Search results for : Moxey

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News Article

October 04, 2011
City Services 'bullish' with headquarters

City Services Ltd has acquired two large pieces of land in Grand Bahama and begun immediate construction of the new company headquarters - a possible sign of even bigger things to come.
The five acres of land, purchased by City Services from Freeport Commercial and Industrial Limited through the joint efforts of the Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA) and local brokers, is a "big step", according to Peter Turnquest, the Chairman of the Chamber of Commerce.
"They are ambitious for the future," he told Guardian Business.
"Anytime an entity sets up a permanent footprint is significant.  It means there is a positive move for the economy and opens the door for further construction projects in the future.  These things never happen in isolation and we invite others to join them."
The headquarters is slated for completion by the first or second quarter of 2012.  It will span 29,000 square-feet and house more than 25 staff members.
City Services, an up-and-coming civil contractor, is responsible for several major projects on the island.
The contractor is currently working on a $50 million portion of the Cruise Ship Terminal in Freeport and $100 million worth of work on the Ginn Development on the West End of Grand Bahama.
City Services also built the movie sets for two installments in the Pirates of the Caribbean franchise. Joseph O'Brien, the Managing Director of City Services Ltd., praised GBPA for working with its licensees
to bring about their latest development.
"We are extremely pleased with the efforts of the Port Authority and Sarles Realty for conducting this transaction expeditiously and as seamlessly as possible," he said.
James Sarles, the President at Coldwell Banker James Sarles Realty, added that "people around the world" were looking at Grand Bahama from an industrial perspective.
He also described the acquisition as a "win-win for all" and "a start of good things to come".
In difficult economic times, these kinds of developments are especially important, he felt.
Ginger Moxey, the Vice President of GBPA, echoed his sentiments, saying the purchase shows the company's commitment to the island economy.
It also illustrates the Port's "open door" policy.
"Our multi-million-dollar expansion project shows we are bullish about Freeport's future and dedicated to the community," O'Brien added.
"Our company has built a strong reputation of reliable, on-time services in Grand Bahama and with the extention of our ever-growing marine services, we like what we see for our company's future on Grand Bahama."

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News Article

November 05, 2014
Clayton Bain achieves a sculling three-peat

Over the weekend, sculling fans gathered along the shoreline at Fort Montagu Beach to see if Clayton Bain would once again emerge as the sculling champion. For the third year in a row, he proved that he is indeed the champion.
"The trash-talking started hours before the race," exclaimed Lynden Johnson, Bahamian Brewery & Beverage Company's director of sales and marketing. "The scullers were all bragging about their ability and the spectators wondered who would be crowned the champion. The atmosphere at Montagu Beach was fantastic for sculling, and we couldn't hope for the day to have gone any better."
The sculling weekend began on Saturday with the High Rock Scramble relay race, which was won by Charles Kelly, Jason Robinson and Dianne Dewitt.
Sunday brought the main event, which included the E-class races and the much-anticipated sculling championship. During the Sands E-class regatta, legendary sailor Lundy Robinson won three races back-to-back and was crowned the E-Class regatta winner. Additionally, Kyle Darville placed second and Steven Rolle third.
Once the sailing races finished, it was time for the main event and spectators assembled at the shoreline early, enabling the races to start on time. Participating in the sculling championship from across The Bahamas were Dennis Fox, St. Valentine champion; Richard Ross, Nassau champion; Danny Knowles, Long Island champion; Steven Rolle, National Family Islands (Exuma) champion in the first heat; Clayton Bain, defending champion; Skeeter Rolle, Abaco champion; Reuben Knowles, Nassau champion, and Clay Moxey, Grand Bahama champion.
Richard Ross and Dennis Fox from the first heat and Clayton Bain and Clay Moxey from the second heat advanced through to the championship round. Unfortunately, Richard Ross was unable to compete in the championship round, so the competitors agreed on including Steven Rolle in the championship race.
After a fierce sculling competition, Clayton Bain won for a third straight year, proving that he is the sculling champion of The Bahamas and won both the coveted trophy and 20 cases of Sands beer. Dennis Fox placed second, and Clay Moxey placed third in the championship round, winning 15 and 12 cases of Sands beer, respectively.
To end the night in grand style, the brewery held a great Bahamian concert, featuring Veronica Bishop, D Mac, Geno D and The Spank Band. "I can honestly say that this weekend was a truly Bahamian great time," said Johnson,. "From the regatta races, to the sculling championship, to the fantastic entertainment provided by our own, truly Bahamian artists."
For more pictures visit the Bahamian Brewery & Beverage Company's website or Facebook page to see photos from the sculling races, and practice your sculling, so you'll be ready for next year's races.

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News Article

November 07, 2014
Clayton Bain achieves a sculling three-peat

Sculling fans from near and far gathered along the shoreline at Fort Montagu beach last weekend to see if Clayton Bain would once again emerge as the sculling champion.
For the third year in a row, he proved that he is indeed the champion.
"The trash-talking started hours before the race," said Lynden Johnson, Bahamian Brewery director of sales and marketing.
"The scullers were all bragging about their ability and the spectators wondered who would be crowned the champion.
"The atmosphere at Montagu Beach was fantastic for sculling and we couldn't hope for the day to have gone any better."
The sculling weekend last Saturday with the High Rock Scramble relay race which was won by Charles Kelly, Jason Robinson and Dianne Dewitt.
After the races were done, the crowd was entertained by Willis & the Illest Band.
Sunday brought the main event, which included the E-class races and the much anticipated sculling championship.
During the Sands E-class regatta, legendary sailor Lundy Robinson won three races and was crowned the E-Class regatta winner.
Kyle Darville placed second and Steven Rolle third.
Once the sailing races finished, it was time for the main event and spectators assembled at the shoreline early, enabling the races to start on time.
Participating in the sculling championship from across The Bahamas were Dennis Fox, St. Valentine champion; Richard Ross, Nassau champion; Danny Knowles, Long Island champion; Steven Rolle, National Family Islands (Exuma) champion in the first heat; Clayton Bain, defending champion; Skeeter Rolle, Abaco champion; Reuben Knowles, Nassau champion; and Clay Moxey, Grand Bahama champion.
Richard Ross and Dennis Fox from the first heat and Clayton Bain and Clay Moxey from the second heat advanced through to the championship round.
Richard Ross was unable to compete in the championship round so the competitors agreed to include Steven Rolle in the championship race.
After a fierce sculling competition and with huge support, Clayton Bain won for a third straight year, proving that he is the sculling champion of The Bahamas.
He won both the coveted trophy and 20 cases of Sands beer.
Dennis Fox placed second and Clay Moxey placed third in the championship round, winning 15 and 12 cases of Sands beer respectively.
To end the night in grand style, the brewery held a great Bahamian concert, featuring Veronica Bishop, D Mac, Geno D and The Spank Band.
"I can honestly say that this weekend was a truly Bahamian great time, from the regatta races, to the sculling championship, to the fantastic entertainment provided by our own, truly Bahamian artists," Johnson said.

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News Article
Clifford Moxey, 77
May 12, 2011
Clifford Moxey, 77

Funeral service for Clifford Moxey, 77 of Pinewood Gardens and formerly of Mangrove Cay, Andros who died on May 5th, 2011, will be held on Saturday, May 14th, 2011, at 2:00 p.m., at St. Joseph’s Roman Catholic Church, #47 Boyd Road. Officiating will be Father Martin Gomes, SS.CC. Interment follows in Tyler Street Cemetery, Tyler Street.

HERE IN LIFE AWAITING THE REUNION IS HIS WIFE: LENORA, DAUGHTERS: JANET JACKSON OF MIAMI FL, CYNTHIA MCPHEE OF FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA’, FIVE GRANDSONS: TERRENCE H GREENSLADE OF LOS ANGELES CALIFORNIA, LIEUTENANT JD(USNAVY) MARK GREENSLADE OF AFGHANISTAN, MAVERICK MCPHEE OF FREEPORT GRAND BAHAMA , FRED AND MARTINA RAHAMING; EIGHT GRANDDAUGHTE ...

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News Article
Coconut Grove Local Heroes Park Celebratory Opening
November 25, 2013
Coconut Grove Local Heroes Park Celebratory Opening

On November 23rd BTC staged an official celebratory opening ceremony for the Coconut Grove Local Heroes Park on Poinciana Avenue and a rededication and unveiling of the Hero’s Wall...

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News Article

May 10, 2013
Colina managers share their career journeys at COB's Business Week

The sole Bahamian actuary working in The Bahamas and the youngest Bahamian Fellow of the Academy of Life Underwriting have two things in common: They both work at Colina Insurance Limited, the largest life and health insurer in the country, and they both started their higher education at The College of The Bahamas. Add to these a third mutual tie, their appearance at COB's Business Week on March 19 with three colleagues to discuss their journeys to rewarding careers at the insurance giant and what it takes to advance a career in financial services. These presentations at the college were the launch pad for Colina's on-the-road initiative "CONNECT", the company's free public education program designed to provide knowledge of insurance concepts and raise awareness about the importance of life and health insurance, financial planning and wellness.
"More than a year ago Colina launched CONNECT," said Wendy Butler, vice president of life operations at Colina. "Since hosting four successful public forums, we've now expanded our mandate to reach out to niche groups in order to advance a better understanding of insurance and financial planning. It was natural to select the nation's premier tertiary institution, and especially its business students, as our first stop."
During the informative session at COB's Business Week, themed "Forty Years of Excellence: Embracing University", former COB alumni shared their personal journeys from the halls of COB to the boardrooms at Colina. Alumna DeAndrea Lewis, the only Bahamian actuary working in The Bahamas, inspired students to achieve their full potential as future business leaders. Lewis, who is responsible for the management of the individual life block of business at Colina, presented "Insurance 101" discussing life, medical and mortgage insurance, the process of pricing insurance products, the risks involved in insurance and the interest rates for insurance premiums.
Kenray Marsh, an alumnus of the college and Colina's new business manager and senior underwriter, is only the second Bahamian Fellow of the Academy of Underwriting (FALU), which is the highest designation in the life insurance underwriting profession. Marsh outlined the role of an insurance underwriter, the types of underwriting in life, health and casualty insurance and the evaluation of risks and accuracies involved in onboarding new clients.
Other Colina presenters included top sales representatives and Million Dollar Round Table (MDRT) qualifiers Amanda Knowles and Ian Capron who each offered a candid look into the benefits of a career in insurance sales. Both Knowles and Capron began their careers in banking and accounting but soon shifted gears and began to look to the insurance industry for greater autonomy, earning potential and career satisfaction which, they acknowledge, they have found in abundance at Colina.
Rounding off the team of presenters was Cathy Williams, vice president of finance at Colina, who educated the students on the technical aspects of financial accounting in life and health insurance, and talked about her own road to the insurance industry in The Bahamas after beginning her career as a junior auditor for PriceWaterhouseCoopers in her native Canada.
The purpose of Business Week, according to Remelda Moxey, acting dean of the Faculty of Business, is to give the School of Business an opportunity to showcase its graduates and provide students with a forum of innovative and informative discussions led by a cadre of alumni and guests with real world experiences.
Emmanuel Komolafe, chief risk and compliance officer at Colina and host for the session, told the students that "one of the objectives at Colina is to educate the public but, in addition to educating, we also want to inspire."
Throughout the conversational presentations, the message was clear, and the team inspired the students to stay the course and to take advantage of the opportunities provided by the college as they carve out their own paths toward success. Following the session, students posed questions pertaining to insurance policies and were given an opportunity to win prizes and giveaways and interact with the Colina managers at a reception held in their honor.

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News Article

September 14, 2012
College of The Bahamas Strengthening International Relations

Nassau, Bahamas - Councilor Fred Payne of the Greenville County Council in South Carolina visited The College of The Bahamas on Wednesday, September 12th to discuss solidifying collaborations with the institution for the benefit of students and faculty.

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News Article

March 25, 2014
Colorectal cancer is preventable

Colorectal cancer affects both men and women, and is the second leading cause of death in the United States, according to gastroenterologist Dr. Beverton Moxey. As Colorectcal Cancer Awareness Month is observed during March, he advises people 45 years and older to speak with their physicians about screening for colorectal cancer. People who have a family history of colon cancer, a personal history of cancer or those who have symptoms -- change in bowel habits, bright red or dark blood in the stool, discomfort in the abdomen, including frequent gas pains, bloating, fullness and cramps or unexplained weight loss, constant tiredness or unexplained anemia (iron deficiency), should also speak with a medical professional.
During a recent Doctors Hospital Distinguished Lecture Series Dr. Moxey stressed that the number of patients affected by colon cancer is equal and that men aren't affected more than women, and that women aren't affected more than men.
Colorectal or large bowel cancer is the disease in which malignant cells form in the lining of the rectum or in the colon. Most colon and rectal cancers originate from benign wart-like structures or growths that occur on the inner lining of the colon or the rectum, called polyps or flat lesions. The difference between polyps and flat lesions is very simple. Polyps protrude into the lumen and flat lesions remain flat onto the lining. The polyps and flat lesions have the ability to transform into cancer. It takes more than 10 years for someone to develop cancer from a polyp or flat lesion according to the doctor.
As the process to cancer development is a lengthy period, Dr. Moxey said colorectal cancer can be prevented through the detection of polyps at an early stage. And that a persons' survival rate is best when the disease is caught at an early stage.
Colorectal cancer is preventable
"Colorectal cancer is one of those diseases that is preventable, but it requires screening. Early diagnosis means a better chance of successful treatment. Screening should begin at age 50 in most persons, except for persons of African descent. The guidelines have changed for persons of African descent that screening should be started at an earlier age, 45, because persons have been found to have a diagnosis of colorectal cancer earlier. Additionally, if you have a family history of colorectal cancer you would start screening before the age of 50, you would start screening either at the age of 40 or at the age of 10 years younger than when the diagnosis was made. For instance, if you have a first-degree relative that was diagnosed at the age of 40, then you should begin screening at the age of 30. Additionally if you have a history of IBD, then that would put you at a higher risk category and you should start screening before the age of 50."
Colorectal cancer data collected by Dr. Moxey from the Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH) between 2003 and 2013 showed that 436 patients were diagnosed with colorectal cancer with 329 persons diagnosed with colon cancer exclusively. Persons that had cancer involving the rectal or the rectum sigmoid junction was at 107.
"When we look at the occurrence between male and female, it's equally affected -- 218 men and 218 female," said the gastroenterologist. Of the total, 298 people are still living, 138 had died. And he said the majority of the patients diagnosed were done at an advanced stage -- stage three as compared to stage zero or stage one.
Dr. Moxey's Doctors Hospital data from 2009 to 2013 data showed 142 persons diagnosed with colorectal cancer -- 53 males and 41 females. For cancer of the rectum, 22 males and 26 females were diagnosed.
Age group wise, he only had information from Doctors Hospital that showed a patient in the 20-25 age group bracket diagnosed.
"For the most part, the incidence increases from the age of 45, and something that was very striking as well is when you look at this age group, persons over 70, compared to looking at the others shows that there is still a high incidence in persons that are older," said Dr. Moxey. "Colorectal cancer in the United States is one of the second leading causes of death. I used the U.S. as a benchmark because that's in large part a lot of the guidelines that we use by which we diagnose and treat. Lung and prostate cancers are more common in men and lung and breast (cancers) in women when compared to colorectal cancer. However, when we look at the incidence of colon cancer in men and women it's equal in terms of the amount of patients that are affected, so men aren't affected more than women, and women aren't affected more than men."
Risk factors for colorectal cancer
Polyps, age, a history of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), diet high in saturated fats such as red meat, a personal or family history of cancer (colon, rectum, ovary, endometrium or breast), obese patients, smoking and genetic syndromes (Lynch syndrome, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis) are risk factors for colorectal cancer.
Dr. Moxey said that the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) sometimes called Lynch syndrome accounts for approximately five to 10 percent of all colorectal cancer cases. And that the risk of colorectal cancer in families with this particular genetic syndrome is 70 percent to 90 percent, which is several times the risk factor of the general population.
"People with HNPCC are diagnosed with colorectal cancer at an average age of 45, and genetic testing for the most part is available and can be done to prevent the development or to at least find out if you are at risk for the development of colorectal cancer," he said.
Another hereditary syndrome is Familial adenomatus polyposis (FAP) which accounts for a very small percentage of colorectal cancer -- one percent of cases. According to the doctor, people with FAP typically develop hundreds or thousands of polyps, so when medical professionals look at the colon during a colonoscopy it's literally studded with the growths. The polyps he said are initially benign (non-cancerous), but that there is nearly a 100-percent chance that the polyps will develop into cancer if left untreated.
"Colorectal cancer usually occurs by age 40 in these persons. There are mutations in this particular gene, and genetic testing is also available. It's recommended that people who are diagnosed with FAP should have yearly screening examinations via colonoscopy."
Symptoms
If you notice a change in your bowel habits, Dr. Moxey said that should prompt you to have a discussion with your primary care physician about getting a colonoscopy, regardless of your age.
"If you were the type of person that went to the bathroom everyday like clockwork, and now for the last several weeks you notice you're going every four days, that represents a change in your bowel habits. If your stools were previously nice, solid chunks, and now they're coming out pencil thin, that represents a change in your bowel habits. If you were having regular bowel movements and now the stools are coming out like diarrhea that represents a change in your bowel habits -- this should be investigated, and looked at to determine if it warrants screening via colonoscopy. If you see blood in your stool, whether it's bright red or dark like tar, that may warrant screening via colonoscopy. If you complain of discomfort in your abdomen, frequent gas pains, bloating, fullness, cramps ... should not be taken for granted if it's a frequent occurrence. If you have unexplained weight loss, if you're constantly tired or have unexplained anemia [iron deficiency] that should warrant you having your bowels screened via colonoscopy."
Screening methods
There are a number of screening methods that medical professionals use -- the standard, tried, proven old way, the Guaic testing in which patients are given cards from the doctor and asked to collect and submit three different stool samples that are checked for blood. Patients can also have a Barium enema, a virtual colonography, a sigmoidoscopy, or a colonoscopy.
The Barium enema is an x-ray test in which a tube is inserted into the rectum through which the Barium solution flows filling up the area and allowing the medical professional to pick up any abnormal areas.
Sigmoidoscopy is a short procedure that goes right to the sigmoid colon looking for any cancers that may go to the sigmoid colon or in the rectum. This procedure misses everything else.
The virtual colonography is a computer CT-guided test that allows medical professionals to visualize the bowel. The disadvantage to this particular procedure is that it examines the entire length of the colon, but it misses smaller lesions as the sensitivity is only where it can detect things that are more than a centimeter. Also if medical professionals see a polyp at the time of the test, they cannot remove it. The patient will still have to have a colonoscopy and have to do the same prep for the colonoscopy as they would have had for the colonography.
"The colonoscopy is the superior test," said the doctor.
He also said there are other modalities that need to be taken into account when deciding on which test is best for patients.
"There are some people who may not be able to have a colonoscopy for whatever reason -- like maybe they have a lot of medical co-morbidities. They may have severe heart disease, in addition to that, severe lung disease ... anything whereby getting sedation poses an increased risk for the patient. In those patients, the CT colonography would be a good alternative, so there are places for each of these modalities, but by far in terms of the superior testing, the colonoscopy is the superior testing when you're talking about the screening for colorectal cancer.
Counseling
Prior to any testing for colon cancer, Dr. Moxey said genetic counseling is always suggested for colorectal cancer patients just as it is for breast cancer patients.
"The question is does the patient really want to know? Do you really want to know if you are at risk, significantly so for developing one of these symptoms from colorectal cancer given the emotional consequences of being a carrier?"
Consequences he said include being patients labeled by insurance companies as well as by employers and affecting their ability to obtain insurance coverage. And that it needs to be taken into account whether the patient is emotionally healthy to accept a positive or negative test.
"Typically, whenever you're going to do a test like this, genetic testing for these particular diseases, even as it relates to testing a patient for HIV, you should always counsel them beforehand, and try to ascertain whether they're emotionally able to handle such a diagnosis."
After the diagnosis
Staging is the standardized way that describes the spread of cancer in relation to the layers of the wall of the colon or rectum, the nearby lymph nodes and other organs. The stage is dependent on the extent of spread through the different tissue layers that are affected. It is an important factor in determining treatment options and prognosis. It's described by the TNM system --T is for the size of the tumor; N is for whether the cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes and the M is for whether it's metastasized to organs such as the liver or lung.
At stage 0 known as "cancer in situ", the cancer is localized in the mucosa (moist tissue lining of the colon or rectum). Treatment is through the removal of the polyp in a polypectomy.
Stage 1 cancer is where it has spread from the mucosa of the colon wall and it has gone into the muscle layer. Treatment in this instance is surgery to remove the tumor as well as some of the surrounding lymph nodes for sampling purposes to make sure that there is no spread involvement of the lymph nodes.
Stage 2 involves spread beyond the muscle layer, but there is no involvement of lymph nodes, but it can involve spread of cancer to other nearby organs as well.
Stage 3 does not necessarily have to involve spread beyond the muscle layers, but it does involve the lymph nodes. And that's further broken down into the amount of lymph nodes that are involved whether it's one to three, four to six, seven or more, and that determines the different stags of stage three, you have A, B and C.
Stage 4 is when you have metastatic spread. The cancer involves the blood, the lymph nodes as well as other organs, so the ovary can be involved, the abdominal wall, the liver or the lung.

Treatment
Treatment involves surgery. It can involve radiation therapy, chemotherapy as well as immunotherapy.
Dr. Moxey said there are several methods that are used, and every case is different, and that every individual case is taken into consideration when medical professionals determine the surgical approach.
"Essentially the goal of surgery is really to remove all of the cancer and to ensure you have clear margins. At this point the gastroenterologists role is complete and we have handed [the patient] over to a surgical oncologist, or a colorectal surgeon," said Dr. Moxey. Their goal at that point is to remove all of the cancerous tissue. That's accomplished by ensuring that you have clear goals on all sides that are free of cancer. Then the remaining sections of the colon are joined together."
With cancers of the rectum, the doctor said there are two approaches to treatment, depending on how high up the cancer is. In a low anterior approach where the upper part of the rectum is removed and the colon is reattached to the lower part, he said the patient can continue to eliminate waste as usual. Or they can have an abominoperineal resection where the cancer is located in the lower part, and in this instance the patient would need to have a bag, or a colostomy to eliminate waste. He said in most instances, it ends up being a permanent colostomy.
Other therapies include radiation therapy and chemotherapy and varies based on the patient's stage and whether they require radiation, chemotherapy or both. Radiation therapy is given with high energy x-rays to kill or shrink the cancer cells. Dr. Moxey said it could be given externally or internally. Chemotherapy involves the administration of drugs that are used to kill the cancer cells. There are different treatment protocols, and the drugs that are used are individualized. It depends on the patient, which therapy the oncologist decides.
Treatments can be done before or after surgery. Adjuvant chemotherapy is given after surgery to maximize a patient's chance for cure. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is given before surgery. In unfortunate cases where the cancer has spread and cannot be removed, there's palliative chemotherapy in which medication can be given to delay or reverse some of the symptoms and provide some improvement in the patient's quality and length of life, but it's not curative.
New therapies
According to Dr. Moxey, new therapies available on the market include Antiangiogenesis therapy, a treatment whereby the tumor cells are starved and done through disrupting the blood supply. He said this is usually given along with chemotherapy. He said the drug Avastin has been approved since 2004 (by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration) for treatment in Stage IV colorectal cancer. Additionally he said there is targeted therapy, which are treatment drugs designed to target the cancer cells while minimizing damage to healthy cells.

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News Article

November 20, 2014
Community center commissioned

SEA GRAPE, Grand Bahama - Bahamians were reminded on Sunday that it only takes one person to make a difference and that each of us should desire to be that person.
That challenge came from the Minister for Grand Bahama Dr. Michael Darville as he participated in the commissioning of the Evangelist Lloyd Quant Outreach Community Center at St. David's Methodist Church in Sea Grape, Eight Mile Rock this past Sunday evening.
Both Minister of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe and Darville took time out from their busy schedules to pay tribute to Evangelist Lloyd Quant.
At age 98, Quant is said to be the longest-serving preacher in the Methodist Church in The Bahamas and the Caribbean, having served the church and the community of West Grand Bahama, in particular, for the past 80 years.
Addressing the gathering at the commissioning ceremony, Darville pointed out that it is the government's mission to wipe every tear from every eye by providing support and assistance for the most vulnerable members of society: children, the elderly, persons with disabilities, the poor and families requiring social and financial support.
"Our vision is to see a country where all citizens are economically empowered to provide for themselves and their families and have equal opportunities to access services that will enhance the basic quality of life for all," he said.
"Despite the efforts of the hard-working employees in the Department of Social Services and Urban Renewal 2.0, we realize that the government cannot do it alone. As a team, together, everyone achieves more and through the collaborative and synergistic efforts of public/private partnerships, we know that we can and will accomplish our goals," Dr. Darville stated.
He added that it is his belief that those who take part in philanthropic activities must have a strong desire to see poverty, and the crime and general social decay that accompanies it, eradicated.
"Therefore, I applaud the supporters and contributors of this outreach center, who have invested their time, finances and other resources, to bring this project to fruition," Dr. Darville said.
He went on to acknowledge 700 Partners, a non-profit organization headed by Ginger Moxey, president and CEO of Immerse Bahamas, for listing the Evangelist Lloyd Quant Community Outreach Center as one of the worthy projects that require community support.
"This organization, which fuses the efforts of the government of The Bahamas, global and civic organizations, corporate Bahamas, religious groups and people from all walks of life, in the spirit of culture immersion, philanthropy and social responsibility, is dedicated to reaching those that are in need and restoring the infrastructure that creates the environment for better communities, hence their partnership with this community outreach center," Dr. Darville informed.
Continuing, he noted that it was his understanding that the center housed a feeding facility, which served breakfast twice weekly to more than 100 children.
"While this is a step in the right direction, they have so much more they would like to accomplish by expanding their facility to include a wellness center, an afterschool program and offer special classes in areas such as adult literacy, karate and sewing programs, just to name a few.
"I would like to take this opportunity to encourage the businesses and residents of West Grand Bahama, in particular, to render assistance to this center as it seeks to expand its operation.
"I would also like to encourage Pastor Kenneth Lewis, the parishioners of St. David's Methodist Church and the outreach center managers to continue to partner with the Department of Social Services and Urban Renewal 2.0 in the execution of your daily responsibilities and to remember that we are only as strong as the weakest among us," the minister for Grand Bahama stressed.
He added that the greatest gift of any leader is his or her ability to connect with, inspire and create opportunities for the youth, the poor and the disenfranchised.
"It is my sincere hope, therefore, that each of you will leave this service empowered with the belief that it only takes one person to make a difference, and a desire to be that person," he said.

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News Article

May 11, 2011
Conflicting reports on mailboat strike

Works and Transport Minister Neko Grant and President of the Mailboat Owners and Operators Association Rafael Moxey offered conflicting reports yesterday on whether operators have agreed to end the suspension of Family Island services.
According to Moxey, despite a meeting with Grant yesterday, mailboat operators engaged in the suspension are not backing down from their position.
Moxey said 12 of the 15 boats in the association have stopped service to the Family Islands and will continue to do so until they reach an agreement with the government.
But Grant said there was some resolution to the matter yesterday.
Just minutes before The Guardian spoke to Moxey, Grant said while the government remained a ...

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