Business

Learn the meaning of 'service excellence'

April 10, 2014

Name: Rochelle M. Rolle
Industry position: Head of compliance, executive director at Julius Baer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited.
Education and training: Bachelor of business administration (with distinction), certified public accountant and successful completion of the ICA diploma in compliance and anti-money laundering.
What attracted you to the sector?
My initial attraction to the financial sector started in high school when I took courses in accounting. After completing a bachelor of business administration degree, with a concentration in accounting, I joined the former Coopers & Lybrand (now PricewaterhouseCoopers) and there, through interaction with my clients, I discovered the various career possibilities available in the industry and how essential it was to the Bahamian economy.
With the changes in the financial services sector during 2001 came the creation of this new position of compliance officer. Around the same time I was invited to join an institution in this capacity. It was a position that seemed both interesting and challenging because of its novelty and the responsibilities assigned to it. I therefore accepted the position.
How long have you been working?
I have been working in the financial sector since 1998, first as an accountant/auditor, then in 2001 as a financial and compliance officer with a Swiss bank. Since 2006 I have worked as head of compliance.
What keeps you motivated?
Well, there are several things that have kept me motivated throughout the years and continue to do so. First, the function that I perform is vital to ensuring that not only the good reputation of the company is maintained, but that of my country as well. Having an appreciation of this awesome responsibility energizes me to perform at the best of my ability at all times. Furthermore, I enjoy being a part of a dynamic team dedicated to the achievement of the company's goals and objectives. Knowing that others are depending on me, fuels me. Also, given this shifting industry, I am excited by the expectation of new and diverse challenges that create learning experiences. In my role, I am fortunate to have gained international exposure by working with colleagues on a global scale, allowing me to demonstrate the capabilities within The Bahamas. Finally, knowing that my function within the organization is appreciated by my employer, evidenced by my recent nomination as BFSB Professional of the Year 2014, keeps me motivated.
Why do you think you have been successful?
Of course all of the basic ingredients for success are important. These include hard work, commitment, diligence and enjoying what you do. However, I have added another secret ingredient, called lifelong learning. Because of the ever-changing environment of financial services, I have realized that professionals who stay abreast of the constant changes are the ones to succeed. Therefore, I am continually expanding my knowledge on various topics. Of utmost importance is the love and support of my family, who are always rooting for me.
Did mentoring play a part in your success?
Yes, mentoring has played a role for me. I credit my mentors with instilling in me the need for continuous education. Also, they have helped me to hone my professional skills by providing advice on work ethics, attitude and business acumen that they had gleaned from their years of experience.
Because of what I have gained through mentorship I see it as a responsibility to pay it forward and offer myself as a mentor to new joiners in the industry and often speak to those considering entering into the industry.
What qualifications do you feel are the most useful in helping you perform in the sector?
Given the dynamics and competitiveness of this industry a college degree with a professional qualification (e.g. CPA or CFA) is a must for entry level. However, one must keep in mind that as we venture into markets beyond The Bahamas, possessing a foreign language skill is the new normal. This, coupled with certain character traits such as a willingness to learn, openness to constructive criticism, attentiveness and versatility are bound to advance you in the industry.
Why is it important to encourage our youth to think of careers within financial services? Are there specific suggestions you have for sustaining or growing the financial services sector? What advice would you give young people just starting out in the industry?
Because financial services constitute the second most important sector of the Bahamian economy, it is important that we think of sustainability. In my opinion it can only be achieved by attracting young talent and encouraging them to enter this arena.
As the Bahamas Financial Services Board is charged with the responsibility of developing and promoting our financial services sector, it is important that it in turn seeks young talent and grooms them for this industry. My Swiss counterparts always speak about internship programs whereby young talent is identified from high school and groomed through on-the-job training and mentoring. We would do well to emulate them in this regard.
Throughout my career I have sought mentoring, inviting advice from seasoned, well-placed professionals in the industry. It is therefore advisable that they do the same. Seek out and align yourself with those individuals that have already made a mark in the industry. Familiarize yourself with the term "service excellence" and always be prepared to give this daily. Give your all to the task whether it is minute or daunting.
Continue to invest in your future. Keep learning and seeking new challenges that would expose you to new learning experiences. This also requires you to measure your qualifications against the industry's needs, and seek to bridge those gaps.
Finally, master a second language commensurate to the market needs. Study the industry to determine its market focus and learn the language and culture of that market.

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Latin America drives demand in funds sector

April 10, 2014

The Bahamas Financial Services Board (BFSB) participated in the annual Hedge Fund Brazil Forum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on April 3-4.
Described as Brazil's premier public equity investor event, the Hedge Fund Brazil Forum, in fact, is Latin America's most specialized international meeting of hedge funds, long-only funds, Brazilian pension funds, Latin American pension funds, Latin American family offices and global endowments, foundations, sovereign wealth funds and pension funds.
The program delivers cutting edge due diligence for investors and managers alike on key questions such as hedge fund asset allocation among Brazilian as well as global pension funds, E&F, family offices and fund of funds, hedge fund regulation in Brazil and key considerations in operational and manager due diligence and economic and hedge fund strategy trends in Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, Colombia, Mexico, Chile and Peru.
As a sponsor, BFSB also had the opportunity to field a promotional exhibit during the three-day event.
BFSB CEO Aliya Allen said, "Our sponsorship and participation in this conference is in line with the consistent interest and business opportunities we are seeing from Brazil. Brazilian multimarket funds are being transformed from inward-looking domestic focused to alpha-seeking investments abroad. Managers are trying to offer more globalized structures and strategies so that clients have access to international diversification. Brazil is just a small part of this and it is clear that the strategies will continue to incorporate international diversification utilising competitive jurisdictions like The Bahamas."
Commenting on statistics released by the Securities Commission of The Bahamas, Allen pointed out that the 25 percent growth in SMART Funds is not an outlier; it is indicative of the growth potential The Bahamas has in the funds business largely driven by demand in Latin America. She added, "A few major BFSB projects this year will build upon this demand, including the new legislation we've been working on steadily since the middle of last year."

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Flipping that house!

April 10, 2014

Some things just don't seem to be on the cards or fall into place when we want a particular thing to happen quickly in this shifting real estate market.
If you have an apartment or home that you've outgrown, or that costs too much to maintain, and on top of that, the market may be too soft for a sale, you may want to consider transitioning that property into an income producing one.
This might just be the right time to join others who have bypassed appealing to the local market and instead, have focused on securing a rental with those in the international market.
In my opinion, many Europeans appear to prefer vacationing in a private home as opposed to hotel, and, for them, in most instances it's a whole lot cheaper. Aside from that, it is suited to what they're looking for while they maximize their vacation experience.
For a prospective landlord, it is profitable because you are able to receive top dollar for the rental on a short term basis and those tenants won't be on property 24 hours a day because they will want to explore the island.
Top dollar may be relative, based on the amenities you are able to offer, such as whether it's on or very near to the beach, vehicle rentals and meals. Those are things you may want to consider, if you want to be competitive and a viable option - people are always looking for a bargain.
There are websites that cater to this mega business like www.homeaway.com and www.airbnb.com, which, for a small fee, will provide pictures and the amenities you offering, with the benefit of regular traffic to your rental property.
Obviously, the better experience your guests have, the more chances you have of them telling their friends about the wonderful experience in that vacation home in The Bahamas.
This may be something Family Island residents may also want to consider or potentially consider linking it closer to a bed and breakfast experience. Tailor the rental project to your specifications and what you think will provide the best returns.
It goes without saying that your place should be spotless with everything in proper working condition.
It would be nice to stock the fridge with drinking water and other essentials until your guest are able to make it to the food store to purchase their own grocery items. Additionally, a list of attractions with things to do, public transport and basic safety guidelines is not a bad idea either.
So, be that roving ambassador, make some extra cash, and possibly earn some life-long friends in the process.
o William Wong is the co-partner at Darville- Wong Realty. He was also a two-term president of The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce and The Bahamas Real Estate Association. Questions or comments can be emailed to William@wongsrealty.com.

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Palm Cay Completes Marina Beach Club, Latest Amenity for Seafront
Palm Cay Completes Marina & Beach Club, Latest Amenity for Seafront

April 10, 2014

Community Billfish Grill Adds 20 Jobs. Palm Cay, the fast-growing nautical development on New Providence’s southeastern coast, this week delivered a key component of its commitment to community building -- The Palm Cay Marina & Beach Club...

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Atlantis Community Service Awards
Atlantis Community Service Awards

April 09, 2014

Now in its 15th year, the Atlantis Community Service Awards continues to assist local charities and other non-profit organizations with their work in the community...

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BTC Board Statement
BTC Board Statement

April 09, 2014

The Board of BTC notes the recent speculation regarding possible job losses within BTC and wishes to confirm that there are no such plans to restructure the business. This message has been shared with our Union partners...

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Landowner slams BEC trespass ruling

April 09, 2014

A man who has had his land trespassed upon by the Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC) for 16 years disagreed yesterday with a ruling by the Court of Appeal, which ordered BEC to pay him $540,255 in profits and damages and ordered a conveyance of the land to the corporation yesterday, and he promised to appeal to the Privy Council.
Joshua Haeward, owner of Delta Properties Ltd., which owns over 16 acres of land between Windsor Road and West Bay Street, said that a decision by the Court of Appeal to order that the land belonging to him, which was trespassed upon by BEC for the purposes of installing utility poles in 1998, be conveyed to the corporation also now effectively "landlocked" the remaining property where he had hoped to develop a 75-lot subdivision.
Haeward had gone to the Court of Appeal to overturn a decision of the Chief Justice in November 2012 that had determined, amongst other things, that an award of damages to him for BEC's "continuing trespass" on his land near the airport should be based on the compensation he would have been entitled to had his land been "compulsorily acquired" under the relevant statutes in 1998.
While the Court of Appeal expanded the financial value of the award that would be made to Haeward to include so-called "mesne" profits - a form of damages common in land disputes, which involve the person who has had their land encroached upon by a profit-making entity receiving a portion of the profits made by the illegal tenant in the interim - and added that interest on the sum would run at seven percent per annum from the date of judgment until payment by BEC to Haeward. The judgment also went further to suggest that the 1.197 acres property upon which BEC had constructed its utility poles should be conveyed to BEC with costs borne by the corporation.
Haeward said he disagreed with this assessment and the value of the mesne profits and damages awarded, suggesting that a portion of the profits made by BEC from running power cables across his land would have far exceeded the $151,468 suggested by the court.
BEC began its encroachment on Haeward's land in 1998, placing utility poles which ran power cables across the land without his permission; proceedings were initiated against the corporation in 2007.
According to the original ruling by the Chief Justice in the matter, BEC had originally claimed that it had "an easement which permitted the erection of the poles and the power lines across the property, but that claim was abandoned and (BEC) conceded the acts of trespass."
The Court of Appeal noted that an appraisal made in 2007, when the proceedings against BEC were initiated, found the total value of the 16.34 acres to be $4 million. Based on that figure, the 1.197 acres of which the power lines hang would be $299,067.
In an interview with Guardian Business after the court's ruling yesterday, Haeward said that he would take the court matter to "the next level" by seeking to appeal to the Privy Council in London.
"They went on the land without my consent. If I conveyed this land to them, that would give me a difficulty in accessing the rest of my land, because it would be blocking the road. So they would be inhibiting me making the kind of development that I want to do with it.
"I also wanted a portion of the income they made from passing through my property. I estimated they would have made over a billion by passing through my property, and I would've settled for $144 million.
"It makes a mockery of private property rights. What's the point of me having land if they can just walk onto it and use it?" said Haeward.
Haeward also expressed concern that the ongoing efforts to bring in private entities to become involved in the operations of BEC may impede his chances of seeing a payout in relation to the dispute, as more interests become involved.

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PM: 'Fundamental disequilibrium' in Canada trade talks

April 09, 2014

Prime Minister Perry Christie has hit out in relation to crucial trade talks with Canada over continued access to its market, suggesting there is a "fundamental disequilibrium" in Canada's approach to the matter.
Addressing the University of the West Indies' St. Augustine's campus in Trinidad and Tobago on the topic "Role of The Bahamas in CARICOM", Christie pointed to the trade talks with Canada as an area of cooperation between CARICOM and The Bahamas, but said meetings with Canada have "proven difficult and a settlement has been nettlesome".
His comments echo those of other governments in recent weeks, including the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Jamaica, which said in a statement that "there is little time remaining in which CARICOM and Canada can seek to bridge the gaps in the negotiations."
In his address on Monday, Christie argued that it should not have been so difficult for The Bahamas and Canada to reach an agreement on the crucial trade pact.
"We must harness the political will to settle the issues. We remember that it was Canada who came to us to ask us to support their resistance to the move of the headquarters of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) from Montreal. They did so on the basis of our traditional friendship, yet our traditional friendship has not been strong enough so far to be leveraged into the conclusion of a trade pact. It is highly arguable that there is a fundamental disequilibrium in that."
In a recent address to the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce and Employers' Confederation's first National Conclave of Chambers of Commerce, Minister of Financial Services Ryan Pinder pointed out the importance of concluding a trade pact with Canada, noting that without it Bahamian exports such as lobster, salt, pharmaceuticals and blended fuel from BORCO would be subject to a 35 percent duty going into Canada.
Goods going into Canada from the Caribbean had been going in duty-free under a waiver obtained by Canada from the World trade Organization (WTO) for the so-called "preferential" arrangement. Under the WTO, WTO members such as Canada and much of the Caribbean are not permitted to offer each other trade terms which are better than those that they offer to other WTO members, and as such talks have been underway since 2007 to conclude a "reciprocal" agreement whereby Canada gets equal benefits to those offered to the Caribbean for its goods and services entering this region.
As with the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) with Europe, the new agreement would cover not only trade in goods, but also in services and investments.
In January 2014, the region was able to obtain an agreement from Canada to hold off on raising duties on Caribbean goods until Caribbean-Canada Trade Agreement (CARIBCAN) negotiations had been concluded, following the expiry of the WTO on December 31, 2013.
Admitting that the talks to conclude a new agreement are "very tenuous" at present, Pinder said last week that while all Caribbean countries would also be disadvantaged by an increase in the duty charged on their goods, it would not be as severe as in The Bahamas' case, given that they are members of the World Trade Organization, and therefore while the duty rates applicable to their products would rise, it would not be as high.
He used the example of what would happen in the case of a lack of agreement in the Canada trade talks as evidence of the importance of The Bahamas finally acceding to the WTO.
"You may as well say to our crawfishermen we have no access because it's not competitive on price.
Morton Salt (will be charged) 35 percent duty on salt (exported to Canada). You might as well say to them that market is closed to you, that's the implication we face. This is a real world, real time implication and effect of us not being members of the WTO."
A fifth round of negotiations on CARIBCAN was held in Barbados in January. Part one of the sixth round was held in Kingston, Jamaica on March 3 to 7. Part two is being held in Ottawa, Canada and was slated to end on April 4, having started on March 31, according to the Jamaica Gleaner.
Contacted yesterday for an update on the latest round of talks, Pinder said that there is "nothing to report, except that they are ongoing".
Negotiations on the agreement have to date been projected to conclude no later than June 2014.
The region's leaders have called for a "pro-development agreement which takes account of the differences in the levels of development between CARICOM and Canada, and which would support the sustainable economic and social development of the peoples of the region.

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Bar president: Bahamas must get 'full benefit' from arbitration push

April 09, 2014

The president of the Bahamas Bar Association (BBA) has said he supports the push to develop The Bahamas as a center for global arbitration "only to the extent" that Bahamians with suitable expertise are given priority for opportunities that may arise from it.
Elsworth Johnson said that bringing in outside professionals when the expertise they offer is available in this country could "create a serious difficulty" for the BBA.
"I think it's a brilliant idea, but I am tired of people saying, 'Bahamians first' when you're always last," said Johnson.
At the Pre-ICCA (International Council on Commercial Arbitration) conference, held last week in Nassau, a number of local and international panellists said that issues with work permits and immigration policy could stand as a potential obstacle to the development of this country as an arbitration center which would attract international persons to bring their cases to The Bahamas for resolution.
Attorney General Allyson Maynard-Gibson was among them, pledging the government's support towards having The Bahamas established as a center for arbitration, but noting that such an effort will only be successful with the "buy in" of the Bahamas Bar Association and the judiciary. "If they don't buy in, we'll have a terrible problem," she said.
Maynard-Gibson said that it will be important to have"flexibility" in work permit policy to help facilitate the development of the sector and enjoy the spin-off benefits it can bring, a point backed by other panelists based on their experience elsewhere.
In an interview with Guardian Business, Johnson said that he views the push to create an arbitration center in this country as "wonderful", but feels it is important that The Bahamas gets "the full benefit from it".
"I understand the concept of arbitration and what it will do for The Bahamas. It's excellent. If we have to make certain concessions that's a decision the Bar has to make; that's an internal discussion, but most certainly, where we have resources, we have to use it. I support arbitration, but use local expertise where they exist," he said.
"If the arbitration they're going to do doesn't require legal expertise, doesn't require for that person to be a lawyer, then the Bar doesn't have a concern. If they need specific knowledge about accounting, then you know BICA (the Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants) will be in on that; if they need architects, then they'll be in on that; if it requires medical expertise then you bet your bottom dollar the Medical Council will say 'are you crazy?' (if doctors are brought in). You're dealing with the Immigration Act. You've got to look at your pool of resources to say you have a house and children, why would you feed someone else first?"
During last week's pre-ICCA conference, The Bahamas won the support of a number of international bodies,including the Permanent Court of Arbitration in the Hague, and P.R.I.M.E. Finance, a group of expert financial arbitrators, for its interest in establishing itself as a center for arbitration.
The message was that there is demand for arbitration arising out of the region and beyond which could more conveniently be conducted in The Bahamas if the right conditions were to be established.
However, local attendees were repeatedly advised that developing a reputation as an arbitration hub takes time, and - at least in the initial stages - attracting international arbitrations to come to The Bahamas relies on the ability to bring in expert arbitrators from elsewhere to conduct their deliberations.

jump headline: Bar: Arbitration must involve locals where possible

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National magazine shortage after U.S. supplier closes

April 09, 2014

A national shortage of magazines has emerged after the sole U.S. supplier shutdown unexpectedly in early March, leaving its local distributor scrambling to find a replacement.
Local retailers such as Bookworld, Hallmark and Chapter One, as well as all of the supermarkets, are now running low or have run out entirely of magazines on their shelves as a result, leaving customers with nowhere to turn.
All except Bookworld, who sourced directly from the US supplier, were supplied by Delivery News, a Bahamian company which worked as the local distributor for Caribbean Management LLC, a Medley, Florida-based company, which Guardian Business understands supplied both The Bahamas and other Caribbean countries.
An employee of Delivery News told Guardian Business yesterday that the company began experiencing problems with deliveries of magazines in late February, and was initially told that bad weather may have been the cause of the delay, ultimately, they were informed that Caribbean Management had gone out of business.
"We are trying to find someone to replace them but we haven't made any progress as yet," said the employee, who declined to be named. They stated that magazine supplies was just one part of their overall product offerings and as such the shortage has not had a severely detrimental affect on their business.
It is unclear what led to the closure of Caribbean Management LLC. Calls to the company went unanswered as an automated message said the line had been disconnected.
At Bookworld, staff said that customers have been repeatedly returning in search of their favorite magazines, only to be turned away. "We told them that until we get the new supplier, there's nothing we can do," said an employee.
Hallmark confirmed that they, too, have been unable to supply customers with magazines, while at Supervalue, on top-of-the-hill Mackey Street, the magazine offerings have been largely replaced by children's coloring books.

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Eleuthera to 'chart a course for growth' at Outlook event

April 09, 2014

A focus on "stimulating growth" will guide the second annual Eleuthera Business Outlook, which has been slated for April 24th.
The Eleuthera event, the newest of the multi-island series, will take place at Cape Eleuthera Resort and Marina, South Eleuthera, with Prime Minister Perry Christie as keynoter speaking to the theme "Charting a Course for Growth in Eleuthera."
"The theme for all our Business Outlook forums this year has been basically the same--a focus on stimulating economic growth after what seemed to be an entrenched recession, which slowed or put growth on hold in a number of areas," said Joan Albury, president of TCL Group and chief organizer of the Business Outlook Series.
"Growth has certainly been the government's focus this year. It is important for Bahamians throughout the archipelago to hear directly from the country's leader what the government's plan is for their community, specifically, and to be able to ask him questions. We are most grateful that Prime Minister Christie and a number of other strategically chosen speakers have agreed to join us in Eleuthera."
Joining Christie on the podium will be Eleuthera Chamber of Commerce President Thomas Sands, Jr., who will update the audience on the developments in Eleuthera since the last Business Outlook.
"We are fortunate to have the support of the Eleuthera Chamber of Commerce again this year and its dynamic president, Thomas Sands, who has a finger on the pulse of business and society on the island, especially in the south. This is a partnership we hold in high regard because it is so necessary to create the kind of cooperate efforts that will continue to energize the Eleuthera economy. It was, in fact, Mr. Sands who invited TCL to bring the forum to his home island. He saw the value of the Business Outlook programme in pulling together the right players from key sectors to share the necessary information to drive things forward," said Albury.
Completing the slate of speakers for the 2014 Eleuthera Business Outlook are: Christel Sands Feaste, partner, Higgs & Johnson, Attorneys-at-Law; Scott Gorsline, VP operations, Cape Eleuthera Resort and Marina; James Malcolm, VP & managing director, Sand Piper Inn and Destination Schooner Bay Ltd.; Juan Pulido, project manager at Cotton Bay Holding Ltd.; Angela Cleare, founder, ABC Tours & Consulting Co.; Christopher Maxey, founder and director, Cape Eleuthera Island School; Arinthia Komolafe, managing director, The Bahamas Development Bank, and Edrin Symonette, farmer and entrepreneur.

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Sandals Foundation outfits Rolleville Primary with computers

April 09, 2014

Another Exuma school has had its technology upgraded by the Sandals Foundation.
Rolleville Primary was the recipient of a brand new computer lab.
And while the lab will be used to advance the students of Rolleville Primary, its principal, Lavone Knowles, said the computers will benefit the entire community.
The students were happy to receive the new computers and created a special hand-made sign for the opening of the lab saying, "thank you Sandals". They also presented Sandals Foundation representatives with a beautiful plaque.
Community leaders, like Reverend Adam Brown, made a commitment to assist in the upkeep of the new computers.
This is the fourth computer lab the Sandals Foundation has donated to Exuma schools. In a release, the company said it is looking forward to completing many more.

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Baha Mar and Chinese ambassador talk tourism ties

April 09, 2014

Executives of Baha Mar met with China's ambassador to The Bahamas to discuss the potential for increased tourism between The Bahamas and China.
They looked at issues such as the development of airlift from mainland China and the raising of awareness among travel agents and consumers of what is involved in travel between the two countries.
Sarkis D. Izmirlian, Baha Mar's chairman and chief executive officer; Tom Dunlap, Baha Mar's president, and Robert D.L. Sands, the resort's senior vice president of administration and external relations, met recently with Yuan Guisen, ambassador of the People's Republic of China to the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.
The discussion followed the announcement in December 2013 of a Bahamian-China visa accord, which allows mutual 30-day access to Bahamian and Chinese passport holders without requiring a visa.
"Our ties with China will be key in helping to diversify The Bahamas' global tourism base," Izmirlian said. "We're grateful for the Chinese government's ongoing efforts to further develop relations between our countries. It's particularly important to Baha Mar, which stands to benefit by providing a unique travel experience -- an authentic Bahamian resort offering the full complement of luxury accommodations, golf, casino gaming, spa treatments and access to one of the world's most beautiful beaches."
China's burgeoning middle class and its affluent citizens have become highly influential global travelers, buoyed by the country's recent economic growth. In 2012, Chinese surpassed U.S. and German citizens to become the world's top international tourism spenders, with 83 million people spending US$102 billion on worldwide travel, according to the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO). By 2015, 100 million Chinese are expected to travel abroad, the organization reported.
Chinese travelers have helped to make Macau and Singapore the world's fastest-growing gaming resort destinations. Macau's gaming revenues soared to US$46 billion in 2013, far surpassing the US$6.5 billion generated by Las Vegas Strip resorts, according to data from U.S. government and Wall Street sources.
Funded in part by the Export-Import Bank of China, Baha Mar is hoping it can draw some of these travelers to The Bahamas with features such as its Baha Mar Casino & Hotel, the centerpiece of the $3.5 billion Baha Mar development, that will offer a "Las Vegas-style" experience with 100,000 square feet of casino space, 1,500 slots and 150 table games.
Regulatory changes to gaming currently under consideration by Parliament would allow Baha Mar to offer many cutting-edge gaming amenities, including private VIP gaming salons; internet gaming; mobile gaming; in-play sports betting, and the newest and most popular slot machines.
By offering the full complement of luxury shopping, fine dining, nightlife, outdoor adventures, art and culture, Baha Mar believes it is designed to compete with the best the world has to offer.

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Cash's Phony Concern over BTC
Cash's "Phony" Concern over BTC

April 09, 2014

Nearly four years after the sale of the Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC) which was vehemently opposed by thousands of Bahamians, the chickens have come home to roost and the country is now forced to face the consequences of the bad decisions made by the former Free National Movement (FNM) administration...

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Conserving Coral Reefs
Conserving Coral Reefs

April 08, 2014

Craig Dahlgren, coral reef biologist, along with volunteers from The Bahamas National Trust, The Nature Conservancy, BREEF and Atlantis’ Water Features Department, teamed up to continue research on coral propagation at Atlantis...

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Baha Mar Executives, Chinese Ambassador discuss development of China-Bahamas Tourism ties
Baha Mar Executives, Chinese Ambassador discuss development of China-Bahamas Tourism ties

April 08, 2014

Officials Discuss Potential for Expanding Airlift, Increasing Awareness
Among Chinese Travelers in Mainland, Abroad. Executives of Baha Mar, the $3.5 billion integrated destination resort project, met with China’s Ambassador to The Bahamas to discuss the potential for increased tourism between The Bahamas and China, which is now ranked as the world’s biggest-spending nation on international travel...

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Fears of mass lay-offs at BTC

April 08, 2014

FNM deputy leader Loretta Bulter-Turner has questioned whether mass lay-offs for scores of BTC employees is imminent as the company reportedly prepares to outsource its call centres to Panama...

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Multi-Jurisdictional Conference proves the Caribbean Region can work together
Multi-Jurisdictional Conference proves the Caribbean Region can work together

April 08, 2014

For over 15 years, the steering committee for the STEP Caribbean Conference has been meeting to produce one of the world’s best attended and most talked about trust conferences...

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