Search results for : Attorney general office

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Business Listing

Office of the Attorney General and Ministry of Legal Affairs
Government Offices
  • JFk next to Ministry of Works
  • Nassau
  • Nassau / Paradise Island, Bahamas
News Article
Fred Smith QCís response to the Attorney Generalís statement on charges against him
August 02, 2013

I have read the Attorney-Generalís press release about the criminal charges brought against me. She makes clear the charges, which I believe are entirely, obviously and transparently manufactured and bogus, were brought by the Police without reference to her and without legal advice from her office.

The Attorney General has stated...

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Business Listing

Office Of The Attorney General
Government Offices
  • Regent Cntr Nth Suites 2&3
  • Freeport
  • Grand Bahama, Bahamas
News Article

March 13, 2013
Attorney General meets with Photographer's Association

Nassau, Bahamas - The officers and members of the Bahamas
Professional Photographers and Videographers Association (BPPVA) met
with Attorney General Sen. Allyson Maynard-Gibson and senior Ministry
officials at the office of the Attorney General on Monday, 11th March
2013. Pictured from left are Archie Nairn, Permanent Secretary, Ministry
of Legal Affairs and Attorney General Office; Deborah Fraser, Director
of Legal Affairs; Andy Adderley, BPPVA member; Kemuel Stubbs, BPPVA
President; Hon. Allyson Maynard-Gibson, Attorney General and Minister of
Legal Affairs; Portia King, BPPVA Vice-President; Kenny Love

...

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News Article

January 17, 2013
Bahamas Christian Council Calls On Attorney General

Nassau, Bahamas - Members of The Bahamas Christian Council pay a Courtesy Call on the Attorney General, Allyson Maynard-Gibson and senior members of the Attorney General's Office, East Hill Street, January 14th, 2013 ...

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News Article

October 14, 2011
Office of Attorney General discusses Anti Crime Bill with religious leaders

Nassau, The Bahamas -
Attorney General and Minister of Legal Affairs the Hon. John Delaney
along with senior officials of the Office of the Attorney General (OAG)
entertained questions on the anti-crime Bill fielded by leaders of the
religious community during a meeting Wednesday.

Mr. Delaney explained
that the objective of the meeting was to answer questions with respect
to the anti crime package tabled in the House of Assembly last week
and for which Parliamentarians began debate yesterday. This is the second
meeting with religious leaders that the OAG has organised for the year...

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News Article

May 21, 2013
Civil Society Bahamas engaged by Office of Attorney General

Nassau, Bahamas -

Civil Society Bahamas, in keeping with its
current operational theme, "Re-education, Training and Development,"
recently engaged with the office of the Attorney General. Personnel from
The Ministry of Foreign Affairs & Immigration were also present. 
The purpose of the meeting was for Civil Society Bahamas to assist
further with the generation of the country's annual report (Universal
Periodic Review) to the United Nations on human rights issues.

 

During
the meeting, Senator the Honorable Allyson Maynard-Gibson and team
members facilitated an up-date of the representation made at the United
Nations. She thanked Civil Society Bahamas for its contribution to the
final report...

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News Article

October 29, 2014
The mishandling of the case of the shantytown resident

Dear Editor,
Like most Bahamians, I followed, with concern and increasing anger, the response of police as led by Commissioner Ellison Greenslade, the Attorney General's Office and the minister of immigration to the now infamous statements made by Anson Aly during the long overdue demolition of the Joe Farrington Road shantytown. The absence of the minister of national security on this deeply troubling matter was noted.
In order to give context to my comments which follow, it is important for Aly's words to be reproduced - as he said them. They follow in the vernacular: "Where dey want the people dem go? Dey want them homeless? Dey want dem on the streets hey? Ya see what I'm sayin'? People like dem does force people to do (expletive) bad tings on the streets... Like how I sayin', how I feelin' I ready to put the Colombian necktie on these niggers man. Whatever is the [indecipherable] that's how it go man.
"Dey gatta understand. It's more Haitian-Bahamians in this country than (expletive) Bahamians. Sorry, sorry for my language. You see what I sayin'? We ain' scared. Dey ain' want start somet'in' what dey ain' ga can finish, boy, you see?"
In the face of these remarks it was offensive to many citizens to hear the commissioner say words to the effect that he met with Aly and Aly showed remorse for his words and that, along with the fact that the Attorney General's Office said that he had not committed any offense, led to his release without being charged. How many persons in police custody have felt remorse and yet have been charged? And, for the benefit of those in the Attorney General's Office, Aly should have been charged with the following offenses:
(1) Threats of harm contrary to section 203 of the Penal Code.
(2) Causing public terror contrary to section 204 of the Penal Code.
(3) Obscene language contrary to section 208(2) of the Penal Code.
(4) Sedition contrary to section 396(1)(a) and (b) of the Penal Code.
The "dey" in Aly's statements could only be those who had signed the eviction notice - and they are therefore the virtual complainants. As the virtual complainants are undoubtedly public servants, they have a duty to assist the police and prosecution in making the case against Aly.
With respect to the commissioner indicating that the Attorney General's Office advised him that Aly had not committed an offense, Mr. Commissioner, you have the authority to proffer all of those charges except for the charge of sedition without any consultation with the Attorney General's Office.
As a renown criminal attorney stated during a private chat on this matter, police find any number of charges to put on a drunkard when that person has been abusive or mildly offensive to them - from obscene language to vagrancy. In this matter, Aly's threats and use of obscene language were recorded and blanked out during the evening news broadcast. It is absurd that police could not even come up with those two charges - which they so readily use against many Bahamian male, Over the Hill residents - when the evidence was recorded and broadcasted to the nation.
Fred Mitchell, we, the Bahamian people, allowed the authorities to deal with this matter. The authorities have failed us - again. We the people have lost confidence in those charged with enforcing the laws of this country and with keeping us safe. Your government and the current commissioner have a lot to do with the erosion of our confidence in law enforcement. The failure to close the illegal numbers houses after the referendum enriched the legacy of lawlessness which plagues our nation. Your government's administration has taught our citizens that we do not have to abide by the laws of this nation and indeed our lawlessness may even be rewarded by a sympathetic government legalizing our illegal activities.
As Aly left police custody, not surprisingly, he declared that he had not committed a crime when clearly, to all who listened to his words, he qualified for charges for several offenses, in my view. Yet again, the lesson learned by all of us is that there are no repercussions for our actions. The legacy of lawlessness marches on in our Bahamaland as your administration refuse to enforce our laws.
Madam Attorney General, you have six months from the commission of the offense to charge Aly with sedition. On that charge, the commissioner cannot move without you. We, the people, implore you to make it right. It is important that our people see our laws being enforced. It is important that those who live amongst us by way of our humanitarian spirit (or decades of slackness on the immigration issue) come to the quick understanding that such inciting, divisive statements suggesting a call to arms and violence against Bahamians will not be tolerated by the state. Issue the written instruction to charge Aly with sedition and let the court determine his guilt or innocence.
- Artemisia

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News Article

December 20, 2014
Retired police officers to challenge pension benefits

Retired subordinate police officers were on Thursday granted permission to appeal a decision to deny them the gratuities that senior officers receive.
Raymond Rolle, who represents the officers, said that Justice Indra Charles approved an application for judicial review of the decision.
Rolle maintains that the subordinate officers are entitled to the gratuity payments by the Police Act. It's been a longstanding practice to only pay gratuities to officers of the rank of Inspector and above, Rolle said.
According to chapter 191, section 66 of the Police Act (1965), any police officer having completed not less than ten years of continuous service, retires from the force at an age other than that at which or in circumstances other than those in which he may be granted a pension in respect of such service, the governor general, acting in accordance with the advice of the Police Service Commission, may grant to such officer in respect of each year of such service, a gratuity amounting to 2.5 percent of his salary at the date of his retirement.
The application for leave was granted in the absence of a representative from the Attorney General's Office, who will represent the commissioner of police. Rolle and a representative from the Attorney General's Office will appear before Charles on January 27 for a directions hearing.

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News Article

December 09, 2011
Commissioner of Police Ellison Greenslade visits Attorney General

Nassau, Bahamas - Attorney General and
Minister of Legal Affairs Sen. the Hon. John Delaney welcomes Ellison
Greenslade Commissioner of Police Ellison Greenslade and senior officers during
a courtesy call December 9, at the Office of the Attorney General, Post Office
Building. Pictured from left: Anthony Ferguson, Asst. Commissioner; Marco
Rolle, Under Secretary; Vinette Graham Allen, Director Public
Prosecutions; Minister Delaney; Commissioner Greenslade; and Paul Rolle,
Superintendent...

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