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News Article

April 11, 2012
Andrew G. Deveaux Sr., 51

 
OBITUARY
Andrew G. Deveaux
May 15th 1960 - March 31st, 2012
 
"The steps of a good man are ordered by the Lord and he delighted in his way though he fall, he shall not be utterly cast down, for the Lord upholdeth him with his hand." (Psalms 37: 23-24)
It was a joyous occasion May 15, 1960 in the home of Perlina Wright in the picturesque settlement of Devil's Point Cat Island, when a baby boy was born to Perlina Wright and Norris Deveaux, handsome, yes! Bouncing baby he was not.  He was christened Andrew George Deveaux. Sr.,
Andrew, the second of three sons brought joy to his family and friends in his neighbor-hood. He received his early education at the Devils Point All-Aged School and later the Old Bight Senior High School.  Andrew was a charmer and a heart-breaker of many girls he outwitted several of them, yet He was an ardent student and kept focus on his studies.
His childhood friends Sham Burrows, Charles Smith and Octavia Mackey, were always up to mischief.  However, his grandmother Rapheletha Brown ruled him and his younger brother Inspector Nathan Mackey with an iron fist. They had to do chores that all family Island children did. Andrew was light skinned, he was afraid of the sun, so whenever they had to help their grand mother with the field chores he always choose the easy ones.  He was hard working and loved to go fishing and crab catching.  Andrew had and infectious smile and you knew when he was happy he would laugh and enjoyed himself to the fullest. He loved life and he loved his family.
Andrew the phenomenal man was a role model to his family.  He was loved dearly by all who came into contact with him. He saw opportunities when many saw problems.  Perseverance and hard work was the name of his game. He was trustworthy, talented; helpful are a few attributes that best described Andrew.
Upon graduation from High school, he migrated to Nassau and found employment at Super Value Warehouse. In October, 1979 he joined the Royal Bahamas Police Force and his first deportment was at the Airport Police Station. Andrew stayed at this location for a number of years.  He was a dedicated staff to his employer and was well versed in his academic profession that allowed him a very rewarding career. His hard work and dedication enable Him to matriculate to the post as ASP of the K-9 Unit Royal Bahamas Police Force.  There he served for thirty-three years until the time of his demise, he served his country well.
In 2008, Andrew became ill and had to seek medical care in the USA.  There were days when he had to fight this dreadful disease called cancer, but with the help of the Holy Sprit, he was determined to win this battle.  The doctors did all they could to assist Andrew and make life more comfortable for him.  However, Andrew knew that he was made from the dust and to dust he shall returned.  He spend his last hours with his family on March 30th, his eldest brother, Thaddeus, took him for a drive and they droved around Nassau all day.
During the early morning of Saturday March 31, he developed shortness of breath and was taken to Doctor's Hospital by his younger brother, Inspector Nathan Mackey.  The doctors applied all the medical expertise but to no avail Andrew George Deveaux Sr., sojourn on this side of the master's vineyard had come to an end.  Hence in the words of Paul the Apostle, Andrew had fought a good fight, he had kept the faith He had finished his course, henceforth there is laid up for him a crown of righteousness that the Lord himself will give him on that great coronation day.
Full Military Funeral Service for the Late Assistant Superintendent of Police Andrew George Deveaux Sr., 51 years of Cassarilla Street, Pinewood Gardens and Formerly of Devil's Point, Cat Island, will be held on Wednesday April 11th, 10:00 a.m. at New Bethlehem Baptist Church, Independence Drive. Rev. Dr. Everette Brown assisted by Bishop Benjamin Gibson, Fr. Stephan Davies, Chaplain RBPF, Rev. Dr. Errol Farquharson and other Ministers of the Gospel will officiate. Interment will follow in Woodlawn Memorial Gardens, Soldier Road.
Andrew's life will be lovingly remembered by his Mother: Perlina Wright; Father: Norris Deveaux, of Kemps Bay Andros;  3 Sons: Lavardo, Adrian and Andrew George Deveaux Jr., 6 Brothers: Thaddeus Wright, Inspector Nathan Mackey,  John, Ivan, David and Alexander Mackey, 3 Adopted Brothers: D/Sergeant 80 Kevin Louis, Marine Seaman Deoroope Louis and Police Reservist 412 Anton Wilson; (formerly of the  US Military); 8 Sisters: Alice Smith, Jestina Burrow, Barbara Mackey-Thompson, Cynthia, Paulette and Eva Mackey, Belinda Mackey-Gardiner, Addell Deveaux of  USA;  1 Daughter-in-Law: Carla Barry-Deveaux; 5 Grandchildren: Jada, Unique, Andrew III, Lavardo Jr., Jason Hanna Jr., and Jayla (Mama) Deveaux;  9 Aunts: Matriarch Florence Brown, Luella, Miriam, Agnes, and Virginia Brown, Mary Bodie, Paulette Mackey, Jane Mackey-Morgan, and Sybil; 4 Uncles: David Brown, Felix Bodie, Harold Taylor and Dencil Nottage; Mentor and Cousin: David Johnson of John Road, 2 Sisters-in-Law: Marilyn Wright and Amanda Mackey; Nieces: Dominic, Denise, Bernice and Lakeshia Wright, Natavia Mackey,  Amanda Mackey-Gibson, Shakiettra Major, Monalisa McPhee, Teki Mackey, Kendra Thompson, Vanessa Saunders, Minera Smith-Culmer, Crystal  Smith-Rolle, Cyprianna Cunningham, Anastacia Ferguson, Lydia McHardy, Derick and Daneisha Mackey; Nephews: Bonnet and Owen Wright, Delmaro, Nathan Jr.,  and Nashad Mackey, Anthony and Reginald Smith, Whitfield Stubbs, Harris, Miller, Lawrence Edgecombe, Damon Mackey, Tario Mackey, Kendal Thompson Jr. and Alexander Mackey Jr.; Grandnieces: Karen, Renae and Gladys Brown; Grandnephews: Sargent 1957 Harrison Brown, Hubert, David Brown Jr., Kingman and Dwight Brown; Great-grandnieces: Terrinique Wright, Kenisha Thompson, Jessica, Jolice, Javanna, Britika and Cardissa Wright, Marissa, Brianna Mackey,  Antonique, Anvaar and Adrianna (spoke-lady) Brown; Great-grandnephews: Harrison Jr. and Delmaro Mackey Jr., Bernard, Terran, Leonardo, Bennett, Kareem, Bonnet Wright Jr., and C.J.; Immediate Cousins: Geneva Dorsette, Mazie Simmons, Tezerene Gray, Ivan Rolle, Leroy , Frank, Lefred, Roosevelt and Junior, Verdell, Mavis, and Syblean Mackey, and Hazel McDonald, Charlotte Culmer, Mae, Clifford, Octavius, Anthony Mackey-Rolle and the entire descendant of Joel and Blossom Mackey, the descendant of Burke and Carlotta Clarke: Bloomfield, Esperline, Geletha, Annamae, Lorene, Charlene, Chris and Arnold Clarke, Steve, Dwight, Leslie, Tyrone, Trevor Miller and their families, Mrs. Lindsay Louis, Joan Stubbs and family, Pearline Johnson, Deborah Taylor-Edgecombe, Helena Morley, Reverend Benjamin and Mrs. Gibson, Pastor Emeritus Reverend Ishmael  and Mrs. (Albertha Smith) deceased, Reverend Dr. Everette J. Brown and Minister Sheila Brown, Reverend Joseph and Mrs. Saunders, Charles Smith & family , Samuel Smith and family, Israel Smith and family, Idell, Martha and Sarah Smith, Mrs. Rosalie Major, DeAndra and Scieska Major, Mrs. Luceal Brown, Keva and Kenisha Louis, Catherine Evans, Linda and Christine Martin, Craig and Corey Burrows, Keno and Neil Johnson and Perry Darling; Special Friends: Tanya, Glendina Saunders, Janelle Wallace and Bernadette Bannister, home-boys and room-mates Sham Burrows and Leroy Saunders.  Other relatives and friends including: the graduating class of  1978, Old Bight Senior High School, Christian Bain, Monica Martin & family, Lorna Hopkins and family, Eulean and Olive Dawkins, the entire Dawkins family, the descendant of Ruben and Hilda Smith, Henry and Rosabell Rolle, the descendants of Jerome and Mildred Gilbert, Hester Gray, Nathaniel Gilbert, the descendant of Sham and Francina Burrows and the entire community of Devil's Point and McQueen's Cat Island,  The Commissioner of Police Ellison Greenslade and all his fellow officers, Supt. Kevin Rolle, Supt. Oscar Sands, Supt. Don Wilson, Supt. Samuel Butler, Supt. Ken Strachan,  Supt. Ashton Greenslade, ASP Donna Francis, ASP Julian Butler, ASP Gregory Johnson, ASP Hurvin Curtis, ASP Dennis Sturrup, ASP Stewart Curtis, ASP E. Demeritte, ASP G. Demeritte,  Sgt. 1169 Armbrister, W/Sgt. Johnson, Insp. Neeley, Insp. Thompson, Insp. Adrian Curry, Insp.  Derek Ferguson, Insp. Roosevelt Curry, Insp. Cephas Rolle, Insp. Dencil Barr, Insp. Philip Rolle, Insp. Raymond Butler, Insp. Deborah McClure, Insp. Donna Barr, Insp. Bruce Thompson, Insp. Brian Miller, Insp. Ricardo Richardson, Insp. Robinson, Insp. Maycock, Insp. Zukie Rolle, Insp. E. Ramsey, Insp. V. Wells, ASP K. Hinsey-Rolle, ASP Hinsey, Supt. David Deveaux , Staff of Southern Police Station, Staff of South Central Police Station, and  the entire staff of the K-9 Unit Royal Bahamas Police Force,  Lesley Phillips, Mama Louise, Bernise Pinder, Robert Pinder, Lloyd Deveaux, Nelson Burrows, Jackie King, the Minnis Staff of the wood work shop John Road, and the entire  John Road Community.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #34 Nassau Street on Tuesday from 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Wednesday at the Church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.

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News Article

April 05, 2012
Ezra Eglon Ferguson, 24

Funeral Service for Ezra Eglon "Woopsy", "Pork Chop" Ferguson, age 24 years, of Cabbage Hill, Crooked Island, will be held on Friday, March 30, 2012 at 11:00 am.

Church: Holy Cross Anglican Church
Address: Highbury Park off Soldier Road
Officiating: Father John Kabiga
Interment: Woodlawn Gardens Cemetery, Soldier Road
He is survived by his parents: Carl and Bloneva Ferguson of Cabbage Hill, Crooked Island; brother: Nehemiah Ferguson; sisters: Teora and Quitel Ferguson; grandmother: Rosemary Moss of Major's Cay, Crooked Island; sister-in-law: Kendera Ferguson; brother-in-law: Kamal Thompson; uncles: Habakkuk and Joseph Ferguson, Vincent Moss of Miami, Florida, Cpl 2241 Cyril Anthony Moss, Nelson and Deacon Darrel Moss; aunts: Christine Sweeting, Thelma Miller, Bernice Culmer, Rachel Gradolph, Patricia Jones, Annamae Richardson, Rowena Ferguson, Priscilla Farquharson and Daphne Cunningham; uncles-in-law: Franklyn Culmer, Robert Gradolph, Louis Sweeting, Joseph Jones, Robert Farquharson, Gerald Cunningham and Leroy Richardson; aunts-in-law: Sherry Ferguson, Denise, Caron, Joy and Shaketress Moss; grandaunts and granduncles: Julia Mills, Leroy Ferguson, Inez and Montgomery Johnson, Calvin Ferguson, Preston and Ralph Ferguson of Florida; cousins: Rashetta, Raquel and Marvin Strachan, Rendi Culmer, Tasha and Charles Ferguson, Sheila and Albury Major, Steve and Jonathan Miller, Melissa, Crystal, Tameka, Ramon, Stacey and Joseph Jones, Carolyn and Mario Lewis, Christina, Keith, Cindy, Kenrick, Kirk, Stacy and James Sweeting, Chrisanta and Terrell Hanna, Jason, Rhonda, Rubyan and Rosie Ferguson, Yvette Bethel, Jasmine, Malone, Cassandra, Avardo, Cheryl, Stephen, Michelle and Earle Ferguson, Crescelle and Rashad Farquharson, Tameka Richards, Shantelle and Valdez Ferguson, Ethan, Amya, Anthoniece, Anthonique, Sonjay and Israel Moss, Patrick, Alton, Andrew, Novus, Vanessa and Katrina Ferguson, Martine Hanna, the family of the late Hosea and Emily Ferguson, Khishlyne and Khalyne Johnson, Elroy, Danielle, Preston Jr., Ralph Jr. and Krystle Ferguson, Damien, Lahai, Antone Miller and the family of the late Leah Nottage; other relatives and friends including: Peter and Cylestina Williams, Diama Ramos, Barbara Gibson and Robert Gibson, Jason Deleveaux, Dennis, Valentino and Cpl 1460 Jerone Thompson and family, Huden and Jennamae, Leroy and Borice Clarke, Timothy and Glenda Thompson and family, David Cunningham, Deangello Knowles, Evelyn Ferguson and family, Sean Spencer, Pastor Linkwood Ferguson and family, Deacon Kermit Farquharson and family, Alphege and Nelson Ferguson, Luellen Farquharson and family, Pastor Dorcas and Stephanie Thompson and family, Evelyn Ferguson and family, Thirza Williams and family, Mrs. Alleset Deleveaux, Cleveland and Elizabeth Ferguson, Viola Cunningham and family, Kenneth and Ruth Farquharson and family, Enrico N. Wright, Father John and Eloise Kabiga and family of All Saints Anglican Church, Church Grove, staff of Thompson Trading, Nassau and Sun Shine Cruises, Water Sports at Atlantis, Paradise Island, the Class of 2005 Crooked Island High School, the Honorable V. Alfred Gray, M.P., MICAL Constituency and the entire community of Crooked Island.
FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR RESPECTS AT ROCK OF AGES NORTH SIDE CREMATION CENTER ON THURSDAY FROM 10:00 A.M. TO 5:00 P.M. AND AT THE CHURCH ON FRIDAY FROM 10:00 A.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

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News Article

April 10, 2014
We could be famous for our culture

Dear Editor,
Culture - we live with it everyday but we hardly see it. It takes a little shake to wake us up to what is around us. The weekend's Transforming Spaces tour gave the population a great opportunity to see what the world of art was up to. It was a terrific day of soaking in culture and being forced to process things in a different, more thoughtful way.
Funny that one of the most shocking installations made the most impact on some. I had to stop and think about what the warehouse space at Liquid Courage was saying to me. The images and things chosen by the various artists worked together to cause mental discord. The entire tour and all the spaces were incredible. However, the Liquid Courage space stood out because of my own work around The Bahamas over the last few months.
I stopped in front of a chaise lounge quite destroyed, standing up on its end, and thought, what is this? What is this trying to tell me? I saw the lovely, white-focused, exotic image of the Bahamian Riviera a la Baha Mar. My mind returned to the chaise lounge, its rubber straps broken, hanging down, discolored, ugly. It made me think of my daily swim from Atlantis to Cabbage Beach Cove, where the mansions have replaced the trees.
At the bottom of the sea, as Jamaica Kincaid's book says, are lounge chairs destroyed by wear and tear but thrown under by the destruction of the sea coupled with careless consumption. The beach struggles under the weight of cruise-ship passengers thrown around by suddenly unforgiving surf, who drink black-hand-served, toxic pink and volcanic yellow rum tainted juices from brown coconuts until they are pink and red from a day or a few hours on an island in the sun.
The loungers and the tables lay at the bottom of the sea, a testament to rough seas, as we have had all month, and littering layabouts who care little for the space they visit except to leave with a tan and a few snapshots of beauty.
The Baha Mar poster ruled. Yet everything else lay broken around it. As the minister of government says, this is our culture. Our culture is tourism; tourism is our culture. How can this wanton destruction of the land by the industry that is meant to be our sustenance be so pervasive?
The room showed carcasses of consumption. All of those corpses that I see everyday. The sad part is the obvious destruction that uncontrolled consumption visits on the environment where we live. While we may not see it because we live in it, the constant use of our island has made it shudder under the weight. Where are the skyscrapers that sing a song of development and progress? Where's the ode to 30-story high hotels filled with people who do not choose to experience our lives. They stay locked away in a world where we only enter to serve with our crocodile smiles and our glass-bottle-fragile natures.
As the monument to consumption rises and the bikini clad sit on the fast powerboat, polluting our waters with vaporous waste, flushing out their contents into turquoise depths and golden sunshine that holds no memory of our existence except the cement boat that sits, floats upon the tumultuous sea of sinking culture. It/we sink(s) down, half a league, half a league, half a league farther into the clutches of consumed beauty constructed by artificial high rises built to keep away natives who enter to serve.
The culture that lives off tourism is sinking like the cement ship that is sent to our aid. As the story goes, aid comes with a bomb. Alas, who really cares that we sink in the turquoise of tourist bile when we can sink with a few cents in our pockets among the carcasses of used chaise lounges, empty glass bottles and plastic water bottles strewn across paradise's sandy shores? Five o'clock marks the dirty end of the oiled bodies as they leave this shore for another one, less used, more beautiful.
What a mind-opening experience that raised my hackles to see the sore loss of innocence on the junk pile of consumption. When they leave, where will we be? Will tourism still be our culture and our culture still be tourism, or will we revert to being natives with soft, black skins baked in the sun after a century and a half of plantation tourism?
Water was such a fitting theme for the exhibitions. It showcased our life-giving seas that surround the islands and how wholeheartedly we destroy them through overexposure. From seesawing ourselves into consciousness as the aqua waters rise and fall on one of the installations to the diversity of textures and visions in the other art forms, it showed how incredibly rich this, our, culture is. The entire tour was an experience in savoring culture and beauty. It awakened so many facets of our beings. Yet the Liquid Courage installation troubled the very waters of my soul. Did it have any impact on the others who whimsically observed but did not feel? As tourism consumes us, the Transforming Spaces tour showed that we could actually be famous for our culture, not our tourist culture. We have already sold out the local music scene that once lured thousands here in the early days of the last century, in favor of the international beat. Why not really develop the true culture of this struggling nation?
- Ian Bethell Bennett

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News Article

September 28, 2013
A ham and cheese French toast built by the loaf

How do you make a big, bold, savory French toast even bigger, bolder and more savory? Instead of building it a slice at a time, you build it by the loaf.My inspiration was a pillow-soft loaf of unsliced sandwich bread. Looking at it, I wondered what would happen if instead of cutting it into traditional slices and frying it a piece at a time -- or even assembling it in a layer as a casserole -- I instead cut the entire loaf horizontally into a few thick planks, stuffed it, then reassembled it in a loaf pan. This recipe is the delicious result of that wondering.
Since French toast is such a perfect fall dinner -- warm and comforting -- I kept the fillings savory with ham, cheddar cheese and turkey. But if you'd rather go sweet, you could substitute jam, peanut butter, cream cheese, fresh berries, even chocolate chips.
While this dish can be assembled and immediately baked, it is even better if you give it time to soak. You can assemble it the night before, then refrigerate until the following day an hour before dinner. Just pop it in the oven when you get home from work.
Ham and cheese stuffed French toast loaf
When selecting your bread, first take a look at the loaf pan you plan to use. You'll want a loaf that fits comfortably in your pan with a little wiggle room. If you can only find loaves that are too big, just use a serrated knife to trim the loaf to fit before beginning the recipe.
Start to finish: 1 hour 15 minutes
(10 minutes active)
Servings: 8
1 loaf white sandwich bread, not sliced
3 eggs
1/2 cup milk
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
4 ounces deli sliced ham
8 ounces deli sliced turkey breast
1 cup grated cheddar cheese
1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
If baking right away, heat the oven to 400 degrees F. Coat a deep loaf pan with baking spray.
Use a bread knife to cut the loaf horizontally into thirds, creating bottom, middle and top layers. Set aside.
In a medium bowl, whisk together the eggs, milk, thyme, salt and pepper. Place the bottom layer of the bread in the prepared loaf pan. Drizzle about a third of the egg mixture evenly over the bread, then use a fork to gently press the bread all over to help it absorb the liquid.
Arrange half of the ham in an even layer over the bread. Top the ham with half of the turkey, followed by half of the cheese. Place the middle section of the bread over the ingredients, then use your hand to gently compress the bread and fillings. Drizzle another third of the egg mixture over the middle layer of bread, then press it gently with a fork to help it absorb the liquid.
Repeat the layering of ham, turkey and cheese, then top with the final layer of bread. Compress the bread and fillings as before, then carefully pour the remaining egg mixture over the top. Some will run down the sides between the bread and the pan; this is fine. Press the top of the bread with a fork the help it absorb the liquid.
Scatter the Parmesan cheese over the top of the loaf. Coat a sheet of foil with cooking spray, then use it to cover the pan. The stuffed French toast can be baked immediately, or refrigerated overnight.
When ready to bake, set the pan on the oven's middle rack and bake for 1 hour, or until it reaches 155 degrees F at the center. Uncover the pan and bake for another 5 minutes. Let cool slightly before serving.
To serve, cut the loaf into thick slices as you would a pound cake.
Nutrition information per serving: 250 calories; 100 calories from fat (40 percent of total calories); 11 g fat (5 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 110 mg cholesterol; 19 g carbohydrate; 1 g fiber; 3 g sugar; 19 g protein; 1,040 mg sodium.

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News Article

March 13, 2014
Eight honored for their contributions to ministry

Five youth members of Restoration Kingdom Ministries and three senior statesmen were honored for their contributions to the ministry, as the church celebrated its seventh anniversary recently.
Aailyah Anderson, Cassius Knowles Jr., Oteus Knowles, Cateleen and Catherine Wells were recognized at a service of thanksgiving. In addition, three adults were acknowledged for their work -- Juliana Major-Bullard, Joseph Wilmore "Bumpy" Saunders and Apostle Samuel Douglas Cleare, who was also the guest preacher.
"We decided to honor the youth of the church because they are the church," said Reverend Wells. "A few of them have been with us from when they were little children, and their longevity and consistency of service with the church has actually been very remarkable. We're going to keep saying thank you. I believe that if people are doing all they can to see the Kingdom of God succeed, the Kingdom should pause and say thank you," said Rev. Wells. "This is not a payment, this is a thank you because only God can pay."
Restoration Kingdom Ministries, co-pastored by Reverend Cleveland D.X. Wells and Minister Samantha Francis-Wells, has accomplished a lot in the last seven years. Already on its property on Faith Avenue South, it is occupying a temporary facility that continues to grow to meet its developing needs as a fellowship. According to Wells, its success to date has everything to do with the blessing of God and the dedication of its members, particularly a small core of leaders.
"One of the key things is our nucleus. You have to have a solid nucleus that has the church and God's house at heart and I can say that I have that," said Wells.
Two of those key members are Elders Wellington and Grace Francis, who is inspired by her personal relationship with God and her witness of the many miracles God brought in her life. Francis looks forward to the pastors' overall vision for their church including a school, a home for abused women and teens, and a counseling center for young men.
"Most of all we want to continue catering to the whole man -- spirit, soul and body," said Francis-Wells.
Francis-Wells said that a part of the ministry's restorative focus is the removal of the stigma that has developed over the whole issue of the church. She said Restoration Kingdom Ministries is creating that image of what the church used to be -- a place where families and communities can be educated, their lives enhanced and they can receive guidance and assistance.
"Our mission is to be really community-minded, to let people know there's a place they can come to, just as they are," said Wells. "In fact, our whole objective is helping people to live a healthy life spiritually so they can experience some Heaven on earth and then have Heaven as their final resting place."

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News Article

April 04, 2014
The illusion and magic of the circus

When Steven Best and Cassandra step onto the stage, their audience becomes a part of an unbelievable magic experience that will leave them mystified -- the master illusionist spins Cassandra's head in a full 360-degree turn -- and they remind you to remember to breathe as Cassandra fits herself into a small box and Steven pushes eight stainless steel, razor sharp spikes through her. This is the magic that Steven Best and Cassandra will bring to the stage as the circus has come to town.
So believe it or not, the circus will be truly amazing, based around a new cast performing and appearing on the popular television show "Ripley's Believe it or Not" and its famous museum in the United States. There will be 12 captivating performances of acrobats, contortionists, a Michael Jackson impersonator, local animals, famous cartoon characters such as Sponge Bob, Dora, Turtle and Elmo, a hilarious side-kick midget who will serve as co-ringmaster, daring swords swallowing act, rivaling Steven Best and Cassandra who headlined their own show in Las Vegas for five years, and who are now currently performing in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee, in their new large-scale illusion show "Magic Spectacular!" for the best acts of the show title.
The sword act duo known as Captain and Maybelle, promise a show that will be shocking and filled with laughter. The self-proclaimed partners in crime perform classic sideshow entertainment with a contemporary twist, delivering zingers and stingers. Captain is a sword swallower, human blockhead and fire breather.
Captain & Maybelle were on "America's Got Talent Season 6", and if you missed them there, it's another dynamic duo that will leave you astonished and shaking your head in disbelief. You can see them push each other to their utmost physical limits, combining unique sideshow talent and spot-on comedy that will make you laugh and cry and have you asking why. They will show you how they quickly became America's favorite sideshow couple.
Rounding out the must see-acts will be juggler, Jonathan Jackson, and of course the co-ringmaster Stanley B. Booker Jr. who performed with the Universoul Circus in Atlanta, Georgia.
The circus has been brought to town again for the fifth year, courtesy of David Wallace and Soft Touch Productions.
"This year's event will be a circus of soul with lots of music and entertainment to hype the crowd," said Wallace, who said he tries to bring in different acts every year to ensure that the show remains relevant and a must-attend event. "This year in particular, there will be eye-popping, jaw-dropping performances that will have the audience anxious and on the edge of their seats when they see particular acts."
Matinee shows will be held today at the Kendal G.L. Isaacs Gymnasium (KGLI) for schools at 10 a.m., with a 1:30 p.m. show at Gerald Cash Primary. Shows open to the public will be held tonight and Saturday at 8 p.m. at KGLI.
Admission is $12 students, $11 for pre-school aged children and includes a hot dog and drink. Adult tickets are $15 general admission and $20 ringside seating.
Tickets can be purchased at Seventeen Shop, Collins Avenue, Carey's Department Store, Mackey Street, Conliffe's Bakery off Carmichael Road and the Original Swiss Sweet Shop, West Bay Street.

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News Article

February 18, 2014
Atlantis sea lions get a new outlook on life

Dolphin Cay at Atlantis, Paradise Island has successfully completed two complex eye surgeries on two of its sea lion residents.Cassie, a star sea lion who makes regular appearances around the resort, and Sebastian, a breeding male sea lion, were showing signs of developing eyesight challenges. Dolphin Cay's attending staff veterinarian and a veterinary ophthalmologist consultant conduct routine eye exams as part of a preventative health care plan for the animals, but the decision was made to conduct a more thorough exam on Cassie and Sebastian. It was discovered that both animals had developed early onset cataracts in their eyes. A cataract is the clouding of the lens inside the eye.As a result, a date was set to correct the situation for both animals and the veterinary team formulated plans to safely remove the lens from within the eyes. When a sea lion develops a cataract, it is usually better to remove the entire lens during the surgical procedure. Once the cloudy lens has been removed, the eye fills with clear fluid and allows the sea lion's eye to function quite well. In fact, the vision is restored and greatly enhances the quality of life for the animal. In humans, the lens is usually replaced to allow for better focus but since sea lions don't need to read fine print, replacement of the lens is not necessary.The eye surgery was indeed a complex surgical procedure that brought the medical and animal training teams together to work side by side to make the surgery a success. Both Cassie and Sebastian are in recovery and are doing well, although they will be limited to light exposure and water for a period of time to allow for their eyes to heal.

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News Article

February 14, 2014
Sports Notices

Bahamas Scholastic AssociationThe Bahamas Scholastic Association (BSA) basketball playoffs will begin on Tuesday, February 25, and will be held at the DW Davis Gymnasium. In an effort to pay for the use of the gym, players are asked to pay one dollar each to enter the gym on the day that they are playing. Teams with balances will not be allowed to play. Also, the league's principal's award for the month of January goes to Mrs. Knowles, principal at Mt. Carmel Preparatory Academy, for her overwhelming support of her team for the month of January 2014.Track & FieldClub Monica Athletics will host its 11th annual track and field classic this Friday and Saturday, at the old Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium. The event is expected to get underway at 6 p.m. on Friday, and 1 p.m. on Saturday, and will feature a number of athletes competing in all of the age groups. In addition to a number of standout Bahamian athletes, the event is expected to feature athletes from throughout the Caribbean as well. It will be held under the patronage of 2012 IAAF Rising Female Star of the Year Anthonique Strachan. Strachan, who is a former member of Club Monica Athletics, is the reigning double sprint champion from the World Junior Championships, and a two-time winner of the Austin Sealy award, handed out to the region's best athlete at the annual CARIFTA Games. Strachan is also a semi-finalist from the most recent world championships, and the Olympic Games. Tickets for the event can be obtained at $10 for VIP, $5 for adults, and $3 for children.BoxingThe Champion Amateur Boxing Club (CABC) will host its bi-monthly show on Saturday, February 15, starting at 8 p.m. at the Wulff Road Boxing Square. A total of six matches will be showcased, and awards will be presented for the 'Best Fight', the 'Most Outstanding Boxer' and the 'Most Improved Boxer'. The CABC along with Platinum Sports Bar & Lounge will also host 'The Spirit of Determination' Amateur Boxing Show at the Platinum Sports Entertainment Center on Dowdeswell Street and Christie Avenue on Saturday, March 1, starting at 8 p.m. The show will recognize Bahamian boxing legends Cassius Moss and David 'Sugar Kid' Bowe. All amateur boxers and boxing clubs are welcomed to participate.

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Movie
Brothers
  • Genre : Drama, Thriller, War
  • Rating : C - 18yrs and Older

A young man comforts his older brother's wife and children after he goes missing in Afghanistan. Based on Susanne Bier's film, "Brothers"....


News Article

October 18, 2011
Christie to challenge McCartney in House

Progressive Liberal Party (PLP) Leader Perry Christie said yesterday he plans to take Bamboo Town MP Branville McCartney on in the House of Assembly over a recent "personal attack" he said the Democratic National Alliance (DNA) leader made on him.
Christie responded in an interview with The Nassau Guardian to McCartney telling a group of DNA supporters that he was a "wimp" for sitting back quietly as Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham hit out over Bamboo Town in the House of Assembly last week.
Ingraham claimed the constituency belonged to him and McCartney would not be playing in his (Ingraham's) or Christie's league in the next general election.
"I'm surprised that Bran would want to take me on personally and when you call someone a wimp, you are making a personal attack on [him] and I'm going to have to ask him on my feet whether he is prepared to stand up in this place (the House of Assembly) where we ought to work and say that to me [that I'm a wimp] so that I could respond to him," Christie said.
"I most certainly will invite him to do that because it seems out of character and I could only assume he was hoping what he said was private and would not reach the light of day.  He couldn't possibly be inviting me to take him on and for me to [provide] an assessment as to what I think he is."
At a recent reception at Workers House for Alfred Poitier -- the DNA's candidate for Kennedy -- McCartney also called Ingraham a bully.
Christie explained why he had nothing to say when Ingraham claimed Bamboo Town was "my things".
He also explained why he had nothing to say when Ingraham suggested that McCartney would be playing in his league if he runs in Bamboo Town against Cassius Stuart (the FNM's candidate hopeful and former Bahamas Democratic Movement leader) and Renward Wells (the PLP's already ratified candidate and former executive of the National Development Party).
"The prime minister was on his feet.  He was speaking specifically about Bamboo Town and Bran McCartney," Christie said.
"What he said had nothing to do with the PLP and the leader of the PLP except that he said that if he didn't win it (the Bamboo Town seat), in his estimation, I have to infer, the PLP will.
"Firstly, I believe that we will win the seat in Bamboo Town because we have a quality [candidate], by any standard, equal to Bran McCartney, the incumbent.  And someone who even has aspirations for leadership, so therefore insofar as Renward Wells is concerned, he is a very, very suitable candidate for that particular area."
Christie also said it would be a mistake for Ingraham to underestimate McCartney in the next general election.
"I would not underestimate Bran," he said.
"The prime minister's comment appeared to underestimate his strength and I think it's a mistake to do that because he is an attractive personality that one has to [take seriously], and most certainly from our point of view, we will never make a mistake again of underestimating anyone because the by-election in Elizabeth told us that every vote counts, no matter how hard you fight for one vote."
Following the recount of the Elizabeth by-election in February 2010, the FNM's candidate, Dr. Duane Sands, was up by two votes.
But the PLP's candidate, Ryan Pinder, ended up winning the seat by three votes following an Election Court challenge.
Asked whether he thought the race for Bamboo Town would be a scrap, Christie said, "From our point of view, we think it's going to be a good fight and we actually think when we look at statistics and what will happen that we're going to win that seat."
The PLP did not run anyone in Bamboo Town in 2002 or 2007.
Christie acknowledged yesterday that not running a PLP candidate in the constituency in 2007 was a mistake.
"It is arguable whether or not it was a wise decision in 2007, because by that time it was clear that Tennyson Wells was just an independent kind of person and candidate and really not one who could be seen to be partial to the PLP," he said.
"And so, if I had to do it all over again, yes, I would have run someone in Bamboo Town at that time.  The point is though you make up for mistakes and we are running now in every seat whenever they finish the (Boundaries Commission's) work... including Long Island."
McCartney won Bamboo Town as an FNM candidate in 2007, resigned from the Ingraham cabinet in 2010 and left the party in 2011, quickly forming the DNA.
He has said that the good thing about being leader is that he can choose what constituency he runs in, and suggested that at the end of the day it could be North Abaco, a seat long held by the prime minister.

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