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News Article

October 05, 2014
The Bahamas reportedly second at CACs Quant settled for seventh

At the 42nd Central American and Caribbean (CAC) Bodybuilding and Fitness Championships over the weekend in St. Martin, Ethan Quant was considered one of the country's best hopes for a medal, but he faded to seventh in the men's physique semi-finals, failing to make the final. However, according to reports, The Bahamas was second overall.
Up to press time last night, the final numbers weren't in for Team Bahamas, but speaking on his performance, Quant said that he was a bit disappointed. Going into the competition, he said that although he felt that his physique was elite, he was a little concerned about his posing and stage presence. He went into Saturday's judging with the confidence that his physique would get him into the final round, but he fell short.
"It's a combination of things, one of the judges told me this as well. It's one thing to have the physique, but stage presence is a major factor," he said. "I know this is one of the areas that I have to work on. You know you get up there and try your best, but it's the total package, and everything happens so fast that you have to be able to react very quickly with very little time to think. I have to work until it becomes second nature. Going into the Arnold Classic, posing will be a major part of what we work on and review with the team."
The Arnold Sports Festival (previously known as the Arnold Classic) is an annual multi-disciplinary sports convention that began in 1989 and is named after Arnold Schwarzenegger. The classic is set for March 2015, and Quant is looking at it as a chance for a better showing.
"I can say that at CAC in St. Martin, I had the best body that I ever had, and I'm glad that I have a physique that can go against the best. It's just minor details I have to tweak now," said Quant. "Going into the Arnold, I want to get a bit bigger, because the Arnold tends to like their guys a little bigger but still conditioned. I want to put on about five to seven pounds of lean muscle, get more conditioned and have more dynamic posing."
Quant said that he is going to use the CAC experience as incentive as he trains for the upcoming Arnold Sports Festival.
"CAC was a one-two punch for me. The first was the fact that I came in confident in my ability to come back with the overall win, and now I have to come home and say that I didn't even make it to the final," he said. "After I got over that and received a lot of support from family and friends, I gained encouragement to get back to work, and now I'm going to get my programs together and do what I have to for March."
Although he was disappointed with his showing, he was proud of the rest of the team. According to reports, the 22-member squad managed a second place finish overall, and had a number of impressive showings.
Dawn Charlton won the overall title in the women's fitness division, and has qualified to become an IFBB (International Federation of Bodybuilding and Fitness) pro in fitness. Lorraine Lafleur managed a second place finish in the women's physique category, and Marco Walkine finished third in the men's fitness category.
"These results show that The Bahamas is back on its way to becoming a powerhouse in bodybuilding and fitness in the region," said Quant.
The Bahamas Bodybuilding and Fitness Federation (BBFF) is expected to release more results this week.

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News Article

November 22, 2011
Man who was on Most Wanted List charged with murder

A man who was once featured on the police force's Most Wanted List appeared before a magistrate yesterday on murder and robbery charges.
Police arrested Elandro Missick, 20, of Kemp Road, in Inagua last week after they circulated his photo in the press.
Investigators believe that Missick is responsible for the September 17 shooting death of Damian Bowe at Kemp Road.
Missick, who is represented by Roberto Reckley, did not have to enter a plea to the murder charge at his arraignment before Acting Chief Magistrate Carolita Bethell.
Prosecutors plan to forego a preliminary inquiry before the magistrate and send the case to the Supreme Court by a Voluntary Bill of Indictment, which is expected to be ready on January 12.
Missick entered a not guilty plea to a charge that he robbed Sherwin Rolle of a carton of Rothman cigarettes and a carton of Backwood cigarettes on July 14.
Magistrate Derence Rolle-Davis will hold a fixture hearing for that case on November 23.
After the arraignments, Reckely asked Magistrate Bethell to order that officials have the prison doctor examine Missick.
He alleged that police officers beat Missick while he was in custody.  He said the officers punched, kicked and tased Missick. He also said that Missick maintained his innocence but he was concerned because Bowe had associates who were in the western block of the prison.
Magistrate Bethell directed that Missick see the doctor.  However, she said could not tell prison officials where to detain him.

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News Article

November 23, 2013
Who is trying to intimidate The Punch

Dear Editor,

It has often been said that journalism or the press is the fourth estate. The first estate is the clergy; the second the nobles, and the third the commoners.
Journalists play a pivotal role in democratic nations. They are the ones who keep the government honest and accountable by asking the hard questions and by sounding the alarm when there is governmental misconduct. They form that important informative bridge between the commoner and the state. Had it not been for the fourth estate, Bahamians, by and large, would still be groping around in the intellectual dark age. I believe that past governments in The Bahamas have fallen at the polls during general elections due to the immense influence of the fourth estate. Whether we would want to admit it or not, the media has helped to mold and shape the political views of thousands of Bahamians during election time.
That is why authoritarian, autocratic, totalitarian, despotic and dictatorial regimes have an irrational hatred for the fourth estate. Indeed, rogue regimes view journalists as nagging thorns in the flesh. According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, an astounding 45 journalists were killed this year alone. Seventy-three were killed in 2012. Countries such as Syria, Iran, Pakistan, Somalia, Yemen, the Philippines, Mexico, Bahrain, Cote d'Ivoire and Egypt are extremely dangerous for journalists. In countries such as these, members of the fourth estate have been arrested, censored, threatened, physically assaulted and murdered. Bahamians must be wondering if the November 18 failed grenade attack on The Punch tabloid is an indication that some criminally minded elements in our society are now attempting to silence the fourth estate by acts of violence. Obviously, somebody's feathers were ruffled.
This could potentially be a dangerous trend in the making. I don't recall ever hearing of Bahamian journalists being attacked or targeted in this fashion. Usually, enemies of the fourth estate in The Bahamas would use economic warfare to get back at journalists for mashing their "corns". For what it's worth, the failed grenade attack was nothing short of terrorism. Bahamian journalists have for years endured maltreatment at the hands of government officials who viewed them as not being of the same political persuasion because they dared to ask simple and straightforward questions.
In the pre-1992 Bahamas, the politicians we hired to manage our affairs seemed to have been offended at the mere thought of being accountable to us. I know of two journalists who were persecuted by the government in the 1980s. One is now in the bosom of the current Christie administration. The political victimization of the fourth estate is an ancient practice that has spanned the duration of the independent Bahamas. And for all intents and purposes, it is here to stay.
The failed grenade attack on The Punch is a somber reminder of this sad fact.

- Kevin Evans

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News Article

November 12, 2011
Joe's Aggressive Style Created Rich Legacy

Joe Frazier was beaten just four times in one of the great careers in the history of boxing.  He went down in defeat in those four bouts to only two men, George Foreman and Muhammad Ali, twice each.
He was valiant and a man of honor and courage. When the all-time best boxers are ranked however, he never makes the top 10.  There are boxers who pound-for-pound were not better than Smokin' Joe but they were able to dominate their eras for longer periods and thus they are rated higher.
The reality of the situation is that Frazier was a victim of fate. He just happened to have a glowing career that was overlapped by Ali. That was an obstacle that none of the other excellent heavyweights through the years would have been able to overcome.
You can name them. If Jack Johnson, Jack Dempsey, Joe Louis, Rocky Marciano would have had the misfortunate to compete at the height of their careers during the time of Muhammad Ali, they also would have certainly been upstaged.
To Frazier's credit, in my view, he fared better against Ali than any of the other great heavyweights would have. It's simple.  Styles make for great matchups. Frazier with his buzz saw, perpetual motion manner in the ring, proved to be quite difficult for Ali in two of their three contests.
Johnson was a smaller, slower version of Ali (or a younger Cassius Clay as was his birth name). He would have done no better against Ali than Floyd Patterson did in two humiliating defeats.
Jack Dempsey, who was before Johnson's time, was even smaller and would have been no match to the self-proclaimed and later widely acknowledged "greatest of all time."
Joe Louis shuffled trying to get in range for his devastating left hook.  Ali would have at the very least, frustrated him tremendously. Louis in my view would have done no better than Sonny Liston who was stopped by Clay in 1964 for the first of three title victories.
Marciano had the heavy punches. Nevertheless, he would not have been a good match for Ali. Marciano was ferocious, but he bled easily. Ali would have had an easy time with Marciano, I feel.
Joe Frazier was another story.
The famous statement made by Ali after the final of their trilogy was: "It was like death.
Although he was unfortunate to emerge as a fistic force in the same era as Ali, the three fights they had, defined Frazier like nothing else that happened in 37 ring battles (32-4-1). Foreman had a style that Frazier, being much smaller, could not solve.
With Ali, it was different.
Perhaps because of the critical remarks Ali sent Frazier's way often, the man from Philadelphia was always sky high when they faced each other. He bore up under the jeers from his nemesis better than any other before him. In the ring, he matched Ali over 41 rounds almost blow for blow.
In their first bout on March 8, 1971, he captured the so-called 'Fight of the Century' when he knocked Ali down on the way to a 15-round decision. They met again in 1974 over 12 rounds and Ali was the clear winner.
Then came the "Thriller in Manila " of 1975. Arguably, a better battle than the one in 1971 was contested by the two warriors. In the end, after a serious of bruising rounds, trainer Eddie Futch became concerned about the terrific pounding Frazier took in the 13th and particularly 14th round. He didn't allow his fighter to go out for the 15th.
Ali later paid Frazier an even better compliment than the "like death' remark.
He said, with a sly smile, "he's the greatest fighter of all time, next to me."
If you take Ali out of his life, Frazier would be ranked right up there with Johnson, Dempsey, Louis and Marciano, definitely.
Here in The Bahamas Frazier always had his share of fans who pulled mightily for him, especially when he and Ali met. There are those like my friends Ira Smith and Bert Perry who actually saw Frazier as the better fighter.
He wasn't better by any stretch of the imagination. However, he was surely one of the true greats.
I close with this tribute from Paul Bevans.
"I was fortunate to call him friend. I met this legend in the late 1980s while working with the Bahamas Tourist Office in Philadelphia. He referred to me as "Bahamas."
"Joe did a lot to rehabilitate the young men in the Philadelphia-South Jersey area. Many of these men came straight out of prison to Joe, seeking shelter at Frazier's Broad Street Gym. Joe had room and board set up there. He and his son Marvis would teach them the sport of boxing and he would also secure jobs for them.
"I have very fond memories of this great boxing legend like the weekend, he invited me to Scranton to attend a fight with him and Marvis. It was the debut of one of his young fighters. The following morning, at breakfast, he introduced me to another legend, Jose Torres (former world light heavyweight champion). One Sunday morning he called me: 'Bahamas, you had breakfast yet? Come over. '
"When I got there he asked: 'How many boiled eggs you want?' He was a comedian. We had boiled eggs, wheat toast and tea. As I looked at all of his historic photos and memorabilia, I was amazed. Joe Frazier, even though he was a celebrity, was very humble. It was truly a favor (for me) to have access to such a sports legend. After hearing of his passing, I could only reminisce as I looked at the autographed boxing gloves and the personal photographs he had blessed me with, one with him training for the "Thriller In Manila."
"What a man!"
Indeed.
May the soul of Smokin' Joe Frazier forever rest in peace.
 
(To respond to this column, kindly contact Fred Sturrup at fredericksturrup@gmail.com).

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News Article

October 09, 2014
Man gets 41 years for murder of girlfriend

A judge yesterday sentenced a man who almost decapitated his girlfriend, Kidley St. Brave, with a tile cutter to 41 years in prison.
Haitian national Gibson Raphael, 29, did not show any emotion when Justice Indra Charles passed sentence.
The couple had recently rekindled the relationship after a mutually agreed break-up of several months, the court heard.
Raphael testified during his trial that St. Brave became enraged when she saw a text message from the mother of his son.
He said she slapped, punched and stabbed him with a screwdriver before she got his tile cutter and sliced his neck.
Raphael said he went into a trance after taking the tile cutter away from St. Brave.
Afterward, Raphael caught a ride to Potter's Cay Dock where he reported the incident to a policeman at the station.
Raphael was the only defense witness in his case.
He denied that he wounded himself after killing St. Brave in a jealous rage.

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News Article

November 26, 2013
Mitchel hits back at The Punch

MINISTER of Foreign Affairs Fred Mitchell yesterday blasted a local tabloid for allegations over spending.

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News Article

July 23, 2014
Feminist: The other F-word

Fuming and trying hard not to cuss, I dialed Guardian Radio hoping that, at six minutes to 9 a.m. when the show was about to end and I should have really been walking out my door to get somewhere for the same time, I could still get through to say my piece on the topic. After seven busy signals, I finally broke into the conversation and the producer sent me straight to air. I was so incensed, I only greeted the host and forgot to bid a good morning to the co-host and guests in-studio.
You see, when I am really angry or extremely impassioned, all my words fight for simultaneous, rapid expulsion. When this happens, I can only do one of two things: whisper or holler. There's no middle ground for my volume, once I am infuriated. Yet, on that morning, I managed to maintain my composure just long enough to whisper the necessary words in the few minutes of talk time remaining on my favorite talk show, before the whisper became a roar.
I was so excited that this particular radio station, heavily laden with male presenters, was bringing a program that was women-focused to the air waves. And, I was told that the new host they were interviewing on the morning show was experienced and 'no-nonsense', so I was looking forward to the possibility of honest and sufficiently uncensored conversations about women's issues. I could even become a 'chronic caller', because I have so much to say already.
But, that morning, I was stumped and stunned at the fact that the women representing in the studio had already submitted to the negativity and ignorance of one ridiculous caller who was clearly anti-woman and didn't think the new show should even exist. Why he takes the time to call Guardian Radio on a regular basis when he's so displeased with the station's shows must be something logical only to a certain Bahamian mindset.
In spite of his inane accusations, the women, in the moment, had allowed this man to bulldoze them, in an attempt to be politically correct, when they should have instead stood their ground and taken him to school on this issue.
He accused the new show and host of being feminist, but it was clear he does not know the definition of the word, and/or is himself not a feminist. What should have been clarified for him immediately following his remark, and with great pride, is that the show was entirely feminist and intended to be, as its tag line suggests: 'From a woman's perspective'.
Who are the feminists?
What Inane Caller and many others do not understand is that feminism is not an undesirable thing. A feminist is not a bad type of person to be, and, for the sake of the mass improvement of our world, everyone should be a feminist. A feminist also does not equate to a lesbian, though I'm sure some lesbians are feminists, as they should be by their own definition. And feminists are not inherently male-bashers.
Feminists are female, but they are male, too. Many triumphs have been won for women because of the commitments of men to women's causes. In actuality, there are many men, sadly, who are more feminist than some women, and who will fight on behalf of all women when women themselves will lie down and be trampled on instead of standing up for their own rights and equality.
A feminist is any person who supports the full equality of females and males anywhere in the world.
So, I'm thinking, if this rascal caller wanted to use the word 'feminist', he really ought to have learned the definition of it first. And I'm disappointed that my fellow women and men in the studio did not preconceive this challenge before the show opened and developed their game plan on how to rebut it.
I'm further disappointed that all in studio did not own up (sooner) to the title of feminist while simultaneously educating the uninformed caller on a matter about which he was distinctly misguided. They fell into his trap within a matter of seconds, and it is a setback which requires an immediate and convincing comeback.
When you're fighting this battle for womankind, in Bahamian culture or anywhere else, you have to come out swinging - not viciously, but boldly, and you have to be ready to punch back against the onslaught, because you are already identified as a biased troublemaker and negative people will begin this conversation by throwing blows at you.
It's no secret to anyone, male or female, that women, by virtue of their gender, are marginalized in every society of the world, obviously some far worse than others. The ways in which this injustice happens in India, for example, may be very different from its manifestations in Iceland. And the treatment of women in New Zealand may be quite unlike the treatment of women in The Bahamas. But just because a woman isn't being sexually or physically assaulted, getting raped or beaten, it doesn't mean she's not being discriminated against, or that her needs, hopes, ambitions, desires and opportunities are not being smothered or reduced to second class importance.
Cultural deficiencies, low expectations
The very manner in which our Bahamian/Caribbean/Western society is structured creates the distinctions between men and women, which, for decades and centuries, we have observed and continue to observe as norms and which in turn create root biases and the reduction of the status of women, particularly in contrast to men.
(Bahamian) men are taught that marriage to a woman gives them ownership of that woman. They are conditioned to believe that men are meant to possess a wife, a family and a household, and be in charge of them all, such that the man is the apex of the home, and his meals must be prepared, and he must be waited on, and his clothes and his house must be cleaned by the wife (or the daughters or the maid, also female). And all of this is because it is the way it was 'intended to be'. As long as you have a religion that is based in Christianity, as the majority of Bahamians, Afro-Caribbeans and Westerners do, a man is always first, or at the top, and the woman is relegated to second position, from where she should support the man no matter what.
Why do we think, then, that women are continually regarded as the lesser gender of humankind? In spite of the work they do in their families, communities and countries, their leadership and contributions to progress are not as respected as the leadership of men. And it is such an established norm that women themselves propagate it.
For what other reason could a Bahamian man feel so correct in saying "How much more rights do Bahamian women want or need?"
Well, sir, if you're not a (Bahamian) woman, chances are you ain't gonna understand this here hustle.
The way a man perceives a woman's life is based on his perception of his own life and what society tells him is the woman's role in it. And if everything remains in place just as society has taught him (and women) it should, in the way that brings him the most comfort, pleasure, opportunity and success, then what else do you think he's going to say about his dominion?
To inform and to educate
I'm looking forward to the success of the new women-driven radio show, because I desperately want women in The Bahamas to have a more united and resilient voice in their own country on the issues that impact upon them most and to have a stronger hand in turning their own lives around for the best, not the better.
But it has to begin with each individual woman having a rehabilitated mentality about her purpose in life.
If you understand it, then let no one else misunderstand it: every person who is in support of women's equality, empowerment, protection and success is a feminist. Let's discontinue the misrepresentation of the English language that suggests the word 'feminist' is a dirty one, particularly when we don't know the definition of the word or can't respect its connotative value. And, when we do know the correct definition and the supreme value in the word 'feminist', let's make sure that we all embrace it and own it fully, especially when challenged, because if we're ever going to get anywhere with our efforts to improve the individual (mental, emotional and physical) conditions of all women in The Bahamas, we have to first own our individual feminist identities.
o Facebook.com/NicoleBurrows

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News Article

July 16, 2014
Lockhart and Rolle to lead bowling team at Pan Am Sports Festival

The Bahamas Bowling Federation (BBF) ratified a small team, led by former national champions Driskell Rolle and Sonith "Kemosabee" Lockhart, to travel to the Pan Am Sports Festival.
The bowling competition is being held in Puebla, Mexico. The festival started on July 11 and runs until the end of September. Other members of the bowling team are 2013 and 2014 finalist at the nationals Jonice "Joy" Lockhart and first-time national team member, Royal Bahamas Defence Force (RBDF) Officer Byron McClain. Also traveling with the team is coach/delegate Ryan Davis.
The bowling competition will get underway on July 17 and will conclude on Sunday, July 20. The team left on Monday and arrived safely in Mexico yesterday.
The team has an awesome task to accomplish. It must finish in the top tier of the tournament in order for The Bahamas to qualify for the bowling competition at the 2015 Pan Am Games, to be held in Toronto, Canada next year.
"Notwithstanding there will be other opportunities for The Bahamas to qualify, we certainly would like to 'punch our ticket early' to this prestigious competition," said BBF Public Relations Officer Clayton J. Gardiner. "The team is quite aware of this and all members and the coach are confident that they will accomplish this."
The team will be bowling singles, doubles and mixed doubles. In speaking with Jonice Lockhart about the tournament, she felt that it was a good team and expressed confidence that they would do well. Coach Davis also was in agreement with Lockhart and he sees no reason why The Bahamas cannot perform well at this festival. Coach Davis pointed to the past performances on the world stage, and sees The Bahamas as an emerging power in bowling.
Sonith Lockhart is the most experienced bowler in the group, and he will have to assist, where necessary, to ensure that bowlers are on 'their games', concentrating on throwing good shots. Sonith Lockhart has travelled quite extensively, representing the country in the sport bowling. He knows that he has to lead the team. When asked about the team's chances in Mexico, he acknowledged that he must set the example for the team. He expressed complete confidence in his teammate Byron McClain, stating that he is a good listener and is receptive to suggestions if he has to adjust his game based on lane conditions.
When asked what kind of averages they must post in this competition, Lockhart said that he must average about 215, Officer McClain around 205 and the ladies should be around 200 if they are to be competitive. Well, time will tell whether those averages will be enough.
Teams from Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Mexico and Puerto Rico will all be at this festival, looking to book their tickets for the 2015 Pan Am Games.
The BBF extends special thanks and appreciation to the Bahamas Olympic Committee (BOC) for playing a part in facilitating the trip to Mexico. The federation also wishes to thank BTC, Ernst & Young, Baha Mar and the RBDF for allowing their employees the time off to represent The Bahamas at the international competition.
The president of the Bahamas Bowling Federation is Yule Hoyte.

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News Article

March 17, 2012
Convicted child rapist sent back to prison

A career criminal yesterday apologized to his victim and to society before a judge sentenced him to eight years in prison for robbery.
Andrew Bridgewater, 38, was arrested in November last year, months after his release from prison for the sexual assault of a six-year-old girl.
Bridgewater, who was unrepresented, confessed to his latest crime when he appeared before Magistrate Carolyn Vogt-Evans on November 25.
The magistrate remanded Bridgewater to prison and sent him to the Supreme Court for sentencing because of his extensive criminal history.
However, Senior Justice Jon Isaacs sent the case back to the magistrate because she made a procedural error by failing to tell him he was convicted.
Isaacs held a sentencing hearing after the magistrate corrected her error.
Prosecutor Kevin Farrington told the court that Bridgewater befriended Patrice Butler on November 21 and invited her to his home before he led her through a track road. The court heard Bridgewater punched Butler in the face and choked her before saying, "Where my children money? I give it to you and they say you ain't give them no money." Butler told Bridgewater the money was in her purse, but she grabbed a pair of scissors from her handbag and stabbed him.
Bridgewater, who has four similar convictions for stealing (2004), robbery (2001) shopbreaking and stealing (1995) and attempted stealing (1993), promised that this would be his last offense.
A repentant Bridgewater told Isaacs, "I apologize to the young lady. I apologize to society. This is my last time. I tired of them hearing my name. I want to apologize to everyone out there, mainly the young lady."
Bridgewater complained that other inmates in maximum security were taking advantage of him. He said, "Please tell HMP (Her Majesty's Prisons) don't let them beat me no more because that's all is happen to me."
Bridgewater started crying after Isaacs ordered that he serve eight years, three more than the magistrate's sentencing cap.

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News Article

February 04, 2014
How to deal with bullying

Bullies come in all shapes and sizes, and most of us have to deal with them at one point or another. However, bullying is a serious problem, not only in schools, but also both in the workplace, home, the military, playground and even nursing homes. Some cases have even been so serious that they have led to the victims committing suicide due to bullying.
Bullying is unwanted, aggressive behavior among school-aged children that involves a real or perceived power imbalance. The behavior is repeated, or has the potential to be repeated, over time. Bullying includes actions such as making threats, spreading rumors, attacking someone physically or verbally, and excluding someone from a group on purpose.
How bullying affects children
Bullying can make kids feel hurt, scared, sick, lonely and sad. Bullies might hit, kick, or push to hurt people, or use words to threaten, tease or scare them. The affects of bullying in a child's life, if not addressed, can lead them going through life being bullied by others even in their adult life or becoming bullies themselves.
Signs of children who are being bullied
o Children coming home from school with damaged or missing clothes.
o Children who come home with bruises and scratches.
o Children having trouble with school work for no apparent reason.
o Children deciding to use a different route between home and school or deciding to avoid their usual route.
o Children having nightmares.
o Children who start to become or feel irritable easily, upset, or feeling emotional.
o Thoughts of going to school become terrifying. Child pretends to be sick or just does not want to attend.
What can be done about bullying
o Know what kind of bully you are dealing with.
What does he/she does to others, and how he/she reacts with different situations? Aggressive bullies are likely to abuse physically and without hesitation. Taunting bullies are verbally abusive (calling names, making jokes, teasing, etc.). Indirect bullies, sometimes known as backstabbers, spread rumors, exclude others, and harass their victims whenever possible. Cyber bullies harass other people through instant messaging, e-mail, and any other electronic means.
o Work your way around the bullies.
Try to avoid them in school and social situations. If they take the same route that you do, try a different way; if they can't find you, they can't bully you. Show minimal reaction to bullying. Do not show the bullies that you feel hurt if they do something that makes you uncomfortable; just walk away. Bullies gain satisfaction from making others feel hurt or uncomfortable, so reacting to them will only encourage them further.
o Report all bullying to an authority figure.
Consider your parents, school guidance counselor, principal, boss, the police, or someone else who can deal with or punish the bully and protect your safety. It's important that you talk to someone about your problem to get it to end. Do not worry about revenge that the bully may take if you report the incident; they will hurt you anyway and appeasing them doesn't solve your problem or anyone else they are bullying.
Advice for parents
o Listen to your child, allow them to tell their story. Do not respond by telling them it is a part of growing up.
o Children should not have to put up with being hit or assaulted when they go to school. If your child has gained the courage to tell a teacher that he or she is being bullied it can be a crushing blow to be told that you are being silly or the other students were just teasing.
o If you suspect that your child is being bullied but is afraid to say anything, find a way to raise the subject or ask one of your child's friends if something is wrong.
o If your child refuses to talk to you, suggest that they talk to another adult such as a family member or a teacher.
o If your child discloses that they are being bullied do not rush in demanding to see the teacher, the bully or the parents. Doing that is the very thing that your child fears.
o Talk to your child about what they want to happen next. Suggest that they keep a record of the incident so that you would have concrete information to show the school.
o Make an appointment to speak to the class teacher or guidance counselor.
o The bullying might not stop right away, however, encourage your child to keep being open by telling you what's going on.
Parents should not give up. Remember that the welfare of your child is at stake.
Bullying consists of the following:
o Being teased, or called names.
o Being hit, pushed, pulled, punched, or kicked.
o Having money or other possessions taken.
o Receiving abusive text messages or emails.
o Being abused or attacked because of religion, gender, sexually, disability, appearance or ethnic or racial origin.
Bullying in any form and at any age is unacceptable.
o If your child is being bullied, we can help, telephone The Crisis Centre 24-hour Hotline at 328-0922 or 322-4999, or check out our website at www.bahamascrisiscentre.org or email us at bahamascrisiscentre@yahoo.com

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