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News Article
Challenged voters down to 17

NICHOLL'S Town, North Andros - The number of voters whose registration in the North Andros constituency is being challenged has dwindled from 30 to 17, North Andros Administrator Huntley Christie revealed at a hearing yesterday.
Before hearing testimony from some of those remaining voters, Christie heard submissions from attorney Philip Brave Davis, who argued that the matter ought to be aborted because Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham revealed the name of one of the voters at a rally this week, days after the administrator ordered that their identities be kept secret.
Davis, deputy leader of the Progressive Liberal Party (PLP), represents some of the people who are accused of being illegally registered in North Andros.
"We submit that the integrity of the proceedings has been compromised," he said.
"...You gave a directive that we were not to disclose the names of persons here."
Davis said he was "appalled and deeply concerned" that Ingraham called the man's name. The voter in question sat in court as Davis made his submissions yesterday.
The lawyer also pointed out to Christie that he does not have tenure like Supreme Court justices, so he could be terminated at any time by the executive.
At the rally, Ingraham also said people like the voter in question will soon come to know that having a second home in another constituency does not give them the right to vote there.
"Is he telling you how to rule?" Davis asked Christie. "...However you rule, that decision is going to be shaken in the minds of the public."
The lawyer further submitted that the prime minister violated one of the most hallowed principles of the dispensation of justice and that is justice must not only be done, but must be seen to have been done.
"It is horrifying to the system," he said, adding that the prime minister had turned the proceedings into a "political circus".
However, attorney Elma Campbell, who represents the objectors, told the court that it was Davis who first called the voter's name outside the tribunal.
She was referring to an interview Davis gave last week Friday in which he called the man's last name. ZNS aired the interview, Campbell noted.
She told the administrator that his directive not to reveal names was an instruction to reporters and counsel.
Administrator Christie said he noted Davis' concerns. He said no one is above the law, and stressed that he is not easily intimidated. He then killed the submissions on the point and directed that the hearing proceed and witnesses be called.
Testimony
The tribunal then heard from several voters being challenged, including a woman who said she lives in Nicholl's Town but has been visiting Nassau frequently over the last year because she injured her back.
She said she has lived in five different places in New Providence, and came back to Andros because "I was ordered to come clear my name".
In fact, she said she canceled a doctor's appointment in Nassau yesterday because she was called to testify.
One of the objectors, Alfie Stubbs, also returned to the stand yesterday, testifying in relation to a voter he said was his cousin. Stubbs said she lives in Nassau.
The young woman later testified. She said she is a resident of Morgan's Bluff, but resides in Nassau for "education purposes".
She was wearing her College of The Bahamas ID around her neck and said she has been attending COB off and on for the past seven years. The woman also said she works part-time at a pharmacy in New Providence.
She said she returns to North Andros during school breaks.
After questioning the young woman, Campbell thanked her for her testimony and wished her well in her studies.
Cassandra Fowler, the Free National Movement's chairman in North Andros, also testified for a second time in relation to a family member - a cousin.
She said he is a customs broker and moved to New Providence with his wife.
But the man said he has been interdicted by the Department of Customs and visits his wife in New Providence, but he insisted that he lives in North Andros.
Another witness, a contractor, testified that he has lived in North Andros all his life and still does.
"I'm always here," said the man, who added that he travels to New Providence for work.
"If someone calls me in Nassau, I go," he said. The man also told the court that he lives with his girlfriend and child in New Providence when he visits.
His mother also testified that her son lives with her in North Andros.
Administrator Christie adjourned the matter to Monday.

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News Article
PEARLEAN BODIE-MCKENZIE, 94

FUNERAL SERVICE

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR THE LATE PEARLEAN BODIE-MCKENZIE AFFECTIONATELY CALLED "LENA" " NANO"AGE 94 YEARS OF ROSEWOOD STREET, PINEWOOD AND FORMERLY OF BARRATERRE, EXUMA WILL BE HELD ON SUNDAY MARCH 11, 2012 AT 1:00PM AT KEMP ROAD MINISTRIES, KEMP ROAD. OFFICIATING WILL BE REV'D DR. IVAN F. BUTLER JR. INTERMENT WILL FOLLOW IN LAKEVIEW MEMORIAL GARDENS, SOLIDER ROAD.

SHE WILL BE GREATLY MISSED BUT HER MEMORIES WILL CONTINUE TO LINGER IN THE LIVES OF HER CHILDREN: ACKAL JR. AND IONA MCKENZIE, LAURIE AND WILLIAM TAYLOR, DOROTHY MCKENZIE-TAYLOR AND ITHIEL TAYLOR SR., RUTHMAE AND LENIX ROLLE, ELEANOR MCKENZIE, BERYL MORRIS, CAROLYN MCKENZIE, CHRISTINE AND FELIX SAUNDERS, MARGUERITE MCKENZIE-TURNQUEST AND LESTER TURNQUEST AND LYNDA MCKENZIE; ADOPTED DAUGHTERS: RAY BODIE, ROSALEE WRIGHT, GARNELL BETHELL; ADOPTED SON: NORMAN LLOYD; SISTERS: MYRTIS JOHNSON, AND CORA MCKENZIE; SEVNTY FOUR GRAND CHILDREN: SHAZAD FERGUSON, OLIVIA MUNROE, ROCHELLE NEWBOLD, RAPHIEAL AND SHAVONNE NEWBOLD, SHAZARO MAURA, SHANAIRJ WALLACE, ROGER AND NOELLE TURNQUEST,KEVIN AND BONNIE MCKENZIE, KALSEY AND CASSANDRA MCKENZIE, KULEM AND GENIEVE MCKENZIE, SHERENE AND SHERESE MCKENZIE, CRAVEN LONGSWORTH, KENDAL ROBERTS, LESLIE AND LAVONE MCKENZIE, NADINE AND COLIN SAUNDERS, RICARDO, DEREK AND DEBRA MCKENZIE, DENNIS, NYOKA AND SERAN MCKENZIE, NATASHA AND TONY MOREE, SHAMARA AND ROBERT TURNQUEST, LINCOLN AND SADAKA MCKENZIE, DIANNE AND JERMAINE SANDS, JEROME, RODERICK, DEACON CADWELL AND SHENEK TAYLOR, TIWANNA NABBY, MARIA TAYLOR-ARIZA AND FRITZI ARIZA, MICHAEL AND THELMA TAYLOR, ITHIEL AND STACY TAYLOR, TERRY RANDOLPH TAYLOR, ANN BAIN, PHILIP ROLLE, MARVIN AND PATRICIA ROLLE, LENIX JR. AND MELBERT ROLLE, JASON ROLLE, KHALILAH AND KATORA SANDS, JOYCELYN MCKENZIE, CHRISANTA AND KIRK SMITH, SANTEREQUE AND VENQUE BAIN, SHAKERA AND SHAZARAY SAUNDERS,, JACKIE MOXEY, BLOSSOM BROWN, BARRY LIGHTBOURNE, RALPH BODIE, PAULETTE SMITH, JONNIE SAUNDERS, BRENDA CLARKE, VANGY BARNETT; EIGHTY ONE GREAT GRANDS: DONTE, SHAZAD JR. AND ZION FERGUSON, KIANA DAVIS, MICHAEL BRANDON, CLAYTON RAPHIEAL AND MARK ANTHONY SAUNDERS, RAPHIEAL JR., AND KAYDE AND RICKITA NEWBOLD, ALKHALBIRNIQUE BUTLER KEIARJ QUISHEDA, KULEM JR., KURON, KEVAUGHN, KRISTIN, KESHNIQUE, KALSEY JR., CAYDEN, SHANTESE TAYLOR, RAQUEL, RIKERA, DEANDRA, DEVIN, DARYAN, ALEXIS, DAYLAN AND ZARIA MCKENZIE, NIESHAR DAVIS, CHRISTOPHER AND CHRYSTYN MOREE, SKYLER TURNQUEST, BRANDON AND JUSTIN SAUNDERS, RODERICK JR, VALENTINO, CADWELL JR., PATRICK JR, KRISTEN, JEROME JR., KHADERO KHAJZAN, AND QUADILEA TAYLOR, SHACOYA, SHAVEZ, SHACAJA AND SHAKEIL BAIN, JOHN BUTCHER, JAYNELL, JAVON, MEKEL, SHANIQUE MARVIN JR., SHANTIQUE, KOBE, COLIAH, LENIX JR., LENECIA, LENISHA ROLLE, LUTHER, AND KEONTAE ROLLE, BRINAIRJ BETHEL, TIWANNA NABBY, ARMANDO AND ALEZANDRO ARRIZA, SHAKOYA, SHAMIKA, TEVIN, ASHON, AUSTIN, AND TEREZ TAYLOR, SHELQUAHN AND TESHIDO DAVIS, AZOURIA SAUNDERS, BRISHARD MUNNINGS, TREVONTE AND SADE BAIN, KERLITHIA, SANTIARJ AND KIRZARIO CURTIS; TWELVE GREAT GREAT GRANDS: JAYDA HAMILTON, LEAYSHIA, HAYNES, AYANNA JONES, TRISTIN MOSS KEVIA WILLIAMS, NICKEIL BAIN, T'AJE AND D'AJE INGRAHAM, CADRE AND CATRELL TAYLOR, KEIARA MCKENZIE, AND TECARDO BROOKS; NUMEROUS NIECES AND NEPHEWS: PEGGY ARTHUR, BRADLEY, GLENROY, HANSEL, LEROY, MELANIE AND BARBARA JOHNSON, DEANNA BROWN, VANGY LEWIS, HALLOND, DEREK, GLENROY, SHIRLEY, LEROY, ESTERMAE, MARGARET, DOROTHY, BERTHA AND NANCY BODIE, LESLIE SMITH OF FT. LAUDERDALE FLORIDA, LISA MILLER, AND GRETHEL LLOYD, MARJORIE GARDINER, LAVORN, LESLIE, FREEMAN, RUDOLPH, RANDOLPH, MARVIN, OLIE MCKENZIE, JENNIFER MCKENZIE, DEANNE MCKENZIE, PATRICE DARLING, BESSIEMAE CURTIS, AGATHA BURROWS, USENE AND MARINA BURROWS, ERSKINE AND EMERETHA BURROWS, JOHN AND LUCY WRIGHT, INEKA FINLASON, VERNICE WRIGHT, MADELINE HANNA, RUTH CURTIS, NAIRN ROLLE, LILLY MAE TAYLOR, ETHEL THOMPSON, RAYANNA BAIN, ISAMAE MCBRIDE, ALVERA ARMBRISTER, LAVONIA SHIELD, NATHALIE MCKENZIE, DOTLYN STORR, ESTELLE STORR, EDNA CHARLTON, BRENDA, BERTALEE, LILLIAN AND BENJAMIN MCKENZIE, IDELLA LAING, LOLETHA THURSTON, MAE EDGECOMBE, LILLIS ELLIS, DOLLY MCKENZIE, ROSE MCKENZIE, MINNIE, AND VERONICA ROLLE, BERNARD, PHILIP, KEN, IRVIN JR. AND JANET BODIE,

PENNY NIXON, RURAL, TONY FREDDY, BARBIE, YVONNE AND SANDY GRAY; GOD CHILDREN: JANET LLOYD, ESTELLA STORR, PAULA MCKENZIE, PRISCILLA WHYMS, CALVIN MCKENZIE, CLYDE BURROWS, NYOKA MCKENZIE-PIERRE, EARL MCKENZIE; RELATIVES AND FRIENDS: REVEREND DOCTOR IVAN FORD AND DR. JOANNE BUTLER, REVEREND DELTON FERNANDER, REVEREND DR. CHARLES SAUNDERS, PASTOR HUETON LLOYD, MINISTER JULIAN AND MELVERN MCKENZIE, MINISTER BETTY LLOYD, PASTOR ANTHONY AND SHERENE RUSSELL, PASTOR SOLOMON AND SEAN MCKENZIE, PASTOR KEITH AND HILDA ROLLE, PASTOR DAISY WINDER, PASTOR EMMANUEL BUTLER, DEACONESS ANNIE LLOYD, DEACONESS ENAMAE WRIGHT, PASTOR RICARDO AND MINISTER BERNADETTE JOHNSON, ELDER AUDLEY AND DEACONESS ETHEL MINUS, DEACONESS BARBARA COOPER, ELDER SHIRLEY BROWN, HUGHRIE AND BERTHALEE LLOYD, ANNUAL AND JULIA LLOYD, MILDRED AND ISIDORA LLOYD, CHERYL PINDER, FAYDORA MUNROE, ROLAND AND GENEVA ROLLE, ALTHEA LLOYD,CURLENA LLOYD, MCNEIL AND EUNAL MCKENZIE, ELDER EVALINA LLOYD, WELLINGTON AND JUILETTA CHARLTON, LAWRENCE AND LORANA LLOYD, ANVIL AND VALERIE TAYLOR, JACK AND MILLICENT WRIGHT, CYNTHIA AND DEANDRA MCKENZIE, WAYNE MCKENZIE, VANDLYN MCKENZIE, BERNICE WILSON, CLOID AND ISSIEANN DAXON, CHARLENE MILLER, RON DON MCKENZIE,

FRANCINA NIXON, PRESTON, ALLISON AND HORACE MCKENZIE, SANDRA, MARTHA AND HANNA TAYLOR, NIGEL CURRY, LAWRENCE LLOYD JR., LOGAN BURROWS, PHILLIP BURROWS, MR. IVAN FERGUSON , TREVOR AND ALTEMESE BURROWS, JACQUELINE BONABY, JEFFREY BURROWS, FRANCIS SMITH, FRANCENA, NIXON, SUTHERLAND BLACK, GLORIA TAYLOR, LORETTA COLLINS, NIOSHIE BOURNE, OSCAR TREJOS, SHERRY ROLLE, RICO AND LAKETA CHARLON, SHANTEL TAYLOR, ELAINE AND LONDA STORR, SHANNY BROWN, VIOLA AND MYRTLYN STORR, ANNIMAE SMITH, DORIS LLOYD, SAMUEL TAYLOR, PATRICIA MORLEY, BABYDOLL LLOYD, DEIDRE SMITH, JENNIFER NEWTON, IDA COLLIE, LORETHA COLLINS, MYRTLE GIBSON,

HAZEL KNOWLES, ENA ROLLE, SARAH ROLLE, LEANA COLLIE, ROSIE MILLER, SHIRLEY AND IVA CLARKE, THE DEAN, STRACHAN, RUSSELL,AND MCKENZIE FAMLIES OF ROSEWOOD STREET, PINEWOOD GARDEN, THE FERGUSON FAMILY OF BAMBOO TOWN, THE COOPER AND BODIE FAMILY AND THE ENTIRE BARRATARRE, HERMITAGE, MOSS TOWN, ROLLEVILLE, STANIEL CAY, AND BLACK POINT COMMUNITIES AND OTHER RELATIVES AND FRIENDS TOO NUMEROUS TO MENTION.

VIEIWNG IN THE PERPETUAL SUITE AT RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND CREMATORIUM LTD., ROBINSON AND SOLIDER ROADS ON SATURDAY FROM 10:00AM TO 5:00PM AND AT THE CHURCH ON SUNDAY FROM 11:30AM UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

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News Article
The illusion and magic of the circus

When Steven Best and Cassandra step onto the stage, their audience becomes a part of an unbelievable magic experience that will leave them mystified -- the master illusionist spins Cassandra's head in a full 360-degree turn -- and they remind you to remember to breathe as Cassandra fits herself into a small box and Steven pushes eight stainless steel, razor sharp spikes through her. This is the magic that Steven Best and Cassandra will bring to the stage as the circus has come to town.
So believe it or not, the circus will be truly amazing, based around a new cast performing and appearing on the popular television show "Ripley's Believe it or Not" and its famous museum in the United States. There will be 12 captivating performances of acrobats, contortionists, a Michael Jackson impersonator, local animals, famous cartoon characters such as Sponge Bob, Dora, Turtle and Elmo, a hilarious side-kick midget who will serve as co-ringmaster, daring swords swallowing act, rivaling Steven Best and Cassandra who headlined their own show in Las Vegas for five years, and who are now currently performing in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee, in their new large-scale illusion show "Magic Spectacular!" for the best acts of the show title.
The sword act duo known as Captain and Maybelle, promise a show that will be shocking and filled with laughter. The self-proclaimed partners in crime perform classic sideshow entertainment with a contemporary twist, delivering zingers and stingers. Captain is a sword swallower, human blockhead and fire breather.
Captain & Maybelle were on "America's Got Talent Season 6", and if you missed them there, it's another dynamic duo that will leave you astonished and shaking your head in disbelief. You can see them push each other to their utmost physical limits, combining unique sideshow talent and spot-on comedy that will make you laugh and cry and have you asking why. They will show you how they quickly became America's favorite sideshow couple.
Rounding out the must see-acts will be juggler, Jonathan Jackson, and of course the co-ringmaster Stanley B. Booker Jr. who performed with the Universoul Circus in Atlanta, Georgia.
The circus has been brought to town again for the fifth year, courtesy of David Wallace and Soft Touch Productions.
"This year's event will be a circus of soul with lots of music and entertainment to hype the crowd," said Wallace, who said he tries to bring in different acts every year to ensure that the show remains relevant and a must-attend event. "This year in particular, there will be eye-popping, jaw-dropping performances that will have the audience anxious and on the edge of their seats when they see particular acts."
Matinee shows will be held today at the Kendal G.L. Isaacs Gymnasium (KGLI) for schools at 10 a.m., with a 1:30 p.m. show at Gerald Cash Primary. Shows open to the public will be held tonight and Saturday at 8 p.m. at KGLI.
Admission is $12 students, $11 for pre-school aged children and includes a hot dog and drink. Adult tickets are $15 general admission and $20 ringside seating.
Tickets can be purchased at Seventeen Shop, Collins Avenue, Carey's Department Store, Mackey Street, Conliffe's Bakery off Carmichael Road and the Original Swiss Sweet Shop, West Bay Street.

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News Article
Emily Virginia Smith-Adderley, 58

Emily Virginia Smith-Adderley, 58, a resident of Bay Cedar Avenue, Sea Breeze Estates, died at PMH on 14th October, 2011.
She is survived by her mother: Lolitha Sweeting; children: Tamara, Tamika, Cassandra, Phillip & Karen Adderley; sisters: Marjorie, Queenie & Rosemary Smith, Yvonne Johnson, Esther Rolle, Cherry Smith & Joann Smith-Cartwright; brothers: Mervin Moss of Indianapolis, Indiana, Joseph & James Smith; 2 grand children & a host of other relatives & friends.

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News Article
BFSB announces 'Excellence Award' nominees

The Bahamas Financial Services Board (BFSB) has announced that the Nominations Committee for this year's Excellence Awards has released the names of all nominees submitted to the Blue Ribbon Panel.
The annual awards program is designed to pay tribute to "people power" - a critical asset of The Bahamas' financial services industry, according to the BFSB.
In a release issued yesterday, the BFSB stated that human resource development is of primary significance to sustaining growth of the financial services sector and the institution "firmly believes that capacity building to meet the myriad challenges and opportunities that confront us in today's globally competitive environment is key to success."
This year's Gala Awards Dinner is scheduled to be held at the Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort on November 1.
Members are encouraged to come out and support these "Stars of our Industry" as they are recognized by their peers.
Ryan Pinder, Minister of Financial Services, also will present the "Minister's Award" for excellence in Financial Services. That recipient will be kept confidential for first announcement at the Awards Dinner. Nominees in each category are as follows:
Achiever of the Year
Bronishka A. Black, Senior Associate, The Bank of Nova Scotia Trust Company (Bahamas) Ltd.
Chanti P. Brown, Human Resources Officer, Central Bank of The Bahamas.
Jeannette Jean, Private Banking Administrator, Societe Generale Private Banking.
Kasynthi Bodie, Financial Officer, Julius Baer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.
Katrina M. Pinder, Sr. Operations Officer, Commonwealth Bank Limited.
Lavanda M. Dean, Payments & Cash Specialist, UBS (Bahamas) Limited.
Marvin A. Dean, Dip CII, Account Executive, J.S. Johnson & Company Ltd.
Taran S. Mackey, Trust Administrator, International Protector Group Ltd.
Professional of the Year
Anita Bain, CPA, CA, TEP, Immediate Past Chairperson, Society of Trust & Estate Practitioners (STEP).
Denise D. Turnquest, Senior Vice President-Credit Risk, Commonwealth Bank Ltd.
Elvira Lowe, TEP, Director, Americas Team Head, UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd.
Felicia S. Mott-Smith, Head of Private Banking/Trust, Societe Generale Private Banking.
Kim D. Thompson, VP Human Resource/Company Director, Equity Trust Bahamas.
Nikia Woodside, TEP, Asst. VP/Team Leader Trust Administration, Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited.
Rochelle M. Rolle, CPA, Director, Head of Compliance, Julius Baer Bank & Trust.
Ronique T. Tinker, Risk & Compliance Manager, CIBC FirstCaribbean Bank (Bah) Ltd.
Sharon Colebrook, TEP, CAMS, Sr. Manager Process Optimization, The Bank of Nova Scotia Trust Company (Bahamas) Ltd.
Sherry M. Brown, Claims Supervisor, J.S. Johnson & Co.
Terrence S. Carey, Sr. Manager-Corporate Credit-Grand Bahama & Family Islands, Bank of the Bahamas.
Mentor of the Year
Jamison J. Davis, Manager-Collections, Bank of The Bahamas
Katherine Y. Hamilton, Acting Manager-Training, Commonwealth Bank Limited.
Executive of the Year
Cassandra Nottage, Bank Supervision Manager, Central Bank of The Bahamas.
Jasmine Y. Davis, CPA, CA, President, Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants.
John K.F. Delaney QC, Senior Partner, Delaney Partners.
Robert A.F. Bartlett, Senior Manager, Customer Service, J.S. Johnson & Company.
W. Larry Roberts, Chief Executive Officer, Bahamas Realty Ltd.
In addition, a separate Industry Panel has released the names of the Student of the Year nominees:
Student of the Year
Dominique E. Rolle - BBA Accounting.
Jasmine L. Williams - BBA Banking and Finance (with Spanish).
Jonelle A. Fox - BBA Management.
Myah D. Moss - BBA Accounting.
Raquel L. Fowler - BBA CIS/Applications Programming.

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News Article
Sports Notices

Bahamas Scholastic AssociationThe Bahamas Scholastic Association (BSA) basketball playoffs will begin on Tuesday, February 25, and will be held at the DW Davis Gymnasium. In an effort to pay for the use of the gym, players are asked to pay one dollar each to enter the gym on the day that they are playing. Teams with balances will not be allowed to play. Also, the league's principal's award for the month of January goes to Mrs. Knowles, principal at Mt. Carmel Preparatory Academy, for her overwhelming support of her team for the month of January 2014.Track & FieldClub Monica Athletics will host its 11th annual track and field classic this Friday and Saturday, at the old Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium. The event is expected to get underway at 6 p.m. on Friday, and 1 p.m. on Saturday, and will feature a number of athletes competing in all of the age groups. In addition to a number of standout Bahamian athletes, the event is expected to feature athletes from throughout the Caribbean as well. It will be held under the patronage of 2012 IAAF Rising Female Star of the Year Anthonique Strachan. Strachan, who is a former member of Club Monica Athletics, is the reigning double sprint champion from the World Junior Championships, and a two-time winner of the Austin Sealy award, handed out to the region's best athlete at the annual CARIFTA Games. Strachan is also a semi-finalist from the most recent world championships, and the Olympic Games. Tickets for the event can be obtained at $10 for VIP, $5 for adults, and $3 for children.BoxingThe Champion Amateur Boxing Club (CABC) will host its bi-monthly show on Saturday, February 15, starting at 8 p.m. at the Wulff Road Boxing Square. A total of six matches will be showcased, and awards will be presented for the 'Best Fight', the 'Most Outstanding Boxer' and the 'Most Improved Boxer'. The CABC along with Platinum Sports Bar & Lounge will also host 'The Spirit of Determination' Amateur Boxing Show at the Platinum Sports Entertainment Center on Dowdeswell Street and Christie Avenue on Saturday, March 1, starting at 8 p.m. The show will recognize Bahamian boxing legends Cassius Moss and David 'Sugar Kid' Bowe. All amateur boxers and boxing clubs are welcomed to participate.

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News Article
Genetics, environment, thinking

Back in the late 60s, I went to Chicago to meet my mentor Earl Nightingale who at that time was affectionately known as the dean of personal motivation. His daily radio program "Our Changing World" upon which I modeled "Time To Think" was being aired on some 1,200 radio stations around the world, and Earl was in fact the most listened to radio personality in the world. I joined his organization, The Nightingale-Conant Corporation as a distributor of Earl's motivational cassette training programs, and later became regional director for The Caribbean, Central and South America for The Nightingale-Conant Corporation. I thank God for the day I joined Earl's organization for I learnt so much from Earl's teachings.
Now one of the most important things I learnt from Earl Nightingale was that three major things contribute in large measure to the person we eventually become, and these three things are as stated in the title of today's article "Genetics, Environment, Thinking".
So, let's first deal with genetics. As Earl put it, each of us is the confluence of a genetic pool that goes back for thousands and thousands of years. So, in a nutshell, there are certain factors in our genes, our DNA, which contribute toward the person we eventually become.
Next, the environment in which we are brought up in influences the way in which we think and act when we grow up. We listen to and observe those nearest to us, our parents, relatives and friends, and what we see them do and how they act in a variety of different situations tends to have a very powerful effect on our thinking and subsequent actions. However, there's a third, most powerful element that finally shapes us into who we eventually become, and that's our thinking.
To explain how important the third element, how we think is, and how it can actually override so to speak, our genes and environmental conditioning, let me give you my valued readers a personal example. I'm Irish, and believe me it was most definitely in my genes to become an alcoholic. My environmental conditioning when I was young led me to love and consume large quantities of alcoholic beverages, that's what everyone who surrounded me did.
So I was indeed destined to become an alcoholic until one day I awoke with a terrible, sickening hangover, looked at my sad, flushed face in the mirror and vowed to stop drinking alcohol from that day, which thank God I did. So, in conclusion, our thinking can indeed override our genetic programming and our environmental conditioning.
o Think about it!
Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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News Article
We could be famous for our culture

Dear Editor,
Culture - we live with it everyday but we hardly see it. It takes a little shake to wake us up to what is around us. The weekend's Transforming Spaces tour gave the population a great opportunity to see what the world of art was up to. It was a terrific day of soaking in culture and being forced to process things in a different, more thoughtful way.
Funny that one of the most shocking installations made the most impact on some. I had to stop and think about what the warehouse space at Liquid Courage was saying to me. The images and things chosen by the various artists worked together to cause mental discord. The entire tour and all the spaces were incredible. However, the Liquid Courage space stood out because of my own work around The Bahamas over the last few months.
I stopped in front of a chaise lounge quite destroyed, standing up on its end, and thought, what is this? What is this trying to tell me? I saw the lovely, white-focused, exotic image of the Bahamian Riviera a la Baha Mar. My mind returned to the chaise lounge, its rubber straps broken, hanging down, discolored, ugly. It made me think of my daily swim from Atlantis to Cabbage Beach Cove, where the mansions have replaced the trees.
At the bottom of the sea, as Jamaica Kincaid's book says, are lounge chairs destroyed by wear and tear but thrown under by the destruction of the sea coupled with careless consumption. The beach struggles under the weight of cruise-ship passengers thrown around by suddenly unforgiving surf, who drink black-hand-served, toxic pink and volcanic yellow rum tainted juices from brown coconuts until they are pink and red from a day or a few hours on an island in the sun.
The loungers and the tables lay at the bottom of the sea, a testament to rough seas, as we have had all month, and littering layabouts who care little for the space they visit except to leave with a tan and a few snapshots of beauty.
The Baha Mar poster ruled. Yet everything else lay broken around it. As the minister of government says, this is our culture. Our culture is tourism; tourism is our culture. How can this wanton destruction of the land by the industry that is meant to be our sustenance be so pervasive?
The room showed carcasses of consumption. All of those corpses that I see everyday. The sad part is the obvious destruction that uncontrolled consumption visits on the environment where we live. While we may not see it because we live in it, the constant use of our island has made it shudder under the weight. Where are the skyscrapers that sing a song of development and progress? Where's the ode to 30-story high hotels filled with people who do not choose to experience our lives. They stay locked away in a world where we only enter to serve with our crocodile smiles and our glass-bottle-fragile natures.
As the monument to consumption rises and the bikini clad sit on the fast powerboat, polluting our waters with vaporous waste, flushing out their contents into turquoise depths and golden sunshine that holds no memory of our existence except the cement boat that sits, floats upon the tumultuous sea of sinking culture. It/we sink(s) down, half a league, half a league, half a league farther into the clutches of consumed beauty constructed by artificial high rises built to keep away natives who enter to serve.
The culture that lives off tourism is sinking like the cement ship that is sent to our aid. As the story goes, aid comes with a bomb. Alas, who really cares that we sink in the turquoise of tourist bile when we can sink with a few cents in our pockets among the carcasses of used chaise lounges, empty glass bottles and plastic water bottles strewn across paradise's sandy shores? Five o'clock marks the dirty end of the oiled bodies as they leave this shore for another one, less used, more beautiful.
What a mind-opening experience that raised my hackles to see the sore loss of innocence on the junk pile of consumption. When they leave, where will we be? Will tourism still be our culture and our culture still be tourism, or will we revert to being natives with soft, black skins baked in the sun after a century and a half of plantation tourism?
Water was such a fitting theme for the exhibitions. It showcased our life-giving seas that surround the islands and how wholeheartedly we destroy them through overexposure. From seesawing ourselves into consciousness as the aqua waters rise and fall on one of the installations to the diversity of textures and visions in the other art forms, it showed how incredibly rich this, our, culture is. The entire tour was an experience in savoring culture and beauty. It awakened so many facets of our beings. Yet the Liquid Courage installation troubled the very waters of my soul. Did it have any impact on the others who whimsically observed but did not feel? As tourism consumes us, the Transforming Spaces tour showed that we could actually be famous for our culture, not our tourist culture. We have already sold out the local music scene that once lured thousands here in the early days of the last century, in favor of the international beat. Why not really develop the true culture of this struggling nation?
- Ian Bethell Bennett

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News Article
An excellent Accountants' Week

As an institute, we are committed to ensuring that we provide the focused, relevant educational opportunities, as well as guidance and thoughtful leadership to government, industry stakeholders and affiliates in this time of change.
- BICA President Jasmine Y. Davis

In November of each year, the Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants (BICA) observes "Accountants' Week", during which members of the accounting profession convene to focus on accounting education and topics of interest to members of that profession. The week begins with prayerful thanksgiving at a local church service, followed by four days of educational seminars, workshops and presentations for its members and other interested financial services stakeholders, and culminates with a Saturday morning fun/run/walk/push for accountants and others whose energy levels enable them to rise at 5 a.m. to participate in that early morning sojourn.
Therefore, this week, we would like to Consider This... has BICA achieved this year's thematic objective of "Broadening Our Expertise to Support the Changing Economic Environment"? A synoptic review of the week-long activities will assist us in answering that question.

Day 1: Preparing for VAT implementation: Presenting all the factors
Given the tremendous interest in and public discourse on the national issue of value-added tax (VAT), it is not surprising that the entire first day was devoted to this topic. The session commenced with an address on the subject by Michael Halkitis, minister of state in the Ministry of Finance, who outlined the rationale for the government's plans to implement VAT by July next year. The minister's succinct but comprehensive presentation addressed the urgent need for tax reform and shed light on the government's decision to introduce this new form of taxation.
In a second address on this subject, John Rolle, the financial secretary, explained that VAT represents the centerpiece of the government's tax reform. Numerous professionals from the Ministry of Finance delivered presentations at concurrent break-out sessions on a variety of topics, ranging from "the VAT Registration and De-Registration Process", "Accounting for VAT and VAT Accounting Systems", "VAT Compliance, the Legal Framework for VAT Legislation, Regulations and Penalties", "VAT Customs Transitional Arrangements for the Implementation Date" to "Legal and Compliance Issues".
Undoubtedly, the informative sessions on VAT highlighted the enormous resources that have been expended in developing this centerpiece of government's tax reform endeavors and the policy considerations that have been factored into the development of this subject. In the final analysis, the participants recognized and appreciated that many questions need to be answered relative to this transformative shift in the country's taxation system.

Day 2: Building on our foundations in accounting and
financial services
On Tuesday, conference participants were apprised of "The Expected Impacts of New Tax Legislation on the Financial Services Industry"; a presentation that was delivered by Cassandra Nottage, a stand-in for Ryan Pinder, minister of financial services.
An address entitled "Statements of Membership Obligations" was delivered by a representative of the International Federation of Accountants (IFAC), the international accountancy body that promulgates the accounting and auditing standards for the profession. BICA has been a member of IFAC since 1978. In addition, a representative of the World Bank delivered an address on "Institute Capacity Building". This was a historic moment for BICA because it was the first time that representatives of those two prominent international institutions, IFAC and the World Bank, addressed BICA members.
An extremely lively VAT panel discussion, comprised of members of the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce and Employees' Confederation (BCCEC), raised grave concerns about the impending introduction of VAT next year. In essence, the panelists asserted that there were many unanswered questions as we approach this imminent launch date of July 1, 2014.
The afternoon session featured a presentation by the Bahamas Trade Commission and senior trade professionals of the Ministry of Financial Services on the topic "Regional Comparisons & Initiatives, Reciprocity Agreements specifically with respect to the World Trade Organization, Economic Partnership Agreements and CARICOM Perspectives".
The second day ended with an "Update on Pending Legislative Changes (to the Public Accountants Act) and Expected Impacts". Participants were apprised of important changes that are being considered to the legislation that regulates the accounting profession, most notably the legislative framework for practice monitoring and peer review of accountants who are engaged in public practice, as well as disciplinary matters for persons who breach the rules of professional conduct that govern the profession.

Day 3: Technical update
Historically, the technical update is the most popular session during Accountants' Week because it affords accountants the opportunity to be informed about the most recent accounting and auditing developments, pronouncements and practices. The theme for this year was "Maintaining Our Technical Competency". This session has normally been led by foreign employees of the larger, international accounting firms. This year, however, witnessed a departure from that tradition. For the first time, the technical update was presented by a Bahamian accountant, Gowon Bowe, a partner at PricewaterhouseCoopers, and, by the reaction of many participants, attendees were treated to an exceptionally outstanding update of accounting, auditing and reporting standards.

Day 4: Cutting edge
tools, energy reform, ethics and certification fundamentals
The final day of educational sessions featured a potpourri of topics that were both timely and informative. The sessions included presentations on: "Making Information Technology Effective", "MS Office 2013 Highlights - Tools to Keep Your Business on the Cutting Edge", "Energy Reform for The Bahamas: A Step Change for Social Change & Economic Development", "Upholding Ethics in the Profession & Avoiding Scandals and Broadening Our Expertise Through Professional Training & Certifications".
Each of those sessions provided invaluable information, which when applied, will enhance professional efficiency and effectiveness and also provided registrants the opportunity to network with colleagues and presenters.

The week's highlight
Unquestionably, the highlight of the week of activities was the impact that VAT will have on the economy, the financial services sector, the society and the profession. Accountants by their education, experience and discipline are uniquely qualified to speak to and advise on the issues associated with taxation in general and VAT in particular.

Conclusion
The Bahamian accounting profession, which began in the 1960s, and culminated in the establishment of the institute with 13 original qualified accountant subscribers to the articles of incorporation in 1971, can now boast of more than 500 members. Approximately 250 accountants are licensed to engage in public practice by BICA. Twenty years after BICA's incorporation by guarantee, Parliament enacted The Public Accountants Act, 1991, which established a regulatory, legislative framework for the profession and that act has served the profession very well for the past 22 years. The profession is once again at the junction of legislative reform in order to assimilate the rapidly accelerating realities and nuances of the profession and the external demands of the world of business and finance.
Jasmine Davis, president of the BICA, her council and the continuing professional education committee should be heartily congratulated for a superlatively outstanding week of activities, which truly enabled the institute's members and participants to realize their objective of "Broadening Our Expertise to Support the Changing Economic Environment".

o Philip C. Galanis is the managing partner of HLB Galanis & Co., Chartered Accountants, Forensic & Litigation Support Services. He served 15 years in Parliament. Please send your comments to pgalanis@gmail.com.

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News Article
Locally-based boxing bodies challenged to revitalize sport

The boxing scene here in The Bahamas is on a downturn. A big reason for the inactivity is a sick economy. To present a more comprehensive sports outlook, it must be recognized that the sport of boxing is not the only discipline experiencing rough times.
Even track and field, the top producer of excellent performances, has not been able to come close to maximizing its true potential for success. There is however, much more that glitters about track and field than any other discipline. Not a whole lot that is positive has been going on in boxing, and the locally based organizations that have the responsibility to enhance the sport have come up against hard times.
The Amateur Boxing Federation of The Bahamas (ABFB) is struggling and the inability to put together a fund-raising team has that aspect of the sport facing serious problems. Its one shining light is Carl Hield, the super welterweight/middleweight who is one of the world's elite amateur performers.
The Bahamas Boxing Commission (BBC), through its relationship with the Commonwealth Boxing Council (CBC), continues to push for opportunities for Bahamian professional pugilists. The commission has also undertaken a program geared to project the sport in the Family Islands. The next trip is scheduled for Long Island (November 28-30). Commissioner Dr. Munir Rashad is now based in that island. He has coordinated, in conjunction with Local Government authorities, education and sports leaders there, several sessions to be addressed by the commission team, that will be headed by Chairman Alvin Sargent. The commission intends to begin a closer relationship with the islands, being aware of the raw talents to be found in those communities.
The Pan American Caribbean Boxing Organization (PACBO) has been an associate of the local boxing program since its was
established in 2006. The organization came about out of a need for the region to get some middle ground assistance for amateur and professional programs in the member countries (The Bahamas, Jamaica, Trinidad & Tobago, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic and New Jersey-United States). The Bahamas is the base of the PACBO president and gets a big focus accordingly.
PACBO plans to accelerate its program of soliciting and purchasing equipment to continue networking with the other boxing partners toward great skills' development in New Providence and the Family Islands.
The boxing groups lament the state of professional boxing in the country. There was a time, during the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s, when professional boxing was quite popular. Charlie Major Sr. returned home from New York during the early 1940s and empowered the boxing game through promotions with some of the world's best as headliners. He continued his contribution in quality promotions at his Nassau Stadium for many years before his death in 1980. Douglas Carey and others, collectively, was a big factor at the Birdland. The Oakes Field Hanger became a big part of the arena equation and hosted many legendary matches, particularly between former heavyweight champions Bert Perry and Leonard 'Boston Blackie' Miller.
Wilfred Coakley and Chris Malakious were esteemed promoters who broadened the popularity base of pro boxing. In Grand Bahama, Jim White, the noted businessman, took the sport to further prominence in the country with his regular shows at the King's Inn. Those eras were glorious ones.
It was not difficult to get top line professionals to come into the country to perform against locals and other foreign opponents. The list from the time of Major Sr. included the best of the best, such as Joe Louis, Jimmy Carter, Willie Pep, Floyd Patterson, Bunny Grant, Levi Forte, and many others.
Bahamians who campaigned out of New York and Florida, namely Yama Bahama, Gomeo Brennan, Sugar Cliff, and Bobo Reckley, came back home to meet the best of the locals. Those campaigning and enjoying the high popularity of the sport included Roy Armbrister, Sammy Isaacs, Cleveland Parris, Black Jack, Wilfred 'Battling' Douglas, Ray Minis Sr., Elisha Obed, 'Baby Boy' Rolle, Ray Minus Jr., Cassius Moss, Willie Dawkins, Bert Woods, Ernie Barr, Sammy Barr, Steve Larrimore and more recently, Jermaine Mackey and Meacher Major.
Bahamian boxers made an impression on the world. It began with Yama Bahama who was one of the poster performers at the famed Madison Square Garden during the 1950s and 1960s. His fellow Bimini Islander Gomeo Brennan was the first Bahamian to win an international title. He became the Commonwealth (British Empire) Middleweight Champion in 1963 and ruled the category on two occasions.
Obed won the only world title (World Boxing Council's junior middleweight crown). Ray Minis Jr., Larrimore and Mackey followed Brennan by winning Commonwealth championships. Sherman 'The Tank' Williams captured Asian titles. Major and Edner Cherry have also won regional crowns. They all contributed to wonderful pages in our sports history.
Now the sport is in great need of a push to an era that could compare with the aforementioned. Hopefully in 2014, the ABFB, the BCB and PACBO will be able to make that happen.
(To respond to this sports feature, kindly contact Fred Sturrup at sturrup1504@gmail.com)

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