsons, Darvilles, C.A.P. Smith and William Cartwright.
Sir Randol Fawkes was born at Fort Fincastle and later lived on McPherson Street, Justice Jeanne Thompson's family and the family of Timothy Gibson, the McCartneys and Coopers also lived there. Archdeacon William Thompson and his brothers Bishop Gilbert Thompson and Dr. Philip Thompson lived at the corner of Hay and Market Streets. Sir Orville Turnquest's family lived on Hay Street, Dr. and Mrs. Jackson Burnside's family lived at Fort Fincastle where Mrs. Burnside still resides; the Coakleys, Smiths, Johnsons and McCartneys lived on Lewis Street; Dr. and Mrs. C.R. Walker lived and worked in Bain Town and their daughter Juliette Barnwell still lives there. Many of our schools are named after outstanding persons who came from Over-the-Hill: Cleveland W. Eneas, C.R. Walker, Mabel Walker, S.C. McPherson, Carlton Francis. Doris Johnson, Donald Davis, Sadie Curtis, Thelma Gibson and the list goes on.
I get annoyed every time I hear Craig Flowers on TV talking about being born in the "ghetto" and he should know better because when he lived there Quakoo Street was clean and he and his brothers, like everyone in the area, were always well groomed and were taught manners. Over-the-Hill and other areas of this island did not look the way they do now with all of the filth. Flowers is seen on TV picking up a piece of paper from the immaculate lawn on his property on West Bay Street. I would urge him to use his influence to encourage some of the Quakoo Street residents with whom he is seen shaking hands and patting on the shoulders to clean up the nasty environment that they have created instead of sitting around under the trees in the midst of the filth.
This is to the detriment of other people like the Storrs and a few others who keep their properties in a clean and pristine condition, as was the case when Flowers grew up there. Everyone in the neighborhood from the humblest to the more successful, like Flowers' father, kept their surroundings clean, and it was definitely not a "ghetto". We all lived by the adage that "cleanliness is next to godliness". Perhaps a part of the reason for the current state of affairs is that so many of our people are godless while others just pretend to be godly and are more concerned with all of the material trappings of being self-appointed pastors, apostles, reverend doctors and bishops.
Self-pride is sadly lacking in so many of us. On the one hand, we complain about the foreigners and want to blame them for everything that is wrong in the country; while on the other, we are quick to pick the most negative aspects of some of those other cultures. I don't want to see your dirty underwear. At the same time some of our so-called "entertainers" pick up a fake Jamaican accent as soon as they put a mic to their mouths. Wherever they go in the world Jamaicans, Americans, Britons and other nationalities never lose their identities or accents, but we Bahamians, the ultimate copy cats, pick up accents after only being away from The Bahamas for brief periods. We are such "pretenders". We also need to get away from the notion that Junkanoo is the only thing that defines our culture. We are much more than that.
I think that one of the worst things to happen in this country was the dismantling of Jumbey Village, which was the brainchild of Edmund Moxey. The village was located at the site where the National Insurance Board building now stands, and featured every aspect of our culture including Junkanoo, art, straw work, music and live entertainment. When Moxey fell out of grace, he was ridiculed and Jumbey Village was dismantled. James Rolle can attest to the fact that he was sent abroad to train as a curator for the art gallery and that when he returned home the village was no more. I also highly recommend Moxey's Jumbey Village documentary to the public.
Wake up Bahamas! We need to educate and enlighten the unformed and yes "indoctrinate" them with what is Bahamian. I make no apologies for that.
- Rosemary C. Hanna

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News Article

May 10, 2012
Sally Agnes Francis, 73

Funeral Service for the Late Sally Agnes Francis, 73 years of Portago Road and Davis Street, Oakes Field, will be held on Saturday May 12th, 11:00 a.m. at St. Joseph's Catholic Church, Boyd Road. Msgr. Alfred Culmer will officiate. Interment will follow in St. Agnes Cemetery, Nassau Street.

Husband: Christopher Francis, Sr.
Daughters: Christal Francis, Michelle Murray, Monique Thompson, and Bridget Butler
Sons: Christopher, Jr. and Francis Francis; and Donald Barrett
Daughters-in-law: Marzelle and Sharon Francis; and Tia Barrett
Sons-in-law: Bertram II, Murray, Patrick Thompson and Perez Butler
Grandchildren: Christan and Patrick Pratt; Marvin, Mark and Franshon Francis; Brandon, Byron and Bertram III, Murray; Alexandria Thompson; Peron and Paige Butler; Tre, Dominic and Taij Barrett; and Chenara (Quinton) Carey
Grand-daughter-in-law: Jovonne Pratt
Great-Grandchildren: Mya Francis and Quinton Carey, Jr.
Children dear to her: Ashley & Amanda Major and Garfield White, Jr.
Sisters: Angela Sands, Rose-Marie Powell, Cleo Williams, & Janet McDonald
Brothers: Hubert Dean, William, Patrick and Kendal Saunders
Sisters-In-Law: Diane Dean, Myrelda Cargill, Thelma Saunders, Delroe Lecky, Evangeline McGill (Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.), Edna Gooden (Trenton, New Jersey), Florinda Smith (Bronx, NY) and Audrey Smith
Brother-In-Law: Dudley Powell
Nieces and nephews and their families: Cecile Dean-Heastie, Terecita Dean, Jewette Wisdom, Lorian and Augustine Dean; Brenda Thompson, Linda Jones and Brendalee Connell;  Kent and Trevor Sands; Sharon Lawrence, Kim Minnis-Collie, Sandy Wilson, Janice Taylor, Wayne Albury and Dave Percentie; Dwayne and Marlin Powell; Rochelle McPhee, Maurice and Jeffery Williams, Jasmine Jones and Sharice Colebrooke; Wayne and Michael Saunders and Deborah Thomas; Kela, Shawna and Samuel McDonald; Jewel Saunders; Denise and Wesley Ingraham and Deborah Moxey; Matthew and Mark Lecky; Calvin and Brian McGill and Denise Clare; Sarina, Eloy and Terry Gooden; Carlton, Errol and Anthony Smith.
Other Family and friends including: Mr. & Mrs. James Butler and family; Mrs. Mavis Tinker and family; Mrs. Meta Bethel and family; Mrs. Marina McCarter and family, Ms. Anne-Marie Ferguson; Ms. Pamela Meyers, Mr. Arthur & Mr. Lawrence Hargray and families; Mr. & Mrs. Ray Saunders and family; The family of the late Cecilia Duncanson; Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Joseph and family; Mr. & Mrs. Clifford Galanis and family; Mr. & Mrs. George Murray and family; Mr. & Mrs. Bertram Murray, Sr. and family; The family of the late Rowena Thompson; Mrs. Alfreda Butler and family; Mr. Stanley Pratt; Mrs. Gertrude Burnside and family; The family of the late Iris Colebrooke, Mrs. Diane Dean; Mrs. Grace Douglas; Mr. & Mrs. Wellington Johnson and family; Mrs. Torkel Smith and family; Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Mott; Mr. & Mrs. Patrick Gomez and family; Mr. & Mrs. Ivan Minnis; Mr. & Mrs. Kendal Campbell and family; Mr. Isaac Rolle; Mrs. Natalie Nairn and family; Ms. Patricia Ingraham and family; Mrs. Venencia Thompson and family; Mrs. Monica Sands and family; Mrs. Eleanor Butler; Ms. Elaine Butler; Mr. Paul Bullard; Mrs. Delores Nottage and family; Mr. & Mrs. Francis Cancino; Mr. & Mrs. Norman Seymour and Family; Mr. & Mrs. Chris Knowles and family; Mr. Earl Thompson; Mr. Winston "Tappy" Davis and family; Mr. & Mrs. Paul Sharma and family; Mrs. Marileta Bethel and Family; Mrs. Trudie Miller and family; Mrs. Geneva Thornton and family; Mr. & Mrs. Justin Roberts and family; Ms. Florinda Bastian and family; Mrs. Pearl Turnquest and family; The Campbell family; Ms. Pat Minnis; Mr. Paul Symonette and family; Mrs. Margaret Claridge and family, The Culmer family; Mr. & Mrs. Andrew Major and the entire Oakes Field Community; Ms. Geraldine Brown and family (Bimini); Reginald Poitier and family; Valarie Lundy and family; Ruth Donaldson and family; The St. Helena's Club Family; Ms. Margaret Smith and family; Mr. George Collymore and family; Mr. Charles Clarke and family; Mr. & Mrs. Michael Cartwright and family; Mr. Warren "Doc" Thompson and family; Msgr. Alfred Culmer, Deacon and Mrs. Gregory Taylor; Msgr. Simeon Roberts; Fr. Reginald Demeritte; Mrs. Barbara Tynes;  Dr. and Mrs. Percival McNeil and family; Mr. & Mrs. Asa Ferguson and family; Mrs. Marilyn Cox and family and the entire St. Joseph Parish Community; Archdeacon Ranfurly Brown and family, Canon Warren Rolle and family; Reverend Father Neil Nairn and family; The St. Agnes Church Usher Board; The ACM and ACW and The St. Agnes Church Family; Mrs. Rose Thompson; Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Braynen; Mrs. Jan Russell and family; Ms. Ida Farrington and family; Mrs. Charlene Musgrove and family; Mr. Dillard Nairn and family; Mr. Jared Albury and family; Ms. Myrtle Gardiner and family; Mr. & Mrs. Steve Barnett; Ms. Betty Tinker; The Doctors, Nurses and Sitters of Doctor's Hospital; Dr. Krill and Mount Sinai Hospital (Miami Beach, Florida); The BATELCO Retirees Association; The Water & Sewage Corporation, Bahamas Electricity Corporation, Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd., Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited; and The Administration, Staff and Students of Queen's College.
MAY SHE REST IN PEACE
Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday at the Church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

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Event
 Paulette Mortimer's Infrared Inspiration
Paulette Mortimer's "Infrared Inspiration"

Monday 22nd October 2012  6:00 PM

Infrared Inspiration: Photography by Paulette Mortimer Monday, October 22, 2012 6pm to 9pm Doongalik Studios Art Gallery 20 Village Road Do you think you could tell what time of day a black and white infrared image was taken? Fine Art Photographer, Paulette A. N. Mortimer, will give you the opportunity to try as she is back to show her unique photography works in an art exhibition entitled “Infrared Inspiration,” which opens on Monday, October 22nd at Doongalik Studios, #20 Village Road from 6 – 9 pm. For 14 years, Mortimer has used her photographic skills to chronicle scenes at Mount Alvernia in Cat Island, as well as in Abaco and New Providence and her portfolio provides an important historical record of the Bahamian landscape. She recently took a trip to Ireland and thoroughly enjoyed focusing her lens on a completely different landscape from the other side of the world. A selection of these works will also be on display in the exhibition. In this exhibition, Mortimer is presenting an array of local landscapes which take on the amazingly surreal quality of another dimension in infrared with white leaves and grass contrasting strikingly with darkened skies – a true reflection of what we cannot see with the naked eye. “My love for fine art photography developed during my college years where I was exposed to hand colouring, hand-toning, pinhole, colour, and panoramic photography and I enjoyed trying new techniques and experimented constantly with different printing processes, hence my love of black and white photography which I can develop myself. Please Join Doongalik Studios Art Gallery for the opening of Paulette Mortimer's "Infrared Inspiration" Monday, October 22nd, 2012 6pm-9pm # 20 Village Road Tel: 394-1886 Doongalik Studios was formed in the 1970's by Jackson Burnside, architect, artist and cultural advocate and his wife, Pam. The couple have spent their lifetime together committed to promoting the country's outstanding artistic talent which they firmly believe can establish The Bahamas as an international center of creativity. Doongalik Studios Art Gallery has two locations in Nassau - in the picturesque Marina Village at Atlantis, Paradise Island (designed by Burnside), which showcases the work of over 70 local artists using all forms of media, and at #18 Village Road which is home to a large Exhibition Gallery in an historically traditional building nestled amongst a lush garden.


News Article

December 18, 2013
Attorney defends clients in Orchid Bay dispute

The attorney for an Abaco couple who saw the development they were involved with subject to a takeover by a team led by Grant Thornton Bahamas, confirmed yesterday that the couple plans to seek to have this takeover overturned in the courts, with applications to be made to this effect in short order.
Roy Sweeting, partner with law firm Glinton Sweeting and O'Brien, and representative for James and Melonie Albury, told Guardian Business that "a lot of incorrect statements" have been made in relation to his clients.
In particular, he said that Melonie Albury's company, Albury's Property Management, "has nothing at all to do with" the overall management of the 203-acre Orchid Bay property, but simply "does some maintenance on private homes and rents golf carts" within the development.
Sweeting stated that Melonie Albury's husband, James 'Jimmy' Albury, is the receiver for the Guana Cay Abaco Development Company.
On December 12, Grant Thornton Managing Partner Paul Gomez took control of the Orchid Bay Resort and Marina.
Court documents obtained by this newspaper show the Supreme Court has appointed Gomez the receiver for the William B. Johnson Investment Company and William B. Johnson entities, which own the outstanding and issued shares in Guana Cay Abaco Development Company.
Gomez is now attempting to account for all of the assets in the company with a view to sell them to raise funds necessary to pay off a debt owed to his client, Synovus.
US bank, Synovus, is the primary creditor of the companies for which Gomez has now been appointed receiver, whose principal is American businessman William B. Johnson.
The property contains a number of houses which are offered as rental properties, and residents have expressed concern that the takeover will interfere with their ability to rent out their properties over Christmas.
A secondary legal action is also underway which alleges that James Albury, acting as property manager for Orchid Bay, caused some of its assets to be sold at significantly below their true market value.

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News Article

May 25, 2012
As education diminishes, so does the tourism industry

Guardian Business: Can you briefly describe your experience in the tourism sector and what your role is today?
Ian: I have worked indirectly in the tourism and hospitality sector since 1994 as a teacher of social studies, history, economics and civics. My role then was primarily responsible for educating and preparing young Bahamians for responsible citizenship and successful careers in the industry. In 2005, I was recruited to work for Kerzner International on the Atlantis property as a director responsible for training with additional recruitment responsibilities. My critical functions included: general employee orientation, company-wide customer service training, Atlantis University Leadership Training and Psychometric Interviewing for The Cove, Reef and Marina Village. In 2008, I served The Bahamas Hotel Association, The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and The Caribbean Tourism Organization (CTO) as a technical consultant and hospitality assured advisor assisting more than 150 small and medium sized companies with models for business and service excellence helping them move towards global competitiveness. I am currently serving as the director for training and education for The Bahamas Ministry of Tourism (BahamaHost), organizing the efforts of five departments in that unit. Additionally, I serve as the chancellor of the Chamber Institute, a subsidiary of The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce and Employers Confederation. I continue to serve as a CTO hospitality assured advisor and a voice and advocate for the adoption of industry best practices by small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

GB: Why did you choose to work in tourism as a career?
Ian: I never imagined myself in mainstream tourism before 2005. I gladly accepted the opportunity to work in the sector that drives the economy of The Bahamas, understanding that my work and gifts would serve our number one industry well. I am also thrilled to work in such a dynamic sector where creativity and ingenuity are so important.

GB: What has been your most memorable moment?
Ian: I have had many memorable moments in the industry, including seeing former high school students of mine enter the industry and succeed, as well as guiding and tracking the career path of employees entering the industry. My most memorable moment in the industry has been spending three years traveling the islands of The Bahamas and sitting with scores of local hotel owners, hearing their concerns and providing interventions, and offering help and hope.

GB: Has the industry changed since you started your career? How?
Ian: As our society changes for the worse, and as our attitude towards education and learning diminishes, so does the state of the industry. We seemingly are on a downward spiral towards ignoring basic standards for service excellence and each generation is entering the industry progressively worse.

GB: What should The Bahamas focus on to stay competitive?
Ian: We have shared as a cliché, that there is strength in unity. Our greatest challenge is that there are wonderful things going on in regards to training, great service delivery and high standards. This is happening in pockets of the sector, but there is no common acceptance of best practices on a national scale. Our focus must be then to unite the industry towards a national training program, national industry standards and support mechanisms and resource centers that everyone (despite their economies of scale) can benefit from.

GB: What advice would you give to a young person who is considering a career in tourism?
Ian: I say to Bahamians entering the business that their focus must be directed towards delivering great value to their customers; learning as much as they can about the industry; positioning themselves and their future (perhaps along the line of entrepreneurship), and maintaining the cultural integrity of The Bahamas.

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News Article

October 21, 2014
Paradise Plates serves up perfect evening of fun and food

Hands For Hunger's Paradise Plates 2014 lived up to its promise this year to be the biggest and best "night of culinary compassion" ever held, drawing the best food and beverage purveyors on the island, 700-plus guests and rave reviews.
Paradise Plates, now in its sixth year, was held on September 27 in the Grand Ballroom of Atlantis resort and is the signature fundraiser for the Hands For Hunger (H4H) organization. H4H is a humanitarian organization committed to the elimination of unnecessary hunger and the reduction of food waste in The Bahamas. Based on a recent report from the Department of Statistics, as many as 34,000 Bahamians face chronic hunger or food insecurity. The good news is that the problem is surmountable. Through the reduction of food waste in our community, unnecessary hunger can be eliminated.
This year, Paradise Plates guests experienced an epicurean adventure of diverse palates, bold flavors and traditional favorites from 29 food and drink stations showcasing their best fare, including sushi, tapas, pork belly, ceviche, hummus, dessert, sky juice, rum and wine, to name just a few. Guests were also entertained by live music. A Junkanoo rushout by the Marina Village Junkanoo Troupe capped off the night.
Chef Monica Hutchinson, a Food Network-affiliated chef, presented a rescued food demonstration, transforming KFC chicken and peas and rice into tasty dishes. There was also a dramatic Chinese noodle demonstration by Atlantis.
For the past two years, Paradise Plates has been used to introduce the public to Nassau's current or newly launching restaurants. In 2012, Graycliff Chocolatier launched its artisan chocolates and bon bons to the delight of guests and just last year Palm Cay's Billfish Grill was a huge hit among the curious "foodie" crowd at Paradise Plates. This year guests were introduced to Lukka Kairi, a new restaurant featuring traditional Bahamian flavors with a fresh, contemporary approach.
The live and silent auctions had guests brimming with excitement as many attempted to win at least one of more than 50 fabulous prizes, experiences and adventures. The star of the silent auction this year was an X4 BMW. Other items up for bid included local and international vacation packages to destinations such as Portland, Ore., Washington D.C. and the Family Islands, along with fine jewelry, art and sculpture, and designer items.
"Every year, in an effort to raise over $100,000 to sustain Hands For Hunger's programs and operations, we rely on our valued partners to ensure the success of this night of culinary compassion," said Anna Bancroft, Paradise Plates Committee lead and communications manager, Hands For Hunger.
The 2014 Paradise Plates event involved a number of companies collaborating to make the event a success. Atlantis, Creative Relations, Zamar, and Wildflowers Events and Occasions provided in-kind donations to transform the venue into a magnificent space. In addition to corporate partnerships, the event would not be possible without a dedicated group of volunteers working with the H4H staff. The event also allowed College of The Bahamas culinary students to practice their skills while giving back. For the last six years they have assisted executive chefs at the participant stations.
Royal Bank of Canada and SkyBahamas both served as presenting sponsors of Paradise Plates this year. BMW was a connoisseur sponsor of the event this year.

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News Article

March 03, 2014
Palm Cay revs up excitement at Miami International Boat Show

NASSAU, Bahamas -- Representatives of a fast-growing New Providence development returned from the Miami International Boat Show this week with reports of their best year ever in the show that spans 2.5 million square feet, attracting tens of thousands of visitors shopping or dreaming over a fantasy land of boats, all things marine, exotic destinations and, more recently, real estate.
For Palm Cay, the $200 million beachfront and marina community rising on Nassau's southeastern shore, there was a steady stream of traffic at the booth they shared with the Bahamas Ministry of Tourism from opening to closing daily.
"There were a few times when people lined up to get more information about The Bahamas and about Palm Cay," said Zack Bonczek, Palm Cay Director of Sales and Marketing. "Of course, we were trying to make it fun, too, encouraging show goers to enter in a Palm Cay photo contest to win a free weekend stay in one of our beachfront townhomes.
"This was our third year at the show and it was by far the best in terms of interest. That's good news not just for us but for The Bahamas as a whole and we were pleased to be able to share The Bahamas' booth."

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News Article

March 08, 2012
BTC set to unveil new Abaco store

In a ceremony without great fanfare but with great expectations for the results, Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC) executives will cut the ribbon and open the door of the company's latest achievement, a bustling location in Treasure Cay, Abaco, that will open on March 22 following a major overhaul, emerging larger and with a sophisticated, bright new look and feel.
The Abaco store is the latest in a string of rebuilds and reopenings that are redefining the retail footprint of BTC, converting often outdated bill payment and service centers into cheerful, interactive spaces with a slew of products and plans available for experiment and instant connection.
Like others that came before and those following close behind, Treasure Cay's interior will be defined by its artwork, a wall-length mural depicting a Treasure Cay beach scene with two of the island's best-known living features, the wild horses of Abaco and the colorful Abaco parrot. The artwork was created by Bahamian Zyandric Jones. If there is a difference between Treasure Cay and most of the other locations, it is in the customer base, which is almost entirely residential with heavy expatriate traffic from the marina and winter residents.
The pace of transformation that began with the Mall at Marathon celebration in December is so fast that BTC is opening its next four stores in seven days, two in New Providence, one in George Town, Exuma and the smallest one - about 800 square feet after its expansion - in Treasure Cay. Another is on tap for Marsh Harbour, Abaco. Other renovations started this week in Eleuthera where there will be four stores.
Officials said they are finalizing details on the first franchise, which is expected to be announced shortly.
The largest of the new renovations is the one set for George and Bay Streets in Nassau, where workmen have had to perform demolition with jackhammers and other heavy equipment after regular business hours because of neighboring tenants. The ribbon will be cut during an official ceremony at the new Bay Street store on March 30, with a huge street party for the general public the next day.
With full-blown competition at its back, BTC is pouring on the speed, living up to the pledge made when the company was privatized less than a year ago that it would open 50 stores by 2012 year-end, while paying tribute in each to local culture and art.

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Event
Harbourside Marine Rotary Tuna Classic
Harbourside Marine Rotary Tuna Classic

Saturday 2nd June 2012  6:00 PM

June 1 & 2 Harbourside Marine Rotary Tuna Classic This fishing tournament is sponsored by Harbourside Marine. Lines must be in at 6am, lines out 7pm. This year weigh stations include Schooner Bay in Abaco, Cape Eleuthera, Spanish Wells and Green Parrot in Nassau. Entry fee is $1,000 per boat. Registration & Captain/Anglers' meetings held at both Green Parrot (PI) and Boat Harbour Marina. Prizes include Yamaha scooters, generator, Shimano and Kristal rods and reels. Proceeds go to Rotary Club of East Nassau's charitable programs. Awards ceremony & raffle held June 9 at Green Parrot East Bay.. T: 376-9858 or 457-2282 Schedule of Events Thursday May 31st, 2012 - Registration & Captain/Anglers’ meeting Held at both Green Parrot (PI) and Boat Harbour Marina-Anglers Bar (MHH-AB) Friday June 1st, Saturday June 2nd, 2012 - Fishing Lines in at 6am. Lines out at 7pm. All caught fish eligible for Bahamas Rotary Tuna Classic awards must be brought to an official weigh station and weighed on the same day as caught. Any fish hooked before “lines out” with fight exceeding “lines out” must communicate with tournament committee or judge. Weighmaster at each weigh station keeps official time. Weigh stations are Schooner Bay, Abaco Spanish Wells, N Eleuthera Nassau, NP Cape Eleuthera, S Eleuthera Hours For Weigh-In: Friday 1st 6pm-8pm Saturday 2nd 6pm-8pm Tuna, Dolphin, Wahoo categories only. No billfish Saturday June 9th, 2012 - Awards Ceremony & Raffle Held at Green Parrot, Harbourside. Live band, food, raffle, awards, fun for the whole family. Any winners in top categories who live in Abaco or Eleuthera will be flown to Nassau and overnight at Sheraton hotel. Compliments of Sky Bahamas and Sheraton Nassau Beach. Covers only the actual angler. ClickHERE to fill Entry Form. ClickHERE to view Rules & Regulations.


News Article

December 28, 2011
Those we lost this year

This year was marked by the loss of several Bahamians who strove to make The Bahamas a better place. Their legacies reflect a deep commitment for developing the moral and cultural fabric of society, making them irreplaceable national treasures.
On February 7, Bishop Michael Hartley Eldon passed away.
Ordained as deacon in 1954 and then as priest in 1955, Eldon was consecrated Bishop Suffragan of New Providence in 1971.  He served as Diocesan Bishop from 1974 until his retirement in 1996.
At his funeral on February 15 at Christ Church Cathedral, Bishop Eldon was remembered as 'the people's bishop' as he was always with them even beyond his capacity as a church leader.  Indeed his influence extended to education as a founding chairman of The College of The Bahamas board of directors, as well as to service in feeding the needy and assisting recovering drug addicts.
In helping to mold all sectors of society, Bishop Eldon was a true conscientious citizen and community leader.
The Bethel family suffered a double loss as Dr. Keva Marie Bethel, Bishop Eldon's sister, succumbed to cancer on February 15, hours before her brother's funeral.
Dr. Bethel was described by the prime minister as an "extra-ordinary Bahamian".  Like her late husband E. Clement Bethel, Dr. Bethel was dedicated to the promotion and advancement of Bahamian culture.
Most notably, Dr. Bethel was also a pioneer in education, joining her brother on the founding board of directors for The College of The Bahamas.  Dr. Bethel acted as principal of the college from 1982-1995, and then as its president until 1998.
As an educator for more than 50 years, Dr. Bethel never stopped in her efforts to advance the intelligent development of Bahamian citizens -- efforts that were honored by her students and colleagues at her memorial service on February 18 at the college's Centre for the Performing Arts.
She was a quiet hero and a magnanimous leader -- with a kind spirit, a purposeful vision, she inspired countless Bahamians to work towards building a dynamic nation.
Another Bahamian icon, Basil Dean, passed away on February 11 in Florida while being treated for cancer.
Beloved and respected by police and feared by criminals, Dean changed the face of crime fighting in The Bahamas. Joining the police force in 1966, Dean served selflessly for 31 years, retiring as assistant commissioner of police.
He then took up the position of vice president of Security and Surveillance at Atlantis resort.
At his military funeral at Christ Church Cathedral on February 22, the beloved Dean was remembered for his no-tolerance stance on crime and his personal integrity.
As his son Brent Dean pointed out during the service, his father left the police force with his integrity intact, considering that his greatest achievement in a time where some policemen readily received bribes and could at times hardly be separated from criminals themselves.
Those who worked with him after retirement looked on him fondly as an important mentor in their lives, for whether in the police force or at Atlantis resort, Dean molded the moral integrity and pride of many a student as an exemplary model.
This year, the Bahamian community also mourned the loss of a great cultural figure, Jackson Logan Burnside. He died on May 11 after suffering a brain aneurysm on April 15 at age 62.
Burnside was a true cultural icon passionate about all things Bahamian.  As an architect under Doongalik studios, Burnside preserved in all of his design projects the 'Bahamianness' in local architecture. Such efforts are seen in many of his projects, including the iconic Atlantis Marina Village.
Considered one of the master artists of The Bahamas, Burnside's colorful paintings invoked in viewers pure joy and appreciation for their heritage.
As Burnside was also a founder of One Family Junkanoo group along with his brother Stan, an elaborate Junkanoo rush-out in his honor followed his funeral service on May 19 where his role as a mentor to many young Bahamians -- whether future architects, artists, or Junkanoo icons -- was remembered.
Though the loss of Burnside is a huge blow to the cultural development of The Bahamas, his passion will live on for he shared it with every single person he came across in his life.
In December, The Bahamas faced the unexpected loss of Canon Neil Roach. As the longest-serving rector of Holy Cross Parish, his death came just days before he planned to celebrate the 54th anniversary of being an ordained priest.
His influence extended beyond his religious post however, for as an honorary consul to Trinidad and Tobago, Canon Roach helped to shape regional foreign policy and contributed to the civic life and development of The Bahamas.
Remembered by many as a particularly jovial and outgoing person, Canon Roach always urged people to see the glass half full, to practice thankfulness and to celebrate life. Nevertheless, with unwavering faith, he was adamant about upholding certain cultural norms about the Anglican Church. Indeed, he was a major icon in the Anglican community who even after his retirement remained dedicated to teaching and guiding people in the community.
Also in December, Bahamians lost a national hero when Sir Clifford Darling died after a long illness at the age of 89.
The fourth Bahamian-born governor general, Sir Clifford had a long and significant career in politics. He served as a Progressive Liberal Party MP for about 25 years.
Appointed as the Minister of Labor and National Insurance in 1971, he introduced the National Insurance Programme on October 7, 1974, ensuring every Bahamian received assistance in their time of need.
From 1977 to 1992, Sir Clifford served as the speaker of the House of Assembly and in 1992 was sworn in at Government House as the governor general of The Bahamas, a post he held until 1995.
Indeed, Sir Clifford fought for significant change in The Bahamas, and not only as a politician. From his beginnings as a taxicab driver and general secretary and then president of The Bahamas Taxicab Union, Sir Clifford sought to ensure fairness in Bahamian businesses and society. From the early 1950s he worked with hotels to ensure Bahamian taxicab drivers received fair treatment and share of passengers from the resort clientele.
Through a general strike in 1958 where he worked with the union to blockade the airport, Sir Clifford helped to forge an agreement involving hotels, tour services and taxicab operators that has persisted to this day.
Sir Clifford was knighted by the Queen in 1977 and was a stalwart councillor, the highest honor that can be bestowed on a member of the Progressive Liberal Party.
In December, Reginald Dumont, the husband of former Governor General Dame Ivy Dumont also died. Dumont was 88.
Of course there were many other beloved Bahamians who made contributions to the development of The Bahamas who died this year.  They too will be fondly remembered by many.  Though their journeys on earth have ended, the legacies of these great Bahamians will be felt for many years to come as they live on in the lives of those they changed.

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