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News Article
Doyle Alton Bastian, 31

Funeral service for Doyle Alton Bastian, 31, a resident of Holiday Drive, South Beach, who died on 19th March, 2012, will be held at Southside Christian Ministries International, Carmichael Road, on Saturday at 11:00 a.m. Officiating will be Apostle, Dr. C. Clifford Smith III. Interment follows in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, JFK Drive.

Left to cherish his loving memories are his mother: Karen Ingraham; father: Alton Bastian; step-father: Orpheus Ingraham; two sons: Doyle and Doylano Bastian; one daughter: Doyleisha Bastian; one brother: Corey Bastian, two sisters: Sharmaine Ferguson, Cassie Battiata; step brother: Dasario Ingraham; step sisters: Olivia Ingraham; grandfather: Alfred Bastian; five niec ...

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News Article
PEARLEAN BODIE-MCKENZIE, 94

FUNERAL SERVICE

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR THE LATE PEARLEAN BODIE-MCKENZIE AFFECTIONATELY CALLED "LENA" " NANO"AGE 94 YEARS OF ROSEWOOD STREET, PINEWOOD AND FORMERLY OF BARRATERRE, EXUMA WILL BE HELD ON SUNDAY MARCH 11, 2012 AT 1:00PM AT KEMP ROAD MINISTRIES, KEMP ROAD. OFFICIATING WILL BE REV'D DR. IVAN F. BUTLER JR. INTERMENT WILL FOLLOW IN LAKEVIEW MEMORIAL GARDENS, SOLIDER ROAD.

SHE WILL BE GREATLY MISSED BUT HER MEMORIES WILL CONTINUE TO LINGER IN THE LIVES OF HER CHILDREN: ACKAL JR. AND IONA MCKENZIE, LAURIE AND WILLIAM TAYLOR, DOROTHY MCKENZIE-TAYLOR AND ITHIEL TAYLOR SR., RUTHMAE AND LENIX ROLLE, ELEANOR MCKENZIE, BERYL MORRIS, CAROLYN MCKENZIE, CHRISTINE AND FELIX SAUNDERS, MARGUERITE MCKENZIE-TURNQUEST AND LESTER TURNQUEST AND LYNDA MCKENZIE; ADOPTED DAUGHTERS: RAY BODIE, ROSALEE WRIGHT, GARNELL BETHELL; ADOPTED SON: NORMAN LLOYD; SISTERS: MYRTIS JOHNSON, AND CORA MCKENZIE; SEVNTY FOUR GRAND CHILDREN: SHAZAD FERGUSON, OLIVIA MUNROE, ROCHELLE NEWBOLD, RAPHIEAL AND SHAVONNE NEWBOLD, SHAZARO MAURA, SHANAIRJ WALLACE, ROGER AND NOELLE TURNQUEST,KEVIN AND BONNIE MCKENZIE, KALSEY AND CASSANDRA MCKENZIE, KULEM AND GENIEVE MCKENZIE, SHERENE AND SHERESE MCKENZIE, CRAVEN LONGSWORTH, KENDAL ROBERTS, LESLIE AND LAVONE MCKENZIE, NADINE AND COLIN SAUNDERS, RICARDO, DEREK AND DEBRA MCKENZIE, DENNIS, NYOKA AND SERAN MCKENZIE, NATASHA AND TONY MOREE, SHAMARA AND ROBERT TURNQUEST, LINCOLN AND SADAKA MCKENZIE, DIANNE AND JERMAINE SANDS, JEROME, RODERICK, DEACON CADWELL AND SHENEK TAYLOR, TIWANNA NABBY, MARIA TAYLOR-ARIZA AND FRITZI ARIZA, MICHAEL AND THELMA TAYLOR, ITHIEL AND STACY TAYLOR, TERRY RANDOLPH TAYLOR, ANN BAIN, PHILIP ROLLE, MARVIN AND PATRICIA ROLLE, LENIX JR. AND MELBERT ROLLE, JASON ROLLE, KHALILAH AND KATORA SANDS, JOYCELYN MCKENZIE, CHRISANTA AND KIRK SMITH, SANTEREQUE AND VENQUE BAIN, SHAKERA AND SHAZARAY SAUNDERS,, JACKIE MOXEY, BLOSSOM BROWN, BARRY LIGHTBOURNE, RALPH BODIE, PAULETTE SMITH, JONNIE SAUNDERS, BRENDA CLARKE, VANGY BARNETT; EIGHTY ONE GREAT GRANDS: DONTE, SHAZAD JR. AND ZION FERGUSON, KIANA DAVIS, MICHAEL BRANDON, CLAYTON RAPHIEAL AND MARK ANTHONY SAUNDERS, RAPHIEAL JR., AND KAYDE AND RICKITA NEWBOLD, ALKHALBIRNIQUE BUTLER KEIARJ QUISHEDA, KULEM JR., KURON, KEVAUGHN, KRISTIN, KESHNIQUE, KALSEY JR., CAYDEN, SHANTESE TAYLOR, RAQUEL, RIKERA, DEANDRA, DEVIN, DARYAN, ALEXIS, DAYLAN AND ZARIA MCKENZIE, NIESHAR DAVIS, CHRISTOPHER AND CHRYSTYN MOREE, SKYLER TURNQUEST, BRANDON AND JUSTIN SAUNDERS, RODERICK JR, VALENTINO, CADWELL JR., PATRICK JR, KRISTEN, JEROME JR., KHADERO KHAJZAN, AND QUADILEA TAYLOR, SHACOYA, SHAVEZ, SHACAJA AND SHAKEIL BAIN, JOHN BUTCHER, JAYNELL, JAVON, MEKEL, SHANIQUE MARVIN JR., SHANTIQUE, KOBE, COLIAH, LENIX JR., LENECIA, LENISHA ROLLE, LUTHER, AND KEONTAE ROLLE, BRINAIRJ BETHEL, TIWANNA NABBY, ARMANDO AND ALEZANDRO ARRIZA, SHAKOYA, SHAMIKA, TEVIN, ASHON, AUSTIN, AND TEREZ TAYLOR, SHELQUAHN AND TESHIDO DAVIS, AZOURIA SAUNDERS, BRISHARD MUNNINGS, TREVONTE AND SADE BAIN, KERLITHIA, SANTIARJ AND KIRZARIO CURTIS; TWELVE GREAT GREAT GRANDS: JAYDA HAMILTON, LEAYSHIA, HAYNES, AYANNA JONES, TRISTIN MOSS KEVIA WILLIAMS, NICKEIL BAIN, T'AJE AND D'AJE INGRAHAM, CADRE AND CATRELL TAYLOR, KEIARA MCKENZIE, AND TECARDO BROOKS; NUMEROUS NIECES AND NEPHEWS: PEGGY ARTHUR, BRADLEY, GLENROY, HANSEL, LEROY, MELANIE AND BARBARA JOHNSON, DEANNA BROWN, VANGY LEWIS, HALLOND, DEREK, GLENROY, SHIRLEY, LEROY, ESTERMAE, MARGARET, DOROTHY, BERTHA AND NANCY BODIE, LESLIE SMITH OF FT. LAUDERDALE FLORIDA, LISA MILLER, AND GRETHEL LLOYD, MARJORIE GARDINER, LAVORN, LESLIE, FREEMAN, RUDOLPH, RANDOLPH, MARVIN, OLIE MCKENZIE, JENNIFER MCKENZIE, DEANNE MCKENZIE, PATRICE DARLING, BESSIEMAE CURTIS, AGATHA BURROWS, USENE AND MARINA BURROWS, ERSKINE AND EMERETHA BURROWS, JOHN AND LUCY WRIGHT, INEKA FINLASON, VERNICE WRIGHT, MADELINE HANNA, RUTH CURTIS, NAIRN ROLLE, LILLY MAE TAYLOR, ETHEL THOMPSON, RAYANNA BAIN, ISAMAE MCBRIDE, ALVERA ARMBRISTER, LAVONIA SHIELD, NATHALIE MCKENZIE, DOTLYN STORR, ESTELLE STORR, EDNA CHARLTON, BRENDA, BERTALEE, LILLIAN AND BENJAMIN MCKENZIE, IDELLA LAING, LOLETHA THURSTON, MAE EDGECOMBE, LILLIS ELLIS, DOLLY MCKENZIE, ROSE MCKENZIE, MINNIE, AND VERONICA ROLLE, BERNARD, PHILIP, KEN, IRVIN JR. AND JANET BODIE,

PENNY NIXON, RURAL, TONY FREDDY, BARBIE, YVONNE AND SANDY GRAY; GOD CHILDREN: JANET LLOYD, ESTELLA STORR, PAULA MCKENZIE, PRISCILLA WHYMS, CALVIN MCKENZIE, CLYDE BURROWS, NYOKA MCKENZIE-PIERRE, EARL MCKENZIE; RELATIVES AND FRIENDS: REVEREND DOCTOR IVAN FORD AND DR. JOANNE BUTLER, REVEREND DELTON FERNANDER, REVEREND DR. CHARLES SAUNDERS, PASTOR HUETON LLOYD, MINISTER JULIAN AND MELVERN MCKENZIE, MINISTER BETTY LLOYD, PASTOR ANTHONY AND SHERENE RUSSELL, PASTOR SOLOMON AND SEAN MCKENZIE, PASTOR KEITH AND HILDA ROLLE, PASTOR DAISY WINDER, PASTOR EMMANUEL BUTLER, DEACONESS ANNIE LLOYD, DEACONESS ENAMAE WRIGHT, PASTOR RICARDO AND MINISTER BERNADETTE JOHNSON, ELDER AUDLEY AND DEACONESS ETHEL MINUS, DEACONESS BARBARA COOPER, ELDER SHIRLEY BROWN, HUGHRIE AND BERTHALEE LLOYD, ANNUAL AND JULIA LLOYD, MILDRED AND ISIDORA LLOYD, CHERYL PINDER, FAYDORA MUNROE, ROLAND AND GENEVA ROLLE, ALTHEA LLOYD,CURLENA LLOYD, MCNEIL AND EUNAL MCKENZIE, ELDER EVALINA LLOYD, WELLINGTON AND JUILETTA CHARLTON, LAWRENCE AND LORANA LLOYD, ANVIL AND VALERIE TAYLOR, JACK AND MILLICENT WRIGHT, CYNTHIA AND DEANDRA MCKENZIE, WAYNE MCKENZIE, VANDLYN MCKENZIE, BERNICE WILSON, CLOID AND ISSIEANN DAXON, CHARLENE MILLER, RON DON MCKENZIE,

FRANCINA NIXON, PRESTON, ALLISON AND HORACE MCKENZIE, SANDRA, MARTHA AND HANNA TAYLOR, NIGEL CURRY, LAWRENCE LLOYD JR., LOGAN BURROWS, PHILLIP BURROWS, MR. IVAN FERGUSON , TREVOR AND ALTEMESE BURROWS, JACQUELINE BONABY, JEFFREY BURROWS, FRANCIS SMITH, FRANCENA, NIXON, SUTHERLAND BLACK, GLORIA TAYLOR, LORETTA COLLINS, NIOSHIE BOURNE, OSCAR TREJOS, SHERRY ROLLE, RICO AND LAKETA CHARLON, SHANTEL TAYLOR, ELAINE AND LONDA STORR, SHANNY BROWN, VIOLA AND MYRTLYN STORR, ANNIMAE SMITH, DORIS LLOYD, SAMUEL TAYLOR, PATRICIA MORLEY, BABYDOLL LLOYD, DEIDRE SMITH, JENNIFER NEWTON, IDA COLLIE, LORETHA COLLINS, MYRTLE GIBSON,

HAZEL KNOWLES, ENA ROLLE, SARAH ROLLE, LEANA COLLIE, ROSIE MILLER, SHIRLEY AND IVA CLARKE, THE DEAN, STRACHAN, RUSSELL,AND MCKENZIE FAMLIES OF ROSEWOOD STREET, PINEWOOD GARDEN, THE FERGUSON FAMILY OF BAMBOO TOWN, THE COOPER AND BODIE FAMILY AND THE ENTIRE BARRATARRE, HERMITAGE, MOSS TOWN, ROLLEVILLE, STANIEL CAY, AND BLACK POINT COMMUNITIES AND OTHER RELATIVES AND FRIENDS TOO NUMEROUS TO MENTION.

VIEIWNG IN THE PERPETUAL SUITE AT RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND CREMATORIUM LTD., ROBINSON AND SOLIDER ROADS ON SATURDAY FROM 10:00AM TO 5:00PM AND AT THE CHURCH ON SUNDAY FROM 11:30AM UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

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News Article
Sports Notices

Bahamas Scholastic AssociationThe Bahamas Scholastic Association (BSA) basketball playoffs will begin on Tuesday, February 25, and will be held at the DW Davis Gymnasium. In an effort to pay for the use of the gym, players are asked to pay one dollar each to enter the gym on the day that they are playing. Teams with balances will not be allowed to play. Also, the league's principal's award for the month of January goes to Mrs. Knowles, principal at Mt. Carmel Preparatory Academy, for her overwhelming support of her team for the month of January 2014.Track & FieldClub Monica Athletics will host its 11th annual track and field classic this Friday and Saturday, at the old Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium. The event is expected to get underway at 6 p.m. on Friday, and 1 p.m. on Saturday, and will feature a number of athletes competing in all of the age groups. In addition to a number of standout Bahamian athletes, the event is expected to feature athletes from throughout the Caribbean as well. It will be held under the patronage of 2012 IAAF Rising Female Star of the Year Anthonique Strachan. Strachan, who is a former member of Club Monica Athletics, is the reigning double sprint champion from the World Junior Championships, and a two-time winner of the Austin Sealy award, handed out to the region's best athlete at the annual CARIFTA Games. Strachan is also a semi-finalist from the most recent world championships, and the Olympic Games. Tickets for the event can be obtained at $10 for VIP, $5 for adults, and $3 for children.BoxingThe Champion Amateur Boxing Club (CABC) will host its bi-monthly show on Saturday, February 15, starting at 8 p.m. at the Wulff Road Boxing Square. A total of six matches will be showcased, and awards will be presented for the 'Best Fight', the 'Most Outstanding Boxer' and the 'Most Improved Boxer'. The CABC along with Platinum Sports Bar & Lounge will also host 'The Spirit of Determination' Amateur Boxing Show at the Platinum Sports Entertainment Center on Dowdeswell Street and Christie Avenue on Saturday, March 1, starting at 8 p.m. The show will recognize Bahamian boxing legends Cassius Moss and David 'Sugar Kid' Bowe. All amateur boxers and boxing clubs are welcomed to participate.

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News Article
20 QUESTIONS

Artist and NAGB chairman Stan Burnside answers this week's 20 Questions.
1. What's been your most inspirational moment in the last five years?
When the Prime Minister chose me as chairman of the board of the National Art Gallery of The Bahamas. That was a singular honor. And I am truly inspired to have a good go at it.
2. What's your least favorite piece of artwork?
I don't have a least favorite piece of artwork.
3. What's your favorite period of art history?
My favorite period is NOW in The Bahamas. We are sitting on a mother lode of remarkably talented artists here. Painters, sculptors, and the list goes on... they are doing phenomenal, world-class work. And we haven't even begun to tap into our design genius, when you consider that we have a couple thousand designers on Bay Street come Boxing Day and New Year's and we still have a multimillion-dollar souvenir industry just waiting to be harnessed. There are exciting days ahead.
4. What are your top 5 movies of all time?
a. Buck and the Preacher. b. Raisin in the Sun. c. The Godfather.
d. Seven Beauties. e. Natural Born Killers (please forgive me for this choice.)
5. Coffee or tea?
Tea, with lemon and honey.
6. What book are you reading now?
Love and Responsibility: The Dawn Davies Collection, edited by Erica Moiah James, PhD., layout and design by Dionne Benjamin-Smith and photography by Roland Rose.
7. What project are you working on now?
I have a number of projects going on in the studio and out of the studio. They will be revealed in due course.
8. What's the last show that surprised you?
@body:Well, there were two shows that surprised me, almost simultaneously. "NE6" at the National Art Gallery of The Bahamas and "Fix Ya' Face" at the D'Aguilar Art Foundation.
9. Saxons, One Family, Valley Boys or Roots?
All of we is One Family!
10. If you had to be stranded on one Family Island which one would it be?
Cat Island.
11. What's the most memorable artwork you've ever seen?
"Nation's Navel", an oil painting by my brother, Jackson L. Burnside III, which can be viewed at The D'Aguilar Art Foundation. This is an incredible painting that says so much about the way we live as Bahamians. It's a backyard scene where people communicate and congregate and the use of color is influenced strongly by his work in Junkanoo, and there's a pointillist treatment to portions of the painting that are very much like the French painter Georges Seurat. The impressionists were color freaks just like Junkanoo artists. When my brother first finished this painting and I saw it on the easel, I was so moved by it and I recognized that I had experienced a similar, but not quite as strong, feeling when I first viewed the painting by Pablo Picasso called "Guernica" at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. I have seen many paintings that I love over the years but I can truly say that particular painting speaks to me like no other.
12. Which artist do you have a secret crush on?
You ain' serious... want get me in trouble, eh?
13. If you could have lunch with anyone who would it be?
Any one of my four children... they are all great company and funny.
14. Who do you think is the most important Bahamian in the country's history?
Me... no, I'm joking. There are so many great Bahamians, too numerous to mention and it would be unfair to single one out of the lot. I think that is a blessing, rather than a curse don't you?
15. Who is your favorite living artist?
I'm not gonna tell you, but I will give you a hint. He or she is a Bahamian.
16. Sunrise or Sunset?
Sunrise, because it's like the beginning of a painting. So much promise.
17. What role does the artist have in society?
To answer 20 questions for the local newspaper.
18. What's your most embarrassing moment?
If I told you, I would have to kill you.
19. What wouldn't you do without?
What I wouldn't do without is spiritual nourishment. I have found that spiritual nourishment in my church and when times get hard, I have some ammunition to fight against the situations that will try to break my spirit. Going to church and taking my communion is like putting on an armor for life... I feel protected.
20. What's your definition of beauty?
For me, the definition of beauty is not exact... there are multiple configurations that exist between here and infinity... between the life-giving beauty of woman in all her glory to that which is found in the artist's imagination. It is in this vast and ever changing firmament that I travel, searching and discovering... it is here, there and everywhere.
In any case, that's my story and I'm sticking to it... what's yours?

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News Article
A healthy, easy, no-knead bread anyone can make

There are bakers and there are cooks. It takes a chemist's love of precision to be a baker. Me? I'm a cook.
However, I do love to bake bread. In fact, I've been on a bread baking kick for several years, experimenting with everything from the old-fashioned knead-it-up method to neo-hippy, grow-your-ownwild-yeast-before-you-evenstart-mixing-the-dough recipes. Recently, however, I learned a method so wonderful that my experimental wanderings may be over.
The breakthrough occurred when I took a class with the legendary Jim Lahey, founder of Sullivan Street Bakery in New York and the man behind a sensational recipe for noknead, slow-rise, no-fuss bread. Maybe just reading about it left me skeptical. Could baking bread really be as easy as he suggested?
Yes, it can. I went home after the class and adjusted his basic formula to my liking, adding extra whole-wheat flour, toasted walnuts and rosemary. Otherwise, I followed his instructions, weighed the ingredients, mixed them together and turned out an attractive, delicious loaf of bread.
One of the ways to ensure your success here is by measuring your flour by weight, not volume. When you scoop and measure flour by volume -- such as using a measuring cup -- the amount of flour you get each time can vary widely, sometimes by several ounces. The discrepancy is due to how tightly or loosely the flour is packed. A few ounces may not sound like much, but it can make a big difference in baked goods.
That's why I recommend investing in a good kitchen scale if you're going to bake bread. The one I own, which registers both ounces and grams, has turned out to be useful for any number of kitchen tasks.
And please remember, this is not your grandmother's bread, or at least it's not your grandmother's method of making bread. So don't be thrown off by the wetness of the dough (it's very wet), the temperature of the water added (it's cool, not warm), or the temperature at which the dough first rises (it's room temp, not warmer).
The only down side to this recipe is the need to plan ahead. Even though mixing the dough takes no time at all (30 seconds), you have to let it rise for at least 12, and preferably 18, hours. Then, after you've shaped it into a loaf (another 30 seconds), it needs to rise for yet another hour or two. Finally, it takes 45 to 60 minutes for the bread to bake, and it has to cool completely before you can eat it.
But if you can deal with the amount of time necessary for the dough to set up, you may find yourself eating really scrumptious, fresh and healthy artisanal bread several times a week. And every time you bake one of these loaves, your whole house smells wonderful.
NO-KNEAD WALNUT-ROSEMARY BREAD
Start to finish: 14 hours (20 minutes active)
Makes 1 loaf (10 servings)
1/2 cup (50 grams) coarsely chopped walnuts
2 cups (266 grams) bread flour
1 cup (133 grams) whole-wheat flour
1 1/4 teaspoons (8 grams) table salt
3/4 teaspoon (2 grams) instant or rapid-rise yeast
2 tablespoons (6 grams) chopped rosemary
1 1/3 cups (350 grams) cool water (55 F to 65 F)
Additional flour, wheat bran or cornmeal, for dusting Heat the oven to 350 degrees F.
Place the walnuts in a shallow baking dish, then place in the oven on the middle shelf to toast for 10 to 12 minutes. Set aside to cool. Once the nuts are cooled, in a medium bowl stir them together with both flours, the salt, yeast and rosemary. Add the water and stir briefly with a wooden spoon or your hands, just until the dough is barely mixed, about 30 seconds.
The dough should be quite wet and tacky. If it is not, add 1 to 2 tablespoons more water. Cover the bowl and let it rise at room temperature for 12 to 18 hours, or until it is more than double in bulk.
After the dough has risen, generously sprinkle a work surface with flour and gently, with the help of a plastic bench scraper, scoop out the dough onto the counter.
Working very quickly, with floured hands, fold the dough inward to the center on all sides to form a seam. Turn the dough over to form a round with the seam on the bottom. Generously sprinkle a clean kitchen towel with flour. Lay the towel flat on the counter and set the dough on top, seam down. Sprinkle the top of the dough lightly with flour and loosely fold the ends of towel over the dough.
Let the dough rise in a warm place for 1 to 2 hours, or until almost doubled in bulk. You will know it is ready when you poke the dough and it holds your imprint. If the dough bounces back, it is not ready.
About 30 minutes before you think the dough is ready, heat the oven to 475 F. Put a rack in the lower third of the oven, and place a covered 4 1/2 to 5 1/2 quart casserole dish in the oven to heat.
When the dough has risen, carefully remove the casserole dish from the oven and remove the lid. With the aid of the tea towel, flip the dough gently, seam side up, into the casserole, put the lid on the casserole and return it to the oven. Bake for 30 minutes. Carefully remove the lid and bake until the bread has browned nicely, another 15 to 30 minutes.
Remove the casserole dish from the oven and use a spatula or dish towel to carefully transfer the bread to a rack to cool completely before slicing.
Nutrition information per serving: 180 calories; 40 calories from fat (22 percent of total calories); 5 g fat (0 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 0 mg cholesterol; 30 g carbohydrate; 3 g fiber; 0 g sugar; 6 g protein; 290 mg sodium.

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News Article
Angela Emily Adderley, 61

Funeral service for Angela Emily Adderley, 61 yrs., a resident of Dignity Gardens, who died on 6th October, 2011, will be held at Our Lady of the Holy Souls Catholic Church, Deveaux Street, on Saturday at 12:00 p.m. Officiating will be Rev. Fr. Alain Laverne, M. Div., assisted by Deacon Peter Rahming & Deacon Maxwell Johnson. Interment follows in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, JFK Drive.

She is survived by her two sons: Shawn and Gregory Smith
Adopted Sons: Drexel Smith, Kevin Miller, Ian Williams, and John Duncombe
Daughters: Shiena Dawkins, Shavanna Moxey, and Alexandria Williams
Adopted Daughter: Nefeteria Albury
Daughter in-law: Elaine Smith
Grandchildren: Shawnice, Desmond, Alexavia, Deshae and Leslia
Sisters: Gloria and Maria Adderley, Joanne and Minerva Smith, and Thelma Cunningham
Brothers: Howard, Harry, and David Adderley
Aunts: Eloise Colebrooke, Ernestine Knowles
Brother in-law: Lawrence Smith

Close Friends: Cherry Jones, Mary Miller, Yvonne Jones, Judy Rolle, Joanne Williams, and Rosanna Dickenson

Nephews: Dereck McDonald, Phillip Munroe, Lawrence Smith, Kevin, Jason, Marvin, Aaron, Theo, Tiko, Mandrell, Stephen, Cordero, Jerrel, and David Jr. Adderley.
Nieces: Throy, Charlene, and Lakiesha Smith, Taneko Adams, Phillippa Roach, Colleen Moss, Leonice Hanna, Shericka Gibson, Lavanda, Shantell, Marva, Tonia, Timincia, Kenva, Donelle, Cassandra, Shanderia, Kenderia, Tamika, Stacy, and Omendelly Adderley, Asha and Racquel Miller, Tanisha Penn and Vanika Cooper

Numerous grand nieces and nephews

Other relatives and friends including: Marsha Smith, Yvonne Kemp, The Staff of the Wyndham Laundry and Housekeeping Department, Maud Smith and Family, Yvonne Skippings and Family, Alma Young, Rosalyn Laing, Sybil Higgs and The Friendship Birthday and Travel Club, Shanrose Clarke and Julia Clarke, Alfreda Sears and Family, Cherilyn and Julian Fernander, Bernadette Brennen, Gabrielle Cooper and Family, Wesley and Tangela Miller, Robert Miller, Shelly Miller and Family, Althea Miller, The Duncombe Family, Nadia Dean and Family, Chadrack Johnson, Christine Key, Verona Bastian, Olivia and Julius Kemp, Leteisha Archer and Family, Karen Ingraham, Dianne Major and Family, The Oliver and Cox Family, The Thurston Family, The Major Family, Jean Parks, Patsy Roberts, Bronson Sands, Brenda Solomon and Family, Leslie Rolle and Family, The Pritchard Family, The Staff ICU of the Princess Margaret Hospital, Dr. Christine Chin, Dr. Kevin Moss, The Lloyd Family, Marie Rolle and Fa mily, Cheryl Wallace and Family, The Newbold and Market Streets Families, Rita Strachan and Family, Cedric Rolle, Emmanuel George, Tiffany Seymour and Family, Patricia Johnson and Family, Gaynell Bullard, Racquel Penn, Rochelle Mckenzie and Family, Wealthy Winters and Family and Linda Johnson.
Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's funeral Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the church from 11:00 a.m. until service time.

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News Article
Locally-based boxing bodies challenged to revitalize sport

The boxing scene here in The Bahamas is on a downturn. A big reason for the inactivity is a sick economy. To present a more comprehensive sports outlook, it must be recognized that the sport of boxing is not the only discipline experiencing rough times.
Even track and field, the top producer of excellent performances, has not been able to come close to maximizing its true potential for success. There is however, much more that glitters about track and field than any other discipline. Not a whole lot that is positive has been going on in boxing, and the locally based organizations that have the responsibility to enhance the sport have come up against hard times.
The Amateur Boxing Federation of The Bahamas (ABFB) is struggling and the inability to put together a fund-raising team has that aspect of the sport facing serious problems. Its one shining light is Carl Hield, the super welterweight/middleweight who is one of the world's elite amateur performers.
The Bahamas Boxing Commission (BBC), through its relationship with the Commonwealth Boxing Council (CBC), continues to push for opportunities for Bahamian professional pugilists. The commission has also undertaken a program geared to project the sport in the Family Islands. The next trip is scheduled for Long Island (November 28-30). Commissioner Dr. Munir Rashad is now based in that island. He has coordinated, in conjunction with Local Government authorities, education and sports leaders there, several sessions to be addressed by the commission team, that will be headed by Chairman Alvin Sargent. The commission intends to begin a closer relationship with the islands, being aware of the raw talents to be found in those communities.
The Pan American Caribbean Boxing Organization (PACBO) has been an associate of the local boxing program since its was
established in 2006. The organization came about out of a need for the region to get some middle ground assistance for amateur and professional programs in the member countries (The Bahamas, Jamaica, Trinidad & Tobago, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic and New Jersey-United States). The Bahamas is the base of the PACBO president and gets a big focus accordingly.
PACBO plans to accelerate its program of soliciting and purchasing equipment to continue networking with the other boxing partners toward great skills' development in New Providence and the Family Islands.
The boxing groups lament the state of professional boxing in the country. There was a time, during the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s, when professional boxing was quite popular. Charlie Major Sr. returned home from New York during the early 1940s and empowered the boxing game through promotions with some of the world's best as headliners. He continued his contribution in quality promotions at his Nassau Stadium for many years before his death in 1980. Douglas Carey and others, collectively, was a big factor at the Birdland. The Oakes Field Hanger became a big part of the arena equation and hosted many legendary matches, particularly between former heavyweight champions Bert Perry and Leonard 'Boston Blackie' Miller.
Wilfred Coakley and Chris Malakious were esteemed promoters who broadened the popularity base of pro boxing. In Grand Bahama, Jim White, the noted businessman, took the sport to further prominence in the country with his regular shows at the King's Inn. Those eras were glorious ones.
It was not difficult to get top line professionals to come into the country to perform against locals and other foreign opponents. The list from the time of Major Sr. included the best of the best, such as Joe Louis, Jimmy Carter, Willie Pep, Floyd Patterson, Bunny Grant, Levi Forte, and many others.
Bahamians who campaigned out of New York and Florida, namely Yama Bahama, Gomeo Brennan, Sugar Cliff, and Bobo Reckley, came back home to meet the best of the locals. Those campaigning and enjoying the high popularity of the sport included Roy Armbrister, Sammy Isaacs, Cleveland Parris, Black Jack, Wilfred 'Battling' Douglas, Ray Minis Sr., Elisha Obed, 'Baby Boy' Rolle, Ray Minus Jr., Cassius Moss, Willie Dawkins, Bert Woods, Ernie Barr, Sammy Barr, Steve Larrimore and more recently, Jermaine Mackey and Meacher Major.
Bahamian boxers made an impression on the world. It began with Yama Bahama who was one of the poster performers at the famed Madison Square Garden during the 1950s and 1960s. His fellow Bimini Islander Gomeo Brennan was the first Bahamian to win an international title. He became the Commonwealth (British Empire) Middleweight Champion in 1963 and ruled the category on two occasions.
Obed won the only world title (World Boxing Council's junior middleweight crown). Ray Minis Jr., Larrimore and Mackey followed Brennan by winning Commonwealth championships. Sherman 'The Tank' Williams captured Asian titles. Major and Edner Cherry have also won regional crowns. They all contributed to wonderful pages in our sports history.
Now the sport is in great need of a push to an era that could compare with the aforementioned. Hopefully in 2014, the ABFB, the BCB and PACBO will be able to make that happen.
(To respond to this sports feature, kindly contact Fred Sturrup at sturrup1504@gmail.com)

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Movie
Monte Carlo
  • Genre : Adventure, Comedy, Romance
  • Rating : T - 15yrs and Older

Three young women vacationing in Paris find themselves whisked away to Monte Carlo after one of the girls is mistaken for a British heiress....


News Article
Ancestral tribute to former Director of Sports Winston 'Gus' Cooper

Anthropologists agree the notion that the survival of any culture resides in the capacity of its people to cherish that which it has produced, using such indigenous commodities, human as well as capital, to construct positive patterns of living permanently alluring to successive generations of its citizenry. Some centuries earlier, Cicero theorized that expressing gratitude is not only the greatest of the seven heavenly virtues, it ought be regarded as the parent of them all, dominating the province of all that is noble about any enlightened and progressive society. Undoubtedly, these twin notions found best intersection in the life of my mentor, Gus Cooper, the first Director of Sports who easily qualifies as one of the most transformative treasures in Bahamian sport, fully deserving of a nation's gratitude and adulation.
As one of three strong candidates who applied for the post of Director of Sports after Senator Kendal W. Nottage became the first Minister of Sports in 1978, Gus' unique credentials earned him that seminal post. He was largely tasked him with administration and development of what was an original 512.92 acres of Crown lands and wetlands granted by Order of the Legislative Council in 1956 for the purposes of national sports development. He assumed such a task with measured
fanaticism fueled by a passionate minister conscious of the cosmic reality that sports center land was scarcely enough to accommodate the long term needs of the national sporting community, given that 75 percent (75%) of its original acreage had already been devoured by other government agencies. The new minister therefore placed a premium on protecting sports center land, having already been well sized of one proposal to develop a new public hospital at the sports center and another to relocate the Hobby Horse Race Track there.
Buttressed by the fierce loyalty of his faithful liege, Doyle Burrows, and his unrelenting fidelity to the 'Sports Power' philosophy loudly espoused by his indomitable minister, Gus protected the sports center as a national sports preserve, shepherding the redevelopment and naming of the Thomas A. Robinson National Track and Field Stadium which first opened in 1968; the improved Andre Rodgers National Baseball Stadium which opened in 1967; the reconstructed South Beach Pools in 1983; the Baillou Hills Softball Complex in 1984; the Churchill Tener-Knowles National Softball Stadium in 1988; the Kendal G.L. Isaacs National Gymnasium in 1994; and the Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association's (BLTA) National Tennis Centre in 1998. Not so well known is the pivotal role of advocacy he played in defending Betty Kelly-Kenning's inclination to build the national swim complex at the sports center, in opposition to lobbyists who wanted it built elsewhere. The swim complex opened at the sports center in 2001. Gus also spearheaded the development of the Grand Bahama Sports Complex in 1995.
Indeed, these historic accomplishments by Gus were not without their challenges as he was compelled to encounter a number of so-called Joshua Generation Ministers, all devoid of the genuine altruism found in the hearts of men and women dogmatically convicted to the precepts of 'Sports Power'. One such Joshua Generation sports minister perceived land dedicated to sports development as more useful for housing or food production. Hence, the use of sports center land for the development of Millennium Gardens. Minister Neville Wisdom rejected such an uninformed proposition when he interrupted the plans of zealots in the Ministry of Housing for further incursion into the sports center. Also, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham intervened to abort plans for a new law school at the sports center, further instructing that the remaining 90 acres of sports center property must be reserved for sports facilities. Those responsible for the current sports center master plan apparently had difficulty with such instructions.
Gus' larger contribution to national sports development was his introduction of enlightened thought to local sports administration. He insisted upon an end to the prevailing jockocratic syndrome which permeated the misperception of athletes as being physically gifted but intellectually deficient. His insistence upon scholarship enhanced the human capital of the sports division to the extent that sports officers and federation executives were figuratively transported from the dust of the playing field to the atmospherics of scientific planning. He oversaw the establishment of high powered sports seminars and sports leaders conclaves featuring expert national and international speakers thereby elevating the organizational and management capacity of local sports leaders, physical education teachers, school coaches and Family Island sports council executives. The scholarship which he brought to sports translated into the kind of national and international sporting successes hereto for unmatched in the annals of Bahamian sport.
Here it is just as important to recall that Gus succeeded in winning the support of Minister Algernon Allen in his 10 years of battle to rationalize a career path for sports officers while at the same time addressing salary anomalies traditionally suffered not only by sports officers but also by officers in the youth division and those serving in the Department of Culture. All these officers had academic credentials and work experiences similar to that of other professionals in the public service, in spite of which they were rated in far lower salary scales. The unintended consequence of such an anomaly was difficulty in retaining and replacing competent officers. Minister Algernon Allen took up Gus' fight and as a result youth, sports and culture officers were incremented and placed in more appropriate salary scales. In the ecology of local public institutions, the entire Ministry of Youth Sports and Culture benefitted at the hands of Gus Cooper. Yet that agency remains unchallenged as the most ungrateful of all public agencies to the men and women who bled it into existence.
Here it is appropriate to contrast such an assertion with Gus' personal appreciation of his sports heritage and the traditions that shaped him. He avidly supported and contributed to a program initiated by Minister Desmond Bannister to have Arlene Nash-Ferguson write an entire series of primary school books that lionized the lives and achievements of Members of the National Hall of Fame. Gus was extremely pleased with Nash-Ferguson's first completion, a wonderful effort on Tommy Robinson meriting Nobel Prize consideration. He was most disconcerted that she was discouraged from continuance of such a nationally redeeming exercise.
As an intellectual descendent and administrative heir to one of the most accomplished sports administrators to grace these islands and the wider Caribbean region then, some of us disciples are simply grateful to have sat at the feet of greatness and to have been exposed to the threads of legacy and the beads of national pride deeply ensconced in the soul of this country's first Director of Sports. Indeed, his great deeds will be his perpetual monument and his eternal rest in the bright light of peace has been so very well deserved. The Right Hand of God will continue to rest upon the foreheads of Cassie, Cisco and Augustus.

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News Article
Let this Christmas be your acceptance of the greatest gift of all time

For God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. - John 3:16
Many would agree as we find ourselves smack dab in the middle of the last month of 2013 that the days are fraught with trials, troubles and tribulations, much to our lack of faith, trust, love and non-forgiveness.
We did and said things that were far from adding to the growth of nation, family, friends and the brotherhood. But most of all, we have not been, for the most part, appreciative of the most valuable gift to humankind of all times, the son of the most high God - Jesus Christ.
Christmas is almost here, and it is all about the son. It is joy to the world and peace toward all men. A story is told about a painting called "My Son", which may bring a clearer picture of what our text is about today in what I would call the acceptance.
A wealthy man and his son loved to collect rare works of art. They had everything in their collection, from Picasso to Raphael. They would often sit together and admire the great works of art. When the Vietnam conflict broke out, the son went to war. He was very courageous and died in battle while rescuing another soldier. The father was notified and grieved deeply for his only son.
About a month later, just before Christmas, there was a knock at the door. A young man stood at the door with a large package in his hands. He said, "Sir, you don't know me, but I am the soldier for whom your son gave his live. He saved many lives that day, and he was carrying me to safety when a bullet struck him and he died instantly. He often talked about you, and your love for art."
The young man held out this package, "I know this isn't much. I'm not really a great artist, but I think your son would have wanted you to have this."
The father opened the package. It was a portrait of his son, painted by the young man. He stared in awe at the way the soldier had captured the personality of his son in the painting. The father was so drawn to the eyes that his own eyes welled up with tears.
He thanked the young man and offered to pay him for the picture. "Oh, no sir, I could never repay what your son did for me. It's a gift."
The father hung the portrait over his mantle. Every time visitors came to his home he took them to see the portrait of his son before he showed them any of the other great works he had collected.
The man died a few months later. There was to be a great auction of his paintings. Many influential people gathered, excited over seeing the great paintings and having an opportunity to purchase one for their collection. On the platform sat the painting of the son. The auctioneer pounded his gavel. "We will start the bidding with this picture of the son. Who will bid for this picture?"
There was silence. Then a voice in the back of the room shouted, "We want to see the famous paintings. Skip this one." But the auctioneer persisted. "Will someone bid for this painting? Who will start the bidding - $100, $200?"
Another voice shouted angrily, "We didn't come to see this painting. We came to see the Van Goghs, the Rembrandts. Get on with the real bids!"
But still the auctioneer continued, "The son! The son! Who'll take the son?"
Finally, a voice came from the very back of the room. It was the longtime gardener of the man and his son, "I'll give $10 for the painting."
Being a poor man, it was all he could afford. "We have $10 ... who will bid $20?"
"Give it to him for $10. Let's see the masters," said a voice.
The auctioneer said, "Ten dollars is the bid, won't someone bid $20?"
The crowd was becoming angry. They didn't want the picture of the son. They wanted the more worthy investments for their collections.
The auctioneer pounded the gavel, "Going once, twice, sold for $10!"
A man sitting on the second row shouted, "Now let's get on with the collection!"
The auctioneer laid down his gavel, "I'm sorry, the auction is over. When I was called to conduct this auction, I was told of a secret stipulation until this time. Only the painting of the son would be auctioned. Whoever bought that painting would inherit the entire estate including the paintings. The man who took the son gets everything!"
God gave his Son, the gift at Christmas over 2,000 years ago to die on a cruel cross. If only you would accept him, then everything belongs to you; similar to the message of the auctioneer. Whoever received the son gets everything. "Seek ye first the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things shall be added unto you."
Why not let this Christmas be your acceptance of the greatest gift of all time. You have nothing to lose, only everything to gain.

o E-mail rubyanndarling@yahoo.com; write to P.O. Box 19725 SS Nassau, Bahamas with your prayer requests, comments and concerns. God's Blessings!

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