Search results for : Carmichael

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News Article

November 09, 2011
The boundaries commission proposal

Sources have confirmed that the governing Free National Movement (FNM) is proposing to reduce the number of seats in the House of Assembly to 38 - the constitutional minimum - for the next general election.  If the FNM sticks to this position, it would be a good thing.
We have long argued that there are too many seats in the current House (41) based on our population size (350,000).  If the constitutional barrier did not exist, it would be easier to cut that number further.  In Sir Lynden Pindling's final election as prime minister in 1992 there were 49 seats in the House - an unjustifiable number.
The boundaries commission is expected to report to Parliament within a few weeks with its recommendations.  We are very near to a general election, one likely to be called for early 2012.  As of Monday, 136,615 people were registered to vote, according to the Parliamentary Registration Department.  It is estimated that approximately 160,000 people are eligible to vote.  With this announcement, and subsequent moves towards the election in the months to come, the rest of the electorate interested in voting will register, likely bring the total on the final voters' list above the 150,684 voters who registered to vote in 2007.
If the governing side is able to finalize these cuts within the projected time frame, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham should be commended for concluding this part of the electoral process early.  The boundaries commission reported late in the process under the administration of Perry Christie in 2007, causing some confusion.
Ingraham is likely aware of the recent record of 'boundary cutters' and he is not wasting time with this exercise which is essentially governed by the prime minister.  In the last four general elections, the prime minister who cut the boundaries lost three out of four times (1992, 2002 and 2007).  Too much significance is placed in this process in a modern Bahamas.
There are certain ethnic or historic communities that support parties for all manner of complex reasons.  For example the residents of the old Shirlea in Palmdale support the FNM and not the Progressive Liberal Party (PLP).  The residents of Englerston support the PLP and not the FNM.
However working class residents of the newer parts of New Providence, such as those residing in the southwestern part of the island, are less loyal.  Constituencies such as South Beach and Carmichael go back and forth.  These are swing areas and more and more of them are emerging.
It could be reasonably argued that there are currently 10 swing seats in the current configuration.  These voters are worrying about crime, the economy, the roadwork and leadership.  They are open to the best argument put forward by the best suitor.  A wise leader or party should seek to present the best message to this group rather than wasting time in dark rooms cutting boundaries.
The next step for the parties once the boundaries are finally set is the finalization of their candidate slates and the presentation of their manifestos.  Too often in Bahamian elections, manifestos come late and they are either too vague or too rambling.
Each party should put forth transformative ideas on crime, immigration and the economy in a coherent and digestible form.  Then, the candidates and parties should state their cases on the campaign trail.
For the voters, this is your time to select a legislature and an executive.  Take it seriously.  It is a mighty task.  At the minimum, we must all be engaged with the process and register to vote.  Scrutinize them carefully.  The men and women you chose to write the laws and govern will have extraordinary powers.
An election is nearly upon us.

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News Article

January 02, 2015
Activists disappointed that Cuban abuse row remains unresolved

A MIAMI-based human rights group has expressed "disappointment" that the Christie administration has failed to bring closure to a trial stemming from abuse allegations launched by Cubans who were housed at the Carmichael Road Detention Centre more than a year ago.

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News Article

October 19, 2011
Police investigate alleged attempted abduction of girl

Police are investigating an attempted abduction of a little girl in the Carmichael Road area Monday, according to head of the National Crime Prevention Office Superintendent Stephen Dean.
The girl's father, Angelo Ingraham, told The Nassau Guardian yesterday that he is enraged over what happened to his 10-year-old daughter, especially after the death of 11-year-old Marco Archer.
Marco went missing on September 23.  He was found dead five days later.
Ingraham said if it had not been for the girl's bravery, she might not have been able to get away from the men who allegedly attempted to abduct her around 7:30 a.m.
"I still can't believe this happened.  My daughter is brave and I just thank God she is alright," said Ingraham.
He said his daughter and her friend were minutes away from the Gerald Cash Primary School when two men attempted to pull them into their vehicle.
"My daughter is traumatized by this incident. When I saw the look on her face I knew that she was afraid," he said.
"My daughter held on to her friend's backpack as one of the men attempted to pull her in the car. She held on and eventually they both were able to get away."
Following the incident, Ingraham said he filed a report at the Carmichael Police Station.
He said the girl was able to provide police with a description of the men.
"From now on my daughter will no longer be walking to school by herself," Ingraham said.
"Parents have to be more responsible for their children's safety.  We have to make sure that our children get to and from school safely every day because you never know what can happen," he said.
Dean could not confirm whether police were questioning anyone in connection with this matter.

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News Article

January 10, 2012
Man dies following traffic accident on Carmichael Road

Police were called to the scene of a traffic fatality early yesterday morning.
According to a police report, the victim, a 53-year-old man of Cowpen Road, was walking across Carmichael Road, near Unison Road before 7 a.m. when a truck hit him.
The truck, a 2007 Ford Ranger, was driven by a 47-year-old woman. The victim received serious injuries and was pronounced dead at the scene by emergency medical services personnel.
This latest incident marks the second traffic fatality recorded on the island for the new year. Over the weekend, an 18-year-old woman died following a traffic accident on Baillou Hill Road.
According to police 44 traffic fatalities happened last year.
 

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News Article

October 22, 2011
Move to prevent cholera spread

Authorities moved speedily to ensure there is no spread of cholera, after confirming that one illegal immigrant had the potentially deadly infection, Minister of Health Dr. Hubert Minnis said yesterday.

Minnis confirmed that the Carmichael Road Detention Centre was being sanitized and some of the immigrants who had been housed at the facility were given medication as a preventative measure.

The others were repatriated, including the immigrant with the confirmed case of cholera, according to the minister.

The Nassau Guardian reported yesterday that detainees at the detention centre were relocated to Her Majesty's Prison.  It was not clear how long they will be there.

The immigrant who had cholera was aboard a vessel detained by the Royal Bahamas Defence Force in late September, Minnis said.

"One was determined to be ill and cholera suspected. The individual is no longer in the country.   [He was] treated, cured of cholera and subsequently deported. Because the individual would have been in certain facilities like the detention centre, we would have had to empty the center and subsequently do the necessary anti-cholera treatment to the cure the place," he said.

Minnis said, "...from day one we had suspected one of the individuals had cholera."

The cholera test was sent to Trinidad and Tobago, which is the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO)-certified laboratory facility for the region.

"Only that one individual to our knowledge had cholera and he was treated appropriately," Minnis said.

"At no time was he within the community, so the community would not have been at risk. Once we manage the facility according to international regulations...we would have no problem opening the facility."

He added that all of the detainees were screened and given prophylactic medication to ensure that there was no possibility for them to become infected.

"All individuals on the vessel would have been given prophylactic treatment. The vessel would have undergone the same anti-cholera treatment as the detention centre."

He said he did not know how long it would take to treat the center.

When asked about the kind of devastation a cholera outbreak could have on The Bahamas, the minister gave an example of a case in Peru.

"In 1992 there was a cholera case in Peru, one case, and Peru's tourism industry suffered devastation," he said.  "It lost over $500 million. Cholera can be very devastating."

Cholera, which is normally easy to treat and can be prevented, can also be deadly.  It is a bacterial infection that is spread through water and food (mainly shellfish).

The infection caused a major crisis in Haiti over the past year. More than 420,000 people in and around Port-au-Prince were impacted during an outbreak in which more than 6,000 people died.

Minnis noted that the government is focused on fighting illegal immigration, but cannot stop it.

"Therefore, from time to time the country could possibly be at risk for introduction to cholera or other [ailments]," he said.

Minnis stressed that every Bahamian has an obligation to report any vessels or illegals who try to enter The Bahamas.

"Each and every citizen has a responsibility," he said.

"You don't take chances when it comes to cholera."

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News Article

December 17, 2014
Mitchell defends Bahamas at OAS

Minister of Foreign Affairs and Immigration Fred Mitchell addressed the Organization of American States (OAS) in Washington, D.C. yesterday, defending The Bahamas against "outrageous and irresponsible" allegations.
Mitchell requested to address the Permanent Council of the OAS following the publication of what he indicated was misinformation about the Bahamas government's new immigration policy, which came into effect on November 1.
He referred specifically to Grand Bahama Human Rights Association President Fred Smith, QC, who, in a series of statements, accused the government of institutional terrorism, ethnic cleansing and running Auschwitz at the Carmichael Road Detention Centre.
"Let me say clearly there is no institutional terrorism in The Bahamas, no ethnic cleansing and no Auschwitz in The Bahamas," Mitchell said.
"No group is being targeted for elimination in The Bahamas. No mass murder is occurring in The Bahamas and certainly none that was sponsored or sanctioned by the state. There is no evidence anywhere that this is the case and we refute it absolutely."
Auschwitz was a network of German Nazi concentration camps where political prisoners were gassed to death or exterminated through mass murder.
Mitchell invited the International Human Rights Commission and OAS to launch an independent investigation of the immigration policies and the detention center.
"We once again repeat the invitation for the human rights bodies of the OAS to inspect at anytime and without notice," he said.
"The fact is the United Nations Human Rights Commission has a representative in The Bahamas and they have been to the detention center and they can say whether or not we are operating gas chambers and engaging in mass murder in the Carmichael Road Detention Centre.
"The remarks are so outrageous and absolutely irresponsible and I condemn them without reservation."
In a recent press statement, Smith indicated that he would bring his concerns to the OAS.
Mitchell said yesterday the government would "meet him head on and we stand here unflinching in the face of these spurious allegations."
Mitchell said he felt compelled to defend the country against such allegation given its dependence on its reputation.
"My nation of less than 400,000 souls thrives off its reputation," he said.
"Tourism is our main business. People come to The Bahamas as tourists because they believe and perceive that it is better in The Bahamas, and it is."
"Nothing is more important to us than that in the international arena, whether in the hemisphere or in the sub-region or around the world."
Mitchell said the "irresponsible" statements by a Florida legislator have not helped the situation.
While he did not call her name, Mitchell was referring to Daphne Campbell, who called for a boycott of The Bahamas last month.
Mitchell accused her of spreading much of the misinformation about the policy, on the basis that she is concerned about the children of migrants.
He explained that when illegal migrants are repatriated, their children must go with them.
"That is the accepted practice around the world and we do not deviate from it," he said.
"There has been criticism at home and abroad about keeping children in the detention center. The prime minister has instructed that we find a suitable facility for alternative arrangements, and the Department of Social Services has spoken to the Catholic Church and the Church of God in The Bahamas with the view to identifying such a facility.
"I was informed today that plans have been settled for the facility to house children away from the detention center."
He did not reveal additional details.
Mitchell also said repatriation exercises costs about $1.5 million per year.
The new immigration policy, as outlined by the government, requires all non-Bahamians to have passports of their nationalities and evidence that they have permission to live and work in The Bahamas.
The Department of Immigration will not issue certificates of identity to non-nationals born in The Bahamas.
The department will not accept first-time applications for residence or work permits from those who have no legal status in The Bahamas.
Mitchell said no one should have been surprised by the policy, as he has issued several warnings.
He said he met with the president of Haiti on July 28 and sought advice on whether that country could meet the expected demand for passports at their embassy.
Mitchell said the new policies seek to stop illegal immigration.
"This policy, therefore, is not to revoke citizenship to any person, nor are anyone's rights being eliminated ex post facto," he said. "It seeks to ensure that the rights of people are being protected."

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News Article

February 22, 2012
Man dies in hospital following head-on collision

Police yesterday said a head-on collision on Monday night involving a motorcycle and a sedan left a man in his mid-30s dead.
According to police reports, the driver of a white 2000 Nissan Sentra traveling south along Iguana Way, collided with a motorcyclist traveling in the opposite direction shortly before 5 p.m.
The operator of the motorbike received severe injuries and was take to hospital via a private vehicle.  However, he succumbed to his injuries shortly after arriving at the hospital, police said.
The victim was identified by police last night as Delsworth James-Curry, 31, a resident of Wingate Drive off Carmichael Road.
Police press liaison officer Sergeant Chrislyn Skippings told The Nassau Guardian it was not yet clear who was at fault for the accident.
 
 
 

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News Article

January 30, 2012
MAN CHARGED WITH 4,000 THEFT

By LAMECH JOHNSON

Tribune Staff Reporter

ljohnson@tribunemedia.net

A MAN was arraigned in Magistrate's Court yesterday in connection with the theft of nearly $4,000 from a service station where he worked.

Delano Marc, 20, of Augusta Street, appeared before Magistrate Guilimina Archer in Court 10 to face five charges of stealing by reason of employment and another five charges of falsification of accounts.

It is alleged that the former cashier at Shell Sun Oil Service Ltd on the corner of Carmichael and Baillou Hill Roads, stole the money between December 28, 2011 and January 4, 2012.

He is accused of falsifying five Royal Bank of Canada deposit slips worth $6,813.71 with intent to ...

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News Article

January 26, 2012
Stephen Adolphus Forde Jr, 59

Final Rites and Burial for Stephen Adolphus Forde Jr., 59, a resident of Wood Creek Close, Of Carmichael Road and formerly of Barbados will be held at St. Agnes Anglican Church, Blue Hill Road on Saturday 28th January, 2012 at 11:00 a.m. Officiating will be Archdeacon I. Ranfurly Brown and Father Neil Nairn and other Ministers and Interment will follow at Woodlawn Garden’s Cemetery, Solider Road.

Left to cherish his memories are his Parents: Stephen and Mertilla Forde, Mother-in-Law: Miriam Lightbourne-Martin, Five Children: Jamicko, LeShanda, Marco, Arlington and Paul, Five Grand-Children: Kenton, Shaheed, Gabrielle, A’yanna and Achon, Daughter-in-Law: Indira Forde, Son-in-Law: ...

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News Article

April 02, 2012
Job Readiness Workshop teaches how to 'Set Yourself Apart In The Job Market'

Carmichael, Bahamas -
Setting yourself apart by thinking of yourself as a brand was a major
theme presented at the Job Readiness Workshop held at Anatol Rodgers
High School on Saturday.

"You have to make sure that you represent yourself well. You represent
the brand that is YOU, so that people can feel confident that you can
represent their company, " said Kenrear Turnquest, Assistant Manager of
Recruitment at RBC...

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News Article

February 07, 2012
Zhivargo Laing is not a recycled bad candidate

Dear Editor,
 
Would you please allow me to comment on a very interesting letter that was published in the February 1 edition of The Nassau Guardian.  The letter is entitled "Recycling of bad candidates" and it was written by the prolific writer Dehavilland Moss.
Let me state from the outset that I consider Moss to be one of the best writers in the country.  I always look forward to reading his insightful contributions to the dailies.  In this particular letter, Moss listed several Progressive Liberal Party (PLP) and Free National Movement (FNM) Members of Parliament who he feels should not have been renominated this time around.  Moss was correct when he stated that Bahamians have become dissatisfied with Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham's current slate of Cabinet ministers and backbenchers.  As most Bahamians should know by now, Ingraham and the leadership of the FNM have ratified 17 new candidates. Obviously Ingraham desires to present an attractive, youthful slate of candidates to the Bahamian electorate.
With the high caliber of candidates that the Democratic National Alliance (DNA) and the PLP have nominated to run in the general election, Ingraham had virtually no other choice but to bring in fresh faces.  It was either that or a blowout defeat at the polls.  Moss commended Ingraham for this shrewd political move.
However, he then expresses amazement that Ingraham had "recycled" or ratified several "bad candidates".  I take it that Moss considers Loretta Butler-Turner (Montagu), Desmond Bannister (Carmichael) and Zhivargo Laing (Marco City) to be either bad representatives or bad Cabinet ministers.  All three of them are in the Cabinet.  Moreover, all three of them have been moved to other constituencies.  According to Moss, the fact that they are running in different areas speaks volumes to the way voters feel about them.  I understand that Bannister has been moved to North Andros and The Berry Islands and Turner to Long Island.  Laing has been moved to Fort Charlotte.  With respect to Bannister and Turner, I cannot vouch for either of them.  I don't know why the leadership of the FNM has decided to run them in different areas.  Perhaps it has something to do with the mood of the voters in the capital.  I live in Freeport.  In fact I live in the constituency of Marco City.
Laing has been my MP for the past four-plus years; and he has done a remarkable job, despite the myriad challenges Grand Bahama continues to face.  Despite the fact that he will not be running in Marco City in the upcoming election, Laing continues to meet his constituents at his office in the East Sunrise Shopping Centre in Freeport.  Even though he is leaving Marco City for Fort Charlotte, he is still loyal to his current constituents.  I think that says a lot about the man and his character.  To his credit, Laing held his annual Christmas party this past December; and he has given away thousands of dollars worth of scholarships to several Grand Bahamian young people each year he has been MP for Marco City.
Laing has even given away money out of his own pocket to help struggling Grand Bahamians and he has assisted many senior citizens in the community.  Moss needs to know this.  Laing has done virtually everything Bahamians expect their representatives to do.  What more could he have done?  I consider Laing to be one of the best MPs in this country.
In fact I would place him in the top five out of the 41 Members of Parliament.  I would even go as far as saying that Laing is prime minister material.  Laing has performed well in Marco City despite the fact that he has been moved to another area.  But perhaps Moss believes Laing should not have been renominated because of his performance as minister of state for finance.  He did say that "many of these candidates have not performed well in their constituencies or as ministers".
Moss mentions the MonaVie incident that Laing was involved with a few years back.  He also mentioned the financial downgrades by Moody's and Standard and Poor's.  I think Laing's opponents have made a mountain out of a molehill with the MonaVie incident.  If you were to compare that to what was alleged to have went on in the former Christie and Pindling administrations, Laing would come out looking like St. John of the Cross.
Regarding the financial downgrades, why should Laing not be renominated by the FNM?  Even if I were to concede that Moss is right about Laing not performing well in the Cabinet, why should the leadership of the governing party or the voters punish him for that?  I think the voters should judge him based on his merits as an MP.  Mind you, Laing is only a junior minister.  What I find interesting about Moss' observations are that he says nothing about the substantive minister of finance, Ingraham, and his performance in that ministry.  Should Ingraham also not be renominated, Moss?  With all due respect, Moss' logic is as solid as an overripe banana.
True, Ingraham and his Cabinet have borrowed a lot of money in the past four-plus years.  But this was done in order to invest in several much needed infrastructure upgrades in New Providence.  This was also an attempt by the Ingraham administration to stimulate the sagging economy by creating jobs for hundreds of unemployed Bahamians.  However, with declining government revenues and a shrinking global economy, the downgrades were inevitable.  Even the mighty U.S. suffered two financial downgrades by Moody's and Standard and Poor's last year.
Yet Moss wants Ingraham to throw an innocent man under the bus.  It is unfortunate that our economy has been downgraded, but why should only Laing be left holding the bag?  What happened last year was in the making since majority rule.  Before majority rule the treasury had a surplus.  Governments since then have engaged in deficit spending.
In closing, I believe Moss is thinking that Laing has been relocated to a different constituency because the voters in Grand Bahama don't like him.  I will admit that this appears to be the case.  But this was due to the aggressive public relations machine of the PLP and several other political opponents who are determined to destroy his career.  These people kept repeating the distortions that he has neglected Marco City and that he has badly mismanaged the economy.  Eventually enough people started believing them and the rest is history, so to speak.  As fallen creatures, we love to believe the worst about people.  This campaign to ruin Laing went on for years.  In the end it was just too much for the FNM to overcome in Grand Bahama.  Many disgruntled voters in Grand Bahama have been drinking the Kool-Aid of Laing's detractors for the past three-plus years.  That is why he was moved to New Providence.  Now, however, Moss and others want to continue slinging mud at the man.
As far as I am concerned, Laing should not have been included in Moss' list of recycled bad candidates.  He is not a bad candidate.  If I lived in Fort Charlotte, I would be excited about having Laing as my future MP.
 
- Kevin Evans

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News Article

February 13, 2012
Immigration manifesto pledges nearly fulfilled

The Ingraham administration has met 10 of the 13 pledges it made in its 2007 Manifesto on immigration and is working on completing the others, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Immigration Brent Symonette said yesterday.
In its nearly five-year term, the government granted citizenship to about 2,600 people; reduced the number of work permits granted to foreign workers; recruited and deployed more immigration officers and introduced tamper proof work permits.
However, repatriation of illegal immigrants dipped in 2010 when the government temporarily suspended apprehension and repatriation exercises of illegal Haitian nationals found in the country after the earthquake in Haiti.
Not long after assuming office, the Free National Movement (FNM) began tackling its first promise for immigration reform: to articulate and implement a medium to long-term immigration policy providing for timely, transparent and expeditious application processes; the regularization of the status of long-time residents and the registration of children born abroad to married Bahamian women.
The process started in the summer of 2007 with an audit of applications outstanding before April 30 of that year.
Officials weeded through a backlog of applications for citizenship, permanent residency and spousal permits that in some cases stretched back decades.
Many of the people whose applications were assessed in the audit were born in The Bahamas and had a right to apply for citizenship. Others had lived in the country for years or were born outside The Bahamas to Bahamian mothers.
Officials at the time said those who were assessed during the audit were not automatically entitled to legal status in the country but had a right to know if they would be approved or denied.
"We hope that persons realize that we are serious about the national sovereignty and security of our country [and] that those who are entitled to be here, we would like to deal with them so that they are not angry; that they are not feeling displaced and those that are not entitled to be here, we can make sure that they are not here," said Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest, who then had responsibility for immigration in 2007.
From May 2, 2007 to December 31, 2011, the government approved 2,590 applications for citizenship. The government also approved 1,710 permanent residence permits; 2,020 spousal permits and 12,678 permits to reside during the same time period.
The process was in keeping with the FNM's stated immigration policies.
"We've been regularizing persons who have been in The Bahamas all their lives, born in The Bahamas who never had status," Symonette said yesterday.
The government was roundly criticized for citizenship grants by some who saw the move as politically motivated.
The FNM's second Manifesto promise was to ensure that its immigration policies reflect the priorities and needs of the people and economy.
Symonette said this pledge was accomplished with the decrease in work permits issued last year.
The government issued 8,116 work permits in 2009; 9,390 in 2010 and 7,091 in 2011.
"That's been achieved, which shows we're trying to make sure that [foreigners who] apply don't get work permits [if] Bahamians qualify," Symonette said.
After the January 12, 2010 earthquake, the government temporarily stopped apprehension and repatriation exercises of illegal Haitian nationals found in the country.
The Department of Immigration also issued permits to reside to 102 Haitians who were detained at the Detention Centre on Carmichael Road at the time of the earthquake.
In 2010, the department recorded its lowest number of repatriations in the past five years: 1,562.
Statistics reveal that 2,392 Haitians were repatriated in 2011; 4,931 in 2009; 6,029 in 2008; 6,063 in 2007 and 6,028 in 2005.
Symonette said the FNM government has also introduced minimum processing times for applicants with no family ties to The Bahamas, in keeping with one of its pledges, and is processing spousal and work permits more efficiently.
"We're working on 21 days for those persons who have high net worth. We've also been able to reduce from about 12 to 15 years [processing time for] spousal permits to five years. We're very successful and we're turning around work permits a lot quicker too," he said.
Over the past three years, the government has recruited and deployed about 85 new immigration officers.
"We're also working to amalgamate Customs and Immigration officers on Family Islands so there's no duplication of work and the need for double officers," Symonette said.
The government has also created a 24-hour immigration hotline for tips on illegal immigration.
According to Symonette, a few things are still left undone on the FNM's 2007 list: To reorganize and bring order to the department; provide for timely processing of applications for expatriate skilled labor or technical expertise not available in the country; and the routine observance of established and published immigration rules.
He said the government has made strides in reorganizing the Department of Immigration but still has to computerize the Nassau office and move operations in Freeport and Abaco into new buildings.
Symonette told The Nassau Guardian that he hopes the next government will also address other areas of immigration reform.
"I think we have to look at the whole question of citizenship, permanent residency, who can apply, how you apply [and] what qualifications you need; just generally revising the rules," he said.
"I think we also need to look at the whole question of the issues that were raised in the [2002] referendum."

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News Article

February 21, 2012
New Providence Police investigat traffic fatality - Investigate shooting incident - Armed robbery suspect detain by citizens -

POLICE INVESTIGATES TRAFFIC FATALITY Police are investigating a
traffic accident that has left a 31 year old male of Wingate Drive off
Carmichael Road dead.The incident reportedly...

ARMED ROBBERY SUSPECT DETAINED BY CITIZENS A 21 year old male of Columbus Avenue is in police custody after being detained by residents of St. Albans Drive and released...

POLICE INVESTIGATES SHOOTING INCIDENT Police are investigating a shooting incident that has left a 24 year old male of...

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News Article

February 20, 2012
Echo Water to produce its own bottles

Echo Water, produced by Source River Limited (SRL), plans to soon emerge as a major player in the local water production and distribution market.
SRL's chief Tennyson Wells confirmed to Guardian Business that Echo Water is now in a position to produce its own bottles.
"We have quadrupled our capacity to produce the five gallon bottles. We are now in a position to produce our own bottles, the 20 oz, 12 oz and the 1.5 liter. We have the pre-forms to make the 20 oz bottles. However, we are now getting ready to order pre-form for the 12 oz and 1.5 liters," according to Wells.
"In about two to three months time, we will be able to produce our own bottles. In three to four weeks time, we will be producing our own bottles for the one gallon."
He added that the company has invested hundreds of thousands within the last several weeks purchasing the necessary equipment. As a result, the company anticipates significant savings in production costs.
To date, Wells pointed out that more than $2 million has been invested into the Echo Water brand.
Since launching in April 2010, he shared that employees at the plant are able to produce up to 5,000 bottles in an eight-hour period in comparison to 1,200.
Now, Wells said they are in the process of shifting employment from direct to contract employees.
This means that compensation will be based solely on what each employee produces. It's a new concept that Wells said his team would be looking into very soon.
The plant currently has over 30 employees.
He revealed to Guardian Business the company is now in the process of finding new sources for labels and caps for the bottles.
Though the company is progressing, Wells noted that it has not been without its fair share of challenges.
"It's a step-by-step process. It's taking us much longer than we had anticipated but the economy being what it was and this being the winter season. I've noticed that people don't like to drink water during the winter season," he explained.
However, Wells said he believes that over the next 12 months Echo Water will become a major player in the market.
"So far, we have been a very small player since we brought it on in April 2010. We are approaching our second year in business. In our third year, I believe we will become a major player in the marketplace," Wells added.
SRL, an investment company comprised of 40 local Bahamian investors, has entered into an agreement to purchase the Bacardi rum facility.
Investors also include former Bacardi employees with technical expertise in manufacturing at the Bacardi plant's infrastructure.
The plant sits on approximately 62 acres of property located south of Carmichael Road on Bacardi Road and extends to New Providence's southern shores.
The company's long-term expansion plans will include the production and bottling of juices, wines, an industrial bakery to produce baked goods for public hotel and food service industries and the development of a luxury residential community with coastal properties.

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News Article

March 01, 2012
Wayde Wendal Rolle, 47

Funeral service for Wayde Wendal Rolle, 47, a resident of Bimini Avenue, who died on 19th February, 2012, will be held at Golden Gates World Outreach Ministries, Carmichael Road, on Saturday at 1:00 p.m. Officiating will be Bishop Ros Davis. Interment follows in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, JFK Drive.

Left to cherish his loving memories are his dedicated mother, Patricia Kelly-Brown, his stepfather, Arthur Brown; Seven Children, Deangelo Thompson-Rolle, Wayde Jr., Christopher, Shantiche, Moesha, Waydesiha and Nehemiah, one granddaughter, Jasmine Thompson. Four brothers, Vincent, Salatichel, Whitney Rolle and Sancto Kelly. Five sisters, Emily, Maudline, Judy, Merancer Rolle-Morley and Shanette Kelly-Rah ...

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News Article

December 10, 2014
Haitian woman claims she had baby on detention center's floor

A Haitian woman who admitted she snuck into the country illegally on a Haitian sloop last December gave birth on the floor of the Carmichael Road Detention Centre two weeks ago and was later released back into society, The Nassau Guardian can confirm.
Maryle Claude, 19, said after she had her baby she was transferred to Princess Margret Hospital.
She claimed immigration officers then released her and threatened that either she sort out papers for her and her baby or they would deport her.
Haitian Ambassador to The Bahamas Antonio Rodrigue confirmed that the Haitian embassy is aware of the matter.
Rodrigue said an embassy official visited the woman in hospital.
Immigration and Foreign Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell said yesterday he was made aware of an "emergency like that", though he did not go into specifics.
Claude said she was picked up by immigration officers early one morning, but could not remember the date.
She recalled that she gave birth at the detention center on November 16.
"On Sunday evening, I was feeling pain and at about 6 p.m. I pushed out the baby's head," she said through a translator yesterday.
"Before that, two women from the Royal Bahamas Defence Force came over and saw me in pain and told me that nothing was wrong and that I was just complaining and that I just wanted to get out of the situation I was in.
"At 6 p.m. I ended up having the baby, but they still didn't carry me to the hospital. The other girls who were in the room with me started to make noise and carry on bad and at 8 p.m. they took me to the hospital."
Claude said the other detainees helped deliver the baby. She said that she was so weak she passed out during the ordeal and had to be revived.
The Haitian mother delivered a healthy baby boy, whom she named Alexander.
"I would have rather been deported," she said.
"I would have been home with my family and had my baby. To know that I had a baby in a prison on the floor, knowing that I could have died and even my baby could have died is terrible."
When asked about her release, Mitchell said he could not say what the administrators did, but admitted that "there is no facility to deal with people like that".
He added, "You do not want to send a message out where you have a baby and are paroled out into the public. That is not how it works."
Claude claimed that there were two other women at the detention center who were pregnant.
When called for comment yesterday, Immigration Director William Pratt said he was out of office for a while, but was made aware of a woman who went into labor at the detention center. He stressed though that he had no information regarding Claude.
Pratt said if she was at the facility, she would have been the responsibility of the Department of Immigration.
"If she went into labor, the first thing our officers would do is call an ambulance," he said.
"It is not that [anyone] meant for her to have [a] baby on the floor."
He added, "Having a baby does not give anyone a passport to stay in The Bahamas."
Pratt said if the woman is in the country illegally, she would be picked up and deported.
Claude told The Guardian that she is working on getting her papers.

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News Article

January 13, 2012
Haiti's help is your yes

Two years after the devastating earthquake struck Haiti, a group of 10 organizations have banded together to host a concert to raise funds to assist the people of Haiti.
The concert dubbed "Haiti's Help Is Your Yes!" will be held tonight at 7:30 p.m. at Enoch Beckford Auditorium on Carmichael Road. Admission is free, but donations, pledges and gift offerings will be accepted.
Performing gospel and conscious music will be Benedict Lamartine, Anna Calixte, Bishop Lawrence Rolle, Group D'Homme Emmanuel (Berean Baptist Church), Theogene Jean Louis (Cornerstone Church), Paul Hanna, Poem by Rosny Jean (Queen of Peace), Seventh-day Adventist men's group, Boys of God, and Mr. J (Gefner Dalmon).
They are expecting the 3,000-seat auditorium to be filled at capacity to hear the uplifting music, guest pastor Maxso Joseph and amputee victims from Haiti.
"The primary purpose of the concert is to sensitize Haitians and Haitians of Bahamian descent, Bahamians and the world to Haiti's current plight and pain," said concert organizer Robert Dieudonne. "Two years after the earthquake, Haiti is still in need of prayer. Haiti is still in need of participation in its restoration."
Organizations comprising the Power of 10 group include the Haitian Embassy, United Associations of Haitians in The Bahamas, Queen of Peace Roman Catholic Church, the Haitian Pastors Association, Real Men Ministries, Haitian Chapter Viahmo, Bahamas Faith Ministries Intl., True Vision Media Group, Church of the Nazarene and Benedict Larmartine.
"The Power of 10 have realized this finger-tapping won't work and that we need a consolidated effort, a collaborative front in order to bring any real effectiveness -- even in a small way," said Dieudonne. "So we've committed to come together to focus on particular projects and we will focus on the kids, the domestic servants, kids who can't go to school but are allowed to work 12 to 16 hours a day just to have a place where they can be accommodated. We're going to focus on the more than 100,000 amputees who are still waiting on prosthetics, wheelchairs, therapy, and vocational training."
The billions of dollars that have been collected, Dieudonne says can go towards constructing infrastructure. He says they are interested in dealing with the human element and building lives - that is where they will focus their support.
Dieudonne says people have no excuse not to help their Haitian neighbors because if they want to adopt a family, they will help them do that. If someone wants to adopt a child, he says they will help them do that. And any denomination from $20 to $2,000 is acceptable. And he says sponsors will know where their aid money goes because they will receive a call from the recipient to say they received it.
New Haitian Mission Baptist Church pastor, Rev. Cherelus Exante, who has an ongoing effort feeding, clothing and educating 50-plus orphans in an orphanage, says the concert people will be given the opportunity to partner with actual efforts now. And get the assistance they need to create initiatives of their own.
"Two years on, we are not here only to organize the concert, but to also give God thanks, and to thank the people of The Bahamas for standing with the Haitian people to help Haiti, so we continue to do work in Haiti and provide aid to Haitians," said Rev. Exante.

HELP HAITI
What: Haiti's Help Is Your Yes! concert
When: Friday, January 13
Where: Enoch Beckford Auditorium, Carmichael Road
Time: 7:30 p.m.
Admission: Free, but donations, pledges and gift offerings will be accepted
Performers: Benedict Lamartine, Anna Calixte, Bishop Lawrence Rolle, Group D'Homme Emmanuel (Berean Baptist Church), Theogene Jean Louis (Cornerstone Church), Paul Hanna, Poem by Rosny Jean (Queen of Peace), Seventh-day Adventist men's group, Boys of God, and Mr. J (Gefner Dalmon).

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News Article

March 08, 2012
Abducted mother forced to hand over 3,500

A MOTHER was abducted from her Paradise Island home yesterday morning by two teenagers who ordered her to drive them to a Carmichael Road bank, where she was forced to withdraw $3,500.

Police reports were sketchy last night, but it is understood that the mother, the wife of a businessman, had taken her two children to school early that morning. She returned to her Paradise Island condominium around noon only to find two young people -- the boy might have been about 18 and the girl about 15 - loitering near the property.

It is understood that someone walking in the area earlier that morning had seen the "children" hanging around and asked it they were looking for someone. No one paid too muc ...

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News Article

March 13, 2012
Christie says FNM hiding over economy

By DANA SMITH

dsmith@tribunemedia.net

THE FNM is hiding behind the global recession, hoping Bahamians will not notice how they've bungled the economy, PLP leader Perry Christie said.

He pointed to tax hikes, high unemployment, the increasing national debt, record crime rates and cost overruns on the ongoing road works, as issues that have been "mismanaged" by the government.

Speaking at the party's Carmichael constituency launch on Monday night in support of PLP candidate Dr Daniel Johnson, Mr Christie told constituents he sees himself as the "bridge" between the late Sir Lynden Pindling and "the new generation of PLP leaders."

He said: "We all share a ...

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News Article

March 17, 2012
3 firearms removed from streets of New Providence

Nassau, Bahamas - In
less than four (4) hours on Friday 16th March, 2012 officers of the Drug
Enforcement Unit (DEU) acting on information, removed three (3)
firearms from the streets of New Providence.

In the first
incident around 7:30 pm DEU officers uncovered a shotgun from a bushy
area at Indiana Drive, Flamingo Gardens Estates. In the second incident
around 9:00 pm DEU officers uncovered a handgun from a bushy are at
Marshall Road. In the final incident around 11:00 pm DEU officers
uncovered a handgun from an abandoned building at Sunset Park,
Carmichael Road. No arrests were made; however, active police
investigations continue....

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