Search results for : food

Did you mean : food stores

Showing 71 to 80 of 1000 results


News Article

April 27, 2011
KPACE Afterschool program along with Ridgeland Primary School partners with Hands for Hunger to conduct food drive

The KPACE Afterschool Program and the Ridgeland Primary School partnered with Hands for Hunger to conduct their first food drive recently at the Ridgeland Primary School.
Participants of the afterschool program, along with their classmates, were challenged by school principal Deborah Stuart to help eradicate hunger in New Providence by bringing in donations over a four-day period, to which approximately 350 pounds of food were collected and presented to the Englerston Urban Renewal Center to be distributed to those in need.
“We chose to partner with Hands for Hunger because there are far too many in our communities going to bed hungry every night,”?said executive director of KPACE, ...

read more »


News Article

January 11, 2011
Announcement of Share Buy Back Program from AML Foods Limited

Nassau, Bahamas - AML Foods
Limited today announces the launch of a share buy back program for its
ordinary shares. The program, authorised by the Company's board of
directors, allows for management to purchase up to 10% of its current
issued ordinary shares of 1,540,417 shares over a 36 month period to
January 31, 2014.

"Our board has been discussing a share buy back program for some time
now" says Mr. Dionisio D'Aguilar, Chairman of AML Foods Limited. "We
have felt that our share price is not truly reflective of the value of
the Company and has been deflated by an illiquid market and sellers
needing to sell shares to raise cash. We feel that we can provide
increased shareholder value by buying back some of our outstanding
ordinary shares and improving earnings and dividends per share...

read more »


News Article

August 07, 2012
Food import bans are not the answer

Dear Editor,

Over the past couple decades successive agriculture ministers have either imposed or threatened bans on food imports as a way of supporting Bahamian farmers. The unintended consequences of such actions were higher prices for what consumers believe are inferior products.
The Banana market of 1996 is a prime example of unintended consequences - for both producers and consumers. In a short period of time after government imposed a ban preventing imports to "help" the local banana growers, the foreign bananas were available from roadside vendors at higher prices. Consumers still preferred the large yellow imports to the variety offered by local growers.
In 2006 a threat to ban imported eggs was not implemented. Today food stores sell locally produced eggs as well as the more expensive imports.
The current minister of agriculture has threatened to impose a "ban on chicken imports" unless Bahamian wholesalers buy 30 percent of their chicken purchases locally.
As noted, there was no shortage of imported bananas during the ban in 1996 even at the higher prices. It is highly likely that foreign chickens will find their way into Bahamian households. In spite of a ban on imported chickens and bananas consumers seem to prefer the imports. It was suggested the imported chicken is less expensive so that's why people buy it. Yet, in the case of eggs, the imported product was more expensive and the consumer still purchased them. Price is a factor but not the only one when people decide how to spend their money.
For the bureaucrats at the Ministry of Agriculture, their time would be better spent determining why Bahamians prefer the imported chicken, why wholesalers buy it, and encouraging Bahamian farmers to promote their products.
Even if a government minister thinks he knows best, being elected to public office is not a mandate to use force to prevent or promote market action so long as it is peaceful.
Local farmers risk their own money to supply the markets. The successful ones find their niche and consumers buy their products. Instead of banning imports it is better to educate Bahamian consumers about the benefits of buying home grown products. Encourage high standards along with creative marketing like taste tests, and prove their product meets strict standards for safety.
It is unclear how the minister of agriculture can force a business to purchase a government specified percentage of its chicken inventory from the vendors he chooses. What happens if the chickens chosen by the minister do not sell? Does the minister intend reimbursing the merchants for their loss? Forcing businesses to make bad investments harkens back to the politburo of Soviet Russia.
Hopefully reason will prevail and the minister will use his soapbox to encourage people to buy local chicken instead of the threatening forceful tactics described in the proposed policy.
As the Nassau Institute pointed out in 2006, protection for some producers discriminates against others. It encourages other businesses to seek government assistance or worse, involvement in their particular enterprise.
There is a long history of costly failures when government interferes in markets. Sadly such failures never deter the newly elected from repeating the errors of their foregoers. It's all about politics.

- The Nassau Institute

read more »


News Article

August 11, 2011
Robin Hood Joins The Wellness Center to Promote Healthy Food Choices for Back to School

Robin Hood Mega Store on Tonique Williams-Darling Highway recently partnered with Dr. Patti L. Symonette, Chief Executive Officer and Founder of the Wellness Center to provide parents with some helpful tips on making healthy lunch and snack choices when selecting food items for their children returning to school this new school year.

read more »


News Article
'I dealt drugs to pay for food'
March 04, 2014
'I dealt drugs to pay for food'

A MAN who said his reason for dealing drugs was to put food on his table cried in Magistrates Court after being sentenced to five years imprisonment for possessing $7,000 worth of marijuana...

read more »


News Article
NCL Food Donors:
March 26, 2013
NCL Food Donors:

In January of this year we achieved a major H4H milestone by tapping into the great waste resource at the Nassau port: cruise ships! We excitedly report that Norwegian Cruise Line (NCL) has paved the way for other socially responsible cruiseliners to make donations. The best part about this partnership? It was spearheaded by the awesome NCL staff.

read more »


News Article

November 17, 2011
Grand Bahama Shipyard Lends a Hand in Annual Food Drive!

Freeport, Grand Bahama - Not just satisfied teaching a trade to Bahamians the management of Grand Bahama Shipyard Ltd. (GBS) is also guiding their apprentices to give back to their community.

read more »



News Article

January 06, 2011
Police: Scam artists target food stores

Commercial crime investigators have uncovered a new fake check scam targeting major supermarkets.
Head of the Business and Technology Crimes Unit of the Central Detective Unit (CDU) Assistant Superintendent Michael Moxey said yesterday that the scam is being backed by an organized crime ring.
Moxey said that while the group is well organized, suspects do not always succeed in passing off the fake checks to businesses.
So far police have discovered 40 fraudulent checks that were used at several supermarket chains in New Providence. According to Moxey, those involved in the scam go to food stores and purchase goods with the fake checks.
He said supermarkets often find out about the scam when attempts ar ...

read more »


News Article

April 10, 2014
Food imports 'could be cut by about 15 per cent'

WITHIN five years, the Bahamas could cut food imports by about 15 per cent - saving $200 million in the process - if the government sustains its current push to develop the Agriculture industry.

read more »