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News Article

August 12, 2010
More power cut problems in Abaco

ABACONIANS told the problems with their power supply would be solved this week had their hopes dashed yesterday as the islands were thrown into darkness once again.

Angry business owners called The Tribune to report the power cut following Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC) chairman Michael Moss' statement on Monday that the almost daily power cuts over the last three months would end with the arrival of three new generators.

The mobile generator and two hired generators installed last week will boost the 40-year-old Marsh Harbour power plant by 4.2 MW for four months, by which time the new Wilson City power plan ...

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News Article

August 23, 2012
Foulkes tells of last moments of Maynard's life

Free National Movement (FNM) Chairman Charles Maynard spent the final hours of life knocking on doors in North Abaco and discussing his party's by-election campaign, according to the last person to see him alive.
FNM Secretary General Michael Foulkes spoke publicly yesterday for the first time on what transpired in the early morning hours of August 14.
"He was doing fine... he and I had a conversation and there was no expression of any pain or any concern or anything," Foulkes told The Nassau Guardian.
"That's why there was so much disbelief and that's why I was so shocked because Charlie and I had a very lively and jovial conversation just before that, before he went on the phone and that's why I couldn't believe it."

Maynard, 42, collapsed on the side of the road, moments after speaking on the phone with his wife, Zelena, who told The Guardian last week he talked about taking his family on vacation after the campaign, and asked about preparations for his children's return to school.
Maynard's family said an autopsy showed he had an enlarged heart and died of a massive heart attack.
He was pronounced dead at 1:30 a.m., according to the FNM.
Foulkes said that when Maynard collapsed he (Foulkes) called FNM Leader Dr. Hubert Minnis who was also on the island at the time.
"I called him and he called the authorities and he walked me through some things, but the efforts were not successful," he said.
Foulkes said all the while he couldn't believe what was happening.
"Charlie and I had a political discussion; we had finished the discussion and then he went on the phone with his wife and after that he said that he needed to relieve himself and I was driving the vehicle," Foulkes said.
"I pulled on the side of the road and he went outside and relieved himself and as he was doing it he collapsed.
"I couldn't believe my eyes frankly -- I just couldn't believe it. It was shocking."
The FNM held a memorial service for Maynard at its headquarters on Mackey Street yesterday.
Foulkes, who said he had developed a special bond with Maynard in the four weeks before his death, delivered the scripture reading.
"Charlie and I in a way, we had formed a special bond and at one point he told me, 'You know Michael, I think we're going places me and you'," he said.
"That's how the relationship became."
Foulkes said that in the days after Maynard's death, he kept to himself.
"I didn't want to talk about it much frankly because I had to internalize things myself and work with it before I started saying things to other people because it was rough," he said.
Foulkes said he would remember his friend fondly.
"Charlie was loved by everybody, he got along with people very well and he achieved what he could and he moved on," he said.
"I have nothing but fond memories of Charlie. I think I am fortunate to have gotten to know him over the last four weeks the way I have and that's special to me."
Maynard was the co-ordinator for the FNM's North Abaco by-election campaign.
He was elected chairman of the party in May after he lost his Golden Isles seat in the general election, and his party was voted out of office.
There will be an official funeral for Maynard at Christ Church Cathedral at 11 a.m. tomorrow.
His body will lie in state at the House of Assembly today until the funeral.

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News Article

June 09, 2011
RBC sponsors swimming nationals again!

Local swimmers will be afforded another opportunity by the Bahamas Swimming Federation (BSF), to qualify for the 2012 Olympic Games. The 28th Annual Royal Bank of Canada (RBC) BSF National Swimming Championships was sanctioned by the international governing body for the sport, FINA, as an Olympic qualifier.
More importantly, the four-day meet is the last opportunity for swimmers to qualify gor the FINA World Championships, set to take place July 16-31, in Shanghai, China. The national championships will be held at the Betty Kelly Kenning National Aquatics Centre, June 18-21. More than 350 swimmers, both local and international, will participate. BSF President Algernon Cargill was pleased to officially announce the dates, times and sponsors for the meet yesterday. He was beaming with pride when confirming that FINA had sanctioned the meet once again.
"It was very easy and a routine matter of receiving FINA's approval for these championships to be an Olympic qualifying event," said Cargill. "FINA actually encourages facilities throughout the region to provide these opportunities. They do not sanction a lot of meets, but we have had this meet sanctioned from 2008. We try to ensure that our swimmers who want to compete at the Olympic Games can actually qualify at home.
"We have been very successful because of the standard of the meet. They (FINA) have been able to put it as an Olympic qualifying meet. This is why the meet has also drawn attention from swimmers from the United States and Venezuela. We have these swimmers coming down. It is one of the few opportunities left to qualify for the World Championships this summer, so it is actually going to be recognized as a World Championships qualifier as well. We are happy that we are able to do this."
So far, a total of 356 swimmers have confirmed their participation in the meet that has seen RBC donate $32,000 toward a successful hosting.
"This is the biggest championships ever," said Cargill, who announced that 15 teams will contest the meet. Eight teams are New Providence based teams, three are from Grand Bahama, Abaco and Venezuela have entered one squad each and the United States has two teams.
With the meet being open to international competitors, Cargill believes that more Bahamian swimmers will be able to qualify for the upcoming regional and international meets. The FINA World Championships have seen three Bahamian swimmers qualify so far. That trio includes Arianna Vanderpool-Wallace, Alana Dillette and Vereance Burrows.
No Bahamian swimmer will be displaced now that the meet has been extended to others. Cargill said: "Hopefully, it will make them go faster. The swimmers tend to respond to the occasion. The question we always have to ask at the federation level is what happens normally when there is a final of eight swimmers and if we have the foreign swimmers who would make the final. Will this displace the Bahamian swimmers? I want to tackle that head on. Our priority first off is to the Bahamian swimmers competing at the national championships. One of the good things about our pool is we have 10 lanes, so it means that we will restrict two lanes in the finals for foreign swimmers only. The other eight lanes that will actually score points will belong to Bahamian swimmers.
"Through the 10-lane facility that we have, which is one of the few in the region, we can host a meet of this standard and ensure that we have all eight lanes dedicated to Bahamian swimmers. I think that is very important for us. This is actually The Bahamas' National Swimming Championships but we want to open the door to foreign swimmers to compete as well because it helps our swimmers to go faster. It shows them really how much more training we have to do to be able to compete with the world's best."
Cargill said that the executive members of the BSF are very appreciative with the great sponsorship received from the Royal Bank of Canada. The bank has supported the efforts of the swimming federation for more than 20 years.
Tickets will be available at the aquatic centre ranging from $5-10.

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News Article
Ike Upgrades
September 04, 2008
Ike Upgrades

As residents in the northwestern Bahamas were busy preparing for the arrival of Tropical Storm Hanna on Wednesday, meteorologists dropped another bombshell when they revealed that Ike, which is on a similar track as Hanna, had become a category one hurricane.

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News Article

August 18, 2012
Just over 300 Haitians repatriated

Just over 300 Haitian migrants have been repatriated to Port-au-Prince, Haiti, since Tuesday after being captured in Eleuthera, Exuma, Abaco and New Providence in recent weeks, Director of Immigration Jack Thompson revealed yesterday.
"We also assisted with the deportation of a number of persons of other nationalities who for one reason or the other [needed to be] deported from The Bahamas," Thompson told The Nassau Guardian.
"For [the Department of] Immigration this has been a very good week in terms of how we have executed and carried out these exercises."
Thompson was unable to provide details on the number of people of other nationalities apprehended and repatriated as part of that exercise.
However, he said the department continues to prosecute and deport many individuals on a week-by-week basis.
"We will continue to do everything we can in the most appropriate, humane, methodical and responsible way, but we must do what we must," Thompson said.
"My officers have worked around the clock and we are grateful to the other agencies who work very closely with Immigration. This is what you call teamwork at its best and I am very, very pleased about it."
When asked to detail some of the circumstances surrounding the apprehensions, Thompson replied, "We had a number of cases where persons made their way to land and we are always grateful to the public, who from time to time contact us and let us know what is happening."
Pressed further on the matter, Thompson said a "pattern change" has been observed in people coming to The Bahamas illegally, but did not disclose many details.
"I don't want to speak too much on that because I think we are on to something," he said.

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News Article

November 22, 2011
Hubert Ingraham's Bahamian vision

Those who want to understand the full scope of Hubert Ingraham's vision of a modern Bahamas, must look not only at what is happening in New Providence but also beyond.  A good place to start is Abaco, the present-day, and circa 1947 to approximately 1964, the early years of the future Bahamian prime minister.
During his nearly 35 years as an MP, the member for North Abaco has had a singular vision for the development of all of Abaco.  It is a uniquely Bahamian vision moulded by the geography of the largest archipelago in the Caribbean, with territory stretching approximately the same distance as from Puerto Rico to Trinidad and Tobago.
Among Mr. Ingraham's signature accomplishments is his transformation of the historic challenge of developing the far-flung Bahamas archipelago with its complex of developmental challenges, into a strategic strength.  In so doing, he is making The Bahamas a model for small-island state development.
To do so, he realized that he had to act on multiple fronts, with limited resources, prioritizing initiatives and capital projects while leveraging the strategic assets of our history, geography and fiscal capacity to diversify the economy and provide greater long-term sustainability and social protections in a modern liberal state.
In this ambition, Abaco has been a grand experiment in small-island development.  It has been a work in progress for many years, now reaching critical mass.
 
ROOTS
The prime minister's vision has its roots in his Abaco boyhood, which he has helped to transform from the Abaco of his youth.  What he has done in the third largest island in the archipelago is a part of his long-term strategic plan for developing all of the major islands in our chain.
He has sought to ensure that each major island group, inclusive of various cays, has the critical infrastructure to become platforms for sustained development and a diversity of industries.  Added to this vision was the introduction of local government so that Family Island residents have more say in running their own affairs and increased participation in decision-making on various local matters.
Mr. Ingraham's model of integral development includes public investment in power generation, water, roads, docks, ports, hospitals and clinics, schools et al., which will help to sustain population growth by attracting domestic as well as foreign direct investment and enticing new residents including Bahamian and non-Bahamian second home owners.
Those in Nassau who have enjoyed cable television and internet service since the inception of Cable Bahamas do not truly appreciate what cable service, which Mr. Ingraham's government introduced, means to Family Islanders.
Today, the owners of a bone-fishing lodge or charter boat service in Acklins or Andros may now advertise and have guests book online enabling them to better sustain their small businesses.  They understand Mr. Ingraham's vision better than the critic pontificating on the prime minister's supposed "lack of vision" from the ease of both an arm chair and ready access to the internet.
The observation of former Barbados Prime Minister Owen Arthur after visiting Abaco is instructive.  Mr. Arthur, who knows well the challenge of developing a single island state, was impressed by the scale of development in Abaco alone.
Within two years of Mr. Ingraham becoming Prime Minister, Cooper's Town had a major clinic.  The pace of development in Abaco has accelerated ever since, continuing to gather pace with an impressive array of public investments similar to the infrastructural works in New Providence.
Mr. Ingraham's delight in the Family Islands, and his enthusiasm for fishing, have made him an ardent environmentalist.  In just 10 years he doubled the size of the national park system.  He appreciates the need to balance development and conservation, one of several reasons he was appalled by the Great Mayaguana Land Giveaway by the former government.
Hubert Ingraham is a pragmatist, technocratic, not given to rhetorical flights of fancy.  This has been a strength, as he has been typically careful to ensure that his rhetoric does not outstrip his ability to deliver on his promises.
U.S. President Richard Nixon famously observed that politicians campaign in poetry, but must govern in prose.  The problem with one former Prime Minister is that he campaigns and governs in rhetorical flourishes rarely getting down to the prose and hard business of government.  The difference between prose and poetry eludes another wannabe prime minister.
 
RHETORIC
The downside for Mr. Ingraham is that more technocratic prose often lacks poetic flourish.  This is why some suggest that he lacks vision as they prefer the frenzied rhetoric of a church revival.  But those who mistake performance art for substantive vision in both religion and politics typically fail to appreciate the breadth of the Prime Minister's vision.
It is not only those who desire fanciful and syrupy rhetoric who fail to appreciate the scope of the Prime Minister's ambition to modernize The Bahamas.
There are also the inveterate Ingraham-haters with personal grudges who cannot separate their personal feelings from the Prime Minister's public performance, and political opponents who have a reason for their denials of his accomplishments. Then there are the intellectually slothful who revel in a "pox on both houses" mentality with regards to political analysis.
As the College of The Bahamas moves to university status, it may bolster its research efforts with more in-depth political analysis.  One project may be an analysis of the Ingraham legacy.  As Mr. Ingraham will leave a wide body of documents, public statements and accomplishments, he will prove a fascinating study in political leadership in The Bahamas in the closing decades of the 20th century and the early decades of the 21st.
One may disagree with Mr. Ingraham's style of governance and/or his positions on various issues.  But to deny that he has a vision is akin to those conspiracy theorists and loons who still believe that Barack Obama is not an American citizen.  Some will never be convinced despite the overwhelming evidence staring them in the face.
 
 
frontporchguardian@gmail.com
www.bahamapundit.com
 

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News Article

April 21, 2013
Possession of Unlincensed Firearm in Abaco

Abaco, Bahamas - On Saturday 20th April 2013 around 3:24am officers of the Marsh Harbour Police Station

reported that while in the area of Forest Avenue in a marked police vehicle, they attempted

to stop a white Nissan Sentra who failed to stop when beckoned to do so by the officers.

The occupants attempted to elude the officers who gave chase however the vehicle came

to a stop of Grace Avenue area and three dark males clad in dark clothing exited the

vehicle on foot making good their escape. Officers upon searching the vehicle discovered a

black unlicensed 12 gauge pump action shotgun...

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News Article

August 16, 2012
Maynard's Widow Recalls Last Phone Call With Husband

Free National Movement (FNM) Chairman Charles Maynard spent the last few minutes of his life on a phone call with his wife talking about their children and taking a vacation together.

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News Article

March 21, 2014
Abaco resort appoints new executive

Abaco Beach Resort and Boat Harbour Marina in The Bahamas has announced the appointment of Brent Ingraham as the director of sales and marketing.
A veteran of the hospitality industry, Ingraham brings with him over 20 years of experience and a history of proven success, said the company.
In his new role he will be responsible for developing and implementing initiatives that seek to increase overall sales and create strong marketing campaigns for the resort's group, leisure and marina offerings.
"Brent's strong sales and marketing background combined with his in-depth knowledge of hotel operations will be a great asset to Abaco Beach Resort and our guests," said Manny Alexiou, owner of Abaco Beach Resort.
"As a former resident of The Bahamas, Brent deeply understands not only this market but also what makes it a unique destination."
Ingraham most recently served as the business development and marketing consultant for the Beck Group in Atlanta, Georgia. Prior to his role there he held positions as the marketing and sales operations consultant for M&M Quality Solutions. During his tenure in The Bahamas Ingraham served as vice president of sales and business development for Old Bahama Bay Resort and Marina, director of catering and convention services at Westin and Sheraton Our Lucaya Resort, regional director of sales and marketing at Royal Oasis Golf Resort and Casino and general manager at Holiday Inn Junkanoo Beach Hotel.
Ingraham holds a bachelor's degree from Hampton University and earned his Master of Business Administration from the University of Miami.

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News Article

May 25, 2011
Bahamian Cricket at crossroads Part I

Over a period of less than two years there have been four different individuals at the top rung of the Bahamas Cricket Association’s (BCA) executive ladder.
Greg Taylor ran afoul of a solid faction in the BCA. Despite some positive steps taken by the BCA during his tenure, he became quite unpopular. Former president Sidney Deveaux stood in the breach and in the aftermath became the chief again.
Amid infighting inclusive of court action, Deveaux, although very dedicated, moved aside due to intense pressure that kept mounting within the cricket ranks. In stepped interim president Ivan ‘Abaco’ James. The cricket climate did not change for the better.
Instead, according to ma ...

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