Search results for : BGCSE

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News Article

October 07, 2010
Bannister: South Andros district doing well

By STAFF WRITER
Guardian News Desk

Education Minister Desmond Bannister yesterday commended teachers and students in South Andros as a result of improvements over the past few years in Bahamas Junior Certificate(BJC)and Bahamas General Certificate of Secondary Education(BGCSE)exam results.
Bannister said for the past five years there have been incremental improvements in BJC and BGCSE exam results in the district.
Bannister has been visiting schools across the Family Islands over the past week.
"The biggest class I have seen here is 20. I just came out of a classroom with seven students in a grade 12. When you have seven students to one teacher we should see outstanding results and that is one ...

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News Article
Who will be the next All Bahamas Merit Scholarship winner
July 24, 2013
Who will be the next All Bahamas Merit Scholarship winner

Queen's College graduate Shannon Butler aspires to become a cardiothoracic surgeon. It will cost him approximately $60,000 per year to study in the medical program of his choosing at the University of St. Andrew's in Scotland. Butler, along with many other Bahamians who have graduated high school this year with impressive grade point averages, and are seeking to further their education post secondary school have applied for consideration to be awarded the most prestigious scholarship awarded in The Bahamas -- The All Bahamas Merit Scholar, which is currently valued at up to $35,000 annually to help fund them in furthering their educational pursuits. But the wait is on, and hopefully within a week, two weeks tops, the person who will receive the 2013 award will be announced...

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News Article

September 03, 2011
Education system failing our boys

During a speech in March, College of The Bahamas (COB) president Dr. Betsy Vogel-Boze told the Zonta Club that only 14 percent of COB graduates are male.

"It is not a problem that happens once they get to us.  They are not graduating at the same rates, they are not applying for college at the same rates and that gap continues to widen," she said.

The head of COB is right.  Each year the results of the Bahamas General Certificate of Secondary Education (BGCSE) reveal the problem with boys in the education system.

In 2010, girls received 16,233 grades; boys received 10,683 grades.  Boys are only receiving 39.7 percent of the grades issued at the senior exams.

The boys receive fewer grades because fewer of them are there at graduation.  Our boys are dropping out in large numbers.

What is even sadder is that the boys who stay in school long enough to do their final exams are doing poorly. 
For A through C grades at the 2010 BGCSE's, girls received about double the number of these grades than boys.  Our education system is failing.  It is particularly failing our boys.

There is without question a correlation between education systems that fail boys and high crime rates.  Young men unable to function in a modern economy will not simply sit down and starve to death.

The Bahamas has set three homicide records in four years and it is on pace to shatter the dubious record set last year.  Police have also been battling a surge in recent years in armed robberies and property crimes such as house-breakings.

Our crisis is not just a crime crisis.  It is a crisis of integrating young men into the legal economy and into civil society.  A national effort is required to help our boys.  One part of the strategy to help them may be to separate the genders in the public education system.

Environments need to be created to help young men, collectively, to equate masculinity with honest work, achievement and struggle.  As we fail our boys in the current education system they go off into the underworld economy of drugs and violence.

The reformatory schools also need to be expanded.  Those who cannot behave should not be allowed to remain in regular schools disrupting the peace.  Those parents who cannot, or do not wish to, control their disruptive children should lose custody of those children to the state.

Just as the reformatory schools would exist for the disruptive, a new juvenile prison is needed at Her Majesty's Prisons.  This would be different from the reformatory schools, which would be schools for troubled children.  Juvenile jail would be jail for young criminals.

These few suggestions should be a part of a wider national discussion on the failing of Bahamian males.  We spend hundreds of millions of dollars on education in The Bahamas and we still have the problems we have.  Simply throwing more money at the education system is not necessarily the solution.

There was a time a few decades ago when women were discriminated against in the workplace and by law.
We fortunately have evolved beyond those times.  Today, however, as women rise and take on leadership positions in the country, men are falling.

The 14 percent figure at COB is dangerous.  If we cannot reach our boys and encourage them to embrace education, more and more of them will be before our courts lost, confused and charged with all manner of violent offenses.

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News Article

August 14, 2012
A Sad Reality

Dear Editor, BGCSE test scores are the hot topic of discussion these days. The grades of course were abysmal. They are the same as they've been since I started seeing the results, yet somehow every year it comes as a shock to the public that only 50 percent of the students are graduating with the minimum...

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News Article

February 26, 2014
A strong foundation pays off

Gia Paige Soles has always been a Principal's List (grade point average of 3.7 or higher) student, so laying claim to the best overall performance in the 2013 Bahamas General Certificate of Secondary Examinations (BGCSE)...

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News Article
Taking In A Different View Of The World
August 22, 2012
Taking In A Different View Of The World

There is nothing more fulfilling than having hard work pay off -- and 17-year-old Dante Delaney knows this firsthand. Staying focused and dedicated to achieving his goals throughout his academic life has allowed him to accomplish one of his dreams -- acceptance into the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

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News Article
Arguably one of the brightest minds
August 07, 2013
Arguably one of the brightest minds

Shannon Butler is arguably one of the brightest minds to graduate high school this year, and it shows in the fact that he has amassed $146,000 in scholarship funds to pursue his educational dream of becoming a cardiothoracic surgeon.

The Queen's College graduate was recently named the 19th recipient of the All Bahamas Merit Scholar, and awarded a four-year $140,000 scholarship, after being named the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity's 2013 valedictorian and awarded a $6,000 scholarship...

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News Article
2013 All-Bahamas Merit Scholar announced
August 03, 2013
2013 All-Bahamas Merit Scholar announced

Minister of Education, Science and Technology Jerome Fitzgerald announced 17-year-old Shannon Butler as the 2013 recipient of the All-Bahamas Merit Scholarship, the country's premier educational award.

The announcement was made during a press briefing on Thursday...

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News Article

August 21, 2013
Union president: Results can only improve if teacher supervision improves

THE results of standardised exams like the BGCSE can only improve if teacher supervision improves, Bahamas Union of Teachers president Belinda Wilson said...

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News Article
Principals told that there is much room for improvement
August 21, 2013
Principals told that there is much room for improvement

Days before the opening of the new school year, public school principals were told that there is much room for improvement in the education sector by Minister of Education, Science and Technology Jerome Fitzgerald, but that in their pursuit of educational success that he was more concerned about the factors beyond their control -- particularly parental involvement in children's education...

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