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News Article
2,000 people tune in to live Junkanoo at BahamasLocal.com
January 19, 2011
2,000+ people tune in to live Junkanoo at BahamasLocal.com

For many people this year, the best seats for the Boxing Day Junkanoo Parade were at BahamasLocal.com.

Braving very cold weather (so you didn’t have to) the BahamasLocal.com team was on Bay Street sending live sounds and video from the parade.

It was the first live broadcast from BahamasLocal.com and, despite a few technical challenges, it was a success.

Then on January 2, BahamasLocal.com did it again, bringing you the Bahamas Association of Athletic Assocations’ (BAAA) Annual Awards Luncheon live.

Live streaming is the latest tool in the BahamasLocal.com kit for putting The Bahamas and Bahamians on the World Wide Web.

Streaming the Boxing Day Junkanoo parade proved

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News Article
Cable Bahamas changes Internet landscape with 500 speed increases
April 15, 2013
Cable Bahamas changes Internet landscape with 500% speed increases

Cable Bahamas changes Internet landscape with 500% speed increases for all customers
New service level to deliver up to 70 megabits per second speed
Embargoed Until: 12:01am Monday, April 15, 2013

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News Article
Cat Island Relief Concert and Fun Day, October 8th
October 07, 2011
Cat Island Relief Concert and Fun Day, October 8th

Bacardi and Make Em Listen, along with Phil's Food Service and Island Games presents, Getting Cat Island Back on Track Relief Fund Concert, Saturday, October 8th, 2011 at the Queen E. Sports Center's carnival site from 12 Noon until...

Before the winds of Hurricane Irene left The Bahamas after leaving behind a catastrophic scene in the southern part of the country, local music manager and CEO of Make ‘Em Listen Patricia Chatti was already thinking of a way to help her family and friends in Cat Island.

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News Article

April 20, 2013
Mainstreaming adaptation to climate change: Utilizing best practices

The aftermath of climate change often fuels optimism.
Continuously, climate change and global warming reminisce to create ecological and social variations - championing environmental degradation, changes in the cryosphere, geological events and extreme weather patterns on earth, which include rising temperature driven by human activities.
Let me reiterate, climate change is expected to severely impact developing countries far greater than developed countries, with soaring temperature, variations in precipitation patterns, rising sea levels and continuous frequent weather-related disasters; changes that pose risk for agriculture, food and the supply of water and menace to undo many years of development in the fight against hunger, poverty, diseases and the lives and livelihoods of billions of people residing in developing countries. More so, addressing climate change demands unprecedented global cooperation across borders, including governmental and non-governmental organizations.
As intended, my focus is St. Vincent and the Grenadines (SVG) and the region. However, some researchers and practitioners alike use acidification of the oceans, temperature rise and cloud cover as the indicators for climate change within the region.
Here, according to the acidification process, the ocean absorbs carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, forms carbonic acid and depletes the pH of the water. To date, it is reported that the ocean had already absorbed 50 percent of the carbon dioxide we have manufactured since the industrial revolution. More so, the lowering of the ocean pH has significantly affected small marine life that forms shells, which play a crucial role at the bottom of the marine food chain. It is scientifically proven that acidification damages coral reefs; hence, it is safe to conclude that the impact of marine bio-diversity and the coral reefs have significant implications for the people who rely heavily on the already depleted fisheries for their survival.
According to a report from Caracas, the collapse of sardine fisheries in the southern Caribbean during a 10-year period is driven by global climate changes.
Coupled with this, researchers from both Venezuela and the U.S. linked ecological measurements in the southern Caribbean to global climate change indicators. These indices were uncovered to correlate to changes in wind and ocean current circulation patterns. Hitherto, these sardinella aurita fed on plankton have been on the decrease since 2005 and are responsible for the collapse not withholding overfishing; hence, sardines have plummeted by 87 percent as revealed by the study.
Additionally, the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) predicts a rise in annual mean surface temperatures somewhere between 1.4 and 5.8 deg C between 1990 and 2100. The report further indicates that a mid-range temperature rise will create a devastating effect on food security. Not only would this phenomenon affect the tropics and mid-tropics but mid-latitudes as well. Moreover, the British foreign minister stated in October 2006 that an increase in temperature by two to three deg C will decrease crop yields by 30 to 40 percent in South Asia, Middle East and Africa. Interestingly, higher average temperature will also stimulate the emergence and re-emergence of pests and diseases, and multiply the vectors that transport these diseases.
As evident in St. Vincent and the Grenadines, rising temperatures have impacted a wide range of crops; influencing farmers to discontinue cultivation practices - not withstanding lack of precipitation. In this capacity, fruits such as mangoes and breadfruit are falling to ground prematurely. Furthermore, lack of precipitation in the dry season has resulted in dry rivers beds; hence, marine life is dying and, therefore, affect the environment in which we live.
Creatively, we can reduce the level of ocean acidification by burning less fossil fuel. From an SVG and Caribbean perspective our best practice is maybe to reduce the amount of carbon into the atmosphere by discontinuing burning our forests and garbage. Moreover, to reduce direct radiation of the sun energy to plant crops, SVG can adapt and practice afforestation - ideally, planting new trees that can withstand harsh weather conditions and which form a canopy that is thick enough to shelter small and vulnerable plants from direct radiation from the sun.
Married to this idea, is a reservoir and rainwater harvesting system that can be used for irrigation purposes, especially in the dry season and high temperature recording days. In addition to this, the system can be use by livestock, particularly in areas where there is no running water.
Now, is the time to make the change; today is the time to educate and mobilize residents about the sustainability of our environment.
Climate change and global warming are real phenomena - look around.

o The author of a number of published works, D. Markie Spring was born in St. Vincent and the Grenadines and now resides in Providenciales in the Turks and Caicos Islands. He has an MBA from the University of Leicester, England, and a BA from Saint Mary's University, Canada. Published with the permission of caribbeannewsnow.com.

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News Article

August 22, 2014
Signaling shifts in Nassau Harbour

Blue Curry is a Bahamian artist currently living in London, who flies his flags in Santa Fe, New Mexico.
Known primarily for his installation works that broach cultural and historical themes, in 2013 Curry was asked to take part in Unsettled Landscapes, a biennial exhibition featuring the work of artists from Nunavut all the way to Tierra del Fuego, and countries in between.
Held at Site Santa Fe, Unsettled Landscapes opened in July 2014. The exhibition examines the "urgencies, political conditions and historical narratives that inform the work of contemporary artists across the Americas". Each work in the show responds to three themes: landscape, territory and trade.
Curry's childhood memories of a tourism-saturated Downtown Nassau were the catalyst for his proposal for Unsettled Landscapes.
"I started by remembering how, as a boy, the cruise ships would come into Nassau Harbour and how dramatic the difference was between just walking around kind of two-story or four-story buildings, and suddenly something the size of a cruise ship comes in and creates this new city," he said.
Seeing the cruise port through a sculptor's eyes, Curry noted the port's shifting shape each time one of the massive vessels arrived or left.
"I'd often see the cruise ship port as a sculptor, because, if you look at the ships, on no two days, does that combination of ships in the port look exactly the same. So I would see it as sculpture and the combinations of the ships coming in, the way they dock and the formations they make, as a sculpture."
Looking to the past for inspiration again, Curry drew on his knowledge of Fort Fincastle and its historical flagpole, which served as an effective communication method for the port, Nassau's residents and incoming ships, in years gone.
"That was at a time when you could look to the top of that hill and see the flagpole - people did commonly know what the flags stood for, so they knew what was going on in Nassau Harbour," said the artist. "Time progressed and flagpoles became obsolescent. Beyond that, the downtown port became predominantly a port for cruise liners, so it served no more purpose. At one moment that flagpole would have been so important, and it has no relevance at all now."
With his wheels turning, Curry offered the concept of presenting Downtown Nassau as a "site for sculpture and installation, rather than a site for just
consumption" to Unsettled Landscapes' curatorial team. His proposal began with the installation of a live video camera taping the port and displaying the "sculptural formations of cruise ships coming in and out".
In a twist on the Fort Fincastle flag post, the artist recreated a signal mast outside of the Site Santa Fe gallery. Curry highlights the impact of The Bahamas' largest industry on its landscape with a pole of nondescript, patterned beach towels fashioned into flags. Each flag represents one of the 40 cruise lines expected to arrive in Nassau Harbour for the duration of Unsettled Landscapes. Inside the Site Santa Fe gallery, the installation is complemented by a projected broadcast of the live streaming from the video camera situated in Nassau and shelves of meticulously folded flags representing the ships that are not currently in Nassau Harbour.
"It's the responsibility of the gallery staff, according to the cruise ship schedules, to raise and lower flags when ships are in the port of Nassau," said Curry. "...One sculpture in Nassau activates another in Santa Fe. Just like cruise ships, it's always changing. There is not really a day that the flag poles always look the same."
Curry has pointed out the symbolism involved in his use of the beach towels as flags.
"The beach towel I'm using it in a sly way," he said. "It is a means of conquest. If only for a day, when tourists go to the beach, they throw these towels down, and they can occupy a beach for a day. This sort of taking over of space that tourists do on a daily basis maybe doesn't affect us, but maybe psychologically it does, as a very small act of conquest. I'm interested in the beach towel as a material that you can use to possess a piece of land, a piece of the beach, if only for the day."
The Unsettled Landscapes exhibition will be up until January 2015. Those interested in finding out more about the space are encouraged to visit its website at https://sitesantafe.org/. More information about Blue Curry and his work as well as a link to his installation's live video stream can be found online at http://www.bluecurry.com/index.html.

Jump: Curry examines beach towels as tools of conquest

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News Article

May 21, 2013
Cable Bahamas launches REVON Extreme

Less than one month after officially launching speed increases of 500 percent, Cable Bahamas has now released its much-anticipated REVON Extreme. This new level of service delivers home Internet speeds at up to 70 megabits per second, which is nearly nine times faster than the nearest competition. The company claims that it is the fastest Internet service that has ever been available to residential customers in The Bahamas.
REVON Extreme is now available to all areas that Cable Bahamas serves in New Providence and Grand Bahama.
"Our goal is to deliver the best, fastest and truly most reliable Internet service to our subscribers," said Cable Bahamas Head of Marketing and REVON Product Manager David Burrows. "REVON Extreme is a huge step forward, not just for our company but our customers. Communication needs have changed and the Internet is a crucial part of all of our lives at home," Burrows added.
"We know that no other Internet service provider in The Bahamas comes close to the speeds that we now offer residential customers, however, we also know that the entire discussion is not just about speed," Burrows said. "It is as much about capacity. That is what determines how many different devices families can use online at the same time and enjoy their Internet experience without constantly waiting."
Burrows stated that a household of three or four people with multiple devices will quickly use up the total bandwidth that is available. "We've seen Internet usage increase dramatically, especially in the last year. Bahamians are using the Internet to work and play more, and low bandwidth speeds of four or eight megabits per second speed just can't meet the demand of today's subscribers."
Four weeks ago when Cable Bahamas announced the imminent launch of the 70-megabit REVON Extreme service, the company immediately received intense interest and created a waiting list for those that were anxious and ready to sign up. Fortunate test customers were able to experience REVON Extreme in April, and Cable Bahamas stated they have been raving about it ever since.
REVON Extreme was introduced to consumers in April at The Mall at Marathon when Cable Bahamas created The Connected Home exhibition that showed as many as 10 active devices using a single REVON Extreme service for bandwidth intensive applications, with no degradation in performance. Despite the number of devices streaming full-screen high definition video to various TVs, and online video games being played at the same time, visitors to the mall exhibition got a first-hand experience of the speed and capacity that REVON Extreme is able to deliver.
"Moms are Skyping, dads are watching YouTube, kids are playing video games online. And they're doing it all at the same time," Burrows stated. "These are the things that are commonplace in more and more families, every single day." He also asserted that Cable Bahamas is meeting these demands.
Since the company increased the speeds of all of its REVON broadband Internet products, there has seen a 400 percent jump in sales. Usage levels have also jumped by more than 20 percent during that same period, as Bahamian households are demanding more capacity to meet their normal day-to-day Internet needs.
Consumers that wish to move up to the new REVON Extreme service level will require the very latest cable modem technology to do so. Cable Bahamas advised that anyone that signs up for or switches to REVON broadband Internet is eligible to receive a cable modem, installation and three months of service for any speed level at no cost. The company is also giving away two prize packages worth $5,000 to new and existing customers.
Existing REVON customers can receive a new modem by exchanging their current modem at Cable Bahamas' locations in Nassau or Grand Bahama, or contacting the company to arrange an installer to come to their premises to do so, at no additional cost.

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News Article

April 10, 2012
Guardian Radio launches today

The Nassau Guardian is introducing a new concept to radio broadcasting in The Bahamas. Guardian Radio, the country's first news and talk format, officially begins transmission today.
The station's broadcast frequency is 96.9 FM and will initially focus on serving the New Providence market. The idea to develop an all news and talk station is the brainchild of President and Publisher of The Nassau Guardian Anthony Ferguson, who views this as an opportunity to "revolutionize news and talk in this country".
Ferguson describes the development of this new radio station as an expression of The Guardian's commitment to develop a multimedia organization that is committed to developing a new approach to news and talk programming.
He believes that together with The Nassau Guardian and NB12, "We can establish a reputation as the news and information authority in the country."
The Guardian's chief is convinced that, "We're going to raise the standard of broadcast journalism, providing a news product that is second to none. We will provide a platform to discuss the issues intelligently in an effort to create a more enlightened and informed society."
Veteran broadcast journalist Darold Miller, described as "The Dean" of talk radio in The Bahamas, headlines an impressive line-up of experienced and young talent who will attempt to usher in a new era and transform the news and talk genre.
Miller returns to Nassau following a two and half year stint in the Turks and Caicos Islands. He will host the show, "Darold Miller Live", a three-hour current affairs format that deals exclusively with current national issues.
He is joined on the Guardian Radio team by former Bahamas at Sunrise Producer Dwight Strachan. A former radio personality, Strachan spent that last 10 years as the producer of the country's lone morning television magazine style program. He will combine his producing and on-air talents to start the day with an enlightening and entertaining show, "Morning Blend".
Among the other Guardian Radio recruits are former ZNS personalities Kirk Johnson and Charlene Ferguson and a new, young talent to radio, Tony Grant Jr., who will be making his talk radio debut.
"I am delighted that we have been able to attract such a talented group of Bahamians to help us provide quality news and talk programming," said Station Manager Carlton Smith.
"We will move talk radio to a different plateau, by seeking to move away from the shows that encourage Bahamians to vent their frustrations and establish opportunities to comprehensively address the issues and hopefully influence change in our society," he added.
Sunday programming on the station will focus on inspirational, motivational and religious programming with an afternoon current affairs program included.
The station will provide a diverse range of programs, inclusive of news and current affairs, arts and culture, health, education, legal and finance, among others.
"We will utilize new media technology and will provide live streaming of the programming when the station launches next Monday. Apart from the regular telephone calls, we will encourage audience participation through the effective use of social networks such as Facebook and Twitter," Smith said.
The station will also encourage creativity and innovation in the producing of programs as part of its quest to revolutionize news and talk radio programming in the country.

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News Article
Bahamian production company chosen for behind-the-scenes video of celebrity photo shoot
September 11, 2009
Bahamian production company chosen for behind-the-scenes video of celebrity photo shoot

FREEPORT, BAHAMAS -- Grand Bahama-based Keen i Media was recently hired to shoot a behind-the-scenes video for a celebrity photo shoot at The COVE at Atlantis.

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News Article
The Bahamas declared ready for IAAF, World Relays Bahamas 2014
May 23, 2014
The Bahamas declared ready for IAAF, World Relays Bahamas 2014

With less than 48 hours to go until the start of the inagaural International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) World Relays in Nassau, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture, Dr. Daniel Johnson has declared the Bahamas fully ready to host the upcoming event...

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News Article

December 20, 2011
FLOW and HBO repeat partnership to Boost exposure for Jazz and Blues Festival

Kingston, Jamaica; Jamaica and the Jamaica Jazz and Blues Festival will once again receive another boost as Flow leverages its broadband technology and partnership with international content provider HBO to help create multiple avenues for exposure.

With the partnership with HBO, viewers across the Caribbean and Latin America will be treated to another Special feature showcasing Jamaica and the 2012 Jamaica Jazz and Blues Festival, a repeat of the highly successful initiative that was such a key element of the previous year's festival.

Flow's technology will also facilitate live streaming to various countries across the globe, OnDemand programmes on its Flow OnDemand platform, and a local feature on Flow TV...

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