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News Article

October 04, 2010
Understanding Chiropractic

By DR JACQUELINE LIGHTBOURN DC

A Better Back

Chiropractic Center

CHIROPRACTIC is a health care profession that focuses on disorders of the musculoskeletal system and the nervous system, and the effects of these disorders on general health.

Chiropractic care is used most often to treat neuromusculoskeletal complaints, including but not limited to back pain, neck pain, pain in the joints of the arms or legs, and headaches. Doctors of Chiropractic practice a drug-free, hands-on approach to health care that includes patient examination, diagnosis and treatment.

The most important procedure performed by Doctors of Chiropractic is known as a Chiropractic adjustment. The purpose of an adjust ...

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News Article
One of the oldest healing arts
June 21, 2011
One of the oldest healing arts

It's one of the oldest healing arts, and today the benefits of massage are varied and far-reaching.  As an accepted part of many physical rehabilitation programs, massage therapy has also proven beneficial for many chronic conditions including low back pain, arthritis, bursitis, fatigue, high blood pressure, diabetes, immunity suppression, infertility, smoking cessation and depression.  Many people will also attest that massage helps relieve the stress and tension of everyday living.

Chantell Smith is one of those persons.  She tries to get a massage as often as she can and when her "pocket" allows so that she can relax from her everyday stressors.   The 50-plus year-old woman says the opportunity to lie on her massage therapist's bed does not happen as much as she would like (at least once a month), but when it does, she says she lets go of all of her worries, at least for the time that she's there.  She says she is not rich or barely even well-off by any stretch of the imagination, but she makes allowances for that one splurge in her life, because for that brief period in time, she says her life is stress-free.

Making time for massages is something persons from all walks of life should do because the benefits are numerous, says Orthopedic Sports Therapist Edwardo Thompson, who is trained in massage therapy and has been practicing for 12 years at Trinity Plaza on West Bay Street.  He says over the years he has found that most people think that getting a massage done is only for the wealthy or the really stressed, but he says the aim of therapists is to help people to recover and that massages are preventative and for everyone from the office worker to the garbage collector to the stay-at-home mom, because he says their bodies all go through chemical reactions that tighten muscles and puts muscles under stress.

"You don't have to lift something heavy to put your muscles under stress -- it could be something as simple as a thought, so therefore that stress level that you're now putting on your body needs to find its way out.  I like to look at the body as a big chain of energy.  Anytime you have a short circuit, it has to go somewhere.  Electricians will tell you that the reason you have circuit boxes is because if you have a shortage somewhere it's going to trip the breaker, so the same thing with stress.  When your body becomes stressed then you start having boils and lumps and all these other things, and this is when diseases start to form.  It has to go somewhere, and nine times out of 10, what massage does is help the body to relax.  It helps the body to get rid of that load.  Muscles are designed to move, so all the movement that you do over a period of time weighs you down and puts tension on you.  It actually strains the muscle, so a good therapist will actually lengthen the muscle tissues and that's where the results will come."

Going for days, weeks and months on end without having your muscles relaxed to release the chemical reaction isn't good says Thompson, who is also an active release therapist.

"The true benefit for me when I work on my clients is to really help them prevent stress ... even disorders.  Sometimes we [massage therapists] are the first ones to recognize a problem with a client.  Sometimes the client doesn't even know they have a problem.  Because we're working on them on a consistent basis, we're able to identify things and sometimes we make suggestions," he said.

Thompson has come across many clients with posture problems from doing everyday things they don't think twice about, like tilting their head to the side, which if they do for years on end, their body adjusts to by rotation.  He's seen countless clients with one shoulder higher than the next due to the shoulder adjusting to a heavy bag slung across it for many years.  Even women wearing incorrect bras pose a problem, he says, as the bra straps cut into the shoulder and causes problems with the trapezius muscle and the neck.

The sports therapist says through just being able to touch, therapists can even identify changes in the foot as well.  A lot of the soreness and tightness at the bottom of people's feet, he says, can be attributed to the type of shoe they're wearing.  Through touch, he says, these simple things he's able to identify and help a lot of clients get back on the right track.

Thompson, who works out of The Spa of Eden at Pishon, says every therapist has his own technique and style, and that he has developed a signature style known as "The Edwardo" that is more of a therapeutic massage.  This style, he says, is for the everyday person seeking relaxation, but he says people who lie on his massage bed don't just get "worked on."  He says he solves problems.

"Most patients when they lay down on my table, nine times out of 10 they have a problem.  When you lay down on my table, I want you to leave out of here completely healed, so for me it's not just a massage, it's solving a problem, so the therapeutic part comes in when I'm asking the questions before we begin the massage.  Are there any concerns?  And you would be surprised what people would tell you about problems they've had for years.

"Every stroke has an intent when I work, and that's the difference.  It has a purpose.  It's being used to deliver something.  And that thing that I'm delivering is what I feel with the tissue that I'm working, what state the tissue is in when I'm working -- whether it's in a contracted state or fibrotic state, it's all about the touch.  A touch that will not only treat the symptom, but correct the problem."
Thompson, who is also trained in neuromuscular therapy, and a myofacial therapist (a technique that is used for releasing tissue and is a certified active release therapist) says all of his work isn't just based on a feel-good massage, but more of a medical massage.

How often a person gets a massage should be based on their lifestyle, says Thompson.  He says it all depends on a person's level of stress or how they carry themselves, and that they just need to find that quiet time for themselves.

When you've made the decision to get a massage, Thompson says the first thing  people should consider in selection the spa you're going to is cleanliness, with professionalism not too far behind.  He says you also want to make sure you feel comfortable and that your expectations are met.

He's the type of therapist who likes his clients to give him the freedom to do his job.  "When a client relaxes and lets their body go, I find that it's the greatest opportunity for me to work, because I find that there's no tension -- there's nothing stopping me from actually working to reach that goal which is to really eliminate the stress and the fatigue, whatever the problem is.  I would suggest clients let the therapist have the freedom to use their gift."

While the country is in an economic bind and most people are watching how they spend their "pennies," he suggests that you start living from a preventative perspective instead of waiting for something to happen.  Thompson says getting massages gives you the opportunity to maintain a perfect health, to recover it, and ensure that your body is performing at an optimum level at all times.
"Spend that quality time for yourself.  To really look at it from the perspective that you not only want to live longer, but you want to live healthier.  When you get a massage, it's not that you're getting a relaxation massage or feel-good massage, you're actually helping your body to function."
 
10 MOST POPULAR TYPES OF MASSAGE

Swedish massage therapy: Therapists use long, smooth strokes, kneading and circular movements on superficial layers of muscle using massage lotion or oil.

Aromatherapy massage: Massage therapy with the addition of one or more scented plant oils called essential oils to address specific needs.  The massage therapist can select oils that are relaxing, energizing, stress-reducing or balancing.  Aromatherapy massage is particularly suited to stress-related conditions with an emotional component.

Hot stone massage: Heated, smooth stones are placed on certain points on the body to warm and loosen tight muscles and balance energy centers in the body.  The massage therapist may also hold stones and apply gentle pressure with them.  The warmth is comforting.  Hot stone massage is good for people who have muscle tension, but prefer lighter massage.

Deep tissue massage: This massage targets the deeper layers of muscles and connective tissue.  The massage therapist uses slower strokes or friction techniques across the grain of the muscle.  Deep tissue massage is used for chronically tight or painful muscles, repetitive strain, postural problems or recovery from injury.  People often feel sore for one to two days after deep tissue massage.

Shiatsu massage: A form of Japanese bodywork that uses localized finger pressure in a rhythmic sequence on acupuncture meridians. Each point is held for two to eight seconds to improve the flow of energy and help the body regain balance.  People are normally pleasantly surprised when they try shiatsu for the first time.  It is relaxing yet the pressure is firm and there is usually no soreness afterwarsds.

Thai massage: Like shiatsu, Thai massage aligns the energies of the body using gentle pressure on specific points.  Thai massage also includes compressions and stretches.  You don't just lie there -- the therapist moves and stretches you into a sequence of postures.  It's like yoga without doing any work.  Thai massage is more energizing than other forms of massage.  It also reduces stress and improves flexibility and range of motion.

Pregnancy massage: Also called prenatal massage, pregnancy massage is becoming increasingly popular with expectant mothers.  Massage therapists who are certified in pregnancy massage know the proper way to position and support the woman's body during the massage, and how to modify techniques.

Reflexology massage: Although reflexology is sometimes called foot massage, it is more than simple foot massage.  Reflexology involves applying pressure to certain points on the foot that corresponds to organs and systems in the body.  Reflexology is very relaxing, especially for people who stand on their feet all day, or just have tired, achy feet.

Sports massage: Sports massage is specifically designed for people who are involved in physical activity, but you don't have to be a professional athlete to have one -- this type of massage is used by people who are active and work out often.  The focus isn't on relaxation, but on preventing and treating injury and enhancing athletic performance.  A combination of techniques are used.  The strokes are generally faster than Swedish massage.  Facilitated stretching is a common technique.  It helps to loosen muscles and increase flexibility.

Back massage: Some massage clinics and spas offer a 30-minute back massages.  If a back massage is not on its menu, you can also book a 30 or 40-minute massage and ask that the massage therapist focus on your back.
Source: altmedicine.about.com

BENEFITS OF MASSAGE

o Alleviate lower back pain and improve range of motion.
o Assist with shorter, easier labor for expectant mothers and shorten maternity hospital stays.
o Ease medication dependence.
o Enhance immunity by stimulating lymph flow--the body's natural defense system.
o Exercise and stretch weak, tight, or atrophied muscles.
o Help athletes of any level prepare for, and recover from, strenuous workouts.
o Improve the condition of the body's largest organ -- the skin.
o Increase joint flexibility.
o Lessen depression and anxiety.
o Promote tissue regeneration, reducing scar tissue and stretch marks.
o Pump oxygen and nutrients into tissues and vital organs, improving circulation.
o Reduce postsurgery adhesions and swelling.
o Reduce spasms and cramping.
o Relax and soften injured, tired, and overused muscles.
o Release endorphins--amino acids that work as the body's natural painkiller.
o Relieve migraine pain.
Source: massagetherapy.com

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News Article

June 15, 2011
Grand Bahama Power Company's new 80 million plant cleared for ground breaking

FREEPORT, Grand Bahama - Work is underway on the Grand Bahama Power Company's new 80 million dollar plant thanks to the efficient work of Waugh Construction, a local contractor in Grand Bahama. GBPC announced a few weeks ago their contractual agreement with Burmeister & Wain Scandinavian Contractor (BWSC) and MAN Diesel & Turbo (MAN) to construct GBPC's new 52 MW HFO diesel plant, on 6 acres of land adjacent to the current Steam Plant.
"We are excited to have bulldozers on site and clearing getting underway," noted Sarah MacDonald, GBPC's new President and CEO. "The new plant is proceeding on schedule and providing much needed construction jobs to the local community."  
The new plant will benefit customers providing a long term solution to improving reliability and stabilizing rates for GBPC customers.  Customers also benefit from the new cost structure approved by the Grand Bahama Port Authority which ensures that the plant is built without an increase in customer's rates.
While the international contractor along with an expected local work force of over 70 will build the new diesel pant, GBPC customers will benefit from supplemental generation brought on Island in early June. Once site clearing is complete construction of the physical plant will commence later this month and is projected to be completed in 2012.
Photos: Waugh Construction clears the way for new 80 million dollar GBPC Generation Plant - Local contractor Waugh Construction has been busy this week clearing the way for the new Grand Bahama Power Generation Plant. GBPC announced a few weeks ago their plans to construct GBPC's new 52 MW HFO diesel plant on 6 acres of land adjacent to the current Steam Plant,  the project is due to be completed in late 2012. 'We are excited to have bulldozers on site and clearing getting underway,' noted Sarah MacDonald, GBPC's new President and CEO. 'The new plant is proceeding on schedule and providing much needed construction jobs to the local community.' (Photos courtesy of Erik J. Russell / Keen i Media Ltd)

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News Article

November 21, 2011
No Stenographer Delays Gun Court Trials

The Gun Court could not hear trials for two days last week because no stenographer was available to record the proceedings, The Nassau Guardian can reveal.

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News Article

November 27, 2011
VERDICT EXPECTED IN BISHOP'S SEX TRIAL

FOLLOWING several delays in making a decision, the ruling in the sex trial of Bishop Randy Fraser, pictured, is expected to be handed down this morning.

The guilty or not guilty ruling was supposed to have been delivered in Court 8, Bank Lane, on Friday. However, an announcement was made the day before, and the ruling was postponed to today.

Tribune sources claim a portion of the trial transcripts - which needed reviewing - had been given to presiding Magistrate Carolita Bethell the day before the ruling was supposed to be made, hence the need for an adjournment.

Upon requesting confirmation from the deputy Chief Magistrate, she directed questions regarding the adjournment to the prosecutor Fra ...

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News Article

April 06, 2011
(Photos) National Arts Festival Holds Workshop on Man-O-War Cay

Man - O- War Cay, Abaco, The Bahamas - Students from the Man-O-War Cay
All Age School perform a song as part of a workshop held for the school
by adjudicators of the E. Clement Bethel National Arts Festival, on
April 4, 2011.

Choral and Instrumental Music Adjudicator Ms. Helen Peloquin (at piano) shows Man-O-War Cay
All Age School music teacher Deanna Stecker a song as part of the workshop...

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News Article
Summer time and the living is easy
June 29, 2011
Summer time and the living is easy

The final school bell has tolled for all school aged kids whether they are in the public or private sector and it's time to "veg out" -- or at least that's what many students may think. The seemingly endless days of summer may finally be officially here but educators at all levels of education say while it is good for students to enjoy their break it does not mean that all they learnt during the school year should just go out the window.

Educators say summer break is the best time to catch up on leisurely reading that students didn't get to engage in due to school work, the perfect opportunity to review old assignments they may have struggled with and have the time to better understand where they went wrong and research topics they are likely to encounter in the upcoming academic year.  Simply put -- summer break they say has more potential than just being the season of endless beach days or becoming a "couch potato" in front of the television.  They say it is the perfect opportunity to assist your child in becoming a well prepared student who will lead the pack in the next school year.

PRIMARY SCHOOL AGED CHILDREN
Kristan Burrows, a first grader teacher at Claridge Primary School, says the worse thing a parent can do during the summer break is to relax all sense of discipline or academic rigidity so their kids can have unhindered fun.

"Kids need a break and they should enjoy themselves during the break I agre, but please do not let them have so much fun that academics and all they learnt through the school year goes down the drain," says the educator.  Kids, especially those in primary school who are still forming their academic foundation, need an extra push so they stay fresh and the information they have learnt is retained and applied.  So putting them in a summer school that has some focus on Math and English is important."

Burrows says it is amazing how much primary school-aged children will remember if they do simple assignments on a regular basis throughout the break.  My school [Claridge Primary School] has a special book that we advise parents to buy for their kids for the summer called Summer Fit.  It allows the students at every grade level to review subjects covered in the previous year and explore new ones that they will have in the coming year.  They have little assignments to do after each topic and it's fun.  Just finishing a book like that can do wonders just to keep kids on the go mentally throughout the summer."

She also suggests parents encourage their young children to enjoy learning by letting them choose a book they want and letting them read it aloud.  Instead of watching television aimlessly all day she says you should ensure they watch some educational programs and that you question them about what they learn and like or didn't like about it.  If they are older kids, she says they can do book reports or reviews to ensure they are comprehending what they read and watch.  And rather than letting them play games on the latest video game console, Burrows urges parents to get their children to use the internet to play interactive educational games.  She says this will not only entertain and educate the children but will also assist in improving their computer literacy as well.

"There is so much that parents can do to ensure their kids do well academically.  As teachers we cannot do everything. We need support and we need parents to be behind their children even more than we are so what we teach is consistent in the home and retained as well.  It's pointless to work all semester with the kids and they do well, only for summer to come and their foundation falls apart because they have no support or do not build on it.  [Children] not being up to par academically during the summer often means teachers have to back track a whole lot more than they should be doing to reteach a concept kids should already know when September comes around again.  This can be avoided if parents chip in."

JUNIOR SCHOOL AGED CHILDREN
C.H. Reeves Junior School Language and Literature teacher Hallnika Bodie is also of the view that students should not fully neglect their studies just because it's summer break, but to use the weeks off school to improve academically and socially.

"[Parents] can make it easier on them by keeping them in a routine much like they had during the year.  Especially at this stage, grades seven through nine, students are preparing to take the Bahamas Junior Certificate [BJC] and they will need to be focused in order to do well," says Bodie.

She says summer break is the perfect time for parents to go to the Ministry of Education's Testing and Evaluation Center on Harrold Road to get copies of older exams so students can do them as a means of studying and preparation. Ensuring they go through their old notes especially for Math and English throughout the break for a few hours she says a day is a good way to keep them on their toes especially in the last few weeks leading up to school reopening.

The Language and Literature teacher also says allowing your children to keep a journal of their experiences helps build their writing skills immensely.

Bodie is also big on allowing children to get a lot of rest during the summer months after a hectic school year.  She says allowing them to stay up late is okay a few times a week, but to always ensure that they get to bed at a reasonable hour so that they can be physically and mentally rested during the break as well.  She says students who are allowed to do whatever they want, and don't get enough sleep regularly tend to be unproductive and still drained by the time school reopens.
The educator says to help your child develop more socially don't just send them to any old camp, but enroll them in camps where they can participate in character-building summer programs like Vacation Bible camps, police camp, maritime camp and rangers summer camps which allows them to be team members, but to study skills and learn responsibility.

Bodie urges parents to use the summer break to get to know their children as well and expose them to life experiences.

"It's not just about getting back on track with school but reforming your relationship as well," says the educator.  "Doing things like going to dinner, to the zoo, to a Family Island, a museum, visiting national sites or whatever else you can find fun to do together is a good thing to do because it makes them more worldly.  This means when students go on field trips and meet new people during the school year they are adjusted and know how to react, they aren't out of their element and they can appreciate what they see more.  They will have fun, experience different aspects of society and learn at the same time. These experiences are good for children to have and it makes the summer vacation a little more interesting."

HIGH SCHOOL AGED CHILDREN
The key to an academically successful, well-adjusted high school student depends heavily on what is done at home during the long breaks away from the classroom says automechanics teacher Michael Clarke.   He says it is important not to let your high-school aged child get lax in 5his studies and discipline and that keeping a level-head and a focus on academics even during the summer months is the best way to ensure your child excels in the next school year.

"First and foremost, parents need to be more vigilant and aware of what their kids are doing.  Yes, it is the summer break, but kids still need to have guidance.  Don't let them get too relaxed or assume they are doing what they should.  Ensure they do make time to study twice a week or more so they stay fresh-minded.  They need a break from the structured classroom setting but that doesn't mean learning stops.  Ensure they are doing something academically and test them to make sure they are remembering what they learn.  Parents need to draw the line and know that their children can have fun, but they still have to remember that they will have to face another school year and it is best to be prepared."
The eight-year automechanics teacher stresses that summer is a perfect time for parents to form a better relationship with their child's teachers as well.  He says it would be a good idea to find out which teacher will be in charge of their child's class in the coming year and contact him/her to find out what he/she would advise as good summer reading in preparation for different classes.

If this is not an option, he says parents should then find out early from the school administration which books are required for their child's upcoming school year so they can be purchased as this gives your child time to read through his textbooks and familiarize himself with different concepts he will encounter in the next semester.

For children that have already selected class options, the teacher says it is a good idea to get books other than the required texts for him to read through so he has a wider understanding of the subject. He says fictional works that incorporate academic subjects are often entertaining and keep the mind fresh and creatively churning.
If your child is preparing for the Bahamas General Certificate of Secondary Education (BGCSE) examinations, Clarke says he should be using the break to study and do research on the topics, so putting their coursework together and preparing to take the exam is easier once the term begins.

"School does not have to be hard or a chore if your child learns
to love learning.  As a parent it is just as important for you to find ways to get your child to want to learn even at home on breaks.  Find ways for this passion to be incorporated in their lives.  Take them to libraries and let them stay there to study for a while so they aren't home alone.  They may not study, but they may just read a book that interests them.  It's still reading and it can help to at least keep them engaged academically to some level. Go places with them instead of dumping them off to one place or the other since school is closed. Since these are older kids let them get a job in a field they like for the sake of experience instead of allowing them to just stay at home.  They will get a taste of the real world and learn some responsibility as well.  At the end of the day, just let your child experience more and use the summer break productively.  It has a lot of potential and parents can help their children make the best of it with their support and guidance."
 

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News Article

October 13, 2010
Thursday is Ladies Night at Neptunes - Chandon 6.50 a glass

Freeport, Grand Bahama Island - Ladies love to dance, and Ladies love champagne!

Every Thursday night at Neptune's, aside from their ever popular Happy Hour from 7 - 9pm, the Ladies can enjoy

Chandon for only $6.50 a glass (regular price is $12.95).

Enjoy music by DJ Lochs or DJ Say My Name and make it your night to hang with the girls and dance the night away to the most upbeat tunes.

Ladies Night is perfect for a birthday, Hen Night, or Wedding Shower, or simply a night to get away with your BFFs...

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News Article

December 02, 2011
Vincent Lorique Wilson, 75

Funeral service for Vincent Lorique Wilson, 75 yrs., a resident of Mason's Addition, who died on 21st Nov. 2011 will be held at St. Francis Xavier Cathedral, West Hill Street, on Saturday at 2:00 p.m.  Officiating will be Fr. Glen Nixon.  Interment follows in Catholic Cemetery, Infant View Road.
Vincent is survived by his wife: Norlean Wilson; two sisters:  Florett Hepburn of Miami, Florida, and Theresa Bruno of Washington, D.C.; one brother: Clunis Devaney; one sister-in-law: Naomi Devaney; one brother-in-law: Edward Hepburn; nieces: Joy Maria Ann Dixon-Ferguson, Brenda Marina Dixon-Price of Queens, New York, Lonnie Emmeline Dixon-Rolle of Eleuthera, Junnette Priscilla March-Radjpaul of Queens, New York, Catherine Joyce March-Butler; Jermaine Manley; Latanya Devaney; Yolande, Heather and Candice Bruno; and Lorraine Bethell; nephews: Robert Frederick Hall;  Edward Jr., Gerard and Gary Hepburn; Tio, Stephen and; Webster, Peron, Dillon, Darius; Cedric A. Rolle, Sr. of Eleuthera and Norval Radjpaul of Queens, New York; grand-nephews and grand-nieces: Oswald Ferguson, Jr., Troy Ferguson of Miami, Florida, Rev. Terrence G. Morrison, Valentino Bethell, Cedric Rolle, Jr., Robert Terrell Hall, Tarvan Symonette, and Sean and Kevin Price of Queens, New York; Ava R. Bain, Tamika P. Symonette, Meisha M. Ferguson, Angelique K. Butler, Sophia Higgs and Chrystal Bethell; Mareen Ferguson, RoyAnne Morrison, Alana Bethell, Denice Rolle of Eleuthera and Elizabeth Symonette of Miami, Florida; Terrence Bain Sr. and Darron Higgs; great-grand nephews and great-grand nieces: Hugh and Travis Ferguson; Demetrius Ferguson of Miami, Florida; Cedric III and Cordero Rolle of Eleuthera; Christopher Price of Queens, New York; Tristen and Tyrese Higgs; Terrence Bain Jr.; Tamara, Shakira and Jamie-Lee Ferguson; Dianna Ferguson of Miami, Florida; Alicia Major; Moesha, Denicia, Lonisha and Angel Rolle of Eleuthera; Nia Price and Brittany Grooms of Queens, New York; Teranne and Terroy Morrison; great-great-grand nephews and nieces: Tarvan Symonette Jr.; Vanlese Symonette, Darren Mackey Jr., Trevayne Pinder Jr.; Demicia Deveaux; and Lamond Davis; many cousins including: Beulah, Wilbur, Elsie and Veronica Smith of Mars Bay, Andros; Ashiel Smith of Freeport, Grand Bahama; Alvin, Lionel and Allan Smith of Miami, Florida; Edithmae Ferguson, Verlee Curtis; Jim Nixon of New York and family; Barbara Sweeting; Roger Nixon and family, Perky & Hugh O'Brien; Rhonda, Terry, Terria and Tyler Murray; Michael and Maria O'Brien and Marguerite Grant; Margaret Duncombe and family; Lorraine Rolle and family; and other relatives and friends including: Monsignor Preston A. Moss; Whitney Forbes; Jacqueline and Judy Toote, Helena Dean, Dawnette Mitchell & Shervone Burrows.
 
A special thanks to the Eucharist Ministers of St. Anselm's Catholic Parish; a special thanks also to the doctors and nurses of the Culmer's Ward at the Geriatrics Hospital who took exceptional care of Vincent.  Thanks to the doctors and nurses of the Accident and Emergency and Male Medical II wards at the Princess Margaret Hospital.
Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday from 9-12:00 noon & at the church from 1:00 p.m. until service time.

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News Article

October 19, 2010
Thursday is Ladies Night at Neptunes - Chandon 6.50 a glass

Freeport, Grand Bahama Island - Ladies love to dance, and Ladies love champagne!

Every Thursday night at Neptune's, aside from their ever popular Happy Hour from 7 - 9pm, the Ladies can enjoy

Chandon for only $6.50 a glass (regular price is $12.95).

Enjoy music by DJ Lochs or DJ Say My Name and make it your night to hang with the girls and dance the night away to the most upbeat tunes.

Ladies Night is perfect for a birthday, Hen Night, or Wedding Shower, or simply a night to get away with your BFFs...

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News Article

April 19, 2011
Amy Roberts Primary Green Turtle Cay, Abaco at the E. Clement Bethel National Arts Festival

Green Turtle Cay, Abaco

- E. Clement Bethel
National Arts Festival Arts and Crafts adjudicator Kishan Munroe
(right) and Arts and Crafts Officer in the Department of Culture Ellery
Deveaux examine a number of torch boxes, at the Amy Roberts Primary
School, Green Turtle Cay, on April 5, 2011. Torch boxes were used on
the island in the era before television for entertaining the children
there.  The children would make the boxes and later parade around the
island with candles in them.

Amy Roberts Primary
School students Makayla McIntosh (left) and Shelby Sawyer sing
"Standing on the Promises", during the  E. Clement Bethel National Arts
Festival adjudications on Green Turtle Cay, on April 5, 2011...

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News Article

December 10, 2011
Stealing arraignment postponed

A former controller and paymaster at Armoured Car Services accused of stealing more than $100,000 from the company over a year remains on police bail until it is determined whether she will be arraigned.
Michelle Bowe originally appeared before Deputy Chief Magistrate Carolita Bethell on November 24 to be arraigned on 49 counts of stealing by reason of employment.
At the time, her lawyer Romona Farquharson raised a preliminary objection saying that the six-month statute of limitations had expired on 33 of the charges.
Bethell agreed and adjourned the matter to allow the prosecution time to get a fiat from the Office of the Attorney General authorizing the court to proceed.
When Bowe appeared yesterday, no fiat had been presented.  The prosecutor, Inspector Ercell Dorsett, said no fiat was needed because of newly passed amendments to the Criminal Procedure Code.
However, Farquharson pointed out that the amendments which came into effect on November 4 were not retroactive so the court still did not have the jurisdiction to arraign Bowe on the charges.
Bethell agreed and adjourned the matter to December 12.

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News Article

April 22, 2011
Small Abaco Schools Take Part in National Arts Festival

MURPHY TOWN, Abaco,
The Bahamas -- Wesley College students strike up the band, during the
recent E. Clement
Bethel National Arts Festival adjudications, at Aldersgate Methodist
Church, in Marsh Harbour, Abaco.  The students dance "Bahamian stlye",
during the adjudications; and Cyber Learning Centre students
perform as a choral verse speaking group ...

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News Article

July 19, 2012
The Bahamas beats Guadeloupe!

The senior men's national volleyball team sent a strong message to the other squads playing at the 14th Annual Caribbean Zonal Volleyball Association (CAZOVA) Championships, in St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands, on Tuesday.
After receiving a first day bye, the national team took to the court against Guadeloupe. Led by captain Prince Wilson, the team served up its first win, 25-17, 25-20 and 25-13. The match lasted 73 minutes and Wilson finished as the top scorer with 14 points. Teammates Renaldo Knowles and Byron Ferguson added 10 and eight points respectively.
The Bahamas is playing out of Pool 'B' with host country the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI), and Guadeloupe. Over in Pool 'A' are the defending champions Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica, Barbados and Martinique. Head Coach De'Vince Smith likes the start the team is off to, and was looking to keep the win/loss record blemish free when they took to the court against the U.S. Virgin Islands last night. The result of that match was unavailable up to press time.
Smith said: "Our players had the opportunity to compete against most players throughout the Caribbean in numerous club and semi-professional tournaments prior to traveling to the Caribbean Volleyball Championships. However, we were placed in a pool with southern countries in the likes of Guadeloupe and the U.S. Virgin Islands where we had no prior opportunities to see the level of competition of these teams.
"Fortunately, host country USVI played Guadeloupe on the opening night which gave us an opportunity to watch and scout both teams. Guadeloupe plays a relatively slow and high game, with most of their sets to the outside or right back position. During our practice session, I had players assimilate the exact style of play in an effort to strategize our game. For the most part, we quickened our offense to beat the taller, slower blocks and used the three-man block to defend the high balls being set to the wings. It was of utmost importance to win the first game and set the tempo. We wanted to make a statement for the remaining games."
The national team was training in preparation for the tournament for over three months. The team is missing Shedrick Forbes, a right-side attacker who plays an integral part in the team's offense. He was unable to travel because of technical issues with his passport. The team was forced to re-adjust the offense, shuffling players around into various positions.
"We have a very versatile team and so we were able to make the necessary adjustments," said Smith. "He (Forbes) is going to be missed. It did bring the mood down a bit but the guys were all hyped and excited to finally hit the court and show that they belong here, and that the title can be won by them. We jumped on Guadeloupe from the first point which was a perfectly executed slide from Byron Ferguson.
"From that point Prince Wilson went to the service line and gave the team a comfortable seven-point lead. The team never looked back as setter Tony Simon ran a consistent offense, coupled with strong blocks at the net from Byron and Renaldo Knowles. Team libero Jamaal Ferguson played a steady reception and defensive game allowing the setter to take control of the offense.
"If we continue to play and have a well-balanced game every time we step on the court, it will be hard to beat us."
The quarter-finals will start on Friday and continue on Saturday. The championship will wrap up on Sunday. The women's segment will come on the heels of the men's, commencing on Tuesday. The women's national team will leave on Monday.

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News Article

July 01, 2014
Brown disappointed in missing BTC Nationals

It seems that not everyone was thrilled with the decision of the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations (BAAA) to switch the nationals from a two-day to a three-day event, moving to a Friday to Sunday format, as opposed to a Thursday to Saturday move. It had a direct effect on one of the country's national stars as he was not able to compete in front of his national people this weekend.
Chris "The Fireman" Brown returned home with every intention of competing in the BTC National Open and Junior Track and Field Championships this past weekend, but wanted to focus on the 200 meters (m) as opposed to the longer quarter-mile event. The only problem is that the 200m was scheduled for Sunday evening, the same day Brown was scheduled to leave to honor his commitments on the European circuit. He is scheduled to compete in the Athletissima Diamond League Meet in Lausanne, Switzerland, this Thursday, as well as a couple more meets on the continent before returning to this side of the world. As a result, he was forced to miss his race in the nationals this past weekend.
Brown said that he always embraces the opportunity to come home and run in front of the Bahamian crowd, but a change in schedule this time prevented him from doing so.
"It's disappointing because I was looking forward to lining up next to the younger guys in the 200m and seeing how I would fare against them," said Brown. "The schedule change made it difficult for me to participate. I was scheduled to leave on Sunday for Europe, so with them changing the schedule for my event to be held on Sunday evening, I couldn't facilitate that. I just wish that I had some earlier notice of the change of schedule, so I could have adjusted myself, but here it is, my ticket for Europe was already purchased, and for me to change that, there would have been some penalty, and it's not like the BAAA would have facilitated that for me. The BAAA was aware of my situation, and it was understood that if I have to leave, I just have to leave. I just did what I had to do," he added.
Brown said that he just got access to the schedule for the nationals last Wednesday, and even that particular schedule was adjusted as he met a different one in place when he arrived in town last Thursday.
BAAA President Mike Sands was unavailable for comment yesterday.
Despite his inactivity, Brown said that he is still looking forward to being named to The Bahamas' team that will compete in the 20th Commonwealth Games, July 23 to August 3, in Glasgow, Scotland. The BAAA usually deems it mandatory for athletes to compete in the national championships in order for them to be named to national teams.
"I've already put down some decent times for the year, but if they decide to just name me for the relay, I'll accept that and go with that. However they decide to make their selection, I am willing to take it," said Brown. "I know what I ran and I know what I can do, so it's up to them to make that decision. If they decide to leave me off completely, then that's just more rest for my body. I could shut my season down and get ready for the World Championships next year. The thing is, I came home with the intention of competing. No one can say that I had no intention of competing in the nationals. It just so happens that a change in schedule affected my plans, and prevented me from competing because I already had plans to leave on Sunday. That (running professionally on the circuit) is how I make a living, so I couldn't jeopardize that," he added.
Brown said that he wanted to run the 200 at the nationals to get in some speed work going into the remainder of the season. His coach, former Nigerian quarter-miler Innocent Egbunike, wants him to focus on getting out of the blocks faster and building up his speed. The 200m race that Brown missed was won by Texas A&M University junior sprinter, Shavez Hart, in 20.57 seconds. Auburn freshman Teray Smith was second in 20.82 seconds, and Texas Tech junior Trevorvano Mackey was right behind him, finishing third, in 20.83 seconds. Hart actually won the sprint double, taking the century in a blazing personal best time of 10.11 seconds. Brown's personal best time in the 200m is a modest 21.05 seconds.
As for the 400m, not only was Brown absent, but fellow 'Golden Knights' Ramon Miller and Demetrius Pinder were also missing in action. Miller sat out these nationals with an ankle injury, and Pinder ran in the heats, but felt a slight hamstring pull and decided not to compete in the final on Saturday night.
In the 400m final on Saturday night, Grand Bahamian LaToy Williams ran his best time in five years, posting a season's best time of 44.97 seconds for the win. That placed him in the top 15 in the world. 'Golden Knight' Michael Mathieu settled for second, in 45.53 seconds, and Florida State University (FSU) senior Alonzo Russell was third in 46.21 seconds. Pinder ran the top time in the heats, 45.64 seconds.
Brown is leading all Bahamian quarter-milers this year, posting a season's best time of 44.61 seconds at the Adidas Grand Prix Diamond League Meet in New York earlier this month.
"I was really impressed with what LaToy did. That's a great improvement for him," said Brown. "It's a confidence booster for him also. It also lets the other guys know that they have to step their games up, because when myself and the other guys are out of the sport or injured or whatever, the other guys have to step up and continue the quarter-mile legacy of The Bahamas. It was a good performance by LaToy, and I hope that he continues to produce top times, and stay healthy."
At 35, an age when most athletes, particularly quarter-milers, slow down, "The Fireman" is turning up the heat. The 44.61 is his best time since he broke the national record six years ago (44.40). The ageless veteran termed this season as one of the best in his career.
"In everything, I give God all the thanks and glory. So many of my teammates have been suffering injuries, and thankfully for me, I have remained healthy. To be able to compete at this level, and this age, and to stay healthy, I owe all the glory to God," said Brown. "I'm thankful and grateful of my career. To be able to still go out there and produce some top times, I consider myself blessed. Coach and I have been working on some new things and hopefully by the time next year rolls around, a lot of those things will come into effect. I'm looking forward to ending my career on a high note."
Brown stopped short of announcing a retirement date, but he is expected to stick around at least until the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. One thing is for certain, with the way he is running now, undoubtedly the country's top quarter-miler, Bahamians everywhere aren't looking for him to step off the track anytime soon.

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News Article

August 07, 2012
Arianna is eighth in the world!

LONDON, England - For the first time ever, The Bahamas can boast of a swimmer being in an Olympic final, and that is more than enough to celebrate at these 30th Olympic Games.
Arianna Vanderpool-Wallace touched the wall in eighth place in the 50-meter (m) Free final on Saturday night, in 24.69 seconds, but said that she was pleased to be competing with the world's best on the world's biggest stage for sports.
"I went in there as good as I can be and I came eighth in the Olympic final - that's not something to frown about," she said. "I think that I over-thought the race a little too much and I should have just let it go but it is a learning experience - first time in an Olympic final, so I'm pretty happy with what just happened."
Vanderpool-Wallace was just five hundredths of a second off her national record setting time, which she swam in the semi-finals. She appeared to be slightly behind the field when the ladies got into their freestyle strokes, but the race was close throughout, and apart from gold medal winner, Ranomi Kromowidjojo of the Netherlands who set yet another Olympic record, no one really separated themselves. The second through eighth places were separated by a little over four tenths of a second.
"Overall, it was a good race," said Vanderpool-Wallace. "It was right there with my best time in the 50 Free. I think I did what I needed to do. The biggest thing I got from this was confidence that I can compete with these girls. I'm very confident going into the future," she added.
Vanderpool-Wallace had qualified for the final with the sixth fastest time, having swum her national record of 24.64 seconds in the semis. It was 15 hundredths of a second faster than her previous national record time, set at last year's Shanghai World Championships. She was seventh and 10th in the 50m and 100m Free at the FINA Worlds last year respectively, and finished eighth and 10th in those events at the Olympics this year.
Gold medalist from the 100m Free, Kromowidjojo, set her second consecutive Olympic record as she won the 50m Free, in 24.05 seconds. Aliaksandra Herasimenia, of Belarus, was second in 24.28 seconds, and Marleen Veldhuis, of the Netherlands, won the bronze medal in 24.39 seconds.
The only other swimmer from this side of the world, Jessica Hardy of the United States, finished seventh in that very fast final Saturday night, in 24.62 seconds.
As for Vanderpool-Wallace, it's been a four-year journey for her to get back to the Olympics. In Beijing as a teenager, she finished 24th and 28th in the 50 and 100m freestyle races overall, in times of 25.40 and 55.61 seconds respectively. She was significantly better, and is looking forward to even greater performances in the future.

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News Article

April 14, 2011
Emma E. Cooper Students Showcase Eleutheran Talent in Arts Festival

Palmetto Point,
Eleuthera, Bahamas - Students at the Emma E. Cooper Primary School in
Palmetto Point, Eleuthera, perform as a descant recorder group, during
the E. Clement Bethel National Arts Festival adjudications, on April
12, 2011.

Emma E. Cooper Primary School students Tyrin Culmer and
Bernard Bethel  perform as a descant recorder group, during
the E. Clement Bethel National Arts Festival adjudications

at
Palmetto Point, Eleuthera school,

on April 12, 2011...

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News Article
Severe Weather Warning
August 03, 2012
Severe Weather Warning

THE BAHAMAS DEPARTMENT OF METEOROLOGY HAS ISSUED A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING FROM 10:45AM EDT UNTIL 12:15PM EDT, FRIDAY 3RD AUGUST, 2012.

A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING IS NOW IN EFFECT FOR, CENTRAL AND SOUTH ELEUTHERA, THE MIDDLE EXUMA CAYS AND THEIR ADJACENT WATERS AND A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WATCH IN EFFECT FOR BIMINI AND ITS ADJACENT WATERS.

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News Article

April 13, 2011
Prosecutors accused of wasting judicial time

A?judge yesterday slammed prosecutors in the murder case of Richard McKinney for wasting judicial time.
He is on trial for the shooting murders of Lashon Davis and Omar?Smith at Rupert Dean Lane on February 5, 2010.
Darnell Dorsette asked the court for an adjournment yesterday morning because of a personal emergency. McKinney’s lawyers, Jairam Mangra and Roberto Reckley, objected to the adjournment.
When the court resumed at 2:30 p.m. Dorsette was not there. However, Ambrose Armbrister appeared in her place. He called crime scene officer Corporal 472 Romel Dixon, who testified that he photographed two men in the morgue.
Five minutes into his testimony, Reckley objected to the photographs ...

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News Article

January 18, 2012
Child rapist sentencing to be delayed again

The sentencing of convicted child rapist and accused robber Andrew Bridgewater will be further delayed.
Supreme Court Senior Justice Jon Isaacs directed that Bridgewater, 38, appear before Magistrate Carolyn Vogt-Evans today so that she could complete his case.
However, The Nassau Guardian can reveal that the magistrate is on circuit in Long Island so the matter will have to be adjourned.
Bridgewater pleaded guilty to robbing Patrice Butler of her handbag and personal items valued at $100, when he appeared before Magistrate Carolyn Vogt-Evans for an arraignment on November 25, 2011.
However, she declined to sentence Bridgewater at that time because she felt he deserved more than her five-year sentencing cap, owing to his extensive criminal history.
Bridgewater appeared before Isaacs for the sentencing hearing Monday. However, the judge noted that the transcripts of the proceedings revealed that Vogt-Evans did not conform with the provisions of the Criminal Procedure Code (CPC) because she did not accept his guilty plea and move to a conviction.
As a result, Isaacs directed that Bridgewater appear before the magistrate today so that she could follow the provisions of the CPC.
Bridgewater remains on remand at Her Majesty's Prisons.
This was the second adjournment for the sentencing hearing. Isaacs put off sentencing because transcripts of the case were not available.

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