Search results for : bahamas national trust

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News Article

September 16, 2013
BNT: Bimini cruise terminal would be 'huge disservice'

The Bahamas National Trust (BNT) undertook a "fact finding mission" to Bimini to investigate circumstances around a proposed cruise ship terminal believed to be on the drawing board for Resorts World Bimini - formerly Bimini Bay...

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News Article

December 06, 2011
Doongalik is Newest Farmers Market Location

There's a movement underway by those who want to know what exactly is going into their food.  With factory-farmed and often pesticide-laden produce from the United States making up the bulk of what's available to Bahamians, supporting local farmers is way the go to ensure that safe, environmentally friendly and more nutritiously dense foods make it to your plate.

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News Article
Presentation by AUTEC Scientist
June 25, 2010
Presentation by AUTEC Scientist

A presentation by AUTEC Scientist: The Andros Reef System, was held on Wednesday, June 23, 2010 at The Retreat, Bahamas National Trust, on Village Road.

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News Article
Festival Noel to Sparkle
November 11, 2011
Festival Noel to Sparkle

One can always count on fantastic local art being showcased at the Bahamas National Trust's annual fundraising event, Festival Noel, in Freeport, Grand Bahama.

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News Article

January 16, 2011
A conversation with Pierre-Yves Cousteau

Freeport, Grand Bahama - I had the
pleasure of meeting Pierre-Yves Cousteau during his recent trip to The
Bahamas to promote and educate on shark conservation. He came to Grand
Bahama with a senior associate of the PEW Environment Group, and two
members of the Bahamas National Trust (BNT) based in Nassau.

He was visiting
the Bahamas to show his support for the BNT's campaign to strengthen the
protection of sharks in The Bahamas, and he gave a public talk at Trust's Rand Nature Center on January 10th.

We met for breakfast the morning he was to head back to Paris where he
lives and I had the pleasant opportunity to pick his brain...

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News Article

June 12, 2013
Securing environmental health

The recent New Providence landfill fire due to poor management of the area harmed the health of nearby residents. The prevalence of spills, leaks, fires or other incidents across the archipelago warrant immediate attention by government to implement regulations and enforce accountability. And the government especially should seek to live up to the standards set out in law.
Since the Environmental Health Services Act was enacted in 1987 few of the recommended regulations have been properly implemented, much to the detriment of the Bahamian people. Regulations for the collection and disposal of waste only came to fruition in 2004. In fact, the act explicitly recommends measures for the prevention and control of pollution of the air, contaminated land and water. While we can praise such forethought, successive efforts to enact final environmental legislation continue to fail.
The Planning and Subdivision Act 2010 may be considered a small victory for the natural environment with its attempt to promote sustainable development through planning policy. On the positive side, it briefly outlines the requisites for an environmental impact assessment or statement, but it hardly satisfies the need for more stringent controls to prevent and hold accountable the release of harmful substances into the environment. Surprisingly, the Department of Environmental Health Services does support an Environmental Monitoring and Risk Assessment Division; yet its absence from public discourse provides little assurance.
The Bahamian people are justified in their outcry over the lingering dump fires. The government's request for nearby residents to keep doors and windows closed is not a long-term solution. Even more so, the public ought to know the extent of adverse impairment to ambient air quality. We would be naive to assume that all garbage in the New Providence landfill is adequately sorted, eliminating the presence of potentially hazardous substances.
But dangers to human health and the environment also lurk within the land. Contamination of land, particularly below the surface, is difficult to detect and when discovered it is prohibitively expensive to remediate. Earlier this year, an underground gasoline leak was discovered at a Robinson Road gas station. Residents with water wells were right to voice concern over the lack of information provided about the leak. The Ministry of the Environment and Housing engaged a Canadian firm, SENES Consultants Limited, to investigate and submit a report to the government, a report not likely to be disclosed to the public.
Environment Minister Kenred Dorsett, in response to the gas station leak, noted that the government is looking to impose stiffer penalties for environment-based offenses. Such a practice may enhance vigilance and hold accountable private businesses, but what about the potential adverse impacts from government-owned entities such as BEC and the landfills? BEC admits lagging behind on maintenance and using Bunker C, a known dirty fuel. Can the government assure residents that smoke stack emissions meet international air quality standards? What about car and bus emissions, or even cruise ship emissions while they are downtown?
As an active participant in numerous United Nations environmental conventions, The Bahamas cannot feign ignorance over the cumulative hazards to human health and the environment. The expansion of environmental education through community programs by the Bahamas National Trust and Bahamas Reef Environment Educational Foundation is building awareness. Exerting greater control over the accountability for harmful releases into the environment would surely benefit the Bahamian people. International standards from recognized entities such as ASTM International exist to identify recognized environmental conditions and determine steps for containment and removal.
Bahamians should expect more from their government regarding the safeguard of human health and the environment. The government has the blueprint and the knowledge, it simply needs greater pressure from the people to act.

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News Article

July 18, 2014
BNT educates future environmentalists with various presentations

ABACO - The Bahamas National Trust (BNT) is on a mission to educate the youth on conservation and the environment throughout The Bahamas and internationally with the help of BNT's Director of Parks David Knowles.
Knowles has been working with the BNT for more than six years and is proud to be a part of an organization that strives daily to conserve and protect the natural resources of The Bahamas, through stewardship and education for present and future generations.
Just recently, he gave a presentation to students who are currently enrolled in summer courses at the environment group Friends of the Environment's Abaco Research Center (ARC). Friends of the Environment has been in operation for almost thirty years, but the ARC has just recently been established in Marsh Harbour, Abaco. The center is used for hosting high school and university programs, conducting field courses and presents opportunities to partner with scientists on long-term research projects. The summer courses will help students take a more in-depth look at diverse ecosystems and marine life.
In his presentation, Knowles covered an array of topics such as habitat conservation, environmental careers and opportunities, as well as Abaco's protected areas and the BNT's role in managing and establishing protected areas. When asked about the experience, he commented, "It was great to present at this workshop for Friends of the Environment, particularly where Bahamian students are involved. These students are the future leaders of our country and their knowledge is critical to the decision-making process that they will be involved in the future."
Data gathered in the courses will also be used to assist ongoing research and support other conservation programs.
Knowles then traveled to the Cape Eleuthera Institute to present at the school's research symposium. This event was the culmination of a semester-long research class, where students became involved in all aspects of research. His presentation covered national parks with a specific focus on marine parks, BNT's conservation goals and the research needed to help with national park management.
Other topics were on sea turtle ecology, shark behavior, lionfish invasion, sustainable fisheries and queen conch and mangrove ecology. The symposium was also a chance for the kids to showcase the data they collected, along with real world implications of the work.
And lastly, Knowles presented to a group of graduate students from Colorado State University (CSU), as part of their Marine Ecotourism Trip--Bahamas 2014 Syllabus Course. The presentation took place on board the Shearwater Charter Boat. The course is a 3-credit study abroad course, with the intent to expose students to the social, cultural, environmental and economic aspects of tourism development in The Bahamas.
Knowles' presentation highlighted the conservation efforts of the BNT and spoke on other ways to protect marine areas in The Bahamas. "It was great to get feedback from these graduate students," he said, "especially since they are currently pursuing degrees in similar fields."
Over the years CSU has provided continued assisted in the Abaco National Park, with trail maintenance and helpful recommendations on improving visitor experience. Knowles added, "BNT will continue to collaborate with international institutions and organizations like Colorado State University and others, to advance the efforts in protected area management."

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News Article

December 06, 2011
17th Festival Noel a sparkling success

FREEPORT, Grand Bahama -- The evening was indeed a sparkling one at the 17th Festival Noel, held at the Rand Nature Center on Grand Bahama on Friday evening, December 2nd.  The slightly cool weather provided a comfortable evening for those who attended the event, as much of it was held outdoors on the grounds of the Rand Nature Center.  
Festival Noel is the annual fundraiser for the Grand Bahama branch of the Bahamas National Trust. This branch has a mandate to care for this island's protected areas of the national park system.  This includes Lucayan National Park, Peterson's Cay, and the Rand Nature Center.  These protected areas are enjoyed by residents and tourists alike.
Festival Noel is primarily a wine tasting affair, sponsored by Bristol Wines and Spirits, who brought to this evening thirty-three different wines from around the world for attendees to sample.  Each patron received a wine guide which identified each wine, the region they came from and the price.  There were nine tables stationed around the grounds featuring the different wines so that patrons could sample each one and learn about their unique features from the trained staff of Bristol Wines and Spirits.
For those who did not want to partake of wine tasting, the Bahamian Brewery Beer Garden provided three of their signature beers: High Rock, Sands Light, and Strong Back.  The beer garden was a cozy area that featured entertainment by Ryan Carroll on guitar all evening.

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News Article

July 10, 2013
BNT Involving Young Bahamians in Sea Turtle Research

Bahamas National Trust (BNT) is currently focusing on learning more about the nesting behavior of the varieties of sea turtles found in Bahamian waters.

Through a summer sea turtle research programme, they are involving young Bahamians in this important work to promote the survival of the animals and their role in the marine ecosystem...

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News Article

October 01, 2010
Council Unanimously Votes for 2011 Convention

Nassau, Bahamas - The following is a press statement by Free National Movement Party Chairman, Carl Bethel.

I wish to advise
the general public that the Central Council of the Free National Movement
voted

unanimously to hold the next National Convention of the
Party in 2011, at a date to be determined by the Party.  

The decision
is in accord with the Party's constitution which stipulates, by Article
49, that the National Convention must be held at least every two years.

The Party held
a successful convention last year which highlighted the many accomplishments
of the FNM in what, at the time, was approximately two and a half years
in office.  We will meet again next year with even more of our
trust agenda accomplished... 

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