Search results for : punch

Did you mean : sodas

Showing 1 to 10 of 358 results


News Article

April 05, 2013
American Citizens Abroad Blasts FATCA in Comment to House Working Groups, Calls for Repeal as Part of Tax Reform Framework

Washington, DC - In an
April 4, 2012, submission to the leadership of the International Tax
Reform Working Group and the Financial Services Tax Reform Working Group
of the Committee on Ways and Means of the U.S. House of
Representatives, American Citizens Abroad (ACA) - the flagship
association representing the interests of some seven million Americans
residing outside the United States - has again called for repeal of
FATCA ("the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act") as part of a
comprehensive overhaul of the U.S. tax system.   While focusing on the
particular damage FATCA does to U.S. citizens living abroad, ACA pulls
no punches in spelling out the broader harm this 2010 law (now pending
implementation) threatens to inflict on the American economy as a whole,
while failing in its stated purpose of curbing offshore tax evasion.

read more »


News Article

November 28, 2013
Journalist P. Anthony White dies at 73

Veteran journalist and broadcaster P. Anthony White died in hospital at the age of 73 yesterday.
White's friends and former colleagues remembered him as a prolific, passionate writer whose work documented the course of Bahamian history and politics after majority rule.
Former Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham was among those who offered condolences to the White family.
Ingraham said White spent time in the United States but returned to The Bahamas after majority rule to work as a columnist and soon became a popular writer. Ingraham said White's "biting" critiques in the 1970s angered the government of the day, prompting him to relocate to the Cayman Islands and later the Seychelles in the South Pacific where he established the Government News Bureau.
Ingraham said White was working with the Free National Movement when he joined the party in 1990. He said White helped the party craft the message that led the FNM to win the 1992 general election.
"He was exceptionally well-read, an insightful political commentator and a man of great personal faith," Ingraham said in a statement released yesterday. "To me he was a political comrade and a personal friend. He will be sorely missed.
"We have truly lost an exceptionally gifted Bahamian: a man of great intellectual curiosity, a steadfast friend and a man of great faith."
Former Progressive Liberal Party (PLP) Cabinet minister George Smith said he got to know White after the 1967 general election when a lot of talented Bahamians who had worked abroad returned home.
"We remained friends up to his death," Smith said. "I regard Anthony White as one of the literary geniuses of The Bahamas."
Smith said White enriched the country through his writing, wit and personality.
"When I think of Anthony White I think of what Shakespeare said in Romeo and Juliet, '...When he shall die, take him and cut him out in little stars. And he will make the face of heaven so fine that all the world will be in love with night. And pay no worship to the garish sun.'"
White worked as a professional writer for more than 40 years. During his career, he served as a New York correspondent for the Nassau Herald and spent three years at the New York Herald-Tribune.
White was also chairman and CEO of radio station Joy FM.
He wrote a column for The Punch tabloid up until his death.
Guardian columnist Fred Sturrup said White's long career in journalism was driven by his passion for the industry.
"He blazed a trail in that regard and he will be sorely missed," Sturrup said.
"He was a true professional in the industry and brought a wealth of education and understanding to his readers of what The Bahamas is today compared to yesterday."
White was also very active in the Anglican community.
He attended Rhodes High School and St. John's University in New York.
White has three daughters, one son and eight grandchildren.

read more »


News Article

April 08, 2013
Man says confession was forced from him by police

By LAMECH JOHNSON?Tribune Staff Reporter?ljohnson@tribunemedia.net??A MAN alleging that his confession statement to a 2010 murder was forcefully obtained from him by police is presenting a final witness today in the Supreme Court.?Billy Johnson intends to call attorney Dion Smith to testify on his behalf in today's proceedings before Justice Bernard Turner.?Johnson faces a charge of murder, which he denies, where it is claimed that he, on March 26, 2010 caused the death of Rodne Feritilien.?Fertilien was found dead on Dowdeswell Street with multiple gun shot wounds about his body.?Johnson was charged September of that year in connection with the murder after he reportedly confessed about the crime to police.?The confession was brought to trial by the Crown. However it was disputed by the defence that alleged the statement was obtained from Johnson through police brutality.?Particulars of the brutality allegations were put to Sgt 1908 Keith Rolle who denied that Johnson was forced to admit to the crime.?Johnson alleged that he was hog-tied, slapped, punched, fish bagged, as well as beaten with a bat and had pliers attached to his genitals.?The officer denied that this occurred and that Johnson came clean about the murder of his own volition.?Today, defending attorneys Romona Farquharson-Seymour and Candice Hepburn will call Mr Smith as a witness.?Public prosecutors deputy director Garvin Gaskins prosecutes for the Crown with Viola Barnett.

read more »


News Article

April 06, 2013
Unnecessary disclosures

In parliaments, vicious debates often take place. Opposing sides do everything they can to win a point or cause the other side to be derailed. Parliaments are not places for thin-skinned people or for the faint of heart.
Public life in general is similar. Those who are against you will tell all manner of lies about you. Some will be highly offensive personal attacks that seek to destroy your reputation.
To make it in public life one has to be able to withstand these attacks and know when to respond and how to respond. Some criticisms from the shadows are not worth dignifying.
Dr. Andre Rollins is a young politician serving his first year as an elected representative. In a recent debate, he stood up in the House of Assembly and went on a tirade defending, in his mind, his sexual identity against questions to it he claimed were made by Opposition Leader Dr. Hubert Minnis.
"For the record, I am absolutely 100 percent heterosexual," Rollins declared.
Rollins went further.
"I was accused by him of living a lifestyle that I do not live so that he could use his contacts in The Punch to try and scandalize my name," he said.
"Anybody who knows me knows the lifestyle that I live.
"I had the FNM, while I ran for the PLP, trying to tell parents lies about me, a professional who works with children, to try and scandalize my name, to cause me to lose business.
"And you think I am not going to defend myself when the member for Killarney who was lying on me, stood up on his feet because he and the member for Long Island (Loretta Butler-Turner) were trying to get into my head and bend their wrists?
"And he's supposed to be a leader of the opposition?"
Minnis said he has no interest in Rollins' sexual preference. Rollins allowed himself to be flustered by the opposition's private taunts. Consequently, he made a bizarre declaration about his sexuality - declaring to be fully heterosexual - that made many people wonder why he felt the need to say such a thing.
We elect people to Parliament to do our business. We expect them to be law-abiding citizens who live honest lives. Being gay is not a crime. Being straight is not a crime. Therefore, it is unclear why a member would need to declare if he is or is not heterosexual or homosexual.
The 100 percent heterosexual declaration by Rollins will linger for a while. Rather than people thinking about his work as an MP and Gaming Board chairman, many will think about his sexuality.
Rollins chose to enter public life. He must learn to be more strategic in his statements. He must also learn that when you are loud, aggressive and challenge your political opponents, they will retaliate. And some people in the public sphere fight dirty. If he cannot handle the fight and is easily drawn to strange declarations on the record, he will not make it as a politician.
When unnamed sources attack unnamed politicians in tabloids, Rollins should know that an elected representative should not respond to that on the floor of Parliament. He must also learn how to fight back when the opposition tries to provoke him - without embarrassing himself.

read more »


News Article

April 26, 2013
Boxing Pro Sherman The Tank Williams to Sign Autographs at Palm Cay

Nassau,
Bahamas - Visitors to the BSFN Boat Show at Palm Cay tomorrow will get
the chance to knock knuckles with Bahamian pro heavyweight boxer Sherman
"The Tank" Williams. The champion boxer will be signing autographs and
browsing dozens of boats on display and available for sale at the event,
which is free to the public Saturday, April 27 from 11am to 6pm.

In
January 2011, Williams had a no-contest ruling during a grueling bout
against former undisputed heavyweight champion Evander Holyfield.
Against Williams, five-time champ Holyfield was on the wrong end of the
punches when the referee decided to stop the fight after three rounds
and declare a no-contest.

read more »


News Article

December 02, 2011
Jerome Benjamin Major, O.B.E., 78

Funeral Service for Jerome Benjamin Major, O.B.E., age 78 years, of Windy Castle, Winton Heights, formerly of Roses, Long Island, will be held on Friday December 2nd, 2011 at 11:00 a.m. at St. Matthew's Anglican Church, Shirley and Church Streets. Officiating will be Father Crosley Walkine, assisted by Deacon Lynden Douglas. Interment will follow in Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church Cemetery, East Shirley Street.
Left to cherish his memories are; his loving wife of 51 years: Avis Major; his adopted children: Horace, Tony, Tasha and Yogi; one brother: Lorenzo Major; one sister: Ella Major; six grand children: Maya, Justin, Brittany, Aliya, little Yogi and Andrew Miller;  eight sisters-in-law: Evelyn D'Aguilar, Heather Rahim of New York, Phyllis Shakes of Baltimore, Maryland, Shirley Francis, Sadie Miller, Rose Miller of Miramar, Florida and Sally Shakes of London, England and Corrie Major of New York;  four brothers-in-law: Adrian D'Aguilar, Easton Miller of Jamaica, Zai Rahim of New York and Joseph Francis of Miramar, Florida; three daughters-in-law: Schevon, Karen and Tanya;  nephews and nieces: Tasha and Kevin Dorsett, Lola and Eddie Rogers, Racquel and Christopher Patterson, Tara and Omar Rahim, Oliver and Lamar Miller, Rudy Francis, Michelle and Bill Jeffreys, Carol Dyer, Troy and Nicholas Rogers, Maureen Shakes, Gloria Berchell, David and Margie Major, Reuben Major, Sandra R. Major, Joyce Johnson, Sarah and Douglas Ausberry, Jackie and Enrique Sewer, Courtney Major, Douglas Major, Doris McCray, Cecil, Charles and Phillip Major, Princess Major, Elizabeth McDonald, Eriamae Saunders, Annemarie Archer and Reitha Curtis, Sandra Major, Paulette and Stephen Humes, Karen and Michael Belfield, Lauren and Bill Higgs, Mark Miller and Rodney Lionel Dean and family; other family and friends including: The Rt. Hon. Hubert Alexander Ingraham and Mrs. Ingraham, Rt. Hon. Frank Watson, Rt. Hon. Perry Gladstone Christie and Mrs. Christie, Manfred and Mae Ginter and family, Gaynell Bullard, Hycianth Nicolls, Thelma Fernander, Bob and Angela Carroll, Ian Mitchell, J.M. and Laverne Pinder, Arlene Ritchie, Harvey and Betsy Morrison, Velma Cartwright, Fairy Kraft, Kirklyn Marche, Dr. Patricia Rogers and Emily Rogers, Dr. Quentin and Mrs. Richmond, David Burrows and family, Carlton and Carla Seymour and family, Nigel Bethel and family, Jerome Young and family, Andrew Rogers and family,  the staff of Centerville Food Market, Grace, Vanessa, Freddy, Ace, Charmaine, Bendy, Kenny, Toya, Jackie, Samson and Annalee; Food Delite staff: Anne, Rosie, Sista, Shorty and especially Maria, Jeffrey Beneby and family, Rosemary Beneby and family, the management and staff of Beneby & Company, Chartered Accountants, the management and staff of Harry B. Sands Law firm, Raymond Rogers and family, Robert Pritchard and family, Caleb Hepburn and family, Karen Archer and family, Robert d'Albenas and family, Glen Pritchard and family, Phillip Lightbourne, Tracy and Sidney Godet,
Mike Cartwright and family, Gussie Turnquest and family, Walter Wells and family, Pat Treco and family, Trevor Kelly and family, Rupert Roberts, Camille and Damien Gomez, the American Embassy, Ship Liaison Office and the Coast Guard Division, the management and staff of d'Albenas Agency,  the management and staff of Bahamas Food Services, the management and staff of Bahamas Wholesale Agency, the management and staff of Lowes Wholesale, the management and staff of Lightbourne Trading, the management and staff of Thompson Trading, the management and staff of Phil's Food Store, the management and staff of Caribbean Bottling Co,  the management and staff of Jamaica Bahama, the management and staff of Nassau Diary, the management and staff of Kelly's Home Centre, the management and staff of Kingston Miami, the management and staff of Ocho Rios Miami, the management and staff of Palmdale Service Station, the management and staff of Hardings' Lock Smith, the management and staff of Nassau Pest Control, the management and staff of The Nassau Guardian, the management and staff of The Tribune, the management and staff of The Punch, the management and staff of Nassau Underwriters, the management and staff of Bahamas First, the management and staff of R.H. Curry, the management and staff of United Shipping Company, the management and staff of Wendell Jones & the Love 97 Media family, the management and staff of Bonaventure Lab, the management and staff of The Amoury Company, the management and staff of Battery and Tyre, the management and staff of Paradise Bottling, the management and staff of Aquapure, the management and staff of M & E Limited, the management and staff of First Caribbean International Bank, Palmdale and Shirley Street branches, the Embassy of the Republic of Cuba, Gurney Pinder of Spanish Wells, Terry Bain and the winter residents of Farmers and the Exuma Cays, the management and staff of Nassau Paper Company, Vaughn Higgs, Paul Major and family, Dwayne Adderley and family, William Mortimer, Harry Bowleg, Jeff  Lloyd, Sammy Taylor, Brendon Watson and Agatha Watson, Tom Watson, Douglas Turnquest and family, Michael Turnquest, Nisha Miller, Gary Sands and family, Retired Chief Superintendant Steven Seymour, Sergeant Terrance Moxey and family, Sergeant Franklyn Ferguson, Inspector Dencil Barr, the Dean family, the Darville family, the Major family, the Mortimer family, the Long Island Association and others too numerous to mention.
Special thanks to Doctors: Dr. I. Francis of the Heart Centre, Dr. Darville at ICU, Doctors Hospital and all the nursing staff of the ICU at Doctors Hospital. Especially, Nurse Shobhana Nair and special thanks to: Sandra Major,  Mr. and Mrs Fred Ginter, Gaynell Bullard,  Thelma Fernander, Camille and Damien Gomez, Nisha Major, Maria Solomon , Carlton Seymour, Trevor Kelly, Jerome Young and all who played an integral part in our hour of bereavement. Many thanks to those who have travelled from abroad.
Friends may pay their last respects at Butlers' Funeral Homes & Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets on Thursday December 1st, 2011, from 10:00 a.m until 4:30 p.m. and at the church on Friday December 2nd, 2011, from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

read more »


News Article

August 15, 2014
Made-over 'Turtles' not all that bad

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (Rated B)

Cast: Megan Fox, Will Arnett, William Fitchner

Genre: Action Adventure

Dwight's Rating: 2.5 stars

Teenagers, mutants, ninjas and turtles; with the possible exception of turtles, one imagines that an assemblage of any of these individual groups could have the potential to get really annoying. So one would not be faulted for suspecting that if called upon to imagine a grouping of turtles that were not only teenagers but also mutant ninjas that it would end up being something in line with what the kids these days call "a hot mess". Add to that the fact that this bizarre premise is based on a comic book and popular TV cartoon series that peaked in popularity way back in the late 1980s and early 1990s, and you would be well within reason to question the sanity of the person who decided to bring this franchise back from turtle purgatory.Yet, here we are, in 2014, with a new version of "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (TMNT)". And bigger than the shock of its return to movie theaters, is that it's not all that bad. In this era of abundant comic book-based films mostly aimed at very adult audiences, and with astonishing levels of violence, "TMNT" takes a different track, aiming to create a new, much younger audience for the franchise.While the original comic book series and the original theatrical release in 1990 were much darker in tone, this new movie (a sequel is already in the works for summer 2016) more closely follows the lighter, more comedic fare we all remember from the TV series. New York City -- Hollywood's favorite punching bag, is overrun by criminal mastermind Shredder and his evil Foot Clan -- the only hope for the city and its citizens rests in the "hands?" of four turtles who happen to be human-like mutants with ninja skills.They acquired said skills from their fellow mutant trainer and master, a rat named Splinter. And as you may recall, the turtles are all named after Renaissance-era painters: Michelangelo, Raphael, Leonardo and Donatello. Very early on, you realize this is not going to be "The Dark Knight". The emphasis is on whimsy. In addition to acting lightweight Megan Fox as news reporter April O'Neil, we have comic actors in the other major parts, including Will Arnett, and Whoopi Goldberg in a cameo. However, most of the humor comes from the wisecracking turtle, Michelangelo, who is blessed with some of the better one-liners and asides.Unlike the last few times we were treated with a "TMNT" movie (the original spawned sequels in 1991 and 1993), when the actors wore turtle suits from muppet master Jim Henson's workshop, advances like motion-capture technology allow for the reptiles to have a slightly less goofy appearance (Just slightly!) As is typical these days, this is a special effects feast, particularly during action sequences. A few of those scenes seem to drag on a bit longer than necessary -- never dull, just overly lengthy. Otherwise, the pacing is spirited.

While there's lots of fighting, it feels nowhere near as violent as most recent comic-based movies, with none of the decapitations, blood squirts or spurts that have become de rigeur.So for those in their 20s, 30s and 40s, nostalgic for the days of their carefree youth, "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" may possibly rekindle a few memories. But it's clear this once omnipresent entity is less for this crowd, and more for their own preteens and teens -- a group likely to enjoy it immensely.

o Dwight Strachan is the host/producer of " Morning Blend" on Guardian Radio. He is a television producer and writer, and an avid TV history and film buff. Email dwight@nasguard.com and follow him on twitter @morningblend969.

read more »


News Article

July 07, 2014
Seven gold medals for The Bahamas at CAC Juniors

After finishing with just one gold medal and a seventh-place finish at the CARIFTA Games earlier this year, The Bahamas proved that not much is broken with its junior athletics program, as the country sealed six gold medals and a fourth place finish at the 20th Central American and Caribbean Junior Track and Field Championships, in Morelia, Mexico this past weekend.
Overall, The Bahamas' 35-member team finished with 20 total medals, seven gold, eight silver and five bronze. Host country Mexico won the meet with a whopping 100 medals - 36 gold, 43 silver and 21 bronze; Jamaica was second with 43 total medals - 15 gold, 17 silver and 11 bronze; and Trinidad & Tobago rounded out the top three nations with 22 total medals - 10 gold, five silver and seven bronze. The Bahamas settled for fourth, and Puerto Rico was a close fifth with 20 total medals - six gold, five silver and nine bronze. The order of finish is based on gold medal count, and it was The Bahamas' best showing at the CAC Juniors in 22 years.
One of the biggest gold medals for The Bahamas came in the under-20 boys long jump where LaQuan Nairn notched a personal best leap of 7.55 meters (m) - 24' 9-1/4" - to win the competition by two centimeters and qualify for the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) World Junior Championships in the process. Ricardo Morales, from Mexico, won the silver medal with a best leap of 7.53m (24' 8-1/2"), and Shamar Rock, from Barbados, settled for the bronze with a best leap of 7.47m (24' 6-1/4").
Another impressive gold medal for The Bahamas came in the under-18 boys high jump. Ken Mullings cleared a personal best height of 2.05m (6' 8-3/4") to hold David Juarez of Mexico and Jah-Nhai Perinchief of Bermuda. Both Juarez and Perinchief cleared 2.02m (6' 7-1/2"). Based on number of knockdowns, Juarez took the silver, and Perinchief won the bronze.
In the under-20 girls triple jump, Dannielle Gibson was short of her personal best of 12.85m (42' 2") which was done at the BTC National Open and Junior Track and Field Championships, but she still had enough to win the gold medal, with a distance of 11.94m (39' 2-1/4"). Mexico took silver and bronze in this event with Lidia Rodriguez winning the silver with a distance of 11.40m (37' 5"), and Luisa Rejon winning the bronze with a leap of 11.05m (36' 3").
The final gold medal in the field for The Bahamas came in the under-20 boys discus. Khyle Higgs just missed qualifying for the world juniors with a distance of 54.64m (179' 3"). The qualifying distance for the world juniors is 55m (180' 5") flat. Mexico once again got the silver and bronze in this event, with Uzziel Munoz taking the silver with a best throw of 51.87 (170' 2"), and Alberto Vargas winning the bronze with a best throw of 49.42 (162' 1").
The Bahamas picked up three more gold medals in track events. There was a 1-2 punch for The Bahamas in the under-18 girls 200m, as Brianne Bethel and Jenae Ambrose were first and second in times of 24.10 seconds and 24.18 seconds respectively. Shanice Reid, from Jamaica, was third, in 24.24 seconds.
In the under-20 girls version of that race, Keianna Albury powered to the gold medal, in a personal best of 23.54 seconds. The Trinidad & Tobago duo of Zakiya Denoon and Kayelle Clarke won silver and bronze in times of 23.63 and 23.71 seconds respectively.
Albury, Bethel and Ambrose were all under the world juniors qualifying time of 24.50 seconds.
The final gold medal for The Bahamas came in the under-20 girls 100m hurdles where Devynne Charlton ran a personal best time of 13.56 seconds to go significantly under the world juniors qualifying time of 14.20 seconds. Andrea Vargas from Costa Rica won the silver medal in 13.72 and Akila McShine from Trinidad & Tobago claimed the bronze, in 14.05 seconds.
One of the more impressive silver medals for The Bahamas came in the under-18 boys 100m. Keanu Pennerman ran a personal best time of 10.51 seconds to win the silver medal behind Jamaican Waseem Williams who ran a meet record of 10.47 seconds. Akanni Hislop, from Trinidad, won the bronze medal in a time of 10.63 seconds. Pennerman qualified for the world juniors with that run.
Ambrose was second behind her teammate Bethel in the under-18 girls 200m, and the other individual silver medal on the track for The Bahamas came in the under-18 boys 400m. Henri Delauze won the silver in a personal best time of 47.21 seconds, which was under the world juniors qualifying time of 47.70 seconds. Jamal Walton from the Cayman Islands ran a splendid race, winning the gold in a meet record of 47.01 seconds, and Jason Yaw, from Guyana, settled for the bronze behind Walton and Delauze, in 47.71 seconds. In that race, Walton broke Usain Bolt's meet record of 47.12 seconds.
In the field, The Bahamas got a silver medal from Denzel Pratt in the under-20 boys javelin. Pratt tossed the javelin 66.18m (217' 1") to finish second behind Trinidadian Shaquille Waithe who had a best throw of 70.39m (230' 11"). Orlando Thomas, from Jamaica, won the bronze medal with a best throw of 63.89m (209' 7").
The other four silver medals for The Bahamas came in the relays. The under-18 girls 4x100m relay team of Andira Ferguson, Jenae Ambrose, Charisma Taylor and Brianne Bethel, in that order, ran 46.76 seconds to finish second behind Jamaica which set a new meet record in 44.97 seconds. Mexico won the bronze in 47.32 seconds.
In the under-18 boys version of that race, The Bahamas' team of Keanu Pennerman, Tavonte Mott, Samson Colebrooke and Aaron Ross ran 41.76 seconds to win the silver medal behind Trinidad which ran 41.25 seconds. Puerto Rico won the bronze in 42.15 seconds. The Jamaicans were disqualified.
In the under-18 girls 4x400m, the team of Brianne Bethel, Amber Ford, Jenae Ambrose and Charisma Taylor won the silver medal for The Bahamas, in 3:56.06. Mexico took the gold in 3:50.63, and the Jamaican team was disqualified.
In the under-18 boys version of that race, the team of Kinard Rolle, Pennerman, Delauze and Samson Colebrooke won the silver medal, in 3:14.70. Trinidad & Tobago claimed the gold, in 3:13.93, and Jamaica settled for the bronze this time, in 3:16.27.
The Bahamas' only bronze medal in the field events came from Andira Ferguson in the under-18 girls long jump. Ferguson leapt 5.72m (18' 9-1/4") for the bronze. Rechelle Meade, from Anguilla, won the gold with a leap of 5.92m (19' 5-1/4"), and Shanique Wright, from Jamaica, settled for the silver with a best leap of 5.79m (19').
In the under-18 boys 100m hurdles, Tavonte Mott ran 13.82 seconds for the bronze medal. Roje Jackson-Chin, from Jamaica, ran 13.36 seconds for the gold, and Michael Nicholls, from Barbados, was second with a time of 13.66 seconds.
In the under-20 girls 400m hurdles, Talia Thompson won the bronze medal, in 1:01:57. Tia Adana Belle, from Barbados, circled the track for the gold medal in 1:00.30, and Paloma Morales, from Mexico, won the silver in 1:01.49.
In the under-20 girls 100m, Keianna Albury picked up another medal as she finished third in 11.56 seconds. Trinidad & Tobago won gold and silver in this event, with Alaliyah Telesford winning the gold, in 11.47 seconds, and Zakiya Denoon taking the silver, in 11.55 seconds.
The final bronze medal for The Bahamas came in the under-20 girls 4x100m. The team of Devynne Charlton, Talia Thompson, Dannielle Gibson and Keianna Albury, in that order, ran 45.73 seconds for the bronze. Trinidad won in a meet record of 44.24 seconds, and Jamaica settled for the bronze in 44.33 seconds.

read more »


News Article

May 05, 2014
Ferguson defends police over Cash matter

Assistant Commissioner of Police Anthony Ferguson defended the actions of the Royal Bahamas Police Force (RBPF) yesterday in relation to a search and seizure of items at the home of Free National Movement (FNM) Chairman Darron Cash.
"The police force is a professional organization with a professional group of persons in Cyber Crime who understand the law and their authority to do certain things," said Ferguson when contacted for comment.
He said he did not want to be caught in a back and forth between politicians, but stressed that he has "no doubt that [the officers in question] would have acted within the guidelines that they have".
"I haven't gotten any information about any adverse things happening while at the residence from anybody. Nobody contacted me and said the police acted inappropriately," he said.
On Thursday, three officers seized two laptop computers and a smartphone from Cash's Cable Beach home, reportedly in relation to a probe into the alleged leak of confidential information from Bank of The Bahamas (BOB).
Since the incident, the RBPF has come under fire from the opposition.
Cash's lawyer, FNM Senator Carl Bethel, claimed the items were "physically grabbed from [Cash's] hands and taken by the police, who refused to deliver or to leave a copy of the 'search warrant' with Mr. Cash".
When asked about this, Ferguson said police are mandated to show a search warrant before executing one at a person's home. He said he does not doubt that the warrant was produced.
Bethel told The Nassau Guardian that he filed a notice of originating motion in the Supreme Court on Thursday, which will begin the process of determining whether the police followed lawful protocol in the execution of their duties.
He said the matter will be heard by Senior Justice Jon Isaacs on Wednesday.
"They had no reasonable or probable cause to act the way they did," Bethel said last week.
"Based on the information we have so far, they did not act with the authority of the law, but we will see how that plays out in the evidence."
The Nassau Guardian also contacted Deputy Commissioner Quinn McCartney about the issue yesterday; however, he said he was not in a position to comment.
Cash has spoken out on several matters related to BOB in the last several months.
He released a series of press statements on issues regarding the bank.
In one of those statements, he raised concerns about reports that the bank was being used as a political tool and called for a select committee to be established in the House of Assembly to scrutinize the extent to which public funds are at risk at BOB.
Both Prime Minister Perry Christie and BOB Managing Director Paul McWeeney strongly denied that the bank's funds were at risk.
BOB pledged to sue The Punch newspaper, which has repeatedly made these allegations. The bank also announced several weeks ago that it was investigating the leak.

read more »


News Article

March 13, 2014
Violence against women: Leslie Miller and the PLP's veil of silence

Approaching International Women's Day, the country witnessed a day of infamy in the House of Assembly, one of the most repugnant moments in the chamber in living memory.
Tall Pines MP Leslie Miller boasted, emphatically and unequivocally, that he had inflicted violence on, assaulted and brutalized a woman. In a 105-word horrendous analogy Miller noted, as reported in this journal: "'That's like beating your wife or your girlfriend every time you go home. You just beat her for looking at her. I love ya. Boom, boom, boom. I had a girlfriend like that.
"'When I didn't beat her she used to tell me I ain't love her no more cause I don't hit her. But seriously I had one like that. I had one. She used to tell me,' he insisted as other members murmured and chuckled.
"House Speaker Dr. Kendal Major injected, 'We know that you're joking with that.'
"However, Miller said he was 'serious with that'.
"'I tell her I get tired, man,' he continued, laughing. 'My hands hurting a little bit... give me a break.'
"After a comment from a sitting member inquiring whether he was joking, he reiterated, 'I am telling you the truth. One thing I don't do is lie.'"
Miller "entertained" his colleagues with braggadocio and misogynistic machismo. He twice said that he was serious. He said that he was telling the truth. He said that he doesn't lie. He could not be clearer. There is no way to misconstrue the remarks.
Equally infamous, many of his party colleagues erupted in laughter. Recall that this was before Miller later claimed that he was joking, making the laughter even more contemptible.
Laughter
Aside Miller was Central and South Andros MP His Excellency Picewell Forbes, the country's high commissioner to CARICOM, shaking uncontrollably with laughter, throwing his arms wildly in the air, howling his enjoyment.
A few weeks ago Forbes told Foreign Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell on the floor of the House that he had "some different views" with him about LGBT issues.
With Mitchell generally voicing the views of successive governments, was Forbes disagreeing with government policy and non-discrimination of gays and lesbians?
It is clear from those remarks and in his delight in Miller's woman-beating story, that Forbes represents an antediluvian mindset. In his public career he has proved an intellectual troglodyte. He is not alone.
Sadly, revealingly, Forbes was also not alone in his raucous snickering at the horror of a woman being brutalized.
What particularly tickled his funny bone and that of certain PLP colleagues? Was it when Miller sighed: "I tell her I get tired, man. My hands hurting a little bit... give me a break." At that point Miller insisted that he was telling the truth.
How long is it into a beating before one's hands start hurting "a little bit"? How long before one's hands start hurting a lot? What is the equation of brutality? Is the victim supposedly to feel more loved the more she is brutalized: "I love ya. Boom, boom, boom"? Miller's comments packed more than a punch or a punch line.
As deafening as the laughter, the misogyny, the nauseating sexism, was the silence, not just in the moment, but more egregiously, the veil of silence of the PLP in the weeks after Miller's revolting statement.
Miller's story of brutality was repugnant enough. The aftermath is as disturbing and as revealing. It was a week before his comments gained notoriety amidst a gathering storm of disgust and rebuke.
Outrage
The outrage on social media exploded, with a Photoshopped image quickly going viral of Miller beating a woman on the ground, surrounded by PLP colleagues, including three female MPs, standing aside laughing. Comments on Facebook are running heavily against Miller, with the PLP's silence equally condemned.
An audio of Miller's repulsive comments was placed on YouTube. On March 8, nearly 630 people had listened to the comments, that number climbing the next day to approximately 1,500, climbing approximately another 400 by the following night to around 1,900, and climbing still.
Having plunged the PLP into a quandary, Miller made matters considerably worse. Instead of humility and restraint in his defensive words and offensive tone, he has appeared belligerent and bullying, continuing to offend. His exercise in damage control has been slapdash, ineffective, unconvincing.
The speaker of the House said that he believes that Miller was joking. Many do not share the speaker's opinion. They take Miller at his first words. Why did it take him approximately a week and enormous pressure before he addressed his remarks?
With Miller having taken nearly a week to backtrack, many concluded that either he did not understand his offense or that he was mostly engaging in damage control or some combination, none of which speaks well of his mindset.
Especially for many women, his eventual apology was too little, too late. It has often been said of misogynists that they simply don't get it. Had Miller's comments not come under scrutiny, he may never have apologized.
An expression of remorse is typically the response of someone who appreciates that they have offended others. But when Miller first took to the floor of the House to address his prior comments, contrition was not his first impulse.
Incredibly, he raged against The Nassau Guardian for reporting his remarks. He threatened to return fire to Long Island MP Loretta Butler-Turner who had upbraided him earlier.
A number of the male PLP MPs who laughed a week earlier at his claim of beating a woman cheered on as he promised to deal with Butler-Turner if she persisted in her criticism. Tourism Minister Obie Wilchcombe suggested that Butler-Turner should apologize to Miller for having criticized him!
Revived
The exchange revived misogynistic remarks Miller made during the 2012 general election in reference to Butler-Turner.
In 2014, Miller's misogyny went even beyond his prior sexist remarks, with his mea culpas growing in proportion to the political heat he was taking.
Full contrition is unconditional: "I was wrong and I am sorry." By contrast, Miller played the victim. His apology was conditional.
He bemoaned: "Unfortunately, the media choose to highlight certain words without executing the entire story and truth... that's how papers are sold and unnecessary drama unfolds. This is common in our society, but unacceptable on all [sic] levels. I will continue to challenge anyone that tries to assassinate my character, especially on such a sensitive topic.
"To anyone that my analogy may have offended, I sincerely apologize. We [sic] are one Bahamas, let's make an effort to put politics and hidden agendas aside and live that way."
It's mostly the media's fault. My words were taken out of context. I'm angry that they reported exactly what I said. Let's put politics aside and love each other. Odd, that the latter is not his modus operandi when he is viciously attacking his opponents.
His is the language typical of faltering damage control campaigns. There was the classic conditionality and half-apology typical of such public relations: "To anyone that my analogy may have offended ..." May have offended?
Miller has condemned himself and assassinated his own character by the rank misogyny he spewed and by the fuller and unconditional apology he could not bring himself to offer.
He can go on wildly blaming others. But it is he and he alone who is responsible for the position in which he finds himself. The more he attacks others in this debacle the worse his position.
Miller has done irrevocable damage to his public standing. He has significantly damaged his party. Still, it is the party that is doing greater damage to itself by remaining coldly silent.
There is the silence of the men of the PLP including Prime Minister Perry Christie. There is the silence of the women of the PLP including Social Services Minister Melanie Griffin, whose words rang hollow in commemoration of International Women's Day.
Historically, silence in the face of racism, sexism and homophobia have suggested a certain complicity with those who would dehumanize others with the most repugnant remarks, as did Miller.
Had an FNM MP uttered Miller's contemptible words, Christie and a host of PLP men and women, including Griffin and her female colleagues, as well as possibly Miller, would have lined up to vehemently assail the FNM in question.
The PLP's silence is more than hypocrisy. It is vile and nauseating.
Sadly, where are the apologies of those PLP MPs who laughed along with Miller? Having failed to apologize, they are even more complicit in the misogyny and the sexism, as is the PLP generally for refusing to rebuke Miller.
Following the 1987 general election, widely thought to have been fraudulent and underhanded, Miller noted, "All's fair in war and love", an idiom suggesting that in love or war or politics one does not have to abide by certain rules of fair play or ethics.
Surely Miller was being "serious about that" back then, just as perhaps most Bahamians view him as having been deadly serious in his more recent comments.
o frontporchguardian@gmail.com, www.bahamapundit.com.

read more »